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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, July 22, 1914, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. IV., NO. 523. ' JUNEAU, ALASKA, WEDNESDAY, JULY 22, 1914. ? PRICE, TEN CENTS
Democratic Club Selects
Candidates For Primary
The Juneau Democratic club heltl a
rousing meeting in the Juneau theatre
last night anil chose a club ticket to be
voted tor at the forthcoming primary
election, Saturday. July 25. called to
select delegates to the Democratic
Territorial convention to be held In
Skagway August 3, and also elected a
new president and vice president for
the club. Other matters attended to
at the meeting was the choosing of
an election board to conduct the forth
coming primary and of rules govern
ing It and also the adoption of a ten
tative platform of principles to be sub
mitted to the convention at Skagway
for consideration.
The club ticket was selected by the
process of elimination from a number
of names presented to the meeting and
resulted in the following being chos
en: Angus Mackay. H. J. Turner. J. F.
McDonald, George F. Forrest, S. H.
Mlllwee, W. W*. Casey, H. C. De Vighne,
D. A. Epsteyn. J. H. Cobb, Franklin
Johnston and Thomas Cole.
The members of the election board
chosen to conduct the primary con
sist of the following: Perry Wiley, An
gus Mackay. W. W. Casey, judges; S.
H. Mlllwee. Thomas Cole, clerks.
Winn Succeeds DeVighne.
Judge J. R. Winn, vice president of
the club was unanimously chosen
president of the club to succeed Dr.
H. C. DeVighne who resigned on ac
count of pressing duties of his profes
sion. D. A. Epsteyn was unanimously
chosen vice president to fill the po- 4
sition formerly occupied by Judge
Winn.
Next Meeting Postponed.
The next regular meeting of the
club which should be the first Tues
day in August was postponed until the
Tuesday following on account of the
Territorial convention falling on Aug- |
ust 3.
? ? #
+ ?
? MARINE NOTES + 1
? ? I
]
The Spokane will arrive at Tread- j
well from the South tomorrow morn
ing at 7 o'clock.
The Dolphin, sailing from Seattle (
last night, should arrive in Juneau Sat
urday.
The Princess Sophia, arriving from ,
Skagway. will sail south Friday morn- .
ing at 7 o'clock.
The Al-Ki will arrive from the .
South Saturday. '
The Northwestern will be due to ar
rive from the Westward Southbound
Sunday.
The Admiral Sampson will be due (
to arrive from the Westward South- t
bound Saturday or Sunday. ,
The Humboldt will be due to arrive (
from the South July 29.
The Georgia sailed for Sitka this
morning. *
The Mariposa arrived from the .
South Westward bound last night.
The Jefferson sailed south last night. '
MARIPOSA BRINGS MANY.
The Mariposa arrived from the '
South last night with a large passen
ger list for the Westward and many '
round trip tourists aboard. The fol- 1
lowing were for Juneau: Miss Hazel '
Jaeger, Mrs. E. R. Jaeger. E. L. Thomp- I
son. A. Pasturnus and wife. E. V. Mor
row. R. W Becker and wife. Mrs. D. '
E. Priest. Patrick Miller. Fred Schnei
der. John Gurnovich. George James, 1
F. B. Shattuck. F. Porter. Miss Mar- !
jorie Dustan, Miss Helen Hamilton. '
Dr. P. R. Hamilton and wife. Mrs. C. 1
Z. Denny. Mrs. H. M. Olson. Miss Hel- '
en Powers. C. Cherovitch. and Nick '
Bergovitch.
MORT BANBURY SKAGWAY
AGENT FOR ADMIRAL LINE -
?,
Mc/rt Banbury, brother to Thomas ,
Banbury, city wharfinger for Juneau. <
has been named as agent for the Pa
clflc Alaska Navigation company at J
Skagway. He is now at Knik. Pal
mer Kennedy, from the Seattle office j
of the company, and George J. Mc- j
Carthy. agent at Juneau, are now in
Skagway establishing the new office.
Mr. Kennedy will remain in Skagway
until relieved by Mr. Banbury, and Mr.
McCarthy will return to Juneau as
soon as the Skagway office Is estab
lished.
WELL KNOWN ENGINEER
WOULD BECOME CITIZEN
Wienand Traugott Tolch. a native
of Amsterdam. Holland, this morning
filed a petition with the clerk of the
district court to be admitted to citi
zenship in the United States. F. W.
Collins and Robert C. Hurley are
named as sponsors. Mr. Tolch is a
well known civil engineer in the em
ploye of the Alaska Gastineau Mining
company and lives at Thane.
SOPHIA ARRIVALS.
The Princess Sophia, arriving from
the South last night brought the fol
lowing passengers for Juneau: George
Glllisple. Miss Mandy Makill. Gus An
derson. G. W. Mitchell. George A. Vlck
ers. Lucy A. Dailey. William Ander
son. Miss Mary Monts. Robert Orme,
C. Duryea. and one second class.
GOLD CREEK WATER
CASE GOING TO TRIAL
The case of the Alaska-Juneau Gold
Mining company against the Ebner
Mining company and others, was set
for trial to follow the case of the Pa
cific Coast company against George E.
James, and it will probably consume
several days.
LEAVING ON GEORGIA.
The Georgia, leaving for Sitka and
wayports at 12:01 this morning, took
the following passengers from Juneau:
For Hoonah ? Mrs. A. Nilsen. Miss
Johnson; for Funter ? Mike Dosen.
Sam Peterson; for Sitka?John Stave.
THE WEATHER TODAY.
Twonty-four hours ending at 3 p. m.:
Maximum?5(5.
Minimum?18.
Precipitation?.08.
Cloudy; rain.
FRIDAY LAST DAY
FOR TAXPAYERS
???
There remain but two more days in
which property owners may pay the
municipal taxes and avoid the penalty
that will be imposed on delinquents.
A penalty of o'r will be added to
all taxes not paid on or before 5 p.
m., Friday. July 24. An additional pen
adty of 5 per cent will be added to all
taxes remaining unpaid on August 1.
After August 1 all delinquent taxes
will be compiled and a list of such de
linquencies published for a period In
the local papers.
After the period given In the notice
by publication has expired the city
will ask the court for an order of sale
and proceed to sell all property on
which the taxes have become delin
quent as provided for by law.
A great many people have had the
impression that the city taxes would
not become delinquent until the last
Friday in July and this in a measure
has tended to cause delay in the mat
ter of paying taxes. The specific date
fixed when taxes become delinquent
is the Fourth Friday in July. This
year happens to have five Fridays In
July and many became confused,
thinking It was the last Friday and
that they would have until the last
day of July.
PROMOTERS TAKU
RAILROAD HERE
?+?
G. W. Mitchell, .who is the active
lead in promoting the projected rail
road from Taku Inlet to Atlin, arrived
n Juneau on the Princess Sophia, ac
companied by P. Duryen who Is as
sociated with him in the enterprise.
Both gentlemen afterward toolc pass
*ge on the Mariposa for Skagway en
route to the Atlin section.
The Taku Railway and Navigation
company was recently organised to
build that portion of the line that Is
projected through American territory
md the survey to the Canadian boun
lary has alrendy been made and ap
plication for the right of way is now
pefore the U. S. land office at Washing
ion. Mr. Mitchell will return to Ju
leau shortly.
DRAPER CLUB TO GIVE
BIG MUSICAL COMEDY
At a special meeting of the Draper
dub at the home of Mrs. W. E. Now
;11 last evening the club decided tc<
>ut on a home talent musical comedy,
?ntitled Juneau "County Fair." The
>crformance will be coached by Miss
Vnnie Sara Bock, of Jacksonville, Fla..
*ho has made a specialty of the homo
alent entertainment business for the
past 16 years. The "County Fair,"
Miss Bock says, has been her biggest
ind most successful production.
The scene and plot of the play is
simply an old time county fair scene
with the characters and dialougues one
would see and hear In such a fair
grounds. About 25 persons will par
ticipate in the dialogue and speaking
parts, while in the choruses 100 young
people will sing and dance.
The the committees were appointed
by the president of the club last eve
ning. and each committee is busy with
its work. At 3 o'clock this afternoon
ibout 50 children for the childrens"
:horuses were to start rehearsals at
the Elks' hall. Tonight the young la
lies and young men and people for
the speaking parts will meet at the
same place.
Rehearsals will be held each after
noon and evening up to July 31 when
:be public uerformances will be given.
The "Juneau County Fair" will be the
biggest home talent musical comedy
?ver given in Juneau. The commit
tees have started their work with the
sreatest enthusiasm with the antici
pation of a big sale of tickets.
The production will be given in the
Interest of the public library and read
ing room that is to be opened in the
Malon.v building on Third street.
The following is a list of the com
mittees:
Finance committee?Mrs. H. J.
Fisher. Mrs. Chas. Goldstein and Mrs.
W. G. Beattie.
Children's Committee?Mrs. J. L.
Gray. Mrs. W. E. Daniels, and Mrs. A.
P. Kasbevaroff.
Chorus committee?Mrs. Willis E.
Novell, Mrs. P. J. Mahone and Mrs.
E. W. Pettit.
Decorating committee?Mrs. E. H.
Kaser.
NOME MAN AND BRIDE
LOCATE IN JUNEAU
C. W. Vickery. formerly deputy in
the office of the clerk of the district
court at Nome, arrived in Juneau on
the Jefferson with his bride from Ket
chikan. Mrs. Vickery was formerly
Miss Bessie Blanchard. daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. John Blanchard of Se
attle. She joined Mr. Vickery at Ket
chikan where they were married and
they left almost immediately for Ju
neau. They intend to make their
home in Juneau.
3IG GAME HUNTERS
PASS THROUGH JUNEAU
Morgan Belmont, son of August Bel
mont: H. Carey Morgan, and C. O.
iselin, Jr.. son of C. Oliver Iselin, the
noted American yachtsman, form a
very interesting party that passed
through Juneau on the Mariposa en
route to the interior hunting big game.
MAMMOTH PRODUCTION
AT JUNEAU THEATRE
Jack London's "Sea AVolf," .one of
the mammoth productions of the mov
ing picture world, will be presented at
rhe Juneau theatre for three nights,
Friday, Saturday and Sunday, July 24,
25 and 20. Admission, 50 cents; chil
dren. 25 cents. (?*?)
B. P. O. E. TO MEET.
There will be a regular meeting of
Juneau Lodge No. 420, B. P. O. E., at
S o'clock tonight (Wednesday). Vis
iting brothers are invited to attend.
G. F. FORREST. E.R.
H. I. LUCAS. Secretary.
HOME RULE MAY |
BE PARTY SLOGAN
The Juneau Democratic Qlpb last
night declared for the widest measure
of home rule for Alaska that is com
patible with a Territorial form of gov
ernment, and for a direct primary
election law that would put the af
fairs of political organizations in the
Territory In the hands of their mem
bers. The club also expressed itself
on other matters which concern the
Territory, declaring that it ib the sense
of the club that the Democratic plat
form which the party will adopt at
Skagway should endorse the adminis
tration's Alaskan and other policies
in strongest terms; that it should con
demn the "Plnchot-Wickersham" con
servation policy; declare for govern
ment railroads; approve the adminis
tration's activities in aiding naviga
tion; ask for liberal appropriations
for wagon roads and trails; ask for
more liberal homestead laws; for an
eight hour day; for Territorial con
trol of the fisheries, and many other
thlhgs of greater or lesser Importance.
Want Party Legislature.
The club also declared that condi
tions in Alaska are such that the
pressing needs of the day could be met
by the Democratic party better than
in any other way, and therefore it rec
ommended that the party put legisla
tive tickets in the field in the various
judicial divisions.
This tentative platform will be pre
sented to the Juneau delegation to tho
Skagway convention as the expression
of the Juneau Democratic club.
Debate on Wlckermham.
The provision of the proposed plat- :
form linking the name of Delegate <
Wickersham with that of Pinchot 1
caused a spirited debate. J. H. Cobb
opposed it, and in a lengthy argument '
went into the history of Alaska to 1
show that the 50-year-old record of tho '
government in relation to this Terri
tory had been as if it were the pur- '
pose to prevent development; and that ;
Pinchot's conservation was but a con
tinuation of a policy of obstruction. ?
He denied that Wickersham had sup- 1
ported conservation, and asserted
that he had contributed toward the
development of the new policy that
the Democratic administration is ap
plying to Alaska.
J. A. Hellenthal contended that Del
egate Wickersham had not opposed the
creation of reserves in Alaska, or the ,
withdrawals of the natural resources; ,
that if he had done so he could have ,
prevented them; that he had not ,
truly represented the protest of the
people of Alaska in this matter, and |
that he was just as responsible for the
policy as though he had urged it.
The club voted for the amendment
linking the names together. <
SHOUP FOR MORE HOME
RULE FOR ALASKA
Representative Arthur 0. Shoup, of j
Sitka. Is In favor of more home rule (
for Alaska. Ho believes the restric
tions on the Territorial form or gov- j
ernment that Is obtaining In the Ter- ,
rltory should be removed, and that ad- s
ditlonal powers should be conferred j
on the Territorial Legislature. He j
contends that all the powers that other -
Territorial governments have had (
should be extended to this Territory. ,
In a letter to The Empire under re- ]
cent date Representative Shoup says:
Alaska should be immediately \
granted every right of self-government
the other Territories have had. and
some certain additional powers. .
The organic act creating the legis
lature withheld from Alaska numerous
privileges and powers usually found
in the Territorial organic acts. Con- j
spicuous among these omissions are: ]
(1) The Alaska law does not clothe i
the Governor with power of pardoning !
offenses against the Territorial laws: :
(2) A county form of government is i
not authorized, except with the affirm
ative approval of Congress; (3) The
appointment of minor officers, such as
probate Judges, Justices of the peace,
recorders, constables, coroners and :
others, is not left to the Governor and i
Territorial Senate?or to election by
the people: (4) There Is no provision
for a Territorial Supreme Court: (5)
A Territorial attorney or Attorney
General is not provided for. More
over, the Alaska act contains the
following direct restrictions: (1) "That
the authority herein granted to the
legislature to alter, amend, modify
and repeal laws in force in Alaska
shall not extend to (1) the game, fish
and fur-seal laws and laws relating
to fur-bearing animals of the United
States applicable to Alaska": or (2) to
the "laws of the United States provid
ing for the construction and mainte
nance of roads, the establishment and
maintenance of schools, and the care
and support of insane persons . . . and
the several acts amendatory thereof;
Provided, that this provision shall not
operate to prevent the legislature from
imposing other and additions taxes or
licenses": (4) "Nor shall any divorce
be granted by the courts of the Ter
ritory, unless the applicant therefore
shall have resided in the Territory for
two years next preceding the applica
tion, which residence and all causes
for divorce shall be determined by the
court upon evidence adduced in open
court"; nor (5) shall the "legislature
( Continued on Page 4.)
ORPHEUM.
"The Miser's Millions at the Or
pheum last night was an exceptionally
interesting picture and displayed some
clever mechanical devises. The story
is shown in three reel ands will be
repeated tonight in addition to the
laugh producer "Alkal Ike" in thie fun
ny comedy entitled "The Laird of Mc
Gillicuddy."
Thursday and Friday the strong 2
reel war feature, "The Grim Toll of
War." (?*?)
SOME DANCE AT BRITT'S.
You have heard of the famous Tan
go, Turkey Trot, Bunny Hug, Grape
Vine and so on. but the latest dance,
which is being featured in all the Pa
rision bath houses, is called the "Wash
Rag." These rags can be had at
Britt's Pharmacy; all sizes, 10c, 15c
and 25c. Phone 25. 7-21-2t.
CANDY FAMINE IS OVER.
We received yesterday fresh Augus
ilivo & Kyer's chocolates. Call or
phone 250, Juneau Drug Co., 107 Front
street. Immediate delivery. 21tf.
NOME GOLD POURS
INTO SEATTLE
SEATTLE. July 22r - The Victoria
arrived from the North ycstordny on
her aecond trip this year from Nome
bringing $800,000 in Seward peninsula
gold, the largest single shipment that
has ever been received at the Seattle
assay office In a long time.
Most of tho Alaska gold is now com
ing to the Seattle assay office. This Is
attributed to tho discontinuance of
the assay charges that formerly were
made by tho government.
BLAMES HAYWOOD
E0R BUTTE ROW,
DENVER, Colo., July 22.?President
Charles H. Moyer, addressing tho an
nual convention of th$ Western Feder
ation of Miners, attacked William M.
Haywood among others as being re
sponsible for the dissensions at Butte.
Ho strongly recommended the consol
idation of the United Mine Workers
of America and tho Western Federa
tion of Miners, and their complete af
filiation with the American Federation
of Labor.
CATHOLIC EDUCATORS
ARE JUNEAU VISITORS
J. J. Lyons and A. M. Jung, of the
faculty of the C.onzaga university of
Spokane, are In Juneau and are the
guests of Father A. R. Drathmau, of
this city. They have come North in
the interest of the school with which
they have been associated, and are
studying the history, geography and
other features of Alaska.
Tho Spokane educators spent three
or four days in Ketchikan, and go to
Skagway, Whitehorse and tho West
ward from here. They will remain at
Juneau and Douglas for several days,
and will be guests of Father Joseph
Bruckert while at Douglas.
>
JURIES TO BE DRAWN
FRIDAY AFTERNOON
? ?
Both grand and petit juries will bo
Irawn in the office of the clerk of the
listrict court Friday afternoon at 2
j'clock for the next torm of court
*-hich has been set for August 17.
DOUGLAS NEWSPAPER MAN
MARRIES JUNEAU GIRL
??
Martin S. Perkins and Miss Ruth
Christensen were united in marriage
by the Rev. J. B. Stevens at the home
3f Mr. and Mrs. Downey D. Mulr on
West Ninth and Dixon streets last
Bvenlng. Those present at the cere
mony were Mr. and Mrs. Muir, Mr.
ind Mrs. Charles Fagan, and Miss Eva
Cole.
Both bride and. yrt*ow are woll
known in Juneau whore they have
many friends. The bride camo here
jbout a year ngo with Mr. and Mrs.
Muir and has made her home with
them in this city. The groom Is a
well known newspaper man, formerly
jf Ketchikan but now Douglas Island
representative for the Alaska Dally
Dispatch.
Mr. and Mrs. Perkins will make
their home in Douglas.
ANXIETY FOR CARPENTERS
OUT IN SMALL LAUNCH
Clarence Carpenter and Mrs. Car
penter. who left Juneau In their small
launch for Excursion inlet last Sat
urday. with the intention of return
ing on Monday, have not been heard
Trom and some anxioty is felt for their
Bafety. They left in company with the
Bell cannery tender. The launch is a
good traveler and should be able to
make run to Juneau in 6 or 7 hours.
Mr. Carpenter said that he would not
start on return trip unless weather
conditions were favorable.
W. R. RUST INSPECTING
THE CHICHAGOFF MINES
?4?
W. R. Rust, president of the Tacoma
Smelter Co.. who.is interested in the
Chlchagoff mines, is at present at Chi
chagoff inspecting the property In com
pany with G. W. Duncan. They will
come to Juneau from Sitka on the
next trip of the Georgia.
Scene from "THE SEA WOLF "?at tne Juneau Theatre.
POLITICS IN MME.
CAILLAUX TRIAL
HAWS, July 28>?Politics Is tho pre
dominating factor in-tho proceedings
in tHo trial of" Mm<3. Henrietta Call
laux today. Tho government is great
ly concerned in regard to documents
in tho possession of Gaston Calmette
at the time he was killed.
Calllaux Gives Testimony.
M. Calllaux, who testified this morn
ing, said that Mme. Calllaux was a
most tender and affectionate wife.
Proceeding, he said:
"Wo loved each other dearly, and
lived in the closest communion of
heart and mind. My wife took alarm
at the dangers my political campaign
exposed me to. She tried to dissuade
me from entering Doumergues' Cabi
net." ,
M. Chcnu, representing Figaro at
the trial, attacked M. Calllaux for "en
deavoring to Boil the grave which his
wife had mnde."
BASEBALL MAGNATES
GIVE IN TO PLAYERS
NEW YORK, July 22.?The Nation
al Baseball commission, which had
suspended Clarence 0. Kraft, of the
Newark International Baseball Lea
gue, for refusing to obey its order that
he report to the Nashville Club in the
Southern Association, last night res
cinded Its action, and the strike that
had been declared by the Baseball Fra
ternity was declared off. Kraft will
romaln with the Newark club at his
old salary instead of going to Nash
ville at a salary of $130 a month less.
WASHINGTON STATE
PIONEER WOMAN DIES
SEATTLE, July 22.?Mrs. Margar
et Peterson, mother of the lato Judge
Thomas M. Chambers, a noted Wash
ington pioneer, died here last night.
Mrs. Peterson crossed the plains to
tho Puget Sound country in 1845.
GREEK NAMES FOR
AMERICAN SHIPS
ATHENS, July 22.?Greece will re
name the battleship Idaho the Lem
nos and the Mississippi the Kllkls.
LONDON THREATENED
WITH BANK MERGER
?+?
LONDON, July 22.?Owing to keen
rivalry in banking circles, I?ondon Is
threatened by a huge banking mer
ger of $800,0000,000 of deposits, and
It has alarmed the public authorities
because It may bring banking funds of
the country Into the hands of a fow
men.
PRICE WAR GIVES
DETROIT CH.EAP GASOLINE
? ?
DETROIT, Mich., July 22.?War of
Standard Oil Co., of Indiana, against
Independent companies operating In
Detroit for domination of gasoline bus
iness worth $1,000,000 a year has forc
ed the price down to 11 cents a gal
lon.
KINNEMAN FUNERAL TOMORROW
Tomorrow afternoon nt 2 o'clock the
funeral of Carl Kinneman. the miner
who was accidentally killed In the
Perseverance mine Monday night, will
be held from the undertaking parlors
of the C. W. Young company, under
the auspices of the Finnish Brother
hood of which deceased was a mem
ber. Interment will be In Evergreen
cemetery.
BRITISH TRADE STILL
SHOWS BIG DECREASE
LONDON, July 22?The Juno state
ment of British trade shows decreases
of $187,000 in imports and $12,817,600
in exports.
BIG WATERFRONT CASE
SUBMITTED TO COURT
The last bit of evidence and the
closing arguments In the big water
front case of the Pacific Coast com
I pany against George E. James were
submitted in the district court this af
ternoon. It will probably be several
days before the court's decision Is an
nounce^
MEDIATORS ASK
EOR AMNESTY
WASHINGTON, July 22?The three
mediators, tho representatives of Bra
zil, Argentina and Chile at Washing- j
ton, today appealed Jointly to i'resl- |
den Woodrow Wilson to use his influ- ,
ence with Carranza to secure a gencr- ,
al amnesty for the recent supportcis
of Huerta in return for their surren
dering the peaceful possession of ine
government to tho Constitutionalists.
Wilson and Bryan Work for Peace. f
WASHINGTON, July 22? President
Woodrow Wilson and Secrotary of
State William J. Bryan, through Amer- (
lean consular representatives in Mexl- ,
co, have appealed to Carranza and
Villa to bury their personal differences. t
Secretary of State Bryan addressed
a personal appeal to both men to sub
ordinate personal feelings and ambi- '
tlons to the general welfare of
the Mexican people and In the interest
of peace. t
(
Peace Negotiation! Threatened. r
EL PASO, Tex., July 22.?The per- t
sonal differences between Gen. Villa ?
and Gen. Carranza, which were patch
ed up when the success of the Con
stitutionalists movement was in dan- 1
ger, again threaten to disrupt the
peace negotiations between the Con
stitutionalists and acting President
Carbajal. ,
HINDUS GIVE UP \
IMMIGRATION EIGHT 1
?+? c
VANCOUVER, B. C.. July 22.?The ?
Hindu committee, with the consent
of the Hindu passengers who have not
been permitted to land from the Koma
gata Maru, have accepted the terms 1
of the government that the ship be t
provisioned and return to Hongkong. ?
The fight to break the law against t
Asiatic immigration and the regula- f
tlons prohibiting the immigration of t
laboring men will probably be discon- !
tlnued. s
? ? 1
RATE DECISION 1
MAY COME SOON
I NEW YORK. July 22. ? The New
York American says: Chairman Har
lin of the Interstate Commerce Com
mission has booked passage for Eu
rope on July 24, and the rate decision
Is expected before his departure. The
result, as a whole, Is expected to be
only moderately favorable. It will ex
cite no enthusiasm. It is understood
that tthree of the commissioners are
opposed to a raise in rates nnd that
the other four favor increases that '
will amount to about 3%%. '
Railroads Have Understanding.
NEW YORK. July 22? A Pittsburgh
dispatch says several transcontinen
tal railways and the Interstate Com- |
merce Commission have come to an '
understanding with regard to freight ]
rates. It is authoritatively stated that ]
the understanding provides for an in- '
crease of rates on many commodities
to coast points in order to make them ]
conform to rates to Intermediate '
points, and vice versa.
"FREDDIE" WELSH TO
BECOME AN AMERICAN
LOS ANGELES, July 22. ? Defore f
leaving here for London with her baby, "
Mrs. Freddie Welsh, wife of the new
llghtwelgh champion, said that her (
husband is coming to Los Angeles to ,
live permanently. She says he will j
become an American citizen. The
Welshes have a fine home at Ocean ,
Park and a lot of Los Angeles real
estate nnd California ranch proper- .
ty.
STEAMERS TO RUN FROM ]
BOSTON TO AUSTRALIA
BOSTON, July 22. ? The White
Star line will establish a Boston-Aus- ,
trialla steamship line early in this
fall, with two vessels sailing from ,
here. j
i
CHICAGO BANK TO <
PAY ONE DIVIDEND ,
CHICAGO, July 22? Receiver Nib
lock of the closed La Salle Street i
Trust & Savings Bank, believes de- i
positors will receive at least 30% on
account by the first part of October.
SWIFT AND COMPANY
TO FILE MORTGAGE
CHICAGO, July 22.?Papers were re
corded here whereby Swift & Co. gave
a 30-year f50,000,000 mortgage at 5
per cent, interest secured by proper
ties In 14 States.
VALDEZ COMPANY SEEKS
PATENTS TO MINING CLAIMS
The Galena Mining company, of Val
dez. has filed an application for patent
with the local land ofllce for five lode
mining claims in the Valdez district.
Girl for general housework; wanted
immediately; apply to Mrs. P.
Crowther. 226 E. 7th st. 7-22-3t.
EGGINTON APPOINTED
"K OF C" PHYSICIAN
Dr. L. O. Egginton has received ap
pointment from the supreme council
of the Knights of Columbus to the post
of nhyslcian of the order for the Ter
ritory of Alaska.
LUNDSTROM GETS VERDICT.
In the case of Alfred Lundstrom
against F. W. Ramm to recover a bal
ance alleged to de due for logs sold,
the Jury returned n verdict of $200 for
plaintiff in the Commissioner's court
yesterday. The case had been pending
since November last.
Irish Crisis Hangs As
A Pall Over Britain
LONDON, July 22?The crisiu in
the Irish question hangs over the Brit
ish people ns a pall. It overshadows
everything else today in the British
Isles. There Is little Interest In bus
iness or anything else, and every one
is waiting upon the outcome of the
party lenders which Is being held at
the request of King George. The feel
ing prevails among the people that if
that conference falls to agree civil
ivar will follow.
King Sees Great Danger.,
LONDON, July 22. ? King George,
iddresslng the eight party leaders, In
i conference over the Irish question
ast night, said:
"The trend Is surely toward an ap
>eal to force, and today to carry words
>f civil war on the lips of the most
'csponslble and sober minded of my
>eople seems the regular and ordi
inry thing."
Uquith Responsible for the King's
Speech.
LONDON, July 22.?Prime Minister
Uquith, addressing the House of
Commons, said that he assumed al!
esponsibility for the speech delivered
ly King George at the opening of the
:onference over the Irish question.
WILSON ORDERS SUIT
TO DISSOLVE NEW HAVEN
WASHINGTON, July 22.?In a let
er to Attorney-General James C. Mc
teynolds, President Woodrow Wilson
lirects that a suit be instituted In the
:ourts under the provisions of the
Sherman Anti-Trust law to dissolve
he New Haven railroad system. He
ilso directs that the criminal aspects
>f the case be laid before a United
States grand Jury.
May Stand Suit.
NEW YORK, July 22. ? The Now
fork Tribune says the best counsel
he New Haven directors have been
ible to obtain have assured them that
he government In the proposed In dls
tolution suit will be unable to show
hat the New Haven and Boston &
dalne are competing lines, and they
ire agreed that It is perhaps best to
ct the Supreme Court decide the mat
er.
k + * + + + ** + + + * + + + +
k +
k ROOSEVELT WANTS +
> TO BE HEARD +
'f *
k WASHINGTON. July 22. ? <?
k In a letter to Senator William +
k J. Stone, of Missouri, chair- <?
k man of the Senate foreign rela- ?
k tlons committee. Col. Theodore +
k Roosevelt asked that he bo +
k henrd In opposition to the pro- 4>
? posed Colombian treaty that Is *
? pending before that committee. +
+
? Stone Against Town Hall Pro- +
> ceedlngs. +
WASHINGTON. July 22. ? +
? Senator William J. Stone, com- ?
> mentlng upon the request of +
? Col. Roosevelt to be heafd on ?
? the Colombian treaty, said that +
' he could see "no reason for ?
? turning Senate committee ?hear- ?
? lngs into town hall proceed- +
? ings." +
+
??k + -l- + -k-{-4*-I- + + + 4, + 4,+
'ASSENGERS COMING
ON STEAMER DOLPHIN
?t?
SEATTLE, July 22.?The Dolphin
lailed for Alnska ports last night
vith the following named passengers:
For Juneau?M. E. Welsh, Mrs. M.
'onway W. V. Davis. Mrs. F. Lewis,
diss Lizzie B. Scott, Mrs. Babcock,
W. Pettygrove, D. M. South and
vife, H. R. Cllse, Mrs. H. S. Slater,
diss M. South, S. C. Pearson.
For Douglas ? E. F. Cashel, Mrs.
'lara McPhetridge and two steerage.
NEW YORK POST
IS FOR WARBURG
?f?
NEW YORK, July 22.?The New
fork Evening Post says no single
nan in this country did more to bring
ibout the present great currency re
'orm than did Paul M. Warburg, and
10 one else has. along certain lines,
lultc his competency. It strongly
trges his confirmation.
Would Be National Calamity.
President Vanderlip, of the National
City bank says if the government is
deprived of the services of Paul M.
Warburg on the National Reserve
Board it will be "little short of a Na
tional calimity."
RAILROADS PLACE BIG
ORDERS FOR CARS
?+?
NEW YORK, July 22?The railroads
have placed more orders with build
ers for cars since June 1st than in any
two months since February, 1913. The
orders for June totaled more than 19,
000 cars. Since then 12,000 cars have
been ordered for Western. railroads
alone. It is thought the total for July
may reach from 35,000 to 40,000. In
spite of this ordering a shortage for
the fall traffic is feared.
CANADA TO GET
BIG SHOE FACTORY
NEW YORK, July 22.?One of the
largest shoe factories on the Ameri
can continent will bo built in Mon
treal in the near future, according to
Hanan & Sons in New York. This
firm turns out $7,000,000 of shoes
yearly.
"OVERHEARD."
"John. I need a few things this morn
ing at the drug store, but it is rather
disagreeable out. Will you step in on
your way to lunch and got It for me?"
"Certainly, dear; but why not call
the Juneau Drug Co., 250 is their num
ber; they are very accommodating,
and will deliver immediately." 21-tf.

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