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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, July 23, 1914, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. IV., NO. 524. JUNEAU. ALASKA. THURSDAY, JULY 23, 1914. ' ? PRICE, TEN CENTS
Democratic Primaries Give
Everyone Equal Chance
The plain Intimation by the Dispatch
thla morning that the anti-Wickorsham
men In the Juneau Democratic club
are taking unfair methods to prevent
a free expression of the will of the
Democrats of Juneau is resented by
some of the leading Democrats of this
city as being unfair?unintentionally,
maybe, but nevertheless unfair. Noth
ing has been done by the club that
would In any manner prevent the Dem
ocrats of this city from sending a
Wickersham delegation to Skagway in
case there are more Wickersham Dem
ocrats here than there are antl-Wlck
ersham Democrats.
The rules tor the primary election?
in the formulation of which the chief
part was enacted by a close friend of
Delegate Wickersham. even to the
suggestion of the judges and clerks
of the election?provide that those
participating must promise, if chal
lenged. to support the nominee of the
Skagway convention. This is just as
binding on the anti-Wickcrshnm men
?and those who are not necessarily
antl-Wlckcrsham. but with whom he is
not the first choice?as upon those
who favor the nomination by the Dem
ocrats of the Delegate. If the Juneau
primary should select a Wickersham
delegation and he should be nominated
at Skagway. or if he should be nom
inated at Skagway without the con
sent of the Juneau Democrats, all
those participating in the primary bind
themselves to support him.
The intimation that the judges se
lected in the first instance to conduct
the primary ? selected before they
were placed in nomination for dele
gates. and four out of five of them sug
' Rested by a Wlckersham supporter
would tolerate anything except a fair
primary and an honest count is un
fair to some of the leading men of this
city. The judges selected were Perry
Wiley, Angus Mackay and W. W.
Casev, and the clerks Thomas Cole
and S. H. Millwee.
The Juneau Democratic club did not
select its delegate ticket at a secret '
meeting. The club has had but one
meeting since its organization from
which others than members were ex
cluded. and at that meeting financial
and other strictly club maters were
discussed.
In selecting a ticket, the club did
not even bind its own members to sup
port it i
It is doubtless fair to say that a <
large majority of those on the club pri- <
marv ticket are not in favor of the <
nomination of Delegate Wickersham at i
Skagwav, though one, J. H. Cobb, the i
lawyer who represented the regular i
Democracy before the credentials com- .
mlttee at the Baltimore convention, ]
favors his nomination, and all of them
will support him if he is the nominee. ;
Skagway not for Joslin.
SKAGWAY. July 23. ? The rumor
that Skagwav Democrats have endors- t
ed Falcon Joslin for the nomination j
for the Delegate to Congress is false. ,,
Local Democrats will meet tonight for t
the purpose of organizing a Democrat- .
ic club and to make arrangements for t
a primary election Saturday to choose |
delegates to the Territorial conven- j
tion which convenes here August 3.
NEW JUDGES FOR THE
PRIMARY ELECTION t
?? j
The committee of the Juneau Demo- <i
cratlc Club, which prepared the plans, I
rules and regulations for the Demo- i
cratlc primary election that will take I
place Saturday afternoon, at the re- t
quest of Angus Mackay and W. W. t
Casey, who were selected for judges
of the primary election before they ^
were placed in nomination for dele
gates. decided today to accept their
resignations and name others. The
other judges who will act with Perry
Wiley will be announced tomorrow. j1
Labor Paper not for Wlckersham. v,
It must not be thought that because li
the Daily Industrial Worker, of Nome, v
a paper conducted by the Western ii
Federation of Miners' local at that >
place, thinks that Delegate James c
Wlckersham will be re-elected, that
it is supporting his candidacy or v
thinks he deserves his popularity, a
After predicting the probable re-elec- r
tion of Delegate Wickersham. The In- v
dustrial Worker says: c
"Wlckersham has always at least s
been an Interesting figure, if his po
pularity has been a somewhat diffi
cult to understand. We see no par
ticular reason for his claiming the
railroad legislation as his own. any
more than he can claim that the Terri- v
torlal legislation was his own. 11
"Much of the purely Wickersham c
legislation was defective in many 1
ways, while the defects of the legls- r
lation claimed by him for the most %
part can be discounted by him or (
claimed by him just as he has a I
mind so to do.
"AS a politician Wickersham is con- '
summatebly able, and he has the hap- v
py faculty of placing his polittclal v
wares before the people so that they
will buy. This is a nicer way of say- f
ing that he can effectively hook his
line and catch the suckers. But it is
the same thing.
"The genial art of serious bull con
that will be taken seriously is one in
which Mr. Wickersham Is an adept.
He can fool the workers, the operators,
the Guggs. the doctors, the lawyers,
the preachers and fool them to the top
of his ability. Such gifts in a politi
cian are not to be despised, what
might appear vicious when practiced
by the common or garden confidence J
man. when made use of by the able
politician reach a standard which
claims with right the wings of vir- '
tue. It is essentially the politicians'
function."
i
"JOY WALK." i
+
Doran's well known and guaran- J
teed corn salve or liquid corn reme- !
dy when applied for few nights, will I
make life's walk easy, and life worth
living. 7-23-tf. ,
THE WEATHER TODAY.
Twenty-four hours ending at 3 p.m.:
Maximum?55.
Minimum?48.
Precipitation?.68.
Cloudy; rain. i
BIG GOLD CREEK
WATER TRIAL ON
?'??
The case of the Alaska Juneau Gold
Miuiug company against the Ebner
Mining company and others went to
trial late yesterday afternoon and Is
now occupying the attention of the
district court. The action involves the
right to possession of Gold creek wa
ter and has been in controversy for
several years. About six months ago
the plaintiff company sought an in
junction and temporary restraining
order to prevent the Ebner company
from diverting the water, pending a
hearing of the case on Its merits
which was denied.
The ease is now being Anally heard
on its merits and it will likely con
sume several days. The hearing on
the application for a restraining or
der last nearly two weeks. Hellen
thai & Hellenthal represent the plain
tiff company and Winn & Burton the
defendants.
"COUNTY FAIR" HAS
FIRST REHEARSAL
Yesterday the committees for stag
ing the "County Fair" musical comedy,
met a part of the cast Invited for the
various parts in the performance at
the Elks' hall. As the ladies had only
a half day for inviting the large cast
they were not able to invite all of the
number listed, but were delighted
with a turn out of 50 children in the
afternoon and nearly that number of
"grown ups" at the evening meeting.
Rehearsals will continue afternoons
and evenings at the Elks' hall, until
July :!1 when the Arst performance
will be given. If the enthusiasm and
Interest of the children and young peo
ple at the first rehearsal is an indi
cation of big success, then the "Ju
neau County Fair" will be the biggest
ever.
HARRY F. CAIN TO
OPE NXEW HOTEL
Harry F. Cain, prorietor of the Ho- ,
tel Cain, announces that lie has se- ,
jured the upper floors of the new Ave- ,
itory concrete Zynda building at the
:orner of Third and Main streets and ,
ivill conduct the Hotel New Cain on
:he premises. It is expected that the
nterior of the building will be finished
tnd ready for occupancy by August
15. It will have 40 guest rooms.
tTLIN IS EXPERIENCING
PROSPEROUS YEAR
?i
Atlin is experiencing one of the
nost prosperous years in its history j
iccording to J. M. Sparkman, the Se- ;
ittle capitalist and member of the j
lioneer real estate firm of Sparkman .
md McLean, who has Just returned
0 that city from Atlin. where he is in ]
erested In the hydraulic company that
s operating on Ruby creek.
Speaking to the Sun. of Seattle, he
isid: '
"Every mining property in the dis
rict is being further developed this
rear, and an era of prosperity is evi
lenced on all hands. The Seattle cor- <
?ortation with which I am connected t
ins had a prosperous year. Thomns :
)aulton. for many years a member of i
he city council here, is in charge of >
he property as superintendent." 1
? ? ? i
CARPENTERS ARE SAFE ;
AT EXCURSION INLET J
John P. Olds chartered the Fox this .
uorning and started for Excursion In
ef to inquire as to the safey of Mr.
r.d Mrs. Clarence Carpenter who
fere to leave that place for Juneau
n a small launch Monday. On the
ray over a gas boat was met com- 1
ng from Excursion Inlet that reported f
!r. and Mrs. Carpenter as safe In Ex- 1
ursion Inlet.
They started for Juneau Monday but 1
rere caught in a storm and put into 1
1 small cove cove where they re- :
nalned nearly two days before the
reather calmed down so that they I
ould make Bell's cannery at Excur
lon Inlet.
KINUNEN FUNERAL TODAY. 1
?t?
The funeral of Carl Kinunen, who
vas accidentally killed in Persever
ince mine, was held from the parlors
>f the C. W. Young company this af
ernoon under the auspices of the Fin
ilsh Brotherhood of which deceased
vas a member. The Rev. J. B; Stev
?ns officiated. The following were the
Kill bearers: .Andrew Rakkla. Selme
a Selmar. Oscar Harri. John Koski.
Jerman Laukka. Frank Oja. There
vas a large attendance. Interment
vas In Evergreen cemetery.
>ATENTS ARRIVE FOR
SOME DALTON CLAIMS I
?t? '
The local land office yesterday re- j
reived patents for the "Comet." "Ju- |
ieau Fraction," and "Bear" lode mln
ng claims situated near Cordova and
iclonging to Jack Dalton and asso- '
dates. These claims form a part of
he land that was in controversy and
nvolved in the litigation between Dal
on and the Katalla company. After
leveral years the matter was settled
>y compromise.
-ATHER DRATHMAN GOES '
ON SICK CALL TO SITKA I
?+? <
Father A. R. Dratbman of the Ju- 1
ieau Catholic church, sailed on the
Spokane for Sitka In response to a
tablegram from C. A. Haley asking
ilm to come there as quickly as pos
dble because his father, X. Haley, the j
pioneer, is 111. ?
During Father Drathman's absence
Father J. Bruckert of Douglas will be
in Juneau.
SHACKLEFORDS HOME.
L. P. Shackleford and family return-!
home on the Spokane this morning
after an absence of several months i
n the States. |
! GOVERNMENT PULP
| EXPERTS IN JUNEAU
\V. G. Weigle, head of the forest scr
vico In Alaska, with headquarters In
Ketchikan; Leonard Lundgren. forost
servlco hydraulic engineer; H. E. Sur
faco, pulp export from Mndlson, Wis
consin, and L. A. Nelson, logging ex
pert from Portland, Oregon, have Just
completed a cruise of Investigation
with the forest service boat Tahn to
Baranotf and Chichagoff islands. All j
of the water power plants and sites in
the BnrnnofT and Chichagoff island sec
tions were visited and conditions stud
ied. All of these gentlemen have pre
pared reports on the conditions as
found that will be submitted to the U.
S. forest bureau.
"The investigation Just made," snid
Mr. Welgle, "disclose that conditions
are favorable in those sections for the
establishing of pulp and paper mills
and the building up of n large industry
in this line. Some day Southeastern
Alaska will be the biggest producing
section in the wood pulp and paper In
dustry in the world."
Since coming to Juneau, Mr. Sur
face has received a cablegram from the
Tasmauinn government usking him to
come to Tasmania and make an Inves
tigation of that country for the pur
pose of determining the possibilities
and resources there for the manufac
ture of pulp and paper.
The Tahn arrived in Juneau two
days ago and is tied up at the H. J.
Raymond Co. float. Mr. Weiglo and
associates will leave tomorrow night
for the South visiting Speel river and
other points between here and Ketchi
kan.
SENATE DEMOCRATS
TO SPEED PROGRAM
WASHINGTON. July 23?The Sen
ate Democrats In caucus last night
agreed beginning with Friday they
will take active steps to put through
the administration anti-trust bills and
the remainder of the appropriation
bills and bring about an adjournment
at the earliest possible moment. The
administration is anxious to secure
the passage of the bills so that busi
ness interests will know what to count
upon as soon as possible and adjust
themselves to it.
If that shall prove necessary, it was
said today, the Senate will both ad
vance the hour of meeting and hold
night sessions. It is believed that in
this manner adjournment can be forc
ed by the middle of August.
KETCHIKAN WINS FROM
PRINCE RUPERT AGAIN
The Ketchikan basebal team won
the rubber game of baseball from
Prince Rupert Inst Saturday by a score
af 7 to 3. This gives Ketchikan two
jut of throo games played. The first
came was played at Prince Rupert
July 1, and the score was 1 to 0 in
favor of the Canadian town. On the
Fourth of July Ketchikan won on its
home grounds by a score of 1 to 0 in
i 12-inning game.
Saturday's score was: R I! E
Ketchikan 7 13 2
Prince Rupert 3 5 6
RAIN MAKES RIVERS
OF SMALL STREAMS
?*i*?
Supt. J. C. Hayes of the Alaska road
?oinmisslon, who was out toward Men
lenhal on the government, road this
norning reports that tho incessant
?ains have caused the small mountain
dreams to flood. Lemon creek is
jooming as large as a river this
norning, but the bridge is still in po
ition. Recently all of the small
midges and culverts between Juneau
md Salmon creek were renewed.
rAXPAYERS CROWDING THE ?
CITY HALL WITH MONEY
Taxpayers came to the city hall in
arge numbers today and kept City
?lerg E. W. Pettit and assistant busy
aking the money. Altogether up
vards of ?7,000 was paid in during the
lay. Tomorrow will be the last day
n which to pay tho municipal taxes
or the year 1914 and escape paying an
iddcd penalty.
i
UcBRIDE RAIDS LOWER
FRONT STREET RESORT
Chief of Police William McBrlde and
lis men raided a cabin near the Bruns
wick building last night and arrest
;d William Hawley and W. Hender
son, both of whom are colored men,
Marry Cant and Carrie Hanson. The
women were adjudged guilty by Mu
licipal Magistrate E. W. Petit of main
ainlng a bawdy house and were
ined $10 and $100 respectively. The
nen were found guilty of frequenting
he place aud were each fined $10.
"GRIM TOLL OF WAR."
Tonight the Orpheum will present
in extra good war drama in two reels,
?ntitled "The Grim Toll of War." This
picture is full of excitement and will
lold the audienco with interest.
"Memories of His Youth." Is a Lu
Pin drama with Harry Myers in thq
lead.
"Taming the Spooks" is sure a laugh.;
Don't fail to see this show; regular j
prices, 10 and 25 cents. (*??)
"BUTTERMILK."
Doran's Prescription Pharmacy has
just received a fresh shipment of
Parke Davis & Company's Lactone
tablets for making buttermilk from
sweet milk In just a few minutes.
Call at Doran's and get a bottle. 25
and 50 cents. 7-23-tf.
MAKING UP JURY LISTS.
Tho Jury commission is making up
the lists of names this afternoon that
will be placed in the box for the draw
ing that will take place tomorrow
morning at ten o'clock in the ofllce of
the clerk of the district court.
? ? ?
IMPROVING DIXON STREET.
A small force of men are at work
grading the Dixon street hill near W.
Ninth street.'
EMINENT RUSSIAN
MINING MAN HERE
E. N. Barbot deAlnrny, eiuinonLmln
lng cngiueor of St. Petersburg. Russia,
and a director of the Lena Gold Fields
Co., the largest gold mining company
In Russia, 1h In Juneau and a guest of
the Hotel Cain. Mr, Barbot do Marny
arrived in Juneau Tuesday ulght en
route to the interior of Alaska via
Yukon Territory. Ho will visit Daw
son, Fairbanks, iditarod, and Nome.
The purpose of his visit is to study
the methods and processes of mining
in this country, particularly that fea
ture which has to do with frozen grav
els.
The mines of the Lena are all deep
placers and frozen, llko they are in
Yukon and interior Alaska. The Lena
Gold Fields company has immenso
holdings and operates on a very large
scale. The company employes 7.000
men and sluices up annually ton tons
of pure gold. The pay is at a depth of
140 feet on an average, too deep for
dredging successfully, therefore the
pay is mined similar to the system em
ployed In Yukon and Alaska, except
the old crude method of thawing the
frozen, gravels with wood llres, or in
lieu of wood. coal. Is still In vogue. The
Introduction of steam thawing plants
is now contemplated by the company
and this Is one reason that this pro
cess of mining is of particulsr interest
to the visitor. While In Dawson ho
will visit the Immense dredgers em
ployed by the Boyles on tho Klondlko
concession and will see the great thaw
ing plants In operation.
Although there are no quartz mines
In tho Lena Holds, Mr. Barbot de Mar
ny takes a keen interest In the great
quartz mines of Southeastern Alaska,
particularly those in the Juneau dis
trict and he will visit Treadwell and
the other mines of this section If pos
sible. There are many quaitz inlneB
in the Ural mountains he says and im
menso'bodies of low grade ores but
as yet they lie untouched because of
the Inability to work them at a profit.
While the cost of labor, he says, Is
less in Russia than here, the results
obtained are proportionately less,
therefore American operators can
work ores at a profit that Russia can
not touch.
Mr. Barbot de Marny Is greatly im
pressed with Juneau. Spenking of his
visit to this section he said: "I am
highly pleased with Juneau and its
surroundings. 1 am more delighted
with the scenery here than with the
better known Switzerland. It Is more
beautiful and has a grander expanse.
It reminds mo greatly of the Northern
part of Ural."
From Nome, Mr. Barbot de Marny
will sail direct to Seattle and from
that place back to Russia.
$100,000,000 TO
COME TO ALASKA
*7>
SEATTLE:, .Tilly 2::.?Judge Donald
A. McKenzlc, Tormerly an Alaskan but i
now ,i resident of Washington City, ar- i
rived from the East last night. He
predicts that there will be $100,000,- ,
DUO invested in Alaska within the next
12 months. He says the Territory Is
attracting a wonderful amount of at
tention.
"The opinion prevails everywhere," 1
;.id Judge McKcnzie, "that the con- 1
i ruction of ho government railroad ,
v. ill provide a field for the profitable
employment of capital in Alaska, and
there arc many people who are anx- 1
ious to enjoy the profits from iilvcst
meats there." (
Judge McKen/.le was formerly Unit
'?d States commissioner In the Koyu
:.uk country, and is now the principal
owner of the townsite of Nelson on
Cordova bay. (
KOMAGATA MARU
SAILS WITH HINDUS
?J-?
VANCOUVER, B. C.. July 23.?The
Japanese steamship Komagata Maru
sailed this morning with che Hindu
passengers that were denied admis
sion to British Columbia. She sails
for Shanghai, and the passengers will
be transferred there for Hongkong.
OKLAHOMA'S U. S.
MARSHAL KILLED
TULSA, Okla., July 23. ? United
States Marshal Holmes Davidson and
Deputy Marshal William R. Plank
were shot and killed here today by
W illiam Baber. The marshal and dep
uty were attempting to senrch Baber's
residence for contraband liquor.
GOVERNMENT MAJORITY
SURE IN MANITOBA
?t?
WINNIPEG, July 23.?The recount
In Klldonan district of the vote for
memb< rship in tho Provincial Parlia
ment giving Dr. Montague, Conserva
tive, a majority of one voto insures a
majority in the new parliament for the
Conservatives.
FRANCE APPROPRIATES
$400,000 FOR 'FRISCO FAIR
?
PARIS, July 23.?French Senate has
passed tjie bill providing $400,000 for
French oillcial participation in Pan
ama-Pacific Exposition. The bill had
already passed the Chamber of Depu
ties.
ENGLISH COTTON MILLS
HAVING HARD TIME
LONDON. July 23.?Tho cotton mill
situation in England Is becoming very
discouraging. Twelve thousand looms
are already idle in the Preston and
Blackburn districts. ?
"OVERHEARD."
"John. I need a few things this morn
ing at tho drug store, but it is rathor
disagreeable out. Will you step in on
your way to lunch and get it for me?"
"Certainly, dear: but why not call
the Juneau Drug Co., 256 is their num
ber; they are very accommodating,
and will deliver immediately." 21-tf.
GOVERNMENT STARTS
NEW HAVEN SUIT
NEW YORK, July 23.?The govern
mopt today Hied suit for the dissolu
tion of the Now Haven railroad sys
tem.
To Plead No Liability.
NEW YORK, July 23. ? The New
York Tribune says the New Haven di
rectors' position in the threatened res
titution suits will bo thnt whatever
losses occurred to the company were
tho results of errors of Judgmont for
which they are not responsible, and
that In any event the statute of limi
tations will act as a bar to practically
any action that may be begun.
Times Blames Commissions.
NEW YORK, July 23. ? The New
York Times editorial comments in
part on Interstate Oommorce Commis
sion report on Now Haven: "Tho In
tcrstate Commission itself, however, is ,
oldor than these errors of manage
ment. There are several New Eng- ,
land commissions of various ages. It
is an arraignment of all these public
bodies that these 'crimes' occur un
der their control, and aro only exposed
and denounced historically. The pub
lic would rather have such a regret- ,
table incidents prevented than pun- i
Ished, and it is to be hoped thnt the ;
New Haven episode will powerfully In- i
fluonco a broader reformation." 1
i
Grounds for Prosecution. ,
NEW YORK. July 23.?A Washing- ;
ton special says that the grounds up
on which the Department of Justice |
can bring criminal proceedings against
the New Haven directors are for vlo- .
lation of the Sherman anti-trust law |
and falsification of records under the t
interstate commerce act. I
? ? ? (
EFFORT TO CRUSH
CAILLAUX FAILSI
PARIS, July 23.?M. Family, of coun
sel for the government, when the gov- j
ernmont announced that papers found (
on Calmette's person, after he was t
shot by Mme. Caillaux, perported to B
be copies of documents that never ex- y
isted, admitted that tho effort to crush t
Caillaux had proved to be a failure. r
Calllaux's First Wife Testifies. C
PARIS, July 23?The feature of the
Caillaux trial today was the testimony t
of Mme. Bertha Gueydan, the first i
wife of M. Caillaux. Sho asked to be t
permitted to refer to notes, saying: i
"I am confronted by a mountain of I
lies which I must climb and break to i
pieces one by one." !
As she made the statement sho
glared at Mme. Caillaux, for which she
was reprimanded.
Her request was denied. e
She said that after the first letter 1
concerning the domestic affairs of M. t
Caillaux had been published, a letter r
\yas given li-r by M. Caillaux In which c
?die Bald that there had never been any I
disagreement in their domestic life,
and that it had always been tender. ^
TO SEPARATE SEXES
IN SEATTLE SCHOOLS
SEATTLE, July 23. -- The Seattle s
school board yesterday agreed to an r
order establishing separate classes in t
the city schools for boys and girls, f
The intention is to keep the sexes a
completely separated both in their t
study rooms and class rooms. c
CHICAGO BUSINESS
MEN OPTIMISTIC F
CHICAGO, July 23.?One of tho Chi
cago business men who rccontly had <'
an audience with President Woodrow c
Wilson, has given Instructions that op- '
orations at one of his plants be in- f
creased from 75% to 100% capacity. v
All the business men who visited the
President returned in an optimistic 1
frame of mind, and tneir optimism is r
spreading.
f
New York Paper Looks for Improve
ment.
NEW YORK. July 23.?A canvass
made by the New York Times of bank- I
ers, manufacturers and railroad heads f
shows confidence in a trade boom for r
the immediate future. t
7,000 Men Put to Work. (
NEW YORK, July 23.?Alexander
Smith & Sons Carpet Co., of Yonkers,
N. Y., which employs 7,000 hands, has
resumed business.
t
I
More Railroad Activity. <;
CHICAGO. July 23. ? The Illinois t
Central railroad will establish at Non- (
eonnah, Ten., the largest car building 1
and locomotive repair shops south of t
Chicago. Employment will be given f
to about 4,000 men. t
Railroads Buying Rails. '
CHICAGO, July 23.?The Denver &
Rio Grande Railroad Co. has ordered
10,000 tons of rails from the Colora
do Fuel & Iron Co., and the Southern ?
Railway is expected to close with the <
Tennessee Coal, Iron & Railroad Co. <
for about 35,000 tons. t
? ? ? j
OHIO MAN KILLS RICH
NEIGHBOR MISTAKE 1
AKRON, O., July 23.?Thomas Wolf,
a rich Ohio business man, wns mis
taken for a burglar last night while 1
at the home of his son-in-law, and J
shot and killed by Anthony Olschefskl, (
a neighbor. j
MISTAKEN FOR A THIEF
POLICEMAN IS SHOT ,
BURLINGTON, N. J., July 23. ?
Thomas Rogan, a policeman, wns mis
taken for a thief last night'and shot (
nnd killed by Wlnfield Templeton, his ,
close personal friend. (
PORTLAND HAS ANOTHER I
FIRE ON THE EAST SIDE '
PORTLAND, July 23.?A Ore on the
East Side In the manufacturing dis
trict yesterday destroyed $150,000
worth of property.
Special sale on Sterling silver
spoons and white and gold Austrian
china. I. J. Sharick. 7-0-tf.
MEXICAN CASE
LOOKING BLACK
WASHINGTON, July 23? Members
of the administration are far from
satl8flod that peace in Mexico Ib as
sured. It is said that both internal
and international troubles are brew
ing, and that Carranza and Villa are
not working together in a free and
frank manner.
Foreign representatives are insist
ing that the new government of Mexi
co must recognize the debts of the Na
tion and respect the property rights
of their citizens, and Zapata and Villa
have thus far failed to comply with
requests for a statement of policy on
that point, and both intimate that
they will not make any promises un
til the question of the redistribution
of the lands in their respective sec
tions of the country is settled. Zapata
Insists as the price of peace that the
big estates of Southern Mexico must
be made available for small holders,
and Villa is believed to incline to the
?ame position as to the estates of
Northern Mexico.
Peace Arrangements Not Concluded.
MEXICO CITY, July 23.?The Bra
sillan minister was informed when
:ie informed the United States govern
nent that arrangements had been com
peted for the peaceful entrance of
Jen. Carranza into the city of Mexl
:o. The delegates who are conferring
invo only arrived at the agreement
hat there shall be a cessation of hos
tilities until the negotiations shall
lave been completed.
? i
Sign Armistice. 1
MEXICO CITY. July 23.?Gen. Itur- '
)lde, military commander of the Fed- 1
>ral district, announced yesterday In
he name of President Carbajal that an
irmlstlce has been signed suspending
lostllltles, pending arrangements for
he peaceful entry of the Constltution
illsta.
Jarranza Expects no Further Trouble.
WASHINGTON, July 23.?Informa
lon coming directly from Gen. Car
anza Is that the successful termlna
Ion of the conference between his
epresentatlves nnd those of Carbajal
s assured, and that the Constitutional
sts will enter Mexico City without
urther bloodshed.
Must Quit Killing Habit
WASHINGTON, July 23.?The lead
?re of Mexican Constitutionalists have
ieen informed in unequivocal terms
hat they will not bo accorded recog
lition by the United States if excess
's are committed on their entry into
Joxlco City.
CANADA MAY MAKE
RESTRICTIONS SEVERER
OTTAWA. July 23.?It is proposed
o to amend the immigration act to
nake it possible thnt In cases such as
ho Komagata Maru. which brought i
orbldden Immigrants to Vancouver, in j
ddltfon to penalties of the owners, ,
he ships may be sold. A number of j
ither points in the law will be stiff- |
med. ]
?OREST FIRES ENDANGER
PORT ORCHARD BAY TOWNS
?4?
SEATTLE, July 23.?Forest fires to
lay threatened the towns on Port Or
:hard bay. including Bremerton. One
lundred sailors helped to flght the
lames, and save the town of Manette
vhlch was in imminent danger.
There has been heavy dnmage to
imber owners and lumber and shingle
nills in ilvc counties.
-ORT YUKON MINER
DIES AT FAIRBANKS
FAIRBANKS. July 23. ? William
doore, of Fort Yukon, a minor, died
lerc today. Moore had made a 500
nllo trip In a row boat to Fairbanks
o have an Injured leg amputated.
DUTLOOK FOR EARLY
ADJOURNMENT NOT GOOD
BOSTON, July 23.?A Washington
llspatch to the Globe says that Re- ;
>ubllcan Senators believe it will re
lulro more than six weeks to consider
hree Important trust bills pending in
Congress if each is taken up separate
y. Some Democrats hold the same
dew, and thero Is a rapidly growing
lentiment in favor of consolidating
hrco bills into one measure.
30 N KILLED ON THE
STREETS OF ST. PETERSBURG
ST. PETERSBURG, July 23.?A doz
en were killed and many more wound
id last night and this morning in the
course of fighting on the streets of
his city between striking workingmen
md Cossacks.
-RIEND OF GOV. BLEASE
SHOOTS HIS ENEMY
COLUMBUS. S. C., July 23.?Dr. J.
?L Montgomery, who figured in an ex
change of denunciations with Gov.
Coleman L. Blease, the result of a
political controversy, was shot today
ly an unidentified man who shouted:
'Now you won't bother Blease."
EXPATRIOTIC ASTOR OUT
WITH AMERICAN SON
NEW YORK. July 23. ? A London
cable says William Waldorf Astor has
nuarel ed with his eldest son, Wal
lorf, whom he will disinherit. This
Is said to be the cause for the dispo
sition of Mr. Astor's interest in the
Observer and the Pall Mall Gazette.
FROHMAN TO BE HEAD OF
MOTION PICTURE COMBINE
NEW YORK, July 23.?A London
cable says a moving picture combine
with a capital of $20,000,000 is planned |
by Charles Frohman and his asso
ciates.
Roosevelt Defendant In
Libel Suit by Barnes
NEW YORK, July 28.?Ropubll
can National Committeeman and
State Committee Chairman Will
iam Barnes, jr., of Albany, today
sued former President Theodore
Roosevelt In the Supreme Court
for libel in connection with hla
charges against Barnes in hla
statement endorsing Hlnman for
the Republican nomination for
Governor.
OYSTER RAY, July 23.?Col. Theo
dore Roosevelt yesterday endorsed
tho candidacy of Harvey D. Hlnman,
of Binghainpton, for tho Republican
gubernatorial nomination. He Issued
a call for all good citizens to rally to
the support of Hlnman as the only
manner of crushing the grip of Barnes
and Murphy, tho Republican and Tam
many lenders. This means that he
now is giving support to a Republican
Progressive fusion.
Hlnman Is a relative of Harold J.
Hlnman, of Albany, Barnes* personal
representative in the House of Repre
sentatives, who recently announced
his candidacy for Lieutenant-Govern
or.
Sulzcr May Ask For Democratic
Nomination.
NEW YORK, July 23.- -It Is believed
that the decision of Col. Theodore
Roosevelt to urge fusion between the
Progressives and Republicans and the
defeat of Barnes In the Republican
primary will result In former Gov.
William Sulzer's asking for the Demo
cratic nomination. Sulzer had said
that he would run in the Democratic
primary against Gov. Martin H. Glynn
if Roosevelt determined not to be a
candidate. With that in mind, he re
cently asked permission to name one
of the three Democratic inspectors
at each New York City polling place.
Roosevelt Bids For Nomination.
WASHINGTON, July 23.?It is be
lieved here that the action of Col.
Theodore Roosevelt in asking New
York Progressives to participate in
the Republican primaries and support
Hinman for Governor means that he
has concluded to make a fight for the
Republican Presidential nomination in
1916.
+ +
+ UNITED STATES MAY +
+ INTERVENE IN HAYTI +
-5- ?+? +
+ WASHINGTON, July 23. ? +
? The United States government +
?t* has made a peremptory demand +
? for the restoration of peace In +
<? Hayti and the Dominican re- +
? public on the threat of Amerl +
4- can intervention as an alter- +
+ native. ?
+
+ + + + + + + + + + + +
SENATE MAY ACT
FOR CONFIRMATION
4 ?
WASHINGTON. July 23.?If Paul M.
Warburg consents to alter his prev
ous determination and appear be
ore the Senate banking and' currency
mmmittee, the opinion la expressed
?>y members of the Senate that he will
je confirmed.
One Republican for Jones.
WASHINGTON, July 23?A canvass
of the Senate shows that Senator L.
V. Sherman, of Illinois, is the only
Republican who has expressed his In
tention of voting to confirm Thomas
D. Jones as a member of the Federal
Reserve Board.
The administration is seeking to In
fluence Senators.
INCOME TAX YIELDS
NEARLY $77,000,000
WASHINGTON, July 23. ? Revised
figures show that the total 1913 incomo
tax collections to date are $76,909,322.
Treasury officials estimate that the
1914 collections will bo $100,000,000.
RAILROAD DEATH LIST
SHOWS SLIGHT DECREASE
WASHINGTON, July 23. ? There
were 10,150 killed and over 190,000 In
jured on the railroads of the United
States in the year which ended June
30. In the previous year 10,964 were
killed.
BEEF PRICES SOARING
IN CHICAGO MARKETS
CHICAGO. July 23.?Cattle prices at
Chicago reached a record point when
choice beeves sold for $10 per 100
pounds. This price is the highest ev
er paid there in July and is a top point
for the year. Hogs touched $9, the
highest level in months.
DRUG MAD MAN KILLS
DAUGHTERS AND SELF
GLENWOO DSPRINGS, Colo.. July
23.?Maddened by the use of drugs,
Dr. T. L. Hutchinson, of this city, yes
terday shot his daughters, Lois, aged
12, and Fay, aged 10, and then killed
himself. The girls were instantly
killed.
EXPRESS RATES FORCED
DOWN IN MISSOURI
ST. LOUIS. July 23.?The Missouri
public service commission has issued
an order requiring express companies
to reduce rates in that State 21 per
cent.
CANADIAN PACIFIC TO
ISSUE MORE STOCK
OTTAWA. July 23.?A London spe
cial says reports are curren that the
Canadian Pacific proposes to offer a
large issue of new stock.
CANDY FAMINE IS OVER.
We received yesterday fresh Augus
tine & Kyer's chocolates. Call or
phone 250, Juneau Drug Co., 107 Front
street. Immediate delivery. 21tf.

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