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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, July 25, 1914, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. IV., NO. 526. JUNEAU, ALASKA, SATURDAY, JULY 25, 1914. PRICE, TEN CENTS
Conference Fails and
Civil War in Sight
LONDON. July 35.?Prime Minister
Asqulth and Speaker of the Commons
Lowther this morning informed King
George that the conference of party
leaders summoned by His Majesty
could not bridge the difference be
tween the Nationalists and Ulsterites
over the home rule bill.
It is now conceded that the con
ference has been a complete failure
as far as practical results are con
cerned. and that the Irish question
is more critical than ever.
Nationalists Ready For War.
ARMAGH. Ireland. July 25.?Nine
thousand armed Nationalist volunteers
of Armagh county have been notified
to be ready for instaneous mobiliza
tion.
MINER DIES FROM
EXPOSURE AND ALCOHOL
William Burns, a miner formerly in
the employ of the Alaska Gastineau
Mining company, died In St. Ann's hos
pital this morning from exposure and
alcoholism, the former resulting from
the latter. He was found In an un
conscious state at an early hour this
morning in his cabin on the beach
just South of the Alaska Juneau mill
site. Death ensued within an hour
after entering the hospital, and he
never regained consciousness. He had
been in the cabin two days cold and
wet and without food, but was not dis
covered until this morning, although
he was heard moaning the day before.
Deceased was 43 years of age and
a native of New York State. He had
no friends or relatives In this country.
Before coming to Juneau he worked
for the White Pass and Yukon and
lived at Skagway. He quit the em
ploy of the Alaska Gastineau company
January 31 last.
COUNTY FAIR CAST
HAVING GREAT FUN
Rehearsals for the Juneau "County
Fair" were held at Elks' hall yester
day afternoon and evening. The af
ternoon reharsal was the rehearsal of
little ones. A swarm of about 100 lit
tle girls crowded into the hall each
eager to have her little part assigned. (
There was not much time wasted iu
assigning as these little ones have
parts in cnly two choruses?one. the '
Teddy Bear chorus and another, the
barn dance chorus. The Teddy Bear
chorus is the biggest attraction possi
bly. as it has the full 100 little girls In
it and the sight of so many little tots
all in a pretty little drill presents a
most beautiful picture. The other
child's chours is also a pretty Interest
ing part of the entertainment, and real
ly requires more real acting and tal
ent.
The evening rehearsal was the re- (
hearsals of the older characters and
it was alive with Interest. The best ,
parts of the play were all assigned and j
read and the musical numbers were
also given out. Miss Annie Sara Bock. (
the director, showed herself well fitted
for the work she is undertaking and |
each character entered well into the t
part she assigned. Everyone there
seemed to echo: "Won't it be fun?"
Did anyone ever see anything so
silly and foolish as a country bride
and groom going to a county fair on
their wedding "tower." The bride and
groom in this particular country 'f
fair are a sight to behold. Their
costumes are the real thing and they
eat more peanuts and drink more lem- "
onade than you would expect of a dozen
persons. But at the groom says. "We 1
ain't ever calcilating to go on another
weddln' tower so I might as well spend c
a whole two days wages on you. so its '.
all right this once." Widow Smithers. '
whose fourth husband has just died
has not yet entirely committed her
part but she reads it with great abili
ty and will have her speeches about c
her four dead partners down pat be
fore July 31.
, , , r
i
+ + + + ?:?+ + + + -? + +?;- + + + + t
+ ??
> ? CHURCH NOTES +i
? + <
+ + + .t + + + + * + 4?<i><|>.t*.i?4i (
Catholic Church.
Rev. A. R. Drathman. Pastor. '
Communion mass at 8 a. m.;
Parish High Mass and Sermon, at
10:30;
Evening services at 7 p. m.
? ? ? ^
Methodist Episcopal Church. j
Rev. R. C. Blackwell. Pastor. ,
Services morning and evening at 11
and 8 o'clock. Preaching by the pas- t
tor. Sunday School at 12 m. Meet
ing of the Epworth League at ?p. m. 1
Prayer meeting and choir practice. ]
Thursday evening.
+ + +
Trinity Episcopal Church. ,
Rev. Geo. E. Renison. Rector.
Morning prayer and sermon at 11 o'
clock. Sunday School immediately af
ter the close of morning service. There
will be no evening service. All are '
cordlaly invited to attend.
* + +
Presbyterian Church
John B. Stevena. Pastor. I
Morning service at 11. Text, Psalms
23. 5. "They looked unto Him and i
were lightened." The ministry of in
fluence in Christian character. Eve- i
ning service at 8. Joshua 23. 10. <
ning service at 8. Joshrua 23. 10. |
and." The possibilities of the individ
ual. Sunday School meets at 12.
+ + *
Christian Science.
Services are held in Christian Sci
ence hall. Third and Seward streets,
at 11 o'clock. Subject of lesson ser
mon: "Truth." Sunday Schoool at 10
a. m. Wednesday night meetings at
8 o'clock. Free reading room every
Wednesday afternoon from 2 to 5.
THE WEATHER TODAY.
Twenty-four hours ending at 3 p. m.:
Maximum?60.
Minimum?45.
Precipitation?.08.
r? Partly cloudy.
LAST BALI GAME
LIKELY TOMORROW
The Gastineau channel baseball sea
son for 1914 will be brought to a close,
probably with the playing of the thlr
teenth game tomorrow, on the Tread
well grounds. This is the tentative
agreement recently reached by L. S.
Ferris, manager of the Douglas-Tread
well team and Manager R. W. Wulzen
of the Gastineau-Juneau team. Thus
far each team has won six games and
tomorrow's game being the deciding
game of the series promises to bring
out a banner crowd.
The series was, as originally agreed 1
upon, to consist of 15 games to be play- 1
ed alternately on each side of the 1
channel with a toss-up for the deciding
game. Both managers are anxious to |
take their teams to Skagway and play
an exhibition game in the Gem City
during the progress of the Democratic
convention and by closing the season j
tomorrow this can be arranged. It is j
sxpected that the teams will leave for ,
Skagway next Saturday or Sunday
and play Monday.
Juneau will still have an opportunl- j
ty to see some baseball during the .
season, however, for the Knights of !
Columbus team is coming from Seat
tle August 16 to play exhibition games
with both of the Gastineau channel
teams. I
LONDON'S "SEA WOLF"
PLEASES BIG AUDIENCE {
? i
Jack London's "Sea Wolf," as adapt- *
ed to the photo-play art and presented .
to the public in the Juneau theatre j
last night, is a pronounced success. .
The great sea story is reproduced in
animated scenes with a fidelity that
i9 remarkable considering the difficul
ty of bringing out book characters C
complete in animated pictures. From
the sinking of the ferry in San Fran
cisco harbor, to the finale, the prin
cipal events, filled with excitement v
and absorbing Interest, are faithfully h
reproduced. The company engaged in E
making the play a success have dono tl
their work well. Boswell as the t
"Sea Wolf" is great, and all the minor h
characters are well represented. c
The little theatre was filled with ti
Juneau society folk who turned out to e
witness the first performance here and tl
they all went home satisfied. This is
the second play of "Famous Players" ^
series of photo-plays that are to be pre
sented in Juneau. The "Sea Wolf"
will be repeated tonight and tomorrow
.KM. ?
0
ORPHEUM CHANGE TONIGHT. P
"Drink's Lure" is a strong object 11
esson by the Biograph Co. ?,
"Tempest Tossed" is of a ship
wreck and storm at sea with a pretty p
ittle story interwoven.
"The 13th Man" is a college drama P
)>* the Essanney Co.
"His Honor, the Mayor." with John
Bunny and Flora Finch, is a sure
>nough laugh. h
The above program will be shown j,
:his evening. f(
II
Program for Sunday and Monday: u
Pathe Weekly?showing happenings n
it San Francisco. St. Louis. Prince- b
on. Panama Canal, and other inter
?sting events, closing with "Mutt and
Feff." cailming that traveling in a
'ullman car is not what it is cracked
ip to be.
"In the Grip of a Charlatan," Is a tl
?lever exposure of a modern fad, by n
Ulce Joyce and Tom .Moore, of the K
\alem Co. Y
"The New Day's Dawn" is a good C
tdison drama by Rev. E. B. Stockt -n. M
"The Amateur Ice Man" Is a Lubin a
omedy-drama with Aurthur Johnson
ir.d I ottie Briscoe in leading roles.
"The Stenographer's Troubles" is a
?oar. by the Vitagraph artists, inclur
ag John Bunny and Florence I'urn
>r. ''
Remember five good reels for the
?cgular price. 10 and 25 cents. Cu ac- J
?nunc of not revolving rhe right series K
>f "What Happened ..c Mvy." it will *
lot be shown this week. (*?*)
I. J. LOUSSAC TO THE EFFICIENT
MAN.
To the modern business man a foun- j*
:ain pen of reliable make in his pock- ^
?t is as much a necessity as a typo- j.
writer in his office, or a cash register j
n his store. A fountain pen stands for ?
ffficiency.
Perhaps yours does not suit you.
Come to the Juneau Drug Co., at 107 11
Front street and get one. We carry the
best only?Waterman's, Ideal, the Con
klin Self-Filling and Moore's Non
Leakable. 7-25-tf P
? ? b
CHANGE OF PROGRAM AT n
THE GRAND THEATRE 8
v
n
The following exceptionally good
films will be included in the list for
tonight:
"Pedro's Revenge," a gogd Majes
tic film.
"The Vengeance of Heaven" is a a
two-reel Reliance drama. Some of the d
Reliance company's best performers e
are seen in this good production. t
"Marriage by the Wholesale" is a c
laughable Gaumout comedy which 7
closes an excellent show. Same pro
gram will be shown Sunday. f
MINING MEN GOING
TO KENSINGTON
C
B. B. Nieding. superintendent of the r
the Kensington mines, who has been i
in Juneau for the past few days will
return on the Georgia tomorrow morn
ing. He will be accompanied by A. P.
Anderson and Frederick Lyon, well
known mining engineers for the Unit
ed States Smelting, Refining and Min
ing company.
WANTED TO BORROW?$750. $1.
000 and $1,250 on Juneau real estate; I
phone 1-1-1, or 113 Decker Bldg. 25tf 1
CAILLAUX JUDGE
TO EIGHT DUEL
PARIS, July 25.?A challenge was
dent this morning by Louis Albanel,
presiding judge of the court that is
trying Mme. Calllaux, by Louis Da
gourg, one of the three judges who aro
sitting with him, because the latter,
commenting upon the ruling of the
court admitting the Calllaux letters,
presented by Mme. Queydam, to the
jury, exclaimed, "you dishonor us,
sir."
Albanel named as his seconds in the
duol Gen. Jules Dallteln, former mili
tary governor of Paris, and Amile Bru
neau de Laborl.
Mme. Calllaux Collapses.
Mme. Calllaux collapsed when the
reading of the Mme. Gueydara letters
began. She was carried out of the
court room In an Insensible condition.
The court suspended its proceedings.
M. Laborl read a letter written by
M. Calllaux before his divorce to his
present wife In which he referred to
the happiness that he would feel when
tie would "press a million kisses over
your dear body."
MR. AND MRS. JOHN
M'LAUGHLIN RETURN HOME
Mr. and Mrs. John McLaughlin, who
lave spent the last three months in
Eastern Oregon whither they went for
he benefit of Mr. McLaughlin's health,
?eturned to Juneau on the Al-Kl. Mr.
McLaughlin was greatly Improved by
lis trip. He says ho spent most of the
;ime killing squirrels, and swears that
le killed 2,000. It was the longest va
cation Mr. McLaughlin ever took.
NORTHLAND STEAMSHIP
OFFICIAL IN JUNEAU
H. C. Bradford, general manager of
he Northland Steamship company
vlth headquarters in Seattle, accom
>anled by D. W. Hunt. Alaska agent
vith headquarters in Ketchikan, ar
ived in Juneau on the Al-Ki this morn- *
ng and will remain hero several days <
ooking into conditions and inspect- <
ng the company's property at this
ilace.
JOLD CREEK WATER
CASE PROGRESSING j
?+?
The big Gold creek water case, in
>*hicb the Alaska Juneau Gold Mln
ng company is contending against the
Ibner Mining company and others for
he right of possession to certain wa- t
er rights on upper Gold creek, still 1
as the right of wny in the district '
ourt. The plaintiff is still putting in |
estlmony and will probably get their j
vldence In chief submitted during
he early part of next week. t
(FMOCRATIC PRIMARY t
PASSING HARMONIOUSLY >
The Democratic primary election be
lg held in Jueau today between 12 .
'clock noon and 8 o'clock tonight, is
assing off harmoniously but not with
ut considerable lnterost. At press
ime the indications pointed to the
lection of the Juneau Democratic 1
lub ticket as delegates from Juneau
recinct to the Skagway convention.
? ? ? I
UGH COMING HOME
VIA YUKON RIVER
?+?
c
Advices received at the customs f
ouse state that Collector of Customs a
ohn F. Pugh left St. Michael July 23, (
)r the Yukon and that he was com
lg back to Juneau via the Yukon and t
p river route instead of coming via J
'ome and Seattle. He Is expected f
ack in Juneau August 10. j
? ? ? i
AL-KI ARRIVALS. 1
The Al-Ki, arriving from the South '
its morning, brought the following
amed passengers for Juneau: Mrs.
leeley, C. Wildren, J. C. McBride, Al.
oung. John McLaughlin and wife. W. 1
. Miller, Mrs. F. A. McDonald, Don- <
IcDonald. W. S. Taylor, F. D. Estes, t
nd two steerage. ?
? ? ? t
F. & A. M. MEETING.
* t
Stated communication Mt. Juneau i
odge No. 147, F. & A. M., Oddfellows'
all. eight o'clock Monday evening,
uly 27, 1914. Work in the M. M. de
ree. Sojourning brethren cordially in
lted. E. D. BEATTIE, Secretary.
-25-2t. _ j
GEORGIA ARRIVALS.
The Georgia, arriving from Sitka .
nd wayports, brought the following (
assengers for Juneau: From Sitka?
'om Cannon, James Frecburn. George
luncan, W. R. Rust; from Excursion ]
nlet ? T. J. O'Connel and William
trandt. H
H
NSPECTOR OF HULLS
AND BOILERS AT USHIGAK i
Capt. G. H. Whitney and Peter G. i
'eltret. U. S. inspectors of hulls and
oilers for the district of Alaska are "
ow at Nushlgak on their annual in- (
pectlon tour. They will return home 1
ia Illiamna and should arrive in Ju- 2
eau by the middle of August.
? ? ,
IT SAYS HERE
4- ?
That a drug store can never reach ;
, higher standing than the quality of <
rugs it carries, which means that <
ventually oartlcular people who want
he best, will trade at Britt's Pharma
y. The home of reliable drugs. ?
-25-2t.
1EW YORK MINING !
MAN SAILS FOR SOUTH
W. W. Mein, the well known New :
fork mining man left for the South
in the Princess Sophia yesterday
nornlng after spending several days
n this vicinity and interior points.
? ? ?
"JOY WALK."
Doran's well known and guaran- ;
eed corn salve or liquid corn reme
ly when applied for few nights, will
nake life's walk easy, and life worth
Iving. 7-23-tf.
FOR RENT ? Desirable furnished
'ront room on Seward street, with
t>ath; $15.00 month. Phone 273. 7-26-3t
WILSON TO WAIT
TOR SENATE ACTION
WASHINGTON, July 25.?Presldonl
Wood row Wilson has determined thai
he will not name a successor to Thos
D. Jones, whose nomination for mem
bsrshlp on the Federal bank reserve
board was withdrawn, until the Sen
ate acts upon the nomination or Paul
M. Warburg, of New York.
It Is believed that the criticism ol
the Senate by the Enstern press for
Its nctlon in practically compelling
the withdrawal of Jones' name will
hnve the effect of causing it to confirm
the nomination of Warburg in spite of
tho opposition of Senator James A. O'
Gorman, of New York.
THREE REPUBLICANS
WANT GOVERNORSHIP
NEW YORK, July 25.?Job Hodges,
the lawyer and orator who was the
Republican nominee for Governor at
tho last election, has announced his
candidacy for tho Republican nomina
tion for that ofllce again. He has been
hesitating as to whether to run for
Governor or United States Senator.
There are now three active candi
dates for the Republican nomination
for Governor?District Attorney Chas.
S. Whitman and Job Hedges of New
York City, and Harvey D. Hinman, of
Binghamton. Tho latter has the en
dorsement of Col. Theodore Roose
velt
The New York primary election will
take place in September.
MOYER AGAIN
HEADS EEDERATION
?*?
DENVER, July 25.?Charles H. Aloy
er was yesterday uanimously re-oloct
?d president of the Western Federation
of Miners.
This is regarded as an indication
that there will be an amalgamation
of tho Westorn Federation of Miners
*nd the United Mine Workers of
America?a movement for which is be
ing supported by President Moyer.
WINDHAM BAY NOTES
-*?
WINDHAM, July 23.?James Han
son and his brother, old timers of
IVindham, arrived here last week,
rhey are thinking of sending for their
amilies who are in Tacoma, and mak
ng their home here.
Mr. Duke expects to leave for Seat
;le tonight.
Mr. Mills will leave for Juneau on
he Hegg, after spending one week's
mention here.
The Show Me with Capt. C. W. Fries
irrived in port last night.
Mrs. A. Benson and children, who
lave been visiting Mrs. D. W. Yates,
vill return to Juneau on the Show Me
omorrow.
The Grace E. was in with a Ashing
>arty for Loch Marie. They returned
vith all the Ash they could carry.
ENGLISH INS. COMPANIES
ENTER THE LOCAL FIELD
Agency supplies were received to
lay by the Allen Sattuck Insurance
igency for the Liverpool and London
ind Globe Insurance company, Ltd.,
>f Liverpool, England.
This is one of the strongest and
jest of the big English companies und
ts entrance into the local insurance
leld is but additional evidence that
funeau is looked upon as being penna
lent and substantial and entitled to
he best.
HASONIC PLOT BEING
MADE BEAUTIFUL
???
Masonic Plot of Evergreen cemetery
s being extensively improved. A con
xete curb has been built around the
?ntire plot and concrete pillars rising
it intervals are connected with two
all concrete pillars each of which
>ears emblems of the order.
Gravel walks are being laid out and
he plot is being parked and other
vise beautified.
HOGAN APARTMENTS
ARE BOTH LEASED
Mr. and Mrs. Jamse Hogan have
?ented both of their apartment houses
or a term of years and plan traveling
'or a time. William McBride has leas
ed the larger building for three years
ind a Seattle man has taken a lease
>n the newer and smaller building.
;? 4- 4- 4* 4- 4- -t- -j- <? 4* 4> 4*
F 4?
PERSONAL MENTION
!? 4
l>4>4> + 4* + 4> + 4>+4>4>4> + 4>* +
John McLaughlin and Mrs. McLaugh
in returned to Juneau on the Al-Ki
his morning from an extended visit
n the States.
J. C. M'Bride, president of the C. W.
i'oung company, returned to Juneau
)n the Al-Ki this morning from a
jusiness visit of some weeks in the
states.
James Freeburn, superintendent and
?eneral manager of the Chichagotf
nine, arrived from Sitka today on
:lie Georgia.
W. R. Rust, head of the Tacoma
smelter company, arrived today from
Sitka on the Georgia accompanied by
3. W. Duncan.
SUNSHINE FOR SUNDAY.
Guaranteed by Juneau Drug Co. to
complete your outfit, take along a box
if Augustine and Kyer's Brittle, or
Victoria chocolates. 51.00 a box. Ju
neau Drug Co., 107 Front St., phone
250. Wo deliver. ???
SPECIAL AGENT RETURNS.
Special Agent W. J. Lewis of the
U. S. Land office returned to Juneau
last night from a cruise to the Excur
sion Inlet and Hoonali sections in the
cruising launch Lue with Capt. Plun
ket.
OPERATION AT ST. ANN'S.
This morning Dr. L. O. Sloane per
formed an operation on H. C. Davis,
son of Capt. R. E. Davis superintend
ent of the Tee Harbor Packing com
pany, at St. Ann's hospital.
P. C. OFFICES TO BE
I INTERLINE AGENCIES
t. SEATTLE, July 25.?Harry Brandt,
l general agent of the passenger de
partment'of tho Pacific Coast Steam
! ship company, sailed last night on tho
, City of Seattle for the purpose of os
. tablishing Interline agencies at the va
rious Southeastern Alaskan offices of
the company, giving the agents of the
> company authority to sell through tick
ets to all points in tho United States,
Canada, Hawaii and the Philippines.
SUBORDINATE KILLS
RAILROAD OFFICIAL
POSATELLO. Ida., July 25?D. J.
Mahone, master mechanic for thin di
vision of the Oregon Short Lino was
shot and killed by Frank Madden, fore
man of the company tin shop at this
place, yesterday. The latter then took
his own life. Madden feared that he
was to be discharged on account of
friction with the muster mechanic.
MAN KILLS BROTHER
FOR CHOKING DAUGHTER
?+?
SANTA ANA. Cal., July 25.?John
Alexander, tho California beet grower,
shot and killed his brother, Reese
Alexander, because the latter choked
the former's 16-year-old daughter for
refusing to obey orders that were giv
en her in the kitchen.
TREND OF COMMENT
IS NOW WILSONWARD
Woodrow Wilson, albeit his adminis
tration is traveling u rough road, is not
to be underestimated politically. He
is stronger than his party.
If half the newspapers of the land
are today criticising his policies the
other half are just as earnestly and
aggressively championing him. In the
independent press of the East, it Is
significant to note, more is to be found
in praise of him than of criticism and
censure. So, too, of the magazinos
thnt go in for discussion of politics
and current affairs. The trend of
their comment is Wllsonward.
All this Is the more apparent since
Theodore Roosevelt returned from the
wilds. His arraignment of the admin
istration has not gone unchallenged
and he has become the target of edi
torial Are. Indeed, one might readily
go led tc believe, in following news
paper discussion, that already he was
in the running for President.
The Colombian treaty, which he re
sents and so scathingly denounces,
does not lack defenders.
James T. Dubois, of long State De
partment experience and former con
sul at Bogata?a Roosevelt appointee
?recently gave publicity to his views
in a strong and dignified statement,
meeting attacks upon the treaty and
championing the cause of Colombln on
the ground of equity and and right. His
presentation of the case seemingly has
made a profound Impression in the
East and greatly tempered the criti
cism of the proposed indemnity. And
word comes from Washington that the
President confidently expects ratifi
cation of the treaty in due season.
He will press it upon the Senate in the
same determined manner that he
forced the cnnal tolls repeal act 1
through Congress. I
Woodrow Wilson and Theodore 1
Roosevelt are figuring in the press to i
the exclusion of all other statesmen.
They occupy the center of the stage |
and monopolize the National limelight.
It is exactly the sort of situation that
Theodore Roosevelt craves, and were
Woodrow Wilson the same clever pol
itician he could ask "othlng better In
the way of preliminary settings.
Not a single star of disputing as
cendancy appears on the entire politi
cal firmament on either side, and the
next National convention Is only two
years off.?Seattle Post-Intelligencer.
+ t + + ^ + ?> + + <? + + ?
+ +
+ MARINE NOTES +
+ ?
+ + + + + ** + + + + * + + * +
?+?
Tlio Dolphin left Wrangell at 9 o'
cldck last night and should be here
early this evening.
The Northwestern will arrive from
the Westward and sail South at 6 o'
clock in the morning.
The Admiral Sampson will be due
from the Westward Wednesday morn
ing.
The Alameda sailed from Seattle
last night and should arrive here Mon
day night.
The Spokane, arriving from Sitka,
will sail South tomorrow.
The Humboldt sailed from Seattle
at 2 o'clock this afternoon and should
arrive here Wednesday.
The Admiral Evans sails from Seat
tle tonight and will be due here Wed
nesday.
The City of Seattle, leaving Seattle
tonight, will be due Wednesday.
Th Gorgla will sail for Skagway at
12:01 tomorrow morning.
Tho Al-Ki will sail South from Ju
neau Monday.
William H. Swinehart, a pioneer of
Juneau who was engaged with his
brother, George B. Swinehart in the
publication of a newspaper at Juneau
before the Klondike rush, dropped
dead of heart disease at his Selkirk
farm on the banks of the Yukon river
July 10. Mr. Swinehart has been en
gaged at farming at Selkirk for 16
years. He is survived by his wife and
four daughters.
A new strike has been made on the
Golden Eagle quartz gold mining prop
erty at Port Wells. The new vein
that has been discovered Is about 1500
feet from tho present workings on the
property. It is said to offer more sat
isfactory Indications than the lode
which resulted in the development of
tho property.
CANDY FAMINE IS OVER.
We received yesterday fresh Augus
tine & Kyer's chocolates. Call or
phone 250, Juneau Drug Co., 107 Front
street. Immediate delivery. 21tf.
FOR SALE?Houseboat, 9x16 cabin,
30h.p. engine. Add.P.O.Box 634, Juneau
?7-20-?t.
CARBAJAL ARRESTS
HUERTA'S TREASURER
MEXICO CITY, July 25?As a re
sult of investigations conducted by
Provisional President Carbajal a war
rant was issued yesterday for the ar
rest of Eugenio Parades, Huerta's gen
eral treasurer of the republic, charging
him with the misappropriation of 2,
000,000 pesos of the treasury money.
Carbajal has ordered a general in
vestigation of the finances of the coun
try as a result of the disclosures that
already have been made.
Agree to Formal Conference.
MEXICO CITY, July 23?The rep
resentatives of Carbajal and those of
Carranza havo reached in agreement
to hold a formal conference at Saltillo.
The delegates will have authority to
sign an agreoment for the surrender
of the government over to the Con
titutionalists on condition that there
be a general amnesty for those who
have engaged in armed conflict or rend
ered support or service to those who
have been so engaged or who have
been employed by the government in
any capacity.
Administration Seeking Amnesty.
WASHINGTON, July 25.?The State ,
Department Is redoubling its efforts ,
to convince Carranza that he owes (
the civilized world a pledge that Mex
icy^shall be obtnined by peaceful par
ley rather than taken by battle.
Latin-American "nations are under
stood to be offering immediate rccog- 1
nitlon of the Constitutionalists ns a re- (
ward for peaceful negotiations and the ;
implied threat of boycott if peaceful '
occupation be refused.
Kahn Says 3ryan Did It.
NEW YORK, J.ily 25. ? The New
York Herald quotes Representative '
Julius Kahn, of California, author of '
the resolution asking for information ?
concerning the negotiations and rela- '
lions of the United States government 1
with the Mexican Constitutionalists, <
as saying that the resolution was j
pigeon-holed by the House foreign re- j
latlons committee at the request of
Secretary of State William J. Bryan. '
Ho said that Chairman Henry D. 1
Flood, of the House committee, said <
that the President does not want the 1
question agitated at this time. Kahn <
said he did not mnke the statement
in a spirit of criticism.
"TED" GEARY MAY
BUILD BIG YACHT t
i
SEATTLE. July 25?L. E. ("Ted") ?
Geary, the naval architect who has de- 1
signed more race winning yachts than
any other Pacific coast builder will J
probably receive a commission to
build a 65-foot yacht in Seattle to
compete in the international yacht
regata at Snn Francisco during the
Pannma-Paciflc Exposition next year. P
Whether he gets this commission (
or not Geary says the Sir-Tom, win- s
ner of the international race at this J1
place for the Upton cup, will enter "
the San Francisco races In her class, jj
SEATTLE COMMERCIAL
CLUB MAN COMING s
SEATTLE, July 25?Otto A. Case, r
secretary of the Seattle Commercial '
Club, will sail on the Admiral Evans v
tonight to meet the ofllcers and mem
bers of various Alaska commercial or
ganizations. He will visit all the c
towns along the coast of Alaska.
Mr. Case was formerly county aud- s
itor of King county, Washington, and '
was a candidate for the Progressive -
nomination for Governor in 1912, but I
was defeated by Robert T. Hodge, who. ^
in turn was defeated at the elction by c
Gov. Ernest Lister. f
? , , r
>
L'HAKtrK IINLUMI'iST.BINtJI t
AGAINST OFFICIAL c
?i|i r
SEATTLE, July 25.?Charges of in
competency have been filed against 1
Thomas M. Fisher, of the United
States immigration service at this
place. Fisher hns been connected with
the service for many years. At one
time he was a practicing lawyer at r
Port Townsend. f
ALAMEDA SAILS FOR
NORTH WITH PASSENGERS !
SEATTLE, July 25.?Tho Alameda f
sailed for Alaska last night with the t
following named passengers for Ju- [
neau: Mrs. M. Gates, MJss Parsons, M.
S. Hibbard, Miss I. Jones, Miss L. J
Thompson, G. L. Erickson, J. G. John
son, B. B. Crowenshleld, A. B. Wilson.
Budd Parsons, C. C. Georgenson, J.
Z. Bayless and wife, Miss Pauline
King, Miss A. S. Keating, Margaret
McCammon, George Darner and wife,
R. Williams, F. E. Earnest, S. H. John- <
son, W. H. Quick, Mrs. Rose and one 1
steerage.
DEPUTY SHERIFF ACCIDENTLY
SHOOTS TWO OREGON GIRLS j
TACOMA, July 25.?When alighting \
from an automobile bus yesterday,
Deputy Sheriff George B. Ashby, of ,
this city, accldentl.v dropped a re
volver from his pocket. The revolver
was discharged, killing Miss Viola
Truesdalc, aged 20 year*, and fatally
wounding her sister, Miss Grace 1
Truesdale, aged 17 years. Both girls J
are from Prinovlllc, Oregon.
TWO MORE OF SEATTLE'S
BANKS CONSOLIDATE
SEATTLE, July 25?The German
American nnd the Mercantile National
Banks consolidated yesterday as the
German-American Mercantile Bank.
ENGLISH POLICE CAPTURE
ULSTER AMMUNITION
DURHAM. Englnnd. July 25.?The
locnl police confiscated 150,000 rounds
of ammunition consigned to the Ul
ster volunteer force at Belfast.
Russia Will Fight To
Protect Servian Autonomy
It***************
+ +
+ SERVIAN GOVERNMENT +
+ TO EVACUATE CAPITAL *
?fr +
* LONDON, July 25. ? A dls- +
* patch at the foreign ofllce from *
?fr Vienna says the Servian gov- *
?> ernment is preparing to evac- +
+ uate Belgrade, the National *
?{? capital. +
?i* +
?> >!? ?> ? -> -J- ?{? ?{? ? + ? 4?
? ?
ST. PETERSBURG, July 25.? The
rapidly developing crisis between Au
stria-Hungary and Servla became so
serious this afternoon that orders were
Issued looking to the Immediate mob
ilization of the Russian army. It was
announced to the diplomatic represen
tatives of the Powers here that Rus
sia will go to war rather than permit
the downfall of Servla.
Austria Preparing for War.
VIENNA, July 25. ? Austrian and
Hungrian officers of the reserves who
are living abroad have all been notified
to be in readiness to join their regi
ments 'mmediately.
Everywhere there are signs that the
Nation is preparing for war.
Regiments are being recruited to
their full strength, and ammunition is
being distributed.
While the army has not been mo
bilized on the frontier, many regiments
ire being transferred to points near
the border.
Powers All Get Notice.
PARIS. July 25.?Austria-Hungary
ins notified all the Powers of Europe
>f its peremptory demands upon Ser
ria to punish the assassin of Archduke
?"ran-/. Ferdinand and those who con
spired with the assassin.
Russia Counsels Against Haste.
ST. PETERSBURG. July 25.?There
? as an oxtradordinary conference of
:he Ministerial Council last night to
:onslder the situation produced by the
lemand of Austria that Servla punish
!ho slayer:; of Grand Duke Franz Fer
lfnand. The result of the conference
las been that Russia's influence is bo
ng exerted to prevent hasty action.
There has been no intimation that
Russia expectB to participate nl the
:roubIe in any way beyond trying to
lelay action so that the differences
tnay be adjusted without war or un
iuo excitement.
Aunstrlan Minister Gets Orders.
VIENNA, July 25. ? The Austro
Rungarian minister at Belgrade has
seen notified to leave the Servian capi
at for his home at 5 o'clock tonight
jnkfcs Servia bas not notified him by
hat time that she will comply with
he demands of Austria's notes.
if AY PROSECUTE CLAFLIN
FOR HAVING BANK
NEW YORK. July 25. ? Talk of
rosecuting the officials of the H. B.
'laflin company for violating the
Itate banking act has been revived,
t has been shown that the company
ad large accounts that were kept for
ountry merchants, subject to draft at
ny time, upon the balances of which
aterest was paid at the rate of 4V4
er cent. Several Alabama and Mls
issippi mercantile houses had from
4500 to $20,000 each with the com
any on that basis. Claflin attorneys
asist that the banking laws were not
iolated by this business practice.
Claflin Says Notes Are Regular.
John Claflin has again denied the
onstantjy arising rumor that he ne
gotiated notes of any of the branch
tores of the New York house except
hose of which it was the sole owner.
Several millions of the notes of the
?ranch stores were made at their New
fork offices without the knowledge
if the local managers. So far invest!
ration has corroborated the state
nent of John Claflin that he or NeNw
fork company, for the benefit of which
he notes were issued, owned all the
apital stock of tho note Issuing com
lanies.
THE "HEAR" SAILS TO
RELIEVE KARLUK CREW
NOME, July 25.?The United States
evenue cutter Bear sailed yesterday
or Wrangell Island to relieve the ma
ooned crew of th Karluk, Stefans
on's exploration vessel. Capt. Bart
ett of the Karluk left on the ship. He
s taking dogs and equipment for a
lash over the ice that will be neces
inrv unless conditions change from
hose obtaining when the whaler Kit
lassed the island a few weeks ago.
The Bear will stop at Point Barrow
m the way to Wrangell Island.
1EDFIELD STILL FIGHTS
FOR THAT WIRE DRAG
WASHINGTON. July 25.?Secretary
if Commerce William C. Redfield has
?efused to take the action of the con
'erees in eliminating the approprla
ion for a wire drag from the civil
tundry bill as final. He has started
i new campaign to have the appropria
ion incorporated in one of the defi
ciency bills, and hopes to get at least
*30,000.
STANDARD OIL CUTS
REFINED OIL PRICE
NEW YORK. July 25. ? Standard
Oil of New York announced a reduc
tion of 15 points, in the price of all
grades of refined oil for export. This
makes total reduction of 50 points
since October, 1913.
SENATORS NOT INVOLVED
IN MINE PROMOTION
WASHINGTON. July 25.?The Sen
ate committee that has been investi
gating exploitation of a North Caro
lina gold mine on Senate stationery
clears Senators of any wrong doing.
PRESIDENT SENDS BRYAN'S
PEACE TREATIES TO SENATE
WASHINGTON, July 25.?President
Wood row Wilson yesterday afternoon
sent Bryan's peace treaties with 20
Nations to the United States Senate.

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