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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, July 30, 1914, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. IV., NO. 530. JUNEAU, ALASKA, THURSDAY, JULY 30. 1914. PRICE, TEN CENTS
GERMANY ASKS RUSSIA
FOR EXPLANATION
* BERLIN, July 30.?The Foreign
Office tonight authorized the fol
lowing statement:
Germany has taken steps with
St Petersburg. Paris and other
European capitals within the past
hour the results of which will de
termine the Issue of peace or
war."
BERLIN, July 30. ? The note
sent by Germany to Russia gives
the latter 24 hours to explain the
meaning of the mobilization of her
army.
In the meantime preparatory to
the mobilizing of German army
orders have been Issued that no
leaves of absence will be granted
to any army officer.
The railroad batallions have
been given special orders.
RUSSIA WILL NOT STOP.
St. Petersburg, July 30.?Orders
for the mobilization of the Rus
sian army have gone too far to be
stopped now.
This Is the answer of Russian
Foreign Minister Sazonoff to the
protest of the German Ambassa
dor.
LONDON, July 30. ? Germany
has demanded that Russia explain
the mobilization of her army on
the Austrian frontier.
GEN. W. L. DIST1N IS
VISITING IN CHICAGO
Letters received by Juneau friends
from Gen. W. L. Dlstln, formerly Sur
veyor-General and acting Secretary of
the Territory of Alaska, conveys the
Information that he is at Chicago, and
having a thoroughly enjoyable time.
Gen. Distin says he would like to re
turn to Juneau, and expecvts to do so
before long, but before doing so he
intended to return to New York where
he would be for several weeks.
CANADIAN PAPER ON
WAVING OF FLAG
Wood row Wilson's brief oration on
the flag, its uses. its dignity, and its
meaning, is one of the most telling and
inspiring things ever utteder by a man
in the Presidential chair. It is a de
claration that will love long after Mr.
Wilson has passed to his fathers.
President Wilson's remarks should
be applicable not only to the particu
lar flag which he had in mind, but
to all flags and. let us hope, most of
all to our own revered Union Jack:
'This flag Is henceforth to stand for
self-possession, for dignity, for the as
sertion of the right of one nation to
serve the other nations of the world?
an emblem that will not condescend
to be used for purposes of aggression
and self-aggrandizement; that is too
great to be debased by selfishness;
that has vindicated its right to be hon
ored by all nations of the world and
feared by none who do righteousness."
We have been wont to scorn the
flag wavers of the United States, but.
goodness knows, we have far too many
flag Haunters in Canada. There have
been people, indeed, shortsighted
enough to advise 'hat Canadians should
enter into rivalry with the insane flag
wavers of the republic.
Sometimes we have been Inclined
to believe the man who most parades
his flag, who waves it on any and
every occasion, is among the least loy
al to that flag. We get the suspicion
that he is trying to hide something be
neath the folds of his flag.
The best lover of the flag is he who
regards it as too sacred to be lightly
used, who attaches to it too much dig
nity and respect to permit it to be
simply a red rag to a bull.
President Wilson's oration on the
flag might, with advantage to Interna
tional good will, be incorporated in
the school readers of both the United
States and Canada. ? Ottawa Fress
Press.'
SEATTLE MAN BOOSTS
HAINES FOR FARMING
"Farming and stock-raising condi
tions in Alaska are excellent," said
Henry Morgan yesterday, for 16 years
a rose florist in Seattle, who has Just
returned from a four-weeks' trip in
Alaska. While in the North, Morgan
visited Sitka, Juneau. Ketchikan and
Haines. He plans to settle in Haines
and raise stock and produce.
'There are several good salleys near
Haines." Morgan declared. "The tem
perature is warmer in summer than
in Seattle. One man made $1,500 on
one acre of strawberries last fall.
'There is ever}' opportunity to make
money in farming, for Juneau alone
will take all that a man can raise. The
soil of the valley land is silt, and the
upland is a rich, loamy, black soil."?
Seattle Sun.
Norman D. Macaulay, the Northern
pioneer, will establish his fox farm at
Snag, on the upper reaches of the
White river. He has 60 foxes already
in capltivity?some of them of great
value. Mr. Macaulay will use fox
hounds in hunting the foxes to their
holes, an innovation in Northern fox
catching.
'
Special sale on. Sterling silver
spoons and white and gold Austrian
china. I. J. Sharick. 7-9-tf.
THE WEATHER TODAY.
Twenty-four hours ending at 3 p. in.:
Maximum?60.
Minimum?<6.
Cloudy; Rain.
Precipitation?.10.
GERMANY AND
ERANCE PREPARE
BERLIN, July 30.?Reserve offi
cers of the guards and army corps
whose residences and headquar
ters are In Berlin have received
orders to mobilize.
Rumors are In circulation that
the First Army corps of the Im
perial defense has been ordered to
mobilize.
COUNCIL OF EMPIRE SUM
MONED.
Behlin, July 30.?A call has been
issued for a session of the Fed
eral council composed of the rep
resentatives of the various States
of the German Empire.
FRENCH GET READY,
Paris, July 30.?Every prepara
tion short of actual mobilization
of the army is being made for
war by the French government.
Railroads are guarded by troops,
and cars are assembled ni yards
where they will be convenient
for making into troop trains.
Students Ordered Out of Germany.
LONDON. July 30.?All foreign pu
pils In the bigger schools of Germany
have been informed that they must
leave Germany immediately.
Prepare English Fleet.
VALETTA. Malta. July 30.?Prepar
ations have been under way through
out the night to put the British garri
son and British Mediterranean fleet
in condition for any emergency.
Italy Moves for Secrecy.
ROME. July 30.? The government
has issued an order prohibiting the
publication of news concerning the
military establishment of the govern
ment including both the army and
navy.
Asiatic Fleets Momllize.
SHANGHAI, July 30.?The British
fleet of the Far East is mobilizing at
Weihalwel.
The German fleet is mobilizing at
Tsingao.
Belgium Ready.
BRUSSELS. July 30. ? More than
100.000 men are armed, equipped and
ready for war in Belgium.
Spain Prepares Navy.
GIBRALTAR. July 30.?Spain has
ordered every available warship of
that country to assemble on the Med
iterranean.
SOUTHERN RAILROAD MAN
ENTHUSIASTIC OVER ALASKA
+
George D. Hunter, general freight
and passenger agent of the Texas Pa
cific railroad with headquarters in Dal
las. Texas, was among the round trip
passengers aboard the Spokane on the
last voyage of that vessel. He was ac
companied on the journey by Mrs.
Hunter. They are both enthralled
with the Northland and speak in en
thusiastic terms of the wonderful
scenic beauty and great natural re
sources. The mountains are particu
'arly appealing, they said, and invite
a second visit to the country. Mr.
Hunter said that he very much regret
ted that he could not stop over in Ju
neau and give another week to South
eastern Alaska.
? ? ? ?
ARCTIC BROTHERHOOD
POSTPONES MEETINGS
The Inability of Juneau Camp No.
31 to secure a suitable place In which
to meet this week has resulted in the
postponement of the meeting that was
to take place until satisfactory ar
rangements can be made. As soon as
'he new Moose hall shall have been
completed the Arctic Brotherhood ex
pect to hold meetings in it.
WRANGELL ELECTS
DEMOCRATIC DELEGATES
Wrangell Democrats elected E. P.
Lynch. H. J. Wallace and C. M. Coult
er to be delegates to the Democratic
convention that has been called to
convene at Skagway next week.
E. P. Lynch was chairman of the
election board at the primary and
Paul F. Stanhope, editor of the Wran
gell Sentinel, was secretary.
MISS WALSH GOES TO WRANGELL
Miss Walsh, one of the popular
nurses of St. Ann's hospital left on
the Humboldt last night for Wran
gell In answer to a call cabled to SL
Ann's for a trained nurse to wait on
Mrs. McCormick, wife of the promin
ent merchant. P. C. McCormick, who
's reported as ill.
CERTIFICATES FOR JUNEAU
DELEGATES MAILED YESTERDAY
??>?
John J. Reagan, of the primary elec
tion board yesterday mailed certifi
cates of election to those elected at
Saturday's Democratic primary in- Ju
neau, to be delegates from Juneau to
the Skagway convention.
Steve Ragan, well known Haines at
torney. returned to Juneau on the
Humboldt this morning, bringing a bo
quet of rich red poppies from his home
town.
NEW PASTOR fOR
CATHOLIC CHURCH
According to a late Spokane news*
paper Rev. Father A. R. Drathman 1b
to be succeeded as pastor of the Cath
olic church at this place by Rev. Fath
er James Kennelly, for 12 years con
nected with Gonzaga University, the
Catholic Institution for higher educa
tion at the metropolis of Washington
State's Inland Empire.
The article follows:
"Word received last night from the
western province of the Jesuit order
appoints the Rev. Father James Ken
nelly, for yearB prefect of Gonzaga
University, to the position of pastor
of the church at Juneau, Alaska. In
the same communication the Rev.
Father George M. Bailey Is ordered
to accompany Father Kennelly to
Alaska, and assist him In the erection
of a parish church at Juneau.
"Father Kennelly spent 12 years at
Gonzaga. Father Balloy was at Gon
zaga for seven years, and recently re-1
turned to the work here after an ab
sence of five years In Europe. Both
men will leave for Alaska August 5."
Chester Murphy, who with his fath
er has a contract to build the service
buildings at the Jualln mine, knows
Father Kennelly, of Gonzaga Univer
sity, where he received his college
training. Ho says no man connected
with that Institution would be missed
more than he will be whon he leaves
there. He was prefect of discipline,
and Mr. Murphy says all the young
men at the university love him. Mr.
Murphy also was a student in his
school days under Father A. R. Drath
man. of Juneau, and agrees with the
sentiment at this place that the only
unfavorable thing In connection with
the Spokane story is the Intimation
that It contains that Father Drathman
may be transferred from this field.
Father Drathman has endearod him
self to a wide circle of friends outside
of his church as well as In it since
coming to Juneau.
CURACAO WAS
FLOATED YESTERDAY
SEATTLE, July 30.?Word was re
ceived here this morning that the Cu
racao was floated yesterdky. She
will be towed to Seattle as soon as she
can be patched up foy the trip.
CARNIVAL SPIRIT
AT FAIRBANKS
Confettl-Btrewn walks and streets,
flags and bunting still flying, an oc
casional masker st'll in evldeuce
reluctant to allow yesterday to end,
hore and thero a place of business
which forgot to open its doors this
morning?all go to mark the close or
finish of the greatest celebration of
Native Son's day, Fairbanks ever saw.
The greatest procession over, the
greatest show our youngsters ever
saw and a revival of the spirit which
has made Fairbanks the best town in
Alaska and which spirit it was feared
had almost perished from our camp.
It's a poor heart which never re
joices. and there are many staunch
hearts still with us. All work and
no play tends to retrogression, and it
is better to laugh than to cry. It is
only a matter of a few years until the
Native Sons and Daughters will be
old enough to take up the entire man
agement of their annual festival and
furnish the celebration spirit as only
the young can furnish it, and in the
meantime it is good to know that
there are enough old boys and girls
who still have a celebration in them to
keep the spirit of fun going until their
successors can take over the whole
Job.
Therels a kick or two left in th'e
Old Town yet?Fairbanks News-Min
er.
FAIRBANKS MEN
HAVE BIG FOX FARM
?+?
What 1b believed will be the larg
est fox corral in the country is now
being built by Vachon Brothers at
Tolovana, who already have about 50
foxes in captivity.
Peter Vachon. one of the members
of the Arm, returned from Tolovana
last Monday on the steamer Alaska,
and he says the big corral now be
ing constructed will have a capacity
of 120 foxes. The corral will be, when
completed. 880 feet long and 16S feet
in width. It will be divided into 40
pens, each 15 by 20 feet. The new
corral will cost between $4,000 and
$5,000.
To begin with, there will be a pair
of foxes In each of the large pens, and
smaller ones will be used for those
that will be isolated at various times.
Vachon Brothers expect to increase
the number of their foxes until the
new corral Is filled.?Fairbanks Citi
zen.
STANDARD OIL COMPANY
CUTS WRANGELL PRICES
The Standard Oil Company has an
nounced another reduction in the price
of their Naptha and gasoline. Naptha
now sells at 16% cents in bulk,
and 23 cents in cases; gasoline 17%
cents in bulk and 24 cents In cases.
This is a drop of a half cent per gal
lon In both kinds of oil. The Stand
ard Oil Company are certainly trying
to do their best for the fishermen and
others. Ever since they came to Wran
gel! have made steady reductions in
all kinds of oil. The sale of the lo
! cal agengy Is around 1500 gallons per
day and is steadily on the increase as
the various outsiders learn that they
can get oil so cheap in Wrangell.?
Wrangell Sentinel.
POWERS WORK
FOR PEACE
+ + + 4, + + + + + + 'l, + + + +
+ +
+ ENGLAND GIVES UP +
4> PEACE STRUGGLE *
? *
4? London, July 30.?Giving up +
4* the strugglo that the dlplomata *
4? have been making for peace, ?
+ the British government and +
4? army have begun the prepara- 4*
4? tlons of troops for war tonight 4
4? 4*
* ????? + + * + +'4 4-4 + +
* * * * * * 4.4.4.4.4.4.4.4.4.4.
4. * 4.
ENGLAND TO BACK FRANCE 4
* 4*
+ LONDON. July 30. ? The 4?
4? Times this morning Indicates 4*
+ clearly that Great Britain will 4*
4* follow France In the event of 4
4? her entrance Into war with *
4- Germany. In Its leading editor- 4>
4? lal It says: 41
4? "England will not see Franco 4
+ crushed by Germany, nor must 4?
4? the Belgian frontier be men- 4
4? need." ?
4? The Times says the situation 4
4? confronting Europe Is ono of 4>
4* supreme gravity, though hopo 4
+ of peace will not be abandon- 4
4? ed as long as the desire for It 4>
4* comes from so many capitals. '4?
4? "However," It adds, "how war *
* Involving other countries than 4>
4- those already engaged can be 4>
4* averted Is not apparent this 4
4? morning." <?
+ 4
4- 4- 4- 4- 4- 4- 4- 4" 4- 4- 4- 4- 4- 4- ?
FRANCIS JOSEPH PLEADS
WITH NICHOLAS.
St Petersbrug.June 30. ? Tho
Novoe Vremya newspaper in an
extra issued before noon today
says Emperor Francis Joseph of
Austria has addressed a personal
tetter to Czar Nicholas which Is
likely to have an important influ
ence on the crisis In Europe.
Servia To Remain Whole.
POTTSDAM. Germany, July 30.
?Emperor William Is said to
have sent telegrams to all foreign
capitals lust night pledging that
the territorial Integrity of Servia
be protected at all hazzards and
without regard to the result of
war between that country and
Austria, if Czar Nicholas would
agree to localize tho war to the 2
countries involved at the present
time.
Austria May Walt.
BERLIN. July 30. ?It Is believed
here that the Emperor has prevailed
upon the Austrian government to de
lay invasion of Servia until he gives
the word. Never before has Germany
and its Emperor labored so hard in
behalf of peace as during the last 48
hours. The apparent determination
of the Russian government to force a
complete back down by the trlpple al
ltanco or an Europenn war has mnde
the task of the Emperor to maintain
the National dignity without involving
his country and, possibly, France,
Great Britain and Italy extremely diffi
cult.
DUTCH TO SPEND
MONEY IN CALIFORNIA
LOS ANGELES. July 30?The Roy
al Dutch-Shell Oil Co. is to spend $7.
500,000 In developing its California oil
properties.
JUNEAU COMPANY MAY
GET WRANGELL MINE
?*?
If the expert Investigation that la
now going on of the mines in the
Groundhog Basin is of a favorable na
ture the properties will be taken over
by the Alaska Gastineau Mining Co.,
in the next few months and unlimited
capital furnished for their develop
ment.
The properties belong to Mr. W. D.
Grant and considerable work has been
done on them already. A. D. Nash,
consulting engineer for the above
company has been on the ground for
some time, and after being in Wran
gell for a few days will return there to
make a thorough and comprehensive
examination of these claims for his
company.
The opening up and working of these
claimR means much to this section of
the country for there aro mountains
of low grade ore In addition to the
higher grades, that can be profitably
worked once a company with suffi
cient capital takes hold and opens this
rich section of the country. And if
the Alaska Gastineau takes hold of
them it will mean that they will be
opened up in the near future, but
much remains on the report that Mr.
Nash makes of the ground whether
that company will take hold of them
or not, but It is the under feeling of
all concerned that the report will be
very favorable and beftfre many
months the Groundhog Badln will be
ono of the rich mining sections of
Southeastern Alaska.?Wrangell Sen
tinel.
THE CHEAPEST WAY
to see a good show is to visit the Or
pheum tonight or tomorrow night and
see the clever Pathe Co. in the "Cheap
est Way," also a battle in the hills by
the Kalem Co., in the "Mission of a
Bullet," and last, but not least the pop
ular artists Courtenay Foote. Rose
mary Theby and other Vitagraph play
ers in the special two-reel feature
"The Web." Remember our prices
are 10 and 25 cents. (???)
HUERTA LEAVES TOR
SPAIN SUNDAY
KINGSTON, Jamaica, July 30. -
Gen. Huerta will sail Sunday for Spall
where ho will reside In the future. H<
has chartered the steamship Patla tc
convey himself, family and friends.
Huerta'a Concessions Not Qood.
NEW YORK, July 30.?A Washing
ton special to Now York Times sayt
the United States government will nol
recognize the validity of any conces
slons In Mexico granted by the Huer
ta government, and has so Informed
representatives of foreign Nations.
Llnd Gets Good Pay.
BOSTON, July 30.?According to
Washington advices to loc^l newspa
pers John Llnd received $25,000 for
his nine months in Mexico, of which
{14,000 was salary and the balance ex
penses.
ALASKA SEAL SKINS
SEIZED AT SEATTLE
?+?
SEATTLE, July 30.?Under orders
from Collector of Customs P. C. Har
per 11 seal skins were seized by in
spectors ni the service yesterday. They
were consigned from'James Conner,
of Nome, to Now York and were en
routo through Seattle from the North
ern town.
MIDDLE WESTERN
BUSINESS EXPANDS
NEW i'ORK, July 30.?A Chicago
dispatch says that business, big and
little, in the Middle West has begun
to expand. Money is circulating more
freely, jobs are being filled, and large
transactions that have hung Are for
months are boing closed. Bumper
crops are reflected through car manu
facturers and railways increasing op
erating forces. Three thousand cars
of wheat have reached Chicago in a
week, largest receipts in a decade.
Pittsburgh Gets Orders.
PITTSBURGH, July 30.? Locomo
tlvo and steel plants at Pittsburgh
have recently received orders which
will give employment to thousands of
men.
OKLAHOMA ATTACKS
TWO OIL COMPANIES
OKLAHOMA, July 30. ? Attorney
General Charles West, of Oklahoma,
will ask for receivers for the propert
ies of the Texas Co. and the Producers'
Oil Co. in this state, under tho law
which forbids one corporation from
purchasing a controlling interest in
another engaged In the same busi
ness.
UNITED STATES RICHEST
NATION IN WORLD
LONDON. July 30. ? Tho London
Statits says the wealth of the four
great nations of the world now stands
as follows:
United States, $135,000,000,000.
Great Britain, $75,000,000,000.
Fronce, $50,000,000,000.
Germany, $49,000,000,000.
NAME RECEIVES FOR
ARKANSAS RAILROAD
?+?
LITTLE ROCK, Ark., 30.?Receivers
have been named for tho Kansas City
&. Memphis railroad, 73 miles long,
capitalized at $6,000,000 and running
through northwest Arkansas. The
road is unable to meet all its charges.
KANSAS WANTS
BIG WHEAT PRICE
CHICAGO, July 30.?W. H. Mitchell,
National Vice-President of the Farm
ers' Society of Equity, says the Kan
sas farmers will hold back 100,000,000
of their 193,000,000 bushel of wheat
this year In a campaign for $1 wheat.
BRAZIL ABOUT TO
PLACE THAT LOAN
NEW YORK, July 30.?A London
special says that It Is now believed
probable that a contract for the Brazil
ian government loan for $75,000,000
will be signed In n few days.
Argentine May Borrow $400,000,000.
NEW YORK, July 30.?Buenos Ay
res special says Argentine minister
of finance is considering a 0100,000,000
loan to aid agriculture and stock
breeding.
MASSACHUSETTS STILL
WANTS THAT RAILROAD
?4*?
NEW YORK, July 30.?Globe Wash
ington dispatch says that if the Fed
eral Department of Justice presses the
dissolution suit against New Haven
Massachusetts-is like ly to intervene
to ask the court to preserve Its right
to buy the Boston & Maine stock. Un
der a Massachusetts statute the State
reserves the right to purchase rail
roads within its border.
INSURANCE MAN FOR
NATIONAL CONTROl
NEW YORK,.July 30. ? Presiden
Kingsley of the New York Life Insur
ance Co. in explaining his plan for tbi
Federal control of the insurance say
the saving In taxation^alone to all ir
surance companies in the Unite
. States would be $10,000,000 a year.
, When a man has really learned th
i art of talking well he doesn't practlt
it much.?Albany Journal,
RUSSIA STANDS BY
SERVIA TO THE END
?+?
?+++++++?+??*?++*
?fr +
" + AUSTRIA AND RU8SIA +
1 * SEVER RELATIONS +
+ ?? +
+ LONDON, July 30. ? The *
+ Times this morning says that +
1 +dlplomatlc intercourse between -fr
? Russia and Austria was bus- *
?pended yesterday. +
? * * + * * * * * + * * + + + ?
LONDON, July 30.?Russia's resolu
tion to stand by Servla all through
her international troubles regardless
of consequences seems to be fixed be
yond the possibility of change. The
sentiment of the country is behind the
stand the government has taken, and
today that is the only country in Eu
rope outside of the combatants where
there is none to work for peace. The
people are taking up arms with enthus
iasm, and soldiers are chanting pa
triotic and religious anthems every
where.
Russia Has 1,300,000 Under Arms.
ST. PETERSBURG, July 30?The
ukase of the Czar issued lastnight call
ing out the first and second reserves
and large numbers of the third reserv
es is being responded to with alacrity.
Troops are mobilizing throughout
Russia in Europe, and all railroad ,
tracks are filled to capacity with ,
trains, moving toward the Austrian ,
border. Four whole army corps have ,
been thrown into the districts adjoin
ing the Austrian frontier, and thous
ands are massing at stragetic points
between St. Petersburg and Warsaw
and the German boundary.
Calculations made at the War Office
today disclosed that more than 1,300,- ,
000 men will be under arms before
midnight, and equipped to enter bat
tle. The mobilization is being extend
ed to the remote sections of the coun- ,
try with all possible rapidity. No one
here feels that there is any longer
any question of doubt about the war.
It is taken for granted that Russia Is ,
about to engage in the most serious
war from a national standpoint in the
history of the country.
Demonstration for Servla.
MOSCOW, Russia, July 30. ? There
was a tromondous demonstration in ,
behalf of Sorvia hero last night. This ,
ancient capital of the Slavs was stirred ,
through and through. The streets ,
wore filled with religion-frenzied peas- j
ants and tradesmen and students de- ,
manding wnr against Austria and all ,
the enmies of the Imperial church and
the Slav race. ,
RUSSIA IS AFTER .
AMERICAN MONEY
j
ST. PETERSBURG, July 30.?Rus- ,
sia is formulating plans to facilitate ]
the emigration of her surplus millions |
to countries other than those In Eu- ;
rope. In 1913 the 281,000 Russian emi
grants to America remitted to the
mother country at least J50.000.000.
This method of getting money is at
tractive to the government.
KANSAS CITY MEN
FOR PRESIDENT'S BILL
4? ?
WASHINGTON, July 30. ? Kansas
City business men who called on
President Woodrow Wilson filed sev
eral objections to the Clayton bill as
it passed the House, but the measure
as reported to the Senate will be sat
isfactory to them.
OVERLAND PLANT TO
BE WORLD'S LARGEST
?'*?
TOLEDO, O., July 30. ? Enlarge
ments when completed will make the
Willys-Overland plant at Toledo the
largest automobile factory In the
world, consisting of 64 buildings, con
taining floor space of over 60 acres.
ARMOURS BUY MANY
CATTLE IN AUSTRALIA
NEW YORK, July 30.?A Melbourne
special asserts that Armour & Co. are
now buying cattle extensively in Aus
i tralia. one agent alone having sold
them 12,000 head in the past two
months.
PHILADELPHIA STOCK EX
CHANGE SEAT GOES CHEAP
PHILADELPHIA, July 30.?A seat
. in the stock exchange was sold for $4,
. 000, a decline of $1100 since last Jan
j uary.
i CONDENSED MILK .MAN
t LEAVES ENORMOUS ESTATE
?4-?
> NEW YORK, July 30.?Matthew C.
. D. Borden left a net estate of $6,467,
386. Dr. Matthew S. Borden, a son,
does not share In It.
- AMERICA GETS MOST
t OF ITALIAN EMIGRANTS
B ROME, July 30.?During the first
three months of 1914, 60,511 emigrants
{ left Italy, of whom 45,238 went to the
(j United States.
There are some men who have sc
e much confidence in themselves thai
:e they really believe they can unscrev
the unscrutable.?New Orleans States
AUSTRIA IS TRYING
TO CROSS DANUBE
LONDON, July 30?The Servian
legation here received a bulletin
this afternoon that Auatrlans are
attempting to cross the Danube
20 miles east of Belgrade, and that
an artillery engagement Is In pro
gress there.
8ERVIA NO INVADED.
It Is not believed here or at
Paris that Austrian troops have
yet crossed the Danube, and no
credence is placed in the report
that Belgrade has fallen.
FIRST IMPORTANT ENGAGE
MENT YESTERDAY.
Vienna, July 30.?The first Im
portant fighting of the war be
tween Austria and Servla occurred
before Belgrade last night. No
statement has been given out of
the losses or results. All press
dispatches are strictly censored.
Belgrade Was Bombarded.
ST. PETERSBURG, July 30.?A dis
patch from Belgrade say8 the capital
sutalned a furious bombardment from
across the river yesterday evening for
several hours. To save the city from
falling Into the hands of the enemy,
the bridge across the river was blown
up.
Austrian monitors are stationed In
the river both above and below Bel
grade.
Austria Captures Servian Steamers.
VIENNA, July 30.?During the night
the Austrlans captured two Servian
steamers laden with mines and ammu
nition. Only a few prisoners of war
ivore taken with the vessels.
Greece Hears of Bombardment.
ATHENS, July 30. ? The Servian
legation here received a telegram from
NIsh saying that Belgrade was bom
barded last night and sustained great
damage. Shells fell all over the city.
The Franco-Servian bank was a par
ticular target, apparently for the Aus
trian gunners, and was struck several
times.
Report Belgrade Fallen.
LONDON, July 30.?Vienna dispatch
es received last night says that Bel
grade was occupied late last night by
Austrian troops following a severe
bombardment.
Dlffisulty with News.
LONDON, July 30.?The strict cen
sorship over press dispatches from
many of the European capitals Is hin
ioring newspaper men In handling the
lews of tho war situation. The opln
on prevails here that there has been
nuch more fighting than people know'
ibout.
WILSON CARELESS OF
PINCHOT'S OPPOSITION
WASHINGTON, July 30.?^though
President Woodrow Wilson Is aware
:hnt Secretary of the Interior Pranklln
fC. Lane's conservation program Is op
posed by Gilford Plnchot and other
members of the National Conservation
Association, he is strongly* in favor of
the bill In Congress that is designed
to carry it into effect, and believes
it protects the interests of the national
government so far as water power
rights are concerned.
SENATE MAY CONFIRM
WARBURG NOMINATION
?+?
WASHINGTON, July 30?It is con
ceded that tho strength of Paul M.
Warburg is growing in the Senate and
it is believed he will be' confirmed if
ho appears beforo tho committee. It
also Is said that he has consonted to
answer all questions put to him.
REDFIELD AGAIN SPEAKS
FOR ALASKA NAVIGATION
YASH1NGTON, July 30?Secretary
of Commerce William C. Redfleld,
writing to Senator Miles Polndoxter,
of Washington, said:
"I wonder at the mental attltudo
towards Alaska of those members of
the Senate and House who have re
fused the needed appropriation for tho
aid of navigation in the Alaska North
ern Pacific waters."
POPULATION CONTINUES
TO GROW RAPIDLY
WASHINGTON, July 30?The pop
ulation of the United States on July 1,
1914, was 109,021,992, according to the
government estimates, a gain of more
than 7,000,000 since the 1910 census.
CHINA WOULD LIKE
SOME AMERICAN CASH
WASHINGTON, July 30.?The State
Department has recently been inform
ed by China that che would like to
obtain one loan from American bank
ers of $40,000,000 for the redemption
of outstanding loans and another of
$30,000,000 for the establishment of
a national bank.
ONLY ONE OUTSIDER IS
AT FRAME CONVENTION
?*?
VALDEZ, July 30.?The Frame con
vention organized here this morning.
E. C. Austin, of Ketchikan, is the only
outsider here. All the others are
Framei^es at Valdez. They will call
i themselves "Progressive Democrats,"
: and nominate Wickersham for Dele
r gate. A full Legislative ticket will
? be named.

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