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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, July 08, 1914, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. IV., NO. 511. JUNEAU, ALASKA, WEDNESDAY, JULY S, 1914. * PRICE, TEN CENTS
U. S. Smelting People's
Juneau Plans Maturing
Work is about to.begin on the oper
ations planned by the United States
Smelting and Refining company in
connection with the development of
the immense holdings of that com
pany through a consolidation of dif
ferent properties at Juneau. This de
velopment Involves the expenditure
of millions of dollars, and the work
ing out of a great mining and milling
system.
A. P. Anderson. Pacific Coast man
ager for the United States Smelting.
Mining and Refining Co.. accompanied
by Frederick Lyon of Boston, also rep
resenting the same company, are ex
pected in Juneau shortly to Inspect
the Ebner property and the work done
on the same under the direction of
D. D. Muir. Uulted Smelting and Re
fining Co., engineer for H. W. Martin,
of New York City.
Mr. Martin was chairman of the re
organization committee which was
successful in bringing about a re-or
ganization of the Alaska-Kbner Gold
Mines Co.. and was the main factor
In that work, being ably assisted by
George R. Noble of Juneau and other
Eastern gentlemen.
To Inspect Other Properties.
It is also understood that the vist
Ing engineers are to inspect all of the
properties controlled by the Hallum
Construction Co.. of which H. W. Mar
tin is president and George R. Noble
general manager. These properties \
are now under option to the United
States Smelting and Refining com
pany. and plans will be discussed with
Mr. Noble as to the best methods of
carrying to completion the large com
bination under consideration. Mr. No
ble is aboard the Alameda and will
arrive in Juneau tomorrow night.
Seattle Paper Telia Story.
J. J. Underwood in a signed article
appearing in the Seattle Times of July
3. gives a comprehensive idea of the
magnitude of the work to be under
taken here, of what has already been
accomplished, and includes an inter
view with George It. Noble. Mr. No
ble. however, has forwarded word dis
claiming any responsibility for the In
terview, stating that, "whereas in the
main facts, a great deal of it is true.
It is somewhat distorted and contains
many Inaccuracies." i
The Underwood story in part fol
lows: j
"Contracts just awarded for the i
construction of a number of tunnels, <
shafts, dams and other development
work at Juneau, mark the real com- |
mencement of work on a gigantic min- |
ing project in Alasku that will cost <
when finished from $12,000,000 to $15.- (
000,000. The project incldues the con- <
struction of a chemical plant in Se- ?
attle. of which the work of construct
ing the first unit has been commenced,
and is by far the largest in Alaska. It I
Is bigger than either the Treadwell or
the Jackling enterprises, and the for
mer already has produced more than
$50,000,000 in gold. <
"The work at Juneau will be under |
the supervision of the U. S. Smelting, j
Refining & Mining company, one of i
the biggest mining corporations in the t
world, and the Seattle plant will be i
constructed by the Noble Metals Com- i
pany. The latter plant, for the treat- i
ment of concentrates by a new chemi- |
cal process, will, when completed, cost ;
more than $1,000,000. and it is expect- i
ed that it will develop into one of the j
biggest Industrial enterprises in the i
State." c
Chemical Plant in Seattle. ;
Quoting George R. Noble, the story
continues: .
- 'We shipped some of these concen
trates to New York, where It was
treated by a special process Invented
by J. A. Comer. We entered into a
contract with the Comer people to i
handle thirty tons a day on the first t
unit. We took a lease of the Barn- r
dell Chemical Company's plant on the f
West Waterway and Mr. Comer ar- 1
rived here a few days ago with a 1
corps of seven trained men to begin v
the installation of the plant.
" 'The cost depends on the treat- s
ment of the mountain ores. I should (
say it will cost at least a million, may- t
be a good deal more. We expect it to
become one of the biggest Industrial |
enterprises on the Pacific Coast. We
don't want to talk about it. The first
unit will be in operation in about five
weeks, and you can have a look at j
It.' ,
Hydro-Energy Plant. ,
"Just as a part of the general devel- ;
opment. work has been commenced <
on the construction of a big hydro-en- ,
ergy plant on I-emon Creek, which will ?
generate tremendous horsepower. The (
dam will be 800 feet long and 185 feet |
high, and will make a reservoir two <
and a half miles long by three-quarters ,
of a mile wide.
" 'We -find the flow of water here
exceeded our expectations." said No- 1
ble. " "We've installed a water line
for ground-sluicing out the dam site,
and are building a road to the beach
so that we can tram the material."
Noble Mrtals Company.
" 'The Noble Metals Company is a !
separate corporation.' he explained in I
answer to a question ?.s to the owner- i
ship and financial end of the enter
prise. 'I optioned the property my
seir, ana siarcea aeveiopir.eni. ine
money was furnished by myself and
H. W. Martin of New York, and a few
friends. The U. S. Smelting. Refilling
& Mining Company have since taken
an option on the mining end of it. and ,
they have done a trem?ndout amouni
of development work.
*" "It's a long story.' ie saii:. in ex
plain.ng the financial arrangement.
'We held a controlling Interest in ?he
beno-j of the old Ebner company,
which was reorganized. ?v"e took
possession in May last, and then be
gan to acquire additional property.
We now own the Dora. Hallutn. Gold
stein. Salmon Creek, Bos'.oi/and Lem
on Creek properties.'"
Noble is Modest
While Mr. Noble has never been
accused of hiding his light under a
bushel, when the magnitude of the
mining enterprise he represents has
been in question, he has been most
modest in advancing any pcsonal
claims. It Is understood that not only
does he represent lnrge Eastern cap
ital. but has himself, large financial
interests in all these properties in
cludnig the Alaska-Ebner.
Table board. $1.00 per day at the
Good Eats Kafflstova; home cooking.
?7-S-0t.
NEW MODERN HOTEL
fOR CAPITAL CITY
A splendid modern hotel Is to be
established in the new 5-story con
crete Zynda building which is now
nearlng completion, according to an
nouncements made by the owners to
day. Although the four upper floors
wet constructed for hotel purposes
it was not until recently that it was
determined to devote any part of the
street floor to that business. It Is
now planued that there will be a tine
lobby and office in that corner of the
building facing on Main and Third
streets. This will provide the necos
sary comfort expected in a first class
hotel. The elevator at the end of the
main entrance hall will be of easy
access.
There are 56 guest rooms in the
building, giving it quite the largest
number of any of the new hoi
tela in Juneau.
"he location Is one feature thnt will
appeal to many. It is back from the|
waterfront far enough to be com
fortable and yet close enough to all
transportation facilities. It is with
in a block of the Federal court house,
directly across the street from the!
Surveyor General's office, within less!
than a block of the new postoffice and {
the new Behrends bank, and only a
short distance from the Federal build-j
ing site and Governor's office.
It is the belief of Mr. Zynda that i
Juneau needs more hotel accomraoda i
tions. hence the determination to make
the change that will give Juneau one
more good hotel.
N'egotatlons are now pending for the
lease of that portion of the building
that is to be devoted to the hotel
business and it is expected that an
nouncements of the management will
be made soon.
LODGE OF CARIBOU
IS ORGANIZED HERE
?+?
The Protective Order of Caribou is
the title of a new farternity that has
just come into being in Juneau, the
organization having been perfected
through the efforts of I.eon E. Woods.
Oscar E. Henschke. and James F.
Meeker, all of whom are well known
tiere. The object of the order is set
forth in articles of incorporation filed
wilth Charles E. Davidson. Secretary
jf the Territory, today. The organiz
ers named are the first board of direc
ors and incorporators of the society.
LIVES ENDANGERED BY
RECKLESS SHOOTERS
Supt. J. C. Hayes of the Alaska road
rommlssion. is making a vigorous com
jlaint against the practice of shoot
ng firearms along the government
roads leading from Juneau. Mr. Hayes
?ays that at this time of the year
many woman and children are out in
:he woods adjoining the government
road, picking berries and that they are
n constant danger of being shot
ihrough the reckless habit of persons
with firearms discharging the same
ilong the road. Supt. Hayes says that
le will cause the arrest of all persons
raught breaking the law in this re
spect.
NEWSPAPER WOMAN
IS DOING ALASKA
? ?
Miss Weil a talented and enterpris
ng Chicago ladv journalist, who is do
ng Alaska for home publications is
low in Juneau and a guest of the Ho
el Cain. Miss Weil has been out to
he Westward recently and gathored
nuch information for special articles
vhich will appear in print later. Ju
leau Is also to receive considerable
mention. Miss Weil is planning to
ake passage on the Northwestern for
he South.
WR. AND MRS HANDY
SAIL FOR CALIFORNIA
Mr. and Mrs. Hobart Handy, who
lave been in Juneau for the past sev
eral months, took passage on the Ad
niral Sampson last night for the
?outh. They will spend the winter in
"alifornia and expect to return to Ju
leau later and make their home here,
rhey are both delighted with the coun
ry. and particularly with Juneau and
ts surroundings. While in Juneau
:hey made many warm friends who re
gret to lose their companionship.
NEW FRUIT STORE
ON LOWER FRONT ST.
A now fruit store has been opened
In the Korhonon building on lower
Front street, by E. Miller and J. R.
Stevenson. They are making a spec
ialty of catering to the family trade
ind ladies' patronage. They are also
local agents for the famous Stokes
ice cream.
iNtW BAKBtK 5HUK VffclN
IN BRUNSWICK BUILDING
?+?
J. D. Van Alta. has opened a new
three-chair barber shop in the Bruns
wick building on lower Front street.
The establishment is one of the best|
appointed places in town and is in a
cood location.
GOOD PROGRESS AT JUALIN.
Supt. L. K. Kennedy ot the Jualln
mines who was in the city over Sun
day reports that good progress In be
ing made on the big tunne at Jualin.
During the month of June about 540
feet were driven.
W. C. T. U. TO MEET.
A meeting of the W. C. T. U. will
be held in the Presbyterian church
Thursday afternoon. July 9, at 2:30
o'clock. Visitors are welcome.
MRS. HYDE. Secy.-Treas.
THE WEATHER TODAY.
Twenty-four hours ending at 3 p. m.:
Maximum?II.
Minimum?18.
Clear.
EIGHT Of KARLUK'S
CREW ARE LOST
I OTTAWA, July 8. ?. It Ib believed
from the report of Capt- Bartlett, com
mander of StefanBson's Karlub, that
eight members of tho Karluk crew are
j dead. Tho report says that one party
I of four set out 10 days afteV the Kar
luk sank for Herachel Island, and an
other party of four for an unknown
i shore. Neither party has been hoard
j from.
The eight persona who are thought
to be lost according tc the report re
ceived by the Minister of Marine, are:
Ctmrles Bartlett, John Breedy, Archi
bald King, Henry Beuchet, Allister
Forbs Mackay, James Murray, Thom
as Morris and one unknown.
* +
1* MARINE NOTES +
* ?
The City of Seattle was scheduled
to arrive from Sitka and sail south
at 4 p. in. today.
The Northwestern Is expected from
the Westward Southbound at nine o'
clock tonight.
The Jefferson, arriving from Sitka
will sail South tomorrow.
The Princess Sophia, returning from
Skagway will sail South Friday morn
ing at 7 o'clock.
The Alameda Is expected from the
South tomorrow night.
The Admiral Evans Is expected from
the South tomorrow night
The Spokane Is expected from the
South Friday night or Saturday.
The Al-Kl Is expected from the
South Saturday.
The Georgia sailed for Sitka this
morning.
The Admiral Sampson sailed for Se
attle last night.
The Humboldt sailed for Seattle this
morning.
TWO MEN LOSE SKIFF
ATTEMPTING STOW AWAY
? ?
Two men whose names could not bo
learned secured an involuntary bath
last night and narrowly escaped
drowning in an attempt to board the
Admiral Sampson from a small skiff,
presumably with the idea of stowing
away. Their small boat was caught
in the swirl of water caused by the
action of the wheel when the ship be
gan backing, and crashed into kindling
wood. The men wero hauled aboard
ship by men of the crew and put
ashore.
The skiff belonged to Capt. Adam
Schneider, game warden for this divis
ion of Alaska, and was used as a ten
der for his launch Eve. The men who
took the skiff from a nearby float are
in close obscurity and Capt. Schneider
is on the war path.
COMING AND GOING
ON THE SAMPSON
The Admiral Sampson arriving from
the Westward last night brought the
following passengers for Juneau: W.
Wllhelm and wife. C. H. Wilbur, D. C.
Alexander. T. Oren, T. W. Harris, and
14 second class.
Departing for the South the follow
ing took passage from Juneau: Will
iam Lefton, Hobart Handy ant wife,
F. A. Boyle, R. E. Murphy, G. C.
Wurth, Wm. McBride, H. L. Wollen
berg, Dr. M. A. Miller and wife, A. W.
Sundstrom, William l^avelle, A. B. Wil
son, J. W. Price, Dale Cunningham,
Frank Donahue, J. C. Smith and wife,
J. M. Anderson, Richard Boyles, B.
Pinder, Mrs. J. E. Ewln, J. H. Guffey,
Mrs. H. Pierson, E. Schoenwald. Nick
Agram.
MRS. WASKEY GOES TO
INTERIOR THROUGH JUNEAU
Mrs. Frank H. Waskey, wife of Al
aska's first Delegate to Congress, and
their two sons passed through Ju
neau recently on their way to Mar
shall, the center of the new district
near Anreafsky on the lower Yukon
river. They will join Mr. Waskey,
who is United States commissioner
at Marshall and in the mercantile bus
iness there.
J. A. McKANNA FALLS
INTO COLD, WET WATER
J. A. McKanna, popular Front street
business man, fell overboard from
Young company's float this afternoon
while attempting to handle some logs
srith a pike pole. He says that the
water of Gastlneau channel is both
wet and cold.
CAREFUL ATTENTION
is given al prescriptions, if taken to
Doran's Prescription Pharmacy. Here
all prescriptions arc invariably com
pounded with absolute accuracy. Only
pure drugs are used; no 'substitution
Is ever allowed. Physicians know this.
Repular patrons appreciate It. Phone
3?Doran's Prescription Pharmacy.?
5-20-tf.
LEAVING ON GEORGIA.
+
Tho Georgia left for Sitka and way
ports this morning taking the follow
ing passengers from Juneau: For Ton
akee?W. Snider, John McCloskey.
Joseph Joy and William Stagher; for
Sitka?Gus Radovlch, H. Moses, Anna
B. Mayer, Maud Jameson, C. H. Stock
well.
R. DORWALDT IS MADE
DEFENDANT IN LAW SUIT
. Mrs. M. E. Bergmnnn this morning
filed suit against Richard Dorwaldt to
recover on a hotel bill balance amount
ing to $149.80, a bar bill of 24.70, and
money loaned amounting to $54.35, all
of which is alleged to be due and ow
ing to plaintiff.
Get In Tune.
D. E. Lentherman, a tuner from the
Baldwin Piano Co., Is in town for a
few days: address Juneau Music Hse.,
phone 317. 7-6-6L
FREE TRIP?
To San Francisco Panama Exposi
tion if you buy your drugs from the
Juneau Drug Co., 107 Front St., phone
260. 6-22-tf
LANDOR CALLS
ROOSEVELT "fAKER"
PARI8, July 8.?Honry Savage Lan
dor returnod home from Rome today
and denounoed Col. Itoosovelt as a
"fake explorer." He said Roosevelt
first announced that he had discovered
a river and then admitted that he
crossed It on a bridge spanned, by
telegraph wires.
Roosevelt Calls Landor "Buffoon."
NEW YORK. July 8.?Col. Theodoro
Roosevelt, replying to Landor's Paris
criticism of him said: "Landor Is a
buffoon as an expjoror."
NEW YORK POLICE
AFTER ANARCHISTS
NEW YORK, July 8.?A campaign
to suppress the activity of anarchists
and Industrial Workers of the World
was ordered at a conference of the
heads of the police force of this city
held yesterday afternoon.
Anarchists Take Warning.
NEW YORK. July 8.?The anarch
istic societies of New York have call
ed off the plans for an elaborate fun
eral service for the victims of the
Lexington avenue tenement house
bomb explosion which occurred here
last Friday. The activity of the New
York police against anarchists and
Industrial Workers of the World Is
given as the causo for tho chango of
plans.
GOV. STRONG ASKS FOR
ANOTHER CHANCE FOR DEER
Gov. J. F. A. Strong has recommend
ed to tho Secretary of Agriculture that
the regulation suspending the sale of
deer carcasses In Southeastern Alaska
until August 1J>, 1914. be continued to
August 15. 1915. While the deer In
Southeastern Alaska are Increasing In
number In most localities, .he contin
uance of the regulation Is cecmcd es
sential to tho proper protection of
these game animals.
Tho Department of Agriculture will
no doubt issue a regulation In accord
ance with the Governor's recommenda
i tion.
ONE BIG SHOW.
After tonight's skating session the
rink will be put In shape?seats and
| new curtain?for the big production of
"Les Miserables," Thursday, Friday
and Saturday; doqrs open 7:30, show
' starts 8:15 sharp.
| This Is the production that playR
all tho big theatres of the country,
charging from 50c to $1.50 a seat. To
lour patrons we will charge 50c; chil
dren, 35c, any scat. If the patronage
t holds up to expectation, these films
will be shown every ten days, giving
tho people a chance to see the famous
players of the world at outside prices
A telegram from Fred Purington to
day states that they played to big bus
iness and had to show in the Red
Men's hall, the theatro being too small
at Ketchikan.
A FEW WORDS ABOUT THE
Juneau Drug Co.
107 Front St.
Phone 250
They carry the beat stock in town.
Their stock is new and complete.
Their prescription department is
modern.
Their service is perfecst.
Courtesy towards their patrons and
good will towards everybody Is the
motto of the "store that has what
you want when you want it."
Remember thai they are giving a
free trip to San Francisco.
Notice to Public.
All dogs running at large in the town
of Juneau after July 15. 1914, without
a tag showing that the 1914 tax has
been paid will be taken up and placed
in the city pound. Persons desiring to
avoid expense and annoyance should
pay the tax on their dogB to the City
Clerk and secure a tag on or before
that time.
Dated at Juneau, Alaska, July 6,
1914. W. M. McBRIDE,
7-6-tf. Chief of Police.
? ? ?
BICYCLE CHALLENGE
RACE AT DOUGLAS
DOUGLAS, July 8.?Julius A. John
I son, of Douglas, challenges all comers
and will run for a purse and entry
I fees of $1 at 7:30 p. m., Sunday. July
12th, for five miles on bicycles.
For rules for entries see B. R. Lelv
ors at Douglas, the Treadwell Cigar
Store, or Burford's, Juneau.
Contestants and particulars will be
advertised Saturday night in The Em
pire, and Sunday morning in the DIs
I patch.
LEAVING ON HUMBOLDT.
Tho Humboldt, sailing for tho South
at 11 o'clock this morning, took the
following named passengers from Ju
neau: For Wrangell ? Carl Nelson.
Lewis Bought; for Ketchikan ? Oak
Olson, Mrs. Olson, J. B. Larson; for
Seattle?F. J. Beardon. John B. Isaac !
son. Oscar Adamson, Mrs. W. W. Cas
ey, and Miss Florence Partec.
RENEWING BRIDGES ON
8ALMON CREEK ROAD
Supt. J. C. Hayes of the Alaskn
road commission, has a crew of men
at work on the Salmon creek road.
Puget Sound flr lumber Is being haul
ed to different points for the purpose
of renewing the tlml era of all the cul
verts and bridges between Juneau and
Salmon creek.
SKAGWAY WINS FOURTH
OF JULY BASEBALL
Skagway won first prize and Fort
William H. Seward the second prize
In the Fourth of July baseball games
at Skagway. Whitehorse was elimin
ated In the first contest. No other
sports contests were carried out.
LEAVING ON NORTHWESTERN.
The Northwestern, scheduled to sail
south from Juneau tonight, will take
the following passengers from Juneau:
Mrs. E. Gnlen, W. F. Elliott and wife,
and Mrs. F. A. Small.
THE VOGUE
Special sal, one-third off all stamped
linens for Thursday, Friday and Satur
day.
New location; Seward, near Third;
phone ? MRS. ALBERT BERRY
?6-16-tf.
IRELAND IS
VAST ARMED CAMP
LONDON, July 8.?Speaking pn the
Irish home rule bill as it passed tho
House of Lords, Lord Lansdowne di
rected his remnrks lost night to the
people of Great Britain, to the govern
ment and the majority In the House
of Commons, begging that they give
earnest consideration to tho amend
ments to the bill as made by the
Peers. He said: "Ireland Is one vast
armed camp, and a spark may set
In motion the forces of civil war at
any moment. Tho part of statesman
ship at this tlmo is to find a way to
avoid threatening calamity." He
thought the amended home rule bill,
giving Ulster six years to study the
operation of the bill In other sections
j of Ireland, .and a chance to vote by
1 counties upon the question every six
| years thereafter ofTers n compromise
with honor to both sides, and ono that
would lead to disarmament.
JACOB FURTH'S ESTATE
WORTH ONLY $1,500,000
SEATTLE, July 8.?An Inventory of
the estate of Jacob Furth was filed in
the Superior court yesterday. It
showed a valuation of $1,500,000 In
cash, stocks, bonds and real estate.
Tho Inventory was a surprise to
most people In Seattle, who had esti
mated that It was worth from twice
that sum to several times the amount.
Many estimates have gone as high as
$10,000,000.
PLAN $100,000,000 IN
LIBRARIES FOR COUNTRY
ST. PAUL, Minn., July 8.?The Na
tional Educational Association In ses
sion here is considering a plan for the
establishment of libraries in the coun
try school districts of the United
States at a cost of $100,000,000. It Is
stated that Andrew Carneglo would be
the chief contributor to the fund that
would be required for that purposo.
LIEUT. PORTE REFUSES
TWO LIFE PRESERVERS
HAMMONDSPORT, N. Y., July 8.?
Lieut. John Cyril Porte, commander of
the flying boat America, last night re
fused to accept two life preservers
presented to him by Lieut. Samuel
Preston. American naval officer. Lieut.
Porto, In declining to accept the pres
ent, said: "If the America Is '/rocked
they will never And two bodies."
GREAT BRITAIN FIGHTS
AGAINST OIL TRUST
LONDON. July 8.?Winston Chur
chill, First Lord of the Admlrallty, ex
plaining the British Admiralty's big
oil enterprise In Persia to the House
of Commons, declared that at present
the Admiralty, with other consumers,
had been 'subjected to a long, steady
squeeze by the two oil trusts.
SEND PICTURES 600
MILES BY TELEGRAPH
LONDON, i July 8. ? A successful
demonstration has been given In Eng
land o fthe telectrograph, an electrical
Invention which reproduces a photo
graph at a distance of 600 miles. Be
fore long It Is believed pictures will
bo telegraphed between New York
and London.
STATE BANK SUPERVISORS
MEET IN CONVENTION
ATLANTIC CITY. N. J.. July 8.?
The National Association of Supervis
ors of State Banks opened their an
nual convention in this city yesterday
afternoon. Representatives are here
from all the States of the Union.
TWO PORTLAND
BANKS CONSOLIDATE
PORTLAND. Ore., July 8. ? The
First National Bank of this city and
the Security Savings bank were con
solidated yesterday as the First Na
tional Bank. The deposits amount to
$18,000,000.
SUFFRAGETTE HURLS
LITERATURE AT KING
EDINBURGH, Scotland, July 8.?A
suffragette hurled a handful) of liter
ature Into the carriage In which the
King was riding yesterday. The police
had difficulty In restraining the mob
from using violence on the woman.
WOMAN THREATENED TO
KILL DR. CARMAN
PHILADELPHIA, July 8. ? John
Howe, a business man of this city,
has reported to the authorities of
Freeport, N. Y., that he heard a wom
an threaten to kill Dr. Edward Car
man. of Freeport, last summer.
HEARST BUYS LONDON
PALL MALL MAGAZINE
?*?
LONDON, July 8.?A Hearst com
pany has acquired the Pall Mall Maga
zine, which will be amalgamated with
Nash's Magazine.
DR. DAVID STARR JORDAN
HEADS NATIONAL EDUCATORS
ST. PAUL, Minn., July 8.?Dr. David
Starr Jordan, president of Leland
Stanford Junior University, was elect
ed president of the National Educa
tional Association last night.
ONE RAILROAD SPENDS
MONEY ON BETTERMENTS
CHICAGO. July 8.?About $10,000,
000 is to be expended by the Illinois
Central on lmpiovementB: about 4000
men are employed on this work at
present.
LABORING PEOPLE WROUGHT
UP OVER INCOMING HINDUS
VANCOUVER, B. C., July 8.?'Wrest
lcsBneso among the laboring people
here over the Importation of Hindus
was Increased by the receipt of news
that another lot consisting of 360
sailed from Hongkong for this place
July 4th
ZAPATA EXECUTES
A FRENCHMAN
VERA CRUZ, Mex., July 8.?Word
has been received here of the execu
tion of Juan Velasco, a Frenchman,
manager of a cotton manufacturing
concern, by Zapata. The refusal or
delay In the payment of a ranrom of
1,000,000 pesos placed upon him was
the cause of the execution.
American Praises Carranza.
SALT1LLO. Mex., July 8. ? Henry
Allen Tuppcr, president of the Indiana
peace forum, speaking at a banquet
last night, said that he hoped to be
able soon to congratulate Gen. Car
ranza as President of Mexico.
MILWAUKEE HEAD
EXPECTS GOOD TIMES
NEW YORK, July 8. ? President
Earllng of the Milwaukee railroad
says: "If nothing happens to mater
ially change the present outlook, bus
iness Is bound to pick up after the
large crops throughout the United
States have been harvested this fall."
NEW STEAMER LINE
FOR NEW YORK
NEW YORK, July 8.?The Pacific 1
Steam Navigation Co. of Liverpool 1
will mike New York a port of call
on Its 'oute from Liverpool to the ]
west coivst of South America after '
tho Panama canal Is opened.
BANK FAILURE DUE ,
TO POLITICAL CAUSES '
NEW YORK, July 8. ? A Chicago
special to New York Hearld says the
Lorimor-Munday bank failure resulted j
from official leniency and political {
favoritism. It says the testimony (
shows that the directors of the La
Salle 8treet TruBt & Savings Bank
knew that the bank was insolvent five
months ago. It is declared that the
bank was in a bad condition at the
t'mo it liquidated as a national insti
tution and became a state bank in
1912.
FATHER AND SON DIE
WITHIN FEW HOURS
DAYTON, Wnsh., July 8. ? Claude
Beckett, assessor of Columbia county,
Washington, a veteran of the Spanish
war, dlod hero yesterday of consump
tion. His little son, Russell, 12 years
of age, dlod of tubercular trouble seven .
hours later.
Mrs. Beckett was this morning ap
pointed by the county commissioners
to fill the vacancy in the office of coun
ty nssessor.
4
UGLY CHARGE AGAINST 1
LOUISVILLE OFFICIAL !
LOUISVILLE, Ky., July 8.?Samuel !
M. WUhlto, city comptroller of thiB
city and prominent in the social life
of the city, is charged with the em
bezzlement of $15,000. He waB arrest- ,
ed Just one hour following the wed- (
ding of his daughter. ' (
URGE AMERICAN BANKS i
IN SOUTH AMERICA
CHICAGO, July 8. ? The Chicago
Coffee Roasters' Association, in pur
suance of a resolution adopted at a
recent meeting, has appointed a com
mittee of five to urge the presidents
of the larger National banks In Chi
cago to establish branches in Rio de
Janeiro and other foreign cities.
HILLCREST INVESTIGATORS
MAKE SLOW PROGRESS '
LETHBRIDGE, Alta., July 8.?The 1
Investigation of the Hlllcrest mine dis
aster is making slow progress. It has
been decided that the accident was
not caused by a defective shot as waB j
at first thought.
? ? ? I
WESTINGHOU8E PROMISES i
TO BE BETTER HEREAFTER I
SALLSBURGH, Pa.. July 8.?The
Wostinghouse Electric & Manufac
turing Co. announce that when the
strike is over a grievance committee
will be appointed whereby complaints
will be looked after more promptly.
UNIONS WIN LONG
OPEN SHOP FIGHT
-4?
BOSTON, July 8. ? After a strike
and eight years' labor contest, cost
ing $1,600,000. Irving & Casson, Cam
bridge and Boston furniture manufac
turers and dealers have agreed to
abandon "open shops" In favor of
union conditions.
?
SEATTLE GETS YET
ANOTHER CONVEITION
???
NORWICH, Conn., July 8. ? The
United Amateur Fress Association,
in session hero all week, yesterday
selected Seattle as the place for Its
1916 convention. Miss Elna Thorne,
of Napa, Cal., was yesterday elected
president of the association for the
coming year.
JAPAN WANTS TO
ARBITRATE DIFFERENCES
NEW YORK. July 8.?Washington
special to the Herald says the Japan
ese government has made tentative
suggestions that the controversy over
the California antl-allen land laws be
submitted to arbitration at The Hague.
SUPREME COURT CONFIRMS
HENWOOD CONVICTION
DENVER, Colo., July 8.?The Colo
rado Supreme Court has confirmed the
conviction of Harold Henwood for
the murdor of SylveBter Von Puhl, and
set the execution of October 26th. .
Senate Passes Mileage
Tax Repeal Bill
WASHINGTON, July 8.?The Unit
ed States Senate this afternoon, pass
ed the bill repealing the Alaska rail
road mileage tax. The bill also wipes
out liability for fines for those that
have violated the law in the past.
Under the new law. If it shall pass
the House, the railroads, Instead of
paying a tax of $100 a mile will have
to pay one per cent, of their gross
earnings in addition to their regular
income tax.
Jones Tries for $50,000.
WASHINGTON, July 8, ? Senator
Wesley L. Jones, of Washington, said
today that he will endeavor to obtain
aft amendment to the sundry civil bill
appropriating $50,000 for assembling
an Alaska exhibit at the San Francis
co exposition, permitting its mainte
nance to be paid from the appropria
tion for the government exhibit
Wants Money for Fairbanks Lots.
Senator Jones also said that he will
endeavor to secure an amendment to
the Hundry civil bill allowing $15,000
to purchase additional lands for a gov
ernment building at Fairbanks.
PRESIDENT DESIRES
WARBURG TO STICK
WASHINGTON, July 8.?President
Woodrow Wilson is urging P. F. War
burg, who yesterday asked that the
President to withdraw his nomination
for membership on the reserve bank
ing board, to reconsider his decision
not to take the office.
It Is understood that the contention
ihat has been aroused over the con
firmation of the nomination of War
nurg decided him to withdraw from
he contest.
SILK WORKERS' STRIKE
COST LOT OF CASH
Washington! July 8. ?workers
lost about $5,000,000 In wages, the
Bilk manufacturers $2,500,000 and the
city $10,000,000 In business from the
Paterson strike, according to an esti
mate by John L. Matthews, editor of
the Paterson Press, at a hearing be
fore the United States commission on
industrial relations.
IMPORTATIONS INCREASE
UNDER NEW TARIFF BILL
WASHINGTON, July 8.?Secretary
of Commerce William C. Redfleld an
nounced last night that foreign manu
facturers have sent 8.8 per cent, more
of their products to the United States
under the new tarifT law than they
sent here under the old tariff law.
PRESIDENT* ACCEPTS
WILLIAMS' RESIGNATION
WASHINGTON, July 8.?President
Woodrow Wilson today cabled his ac
:eptance of the resignation of George
?red Williams, former United States
nlnister to Greece. This closes .the
Williams' episode.
SENATOR BORAH THINKS
TREATIES ARE VERY BAD
WASHINGTON, July 8. ? Senator
William E. Borah declared yesterday
that the Nicaraguan treaty Is based
on corruption, tryanny and fraud, and
demanded that It and the treaty with
Colombia be discussed in open ses
sions of the United States Senate rath
er than in executive sessions.
PRESIDENT PARDONS
BLACKFOOT INDIAN
WASHINGTON, July 8?Spopee. a
Blnckfoot Indian, who had been sen
tenced for life for murder and who
had served 34 years In the peniten
tiary, was unconditionally pardoned
by President Woodrow Wilson yester
day.
CROP MOVEMENT WILL
STOP GOLD EXPORTS
WASHINGTON, July 8.?"The ex
portation of gold Is bound to cease
with the movement of the grain crop
from the United States to Europe,"
Bays George E. Roberts, director of
the mint.
RESERVE BOARD MUST
WAIT FOR PAY
WASHINGTON. July 8.?The mem
bers of the federal banking board will
have to serve without pay until they
have had time to levy an assessment
on banks necessary, as the original
$100,000 fund cannot be used for sala
ries.
AMERICANS BUY BEEF
FROM FOREIGN PRODUCE,18
WASHINGTON, July 8.?The Im
portations of meat from October 3,
1913, when meat went on the free
list, have amounted to $10,650,000,
praclically all of which was beef.
MRS. CARMAN HELD
FOR GRAND JURY
FREEPORT, N. Y.. July 8. ? The
coroner's jury held Mrs. Carman, wife
of Dr. Edward Carman, for the mur
der of Mrs. Loujae Bailey, pending tho
action of the grand jury.
QUARRELS WITH WIFE
AND KILLS HIMSELF
?
SEATTLE, July 8.?After a quarrel
with his wife yesterday, Frank Blanch
ard, a clerk In this city, committed sui
cide.
GOV. JOHNSON AGAINST
PARDON FOR ABE RUEF
SAN FRANCISCO. July 8. ? Gov.
Hiram W. Johnson said yesterday that
Abe Ruef should not be pardoned.
Mrs. W. W. Casey and daughter,
Miss Florence Partee, took passage on
tho Humboldt today and will visit in
Seattle for about two months.
a.'iSi L...

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