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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, July 13, 1914, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. IV.. NO. 515.
JUNEAU, ALASKA, MONDAY, JULY 13, 1914.
PRICE, TEN CENTS
Democratic Primaries
Fixed For July 25
Democratic primary elections will
be held In the Incorporated towns of
the First Judicial Division of Alaska.
Saturday. July 25. tor the selection of
delegates to the Territorial convention
that has been called to convene at
Skagway August 3. The delegates
from those precincts that are not with
in Incorporated towns may be selected
at caucusses held at any time before
August 1. It Is provided that arrange
ments for the primaries and caucusses
at places where there are Democratic
clubs shall be in the hands of those
clubs, and at other points they shall
be made at a meeting called for that
purpose by some Democrat. To be
qualified to vote at the primary one.
if challenged must make oath that he
is a Democrat and will support the
nominee of the Democratic party to
he selected at the Skagway convention
for Delegate to Congress.
The call for the convention was Is
sued by Chairman Harry A. Blahop.
of Juneau, and Secretary Charles H.
Coegrove. of Ketchikan, of the Demo
cratic Divisional committee, this
morning.
The call is as follows:
CALL FOR DEMOCRATIC KKIivi*n
IES. FIRST DIVISION, ALASKA.
By authority vested In us by the last
Territorial convention held In Voider,
Alaska, March 29. 1912. primaries are
hereby called for the purpose of elect
ing delegates to the Democratic con
vention called by the Democratic Ter
ritorial committee to be held in Skag
way, Alaska, on the 3rd day of Aug
ust. 1914, at ten o'clock in the fore
noon of said day. Said primary elect
ions to be held in the First Judicial
Division of Alaska on the 25th day of
July, 1914. in the following named in
corporated towns: Juneau. Skagway,
Sitka. Douglas. Ketchikan. Haines,
Wrangell and Petersburg; all other
precinct elections to be held at any
date prior to August 1st. and by pri
mary or caucus as the several pre
cincts may elect.
Apportionment of Delegates.
Juneau. 12; Douglas, 6; Treadwell.
3; Haines. 1: Chllkat, 1; Sulzer, 1;
Wrangell. 3: Sllverbow Basin. 1; Kll
lisnoo. 1; Skagway, 3; Ketchikan, 7;
Sitka, 2; Gypsum. 1; Petersburg. 1;
Chicbagof. 1; Jualin. 1; Kasaan. 1;
Tenakee, 1; Charcoal Point. 1; Sheep
Creek. 1; Craig. 1.
RULE I. Primary elections In the
incorporated towns shall be held un
der the auspices of a regularly organ
ized Democratic club where such club
exists, and in the event there is no
clubs in the town, then any Democrat
is authorized to call a public meeting
of Democrats by inserting a notice of
such meeting at least once in a news
paper of said town, said meeting to
arrange for polling places and appoint
ment of judges and clerks of election,
and make ail other arrangements nec
essary for carrying on said primary.
RULE II. No one will be allowed
to vote at said primaries if challenged
unless he or she subscribe to a declar
ation. before the Judges of election,
pledging themselves to support the
candidate for Congress who shall be
chosen by the said Democratic conven
tion to be held at Skagway on the
above named date. Polls to be open
In said Incorporated towns from twelve
noon until eight P. M.
RULE III. All credentials must be
in the hands of the Territorial Com
mittee before six P. M., August 2.
1914.
Dated at Juneau. Alaska, this 13th
day of July. A. D.. 1914.
H. A. BISHOP.
CHARLES H. COSGROVE.
Territorial Central Committee. First
Division. Alaska.
INSANITY CHARGE
AGAINST "SCOTTY" WALLACE
? ?
"Scotty" Wallace was taken Into
cutody yesterday by the U. S. mar
shal's office force and held pending an
investigation as to his sanity. He wan
dered up to the court house unattend
ed and was found prowling around the
upper corridors. He declared that he
had that morning killed a well known
business man of Juneau because the
latter had stolen some watches from
him.
This is not the first time that Wal
lace has been apprehended on an In
sanity charge. Heretofore these at
tacks have been traced to excessive
drinking. This time he does not seem
to have been drinking much. Wallace
Is a well known Journeyman Jeweler
and Is said to be an artist at his call
ing.
SENATOR ROOEN IS
SHORT TERM SENATOR
The dispatch printed in The Empire
Friday said that Dan Callahan and
John Junkin, of Fairbanks, have an
nounced their candidacy for the Terri
torial Senate to succeed Senator Dan
Sutherland. They are candidates to
succeed Senator Henry Roden. who is
the short term Senator. Senator
Sutherland is a holdover.
FOR LYNN CANAL.
The Georgia leaving for Lynn canal
ports yesterday morning took the fol
lowing passengers from Juneau: For
Jualin?Charles N'aghel, R. D. Pickert,
Mrs. M. J. Aubrey. Mrs. R. T. Lynch;
for Haines?W. Funck; for Skagway
?G. Lind, Mrs. James McCloskey,
James McCloskey, Jr.
FREE TRIP?
To San Francisco Panama Exposi
tion If you buy your drugs from the
Juneau Drug Co., 107 Front st., phoue
250. 6-22-tf
THE VOGUE
Neve location; Seward, near Third;
phone ? MRS. ALBERT BERRY
??-ld-tf.
Automobile for hire. Careful driver.
Call up 57 or 321. 7-Mf.
THE WEATHER TODAY.
Twenty-four hours ending at 3 p.m.:
Maximum?55.
Minimum?47.
Precipitation?.71.
Cloudy; rain.
TAKU RAILROAD
HAS EASY ROUTE
Tho estimated cost of the TaRu
railroad from the terminal ground on
Taku Inlet to the International bound
ary line, a distance of approximately
24 miles is $634,100, according to the
report of F. J. Wettrlck, of tho firm
of Wettrlck & Wllhelm. the well
known engineers who made the sur
vey. The cost is subdivided as fol
lows: Clearing, $30,000; steel. $160.
000; ties. $36,000; ballasting and grub
bing. $80,500; engineering. $33,000.
The cost of construction will average
$26,500 per mile.
The survey was made for the Taku
Railway and Navigation company,
which company Is projecting a rail
road from a point on Taku Inlet to
the International boundary line that
Is designed to connect with another
proposed railroad reaching from that
point to Atlln City on I*ake Atlln.
There are no engineering difficulties
In the way of construction as survey
ed. A few miles of rock cuts being
the most expensive, but nearly the
entire distance Is through the valley
of Taku river and practically level.
The grade for the entire distance Is
considerably less than one per cent.
The right of way as surveyed passes
through much fine spruce and hem
lock that will be useful in railroad
construction.
The Taku terminals are located
about five miles from the mouth of
Taku river on the South side of Taku
Inlet and about twelve miles up the
inlet from Stevens passage. It is
within easy reach of Juneau, being a
matter of only two hours by ferry
boat. It will require a dock 1,600 feet
long from the terminal ground to
reach deep water. The extreme depth
of the Taku Inlet channel at this point
is only 18 fathoms.
A preliminary survey has nlso been
run from the boundary line to Atlln.
but this part of the road has not been
definitely located.
F. C. RYUS GOES HOME
BOOSTING AND BOASTING
F. C. Ryus. the well known Ketchi
kan druggist is an enthusiastic base
ball fan. and also an enthusiastic, in
sistent and persistent booster for the
First City. Anything that lives, moves
or exists around Ketchikan has his
support. Speaking about baseball. Mr.
Ryus said that he witnessed the game
yesterday between Douglas-Treadwell
and Gastineau-Juneau on the Tread
well grounds. "I think the Ketchikan
team can make the ball tossers of Gas
tlneau channel look foolish" he said.
"We have some team -down there ?
hear about that game we played with
Rupert? Twelve innings and one to
nothing with Ketchikan on the win
ning end. It was great.
Mr. Ryus is a member of the Ter
ritorial Pharmacy Board that has just
completed Its session here In Juneau.
JUNEAU PEOPLE HAVE A
SUCCESSFUL FISHING TRIP
Cashier H. H. Post of the First Na
tional Bank, and Mrs. Post; Assistant
Cashier R. H. Stevens and Mrs. Stev
ens, G. H. Weir, of the Pacific Coast
Steamship company office, and Mrs.
Weir, constituted a fishing party that
left Juneau on the Grubstake II, Capt.
E. D. Be attie, Saturday afternoon and
went to Auk bay. They captured
about 100 finny beauties, and return
ed home yesterday evening.
?? ? ? /MIPO*r? le MAT OATICCICn
J. LUUOOnv IO in V I gn I lonuw
+ ?
to have the best Drug store in Juneau.
He says The Juneau Drug Co. will be
the best drug store in Alaska. "The
support I receive from the people of
Juneau is so splendid that nothing is
too good for them at the store, 'that
has what you want when you want it.'
Giving goods of quality, perfect pre
scription and the very best service is
the only way I can show thp people
that I appreciate their good will and
interest." Get the habit of coming to
107 Front St. for your drugs. Phone
250.
ARRESTED FOR FORGERY.
M. J. Keating was arrested last
night by the U. S. marshal's office
force on a warrant charging forgery.
Max Endleman swore to the complaint.
Keating is alleged to have forged the
name of Downey D. Muir to a check
drawn on the B. M. Behrends bank for
the amount of $12 and afterwards to
have pursuaded Mr. Endleman to ad
vance that much cash for the shady
paper.
Keating was arraigned this after
noon and will have a hearing tomor
row morning at 11 o 'clock.
FOLLOWING THE DIRECTIONS
on the bottle is the nurse's duty. Fol
lowing to the letter the directions of
the doctor Is our duty and we fulfill
it in every case. No medicine can be
too good. Our prescription work guar
antees the best to be had. "We do
not substitute." Dorans Prescription
Pharmacy. 7-9-tf.
F. & A. M. MEETING.
Stated communion Mt. Juneau lodge.
No. 147. F. & A. M.. Oddfellows' hall.
Monday evening. July 13, 1914. Work
in second degree. Sojourning breth
ren cordially invited.
E. D. BEATTIE.
7-ll-2t. Secretary.
ONE DRUNK.
Municipal Magistrate E. W. Pettit
only had one drunk with which to deal
with this morning and he was dis
posed of fine with a $5 fine.
Get In Tune.
D. E. I.entherman, a tuner from the
Baldwin Piano Co.. is in town for a
few days: address Juneau Music Hse.
phone 317. 7-6-6t.
DOUGLAS TAKES LEAD
AGAIN IN THE SERIES
Won Loot Pet
Do wg la ? .. 8 5 .548
Juneau 5 6 .455
Yesterday's Game:
R H E
Douglaa-Treadwell 7 5 2
Gastlneau-Juneau 1 6 3
TREADWELL, July 13.?A mixture
of timely hits by Treadwell, and er
rors by Juneau, yesterday afternoon
netted the Treadwell team 7 runs,
while Juneau was unable to send more
than one man over the pan In nine in
nings, of what was an interesting and
at the same time brilliant came of ball.
This makes the sixth game won by
Treadwell, as against five that count
for the Juneau team in tho series con
sisting of fifteen games at present be
ing played.
Ford, tho Juneau pitchor, was not
up to his usual form, and was hit
quite freely, being replaced in the
seventh Inning by Frye.
Treadwell started things in the first
inning by making two scores. Con
nor, the first man up, walk>?d. took sec
ond on a passed ball, nnd third on a
balk. Ford gave Kerry flirst on balls.
Kertis dumped a ball to short stop
and Connors was thrown ciut at home.
Wood bit one through Hhrlbutt and
Callan, and Kerry scored. Wood stole
second and romped homo on Red
mond's Texas leaguer.
Juneau's only run was made in the
third when Ford hit a three-bagger
to center and came in cin Duggan's
single to left.
In the sixth, Treadwell. practically
cinched the game. Kertis singled ov
er second, went to third on a fumble
by Mullen of Wood's hot bingle. Wood
took second on a passed ball, and Red
mond was given a pass by Ford filling
the bases. Dahl was at bat when Ker
tis came home on a passed ball that
was dropped by Ford at the plate.
Dahl hit over the left field fence clear
I ing the bases.
Treadwell made one more run in the
eighth inning against Rrye. when Dug
gau threw Wood out at second while
Kertis was on third; Kertia scored.
Gastincau-Juneau:
aii jv n ru a Ki
Callan, us, 3b 5 0 1 3 5 2
Duggan. c 4 0 1 4 2 0
Hester, lb 4 0 1 10 0 0
Reid, cf 1 0 0 3 0 0
Wright. 2b 3 0 1 2 3 0
Molloy, If. rf _... 4 0 0 0 0 0
Hurlbutt. 3b, If 4 0 0 2 0 0
Momb. rf 1 0 0 0 0 0
.Mullen, ss 3 0 10 11
Ford, p 3 110 10
Frye, p 1 0 0 0 0 0
TOTALS 33 1 6 24 12 3
Douglas- Treadwell.
AB R H PO A E
Conors, 3b 3 0 0 1 1 0
Kerry, c 3 1 0 12 1 0
Kertis, lb 4 2 1 5 0 0
Wood, ss 4 2 1 2 4 2
Redmond, 2b 3 .110 2 0
Dahl. If 4 110 0 0
Kalal. cf 3 0 1 0 0 0
Mauseth, rf 2 0 0 1 0 0
Pittman, p 3 0 0 0 0 0
TOTAI25 29 7 6 27 8 2
Summary?Three-base hits. Kord;
home run. Dahl; base on balls, off
Plttman 4. off Ford 3; struck out, by
Pittman 11, by Ford 2; (one hit, ono
run off Frye in two innings); balk,
Ford: hit by pitcher, Mauseth by
Ford: double plays, Calaln to Hester,
Wood to Redmond to Kertis, Redmond
to Kertis; left on bases, Douglas 2,
Juneau 2. passed ball, Duggan 3; um
pire Dutton; time, 1:45.
FATHER GLEESON
PRAISES ALASKA
"Alaska is a great country, and has
a great future," said Father J. H.
Gleeson on the eve of his departure
i for the States, "and our church will
grow with the development of the
country," he continued. "We already
have many people here and more are
continually coming. My visit here
has no special significance beyond a
desire to get as much information
first hand as possible In a briof time.
Plans for the future are not yet far
advanced to speak about, but we hope
that the scope and influence of our
church will grow.
l m? is a wuuuuuui ?a
fascinating country and I am not sur
prised that you all love it. I have en
joyed every moment of the time spent
in Juneau and Douglas. The people
are most kind and hospitable and the
scenic beauty of the country Is be
yond comparison. The wealth of na
tural resources insures a grand fu
ture. It will perhaps be more than a
year before I get up here again, but
I nm looking forward to It."
Father Gleeson is Provincial, of the
Jesuit order of the Catholic church
for the Province of California, which
Includes five of the Pacific Northwest
States and Alaska. He has only been
Inducted into hio present office a few
months and this is his first visit to
Alaska. He took passage on the Mari
posa last night for the States.
BILLIARD PARLOR FOR
THANE EMPLOYEES
4*
Clarence B. (Duke) Duggan, catcher
for the Gastnieau-Juneau baseball
club, has secured the concession for
an amusement place at Thane and will
conduct a first class billiart parlor at
the new industrial town for the ben
efit of the Alaska Gastineau Mining
company's employees. Today Mr. Dug
gan let the contract to A. C. Craig for
the erection of a building at Thane
that is to house his enterprise. The
building will be 24 x 40 and it is plan
ned to have it completed so the grand
opening can take place one week from
next Saturday.
CRAMER FAMILY HERE.
Mrs. Cramer. Russell Cramer, and
Miss Dorothy Cramer, wife, son and
daughter respectively of J. M. Cramer
of The Empire, arrived from Seattle
on the Dolphin today joining Mr. Cra
mer. They will make their home in
Juneau.
i " ? ? ?
l WANTED ? Position by first class
, baker and cook; sober; long exper
ience. Add. Baker, % Empire. 7-13-3t
TERRITORY GETS
RAILROAD TAXES
The bill pasued-Jay the House or Rep
resentatives substituting a ftfosr in
come tax on rultroads operated in Al
aska in lieu of a flOO a mile track
age tux contains another innovation
; In taxes levied in Alaska by the Fed
! era! government in that It provides for
l the payment of the tax into the Ter
ritorial treasury for the boneflt of the
i Territory instead of Into the National
. treasury lcr the Alaska Fund as othr
or special occupation taxes in Alas
ka are disposed of.
The bill was passed by the House
June 29 and transmitted to the Sen
ate June 30, and referred to the com
mittee on finance, of which Senator F.
M. Simmons, of North Carolina, Is
chairman. The bill, as it pkssed the
House, follows:
"Be it enacted by the Senate and
House of Representatives of the Unit- 1
ed States of America in Congress as- '
sembled, That in addition to the nor- ]
mal income tax of one per centum on !
net Income there shall be levied and '
collected one per centum on the gross !
annual Income of all railroad corpora
tions doing business in Alaska, on 1
business done in Alaska, which shall '
be computed and collected in the mnn
ner provided in the Act of Congress,
approved October third, nineteen hun
dred nnd thirteen, entitled 'An Act
to reduce tariff duties and to provide '
revenue for the Government, and for I
other purposes,' the proceeds of which '
tax when collected shall be paid to 1
the treasurer of Alaska and be appli
cable to general Territorial purposes. ?
So much of the provisions of the Act '
of Congress, approved March third,
eighteen hundred and ninety-nine, en- .
titled 'An Act to define and punish
crimes in the District of Alaska and
to provide a code of criminal proced
ure for said district,' or Acts amenda
tory thereof as impose a license ax of
1100 per mile per annum on railroads
operated in Alaska is hereby repealed,
and all penalties for nonpayment r
thereof are hereby remitted. ti
? ? ? c
$90,000,000 STOLEN j
EROM NEW HAVEN *
WASHINGTON, July 13.?The Intor- "
state Commerce Commission report c
says the New Haven is the most J'
! glaring instance of maladministration
in the history of American railroad
ing. It says that $90,00,000 of the
stockholders' money was squandered. e
r
DEMOCRATIC CLUB I
AT JUNEAU THEATRE J
The Democratic Club will meet to- ^
morrow night at the Juneau theatre in
stead of at Gross hall, as previously. ^
Arrangements for the meeting in the ^
theatre have been made by the ofll- n
cers of the Club.
S
1,700 MEN OWN 6,000,000
ACRES TIMBER LAND
WASHINGTON. July 13.?Tho bu
reau of corporations reported to tho ?
President this morning that 1,700 men "
in the United States own 6,000,000 fl
acres of timber lands. 11
q
? b
EXCITING RUNAWAY AT
KENSINGTON MINES (
The gasoline engine and car operat
ing on the tram road at Kensington
got beyond control, and, lenving the
track at the curve near the beach, g
soared over the roof of the old beach ti
camp boarding house and landed at t
tidewater, a mass of junk. No one
was hurt. h
NEW ELECTRIC CABLE
NOW BEING PLACED ^
The new towers erected by the Al- 1
aska Light nnd Power company for 1
carrying the high tension cables from (1
Juneau across the channel to Douglas 8
island were completed Saturday after- 1
noon and the cables are now being 1
strung for the purpose of giving a bet
ter service to the people of Douglas /
Island.
ADDITIONAL CREW
SENT TO JUALIN I
Gen. Supt. A. E. Nadcu of the Jualin f
mines came to Juneau on the Georgia 1
to engage a crew for railroad con- 1
struction. He socured 40 men without c
difficulty and sent them to Jualin this
afternoon. They are to build the lit- I
tie narrow guage railroad from the
docks around to the new mine tunnel
portal.
? ? ? c
REGULAR SHOOT POSTPONED
* t
The regular Sunday shoot of the Ju- j
neau Gun Club was postponed yester
day In order to give those who were t
present an opportunity to try out the
C. W. Young company's new Winchest
er tournament grade of shot gun. W.
H. True8dalc made a straight 25 score f
with one of the guns, which are of the \
1912 model. I
? ? ? |
ISLAND ROAD BUILDING. l
Supt. J. C. Hayes of the Alaska road 1
commission has a force of men work
ing on the Douglas Island government
road and is establishing a new camp
on the island. The road is to be com- <
pleted up to the point where the pro- ?
jected Gastineau channel bridge is to *
be built.
? ?
APARTMENTS OVER THEATRE.
W. D. Gross, the moving picture
magnate, has converted the upper
story of the Grnnd theatre Into living
apartments. A portion of the upper
floor Is to be occupied by Mr. and Mrs.
Gross and the remainder will bo for
rent.
PAYROLL IS LARGE
The payroll for the three divisions
of the Alaska Gastineau Mining com
pany totaled for the month of June
$125,000.
, * ? ?
If you want a Joy ride call up 57
. or 321. 7-9-tf.
SUPREME COURT
JUSTICE LURTON DIES
ATLANTIC CITY, N. J., JulM3.?
United StattiB Supreme Court Justice
Horace H. Lurton died iiero last night
of diseuse of the heart superinduced
by cardiac asthma.
Justice Lurton was a resident of!
Tennessee and was a Judge of the
United States Circuit of Appeals when
former Preeldent William H. Taft ap
pointed him to be a Justice of the
United States Supreme court in 1909.
He is a Democrat.
MISTAKE CELEBRANTS
FOR WAR MAKERS
LONDERRY, Ireland, July 13.?Or
fingemen began celebrating the Battle
sf the Boyne this morning with can
lonndlng, projecting their explosives
so they would burst over the resl
lences of those In the Catholic section
of the city. Tho Nationalists, bellev
ng tho firing the prelude of war, be
gan arming. Already several thous
ind on both sides are under arms in
this city.
War If Not Peace with Honor.
I-ARNE, Ireland, July 13?Sir Ed
ivard Carson, addressing the volun
eers at Central Antrim, said "If It be
lot peaco with honor It must be war
vlth honor."
Carson said that Ulster would never
lubmit to being turned out of tho
mperlal Parliament.
rHREE DIE IN
SEAnLE JOYRIDE
SEATTLE, July 13.?Welwood Mur
ay, aged 23 years, a lawyer and an
inknown woman known by her asso
iates as "Bess" were killed and an
inknown woman known by those with
ler as "Irene" was fatally Injured
arly yesterday morning while out
oy riding in this city. Joseph J.
'aylor, the chauffeur, was arrested.
While the mnchine was being driven
t the rate of fifty miles an hour,
Irene" began hugging and kissing the (
hauffeur, causing the automobile to
Limp off a trestle.
Girls Well Known.
SEATTLE, July 13?The girl killed i
arly yesterday morning while Joy
iding was Miss Bessie C. Brooks, a ,
eamstress, of this city. The Injurtd ]
Irl is Miss Irene Helllwell, a clerk |
i the National Bank of Commerce |
nd daughter of Sidney S. Helliwell, ?
uditor of the same bank. She is suf- |
?ring of concussion of the brain.
Miss Helliwell Ib held to be respon
ible for the accident by carrosslng ,
he chauffeur while he was driving
Is nutomobile at the rate of 50 miles (
n hour.
? ? ? I
iUFFRAGETTE PLAYS
BALL WITH QUEEN j
LONDON, July 13.?Olive Walker, 1
suffragette, yesterday hurled a rub- '
er ball, Inscribed, "stop forceable 1
jedlng," into the lap of Queen Mary 1
s she wns driving to church. The '
ueen laughed as she inspected the
all and tossed it aside.
:ORWIN MAY RESCUE !
CREW OF KARLUK j
SEATTLE, July 13?The Canadian
ovcrnment Is endeavoring to char- ,
er the Corwln to go to the rescue of
he Knrluk's crew. (
(INDUS REFUSED ENTRANCE |
BY VANCOUVER COURT
?+??
VANCOUVER, B. C., July 13.?Af
er the decision of the appenl court
he committee that was conducting
he contest for admission of 250 Hln- 1
lus on the Japanese steamer Koma
;nta Maru gave up and is now nego- (
iating for their return to Kongkong,
he port from which they sailed.
ARGENTINE 1915-WOOL
CROP TO BE SHORT
?+?
BUENOS AYRES, July 13. ? Do
tressed business conditions in Argen
ina and financial troubles have caus
ed an unusual slaughtering of sheep
n that country, with prospect that
he 1915 Argentine wool crop will be
onsiderably short.
-IELD DIVISION CHIEF
TO START FOR NORTH
SEATTLE, July 13.?A Christiansen,
:hlef of the field division of the Unit
ed States public lands service, will
sail on the Northwestern for Alaska
o take the final testimony in all the
Alaska coal cases.
\MERICAN BALOONS START IN
TRYOUT FOR BENNET RACE
ST. LOUIS. July 13?Eight baloons
sailed yesterday in an effort to deter
nine the American entrant in the In
:ernational race for the Bennett cup
hat will be sailed from Kansas City
lext October.
^ARST LEAVE SEATTLE
FOR SAN FRANCISCO
SEATTLE, July 13.?William Ran
lolph Hearst and his party left this
:lty Saturday for San Francisco and
sther California points.
DR. ALFRED H. BROOKS
TO SAIL FOR ALASKA
SEATTLE, July 13?Dr. Alfred H.
Brooks, head of the geological survey,
will sail tomorrow for Alaska to take
up his summer's work in that Ter
ritory.
SEATTLE BOY IS
DROWNED IN SOUND
SEATTLE, July 13.?The thirteen
year-old son of Mrs. G. A. Wilmot, of
this city, was drowned In Puget sound
Saturday.
Special sale on Sterling silver
spoons and white and gold Austrian
china. I. J. Sharick. " '7-9-tf.
ttuerta Is Ready To
Satisfy Constitutionalists
" ?? ? 1 x
BRYAN DEPENDS
COLOMBIAN TREATY
WASHINGTON, July 13?Secretary
of State William J. Bryan this morn
ing Issued a statement defending the
proposed treaty to settle the differ
ences between the United States and
Colombia over the separation of Pan
ama from that country. He said in
the course of the statement that it Is
necessary only to discuss the fact that
an estrangement exists, and that this
government having refused to arbi
trate the differences takes upon itself
the responsibility of doing justice to
Colombia. In case of doubt as to
the amount of the damages he said
that we must resolve the doubt against
ourselves and in favor of Colombia.
REPUBLICAN DEFENDS
COLOMBIAN TREATY
James T. Du Bole, who was connect
ed with the State Department during
the Roosevelt administration and was
minister to Colombia during the Taft
administration, recently issued a state
ment in defense of the treaty between
the United States and Colombia which
Is pending in the United States Sen
ate. Among other things, Mr. Du
Bols says:
"I was in the Department of State ,
in 1903 when the press announced |
that the mailed hand of the United ?
States had stopped Colombian soldiers |
from suppressing a revolution on the ^
Isthmus of Panama. Amazed at this c
enterprise I said to those present: t
'This, if true, is a shocking Injustice i
to Colombia and the United States t
must pay dearly for it in the end.' a
"Three years ago, when I was a3ked c
to go to Bogota as Minister, I frank- g
ly stated my sincere sympathies for o
Colombia and was informed that r
friendl' relations with that country
were desired by the United States, /
and that my sympathies were no bar
to my mission.
"An impartial investigation at Bo
gota, running over a period of two
years, confirmed my sympathies, and (
convinced me that, instead of 'black- ,
mailers' and 'bandits,' the public men (
of Colombia compare well with the L
public men of other countries in in- t
telllgence and respectability, while (
the social life is as refined and cul
tured as can be found In any capital
In the world. Bogota Is called the
Athens of South America. .
"Impressed by tho humiliation and J
sufferings that had befallen Colombia j1
by the act of 1903, I have worked un- J
selfishly for the true interests of- tho
United States In Latin America by
trying to secure a settlement of our
unfortunate differences on a broad and 1
lust basis, and the new treaty will
accomplish that result. I deeply re
gret the antagonism to It displayed
n certain quarters, and I deplore Col.
Roosevelt's bitter and misleading at- ll
tack embodied in his recent public n
statement.
Camants/l The
Revolution.
"He says: 'The people of Panama r
were a unit In demanding the revo- v
lution.' I say, and can prove It, that
1 handful of men, who were to be n
the direct beneficiaries of the revolu
tion, conceived it, and not the hun- .
ilredth part of the Inhabitants of the *
isthmus knew of the revolt until an
American officer, in the uniform of the
United States army, raised the flag
of the new republic.
" 'We never flred a shot at any Co
lombian,' says Col. Roosevelt. True,
but the execution of the orders of
President Roosevelt to the American
warship was an act of war, and if
the Colombian soldiers had attempted
to suppress the conspiracy they would
have been captured, or driven into the
Bea, or killed, because that is the way ]
our brave marines have of doing things
when they are let 'loose.'
"The time is not distant when Latin
America will have a hundred million
of people, Inspired by new conditions e
of nntlonal and commercial life. Those \
now living feel that the Panama in- j
cident is the only real injustice com- r
mitted by the United States against t
the Latin-American people. The treaty \
will correct that feeling and greatly
change the sentiment that is now run- ?
ning heavily against us in all South
America, and place this country and
Colombia upon that friendly footing
so greatly desired by the people of
both nations. *
"If any person believes It Is pleas- '
ant for me to oppose a great leader f
whose fortunes I devotedly followed (
for ten years, and for whom I have *
profound esteem, he Is radically mis- <
taken. I am a Republican and have
been all my life, and I have been urg- >
ed not to make this statement public,
because a successful issue of the
treaty will help the Wilson Adminis
tration.
"I do not care to live to greet that ,
day where my love of party smothers ,
my love of Justice and halts my cour
age in doing what I believe is right ,
for the true interests of my country.'"
employers and
men adjust dispute
NEW YORK, July 13.?The Interna
tional Paper Co., employing between 8.
000 and 9,000 men, has arrived at an
amicable adjustment with Its employ
ees after a Ave months' dispute.
to cure cancer
and tuberculosis
DETROIT, July 13. ?The General
hospital of Detroit, made possible by
Henry Ford's $3,000,000 gift, will
specialize In cancer and tuberculosis.
vicereine of india dies.
LONDON, July 13.?Lady Hardinge,
vicereine of India, died here yesterday
morning.
Table board, $1.00 per day at the
Good Eats Kafllstova; home cooking.
?7-8-6t.
MEXICO CITY, July 13.?Sub-Secre
tary of Foreign Affairs Boberto Esteva
Rinz, who is here from Mexico City,
says Gen. Huerta will surrender the
Mexican government this week to
Francisco Carabajal, the new foreign
minister, and that the latter will step
aside for a Provisional President who
may be satisfactory to the Constitu
tionalists. He believes that peace in
Mexico is not far distant, because he
says the proposal that Carabajal will
make to the Constitutionalists will De
so fair that the opinion of the world
will force those among the Constltu
ionalists who are not in favor of peace
to yield.
Finance Minister Confirms Rinz.
VERA CRUZ, Mex., July 13.?Min
ister of Finance Delalama in the Huer
ta cabinet arrived here from Mexico
City on his way to Europe. He said
that Huerta will retire from the Presi
dency shortly?probably Monday.
Carranza Gives Notice.
WASHINGTON, July 13.?Gen. Car
ranza today formally notified the Unit
ed States that he will engage in no
mediation conference with Huerta del
egates except on a basis of absolute
surrender.
PLAN AUTONOMY
FOR PHILIPPINES
WASHINGTON, July 13. ? Rcpres
sntative William A. Jones, of Virgin
la, chairman of the committee on In
jular affairs, Saturday introduced a
Jill in the House of Representatives
fiving the Philippines a more nearly
?omplete autonomous government
han that which they now possess.
The bill has met with the approval of
ho administration, and in its pre
imble it recites that it is the purpose
if the United States government to
;lve the Philippines their complete in
lependenco when a stable self-govern
nent shall have been established.
:OL. GOETHALS DENIES
DEFENSE OF 'FRISCO MEN
PANAMA, July 13.?Gov. George W.
loethals denied yesterday the stato
nent made by Charles K. Field, editor
>f Sunset Magazine, that he had given
termission to photographers and avla
ors to take pictures of the Panama
lanal fortifications.
Field Places Blame on Goethals.
SAN FRANCISCO, July 13.?Charles
C. Field, editor of Sunset Magazine,
laid that Photographer Roy A. Dun*
tarn and Aviator Robert G. Fowler
lad permission to take pictures of the
'anama cahaT~fortifications.
3XCESSIVE HEAT KILLS
ST. LOUIS PEOPLE
ST. LOUIS, July 13.?Four died yes
erday of the intense heat. The thor
aometer registered 109 In the shade.
Heat Wave Causes Suffering.
WASHINGTON, July 13.?The ter
ific heat throughout the Mississippi
alley Is causing much suffering. The
eath tolls will be large unless re
,ef comes quickly.
(VHEAT EXPORTATION
EXCEED LAST YEAR'S
NEW YORK, July 13.?Wheat ex
lortatlons last week from the United
States and Canada exceeded thope for
he same week last year by 1,400,000
mshels. There have been 1,000,000
mshels or more per week In excess
if last year's exportatlons for more
han a month.
3ATTLESHIP NEVADA
TAKES THE WATER
QUINCY, .Mass., July 13?The new
luperdreadnnught battleship Nevada
vas launched here Saturday. Miss
Sleanor Ann Slebert, the 10-year-old
ileco of Gov. Taskor L. Oddle, christ
ened the big ship as she slid Into the
vater.
ENGLISH BUYING OIL
INTERESTS IN AMERICA
?+?
NEW YORK. July 13.?An English
lyndlcate lias taken an option on a
najorlty Interest in the Pure Oil Co.
it $25,000,000. The company Is a $10,
100,000 New Jersey corporation, with
l daily production of 25,000 barrels in
Dklahoma and Louisiana.
TRAIN RUNS DOWN
AND KILLS SIX
?+?
ROCHESTER, N. Y., July 13.?Six
persons riding in a buckboard yester
day and singing "Nearer My God to
Thee" were run down by a freight
train and killed.
FORD TO DOUBLE
CAPACITY OF FACTORIES
DETROIT, July 13?The Ford Mo
tor Co. plans to double Its plant In
this city by the erection of seven
new buildings and a power house, at
a total cost of about 15,000,000. This
will mean, when the factories are run
ning full, some 40,000 employees.
WOOL MANUFACTURERS
TO GIVE NEW REST
PHILADELPHIA, July 13. ? The
Philadelphia wool houses until the end
of August will close on Friday nights
and not open again until Monday
mornings. Each concern hat signed
an agreement: "In order to get more
efficiency out of our employees."
BRAZIL CANNOT PLACE
NEW NATIONAL LOAN
LONDON, July 13.?It is understood
here that the Brazilian loan negotia
tions have again been postponed, and
there is no faith In the public credit
of Brazil,

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