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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, July 31, 1914, Image 1

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ALASKA HISTORICAL 800.
(114-14) & MUSEUM
? < mta f.-^ISHOLM
THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
? ' ? ? , ? ? ?? , i 11
VOL. IV., NO. 631. JUNEAU, ALASKA, FRIDAY, JULY 31, 1914. ____ PRICE, TEN CENTS
EUROPEAN WAR PRODUCES CRISIS IN FINANCIAL WORLD
4USTRIANS AND SERVIANS
FIGHTING ON FRONTIER
LONDON*. July Jfl.?Dispatches re
ceived this afternoon from Nish con
tain fragmentary accounts of terrific
fighting along the River Drix. The
losses to both the Austrians and Serv-{
ians have been terrlfllc. Reports have
been received from the interior of Au-:
stria that train load after train load
of dead and wounded are being taken
to the large hospitals of the cities. j
Montenegrins Capture Austrian Sea
port.
LONDON*. July 31.?The Montene
grins during the night occupied Cat
taro. the seaport of the Austrian pro-1
vince of Dalmatia. There was very
little fighting.
Cattaro is about 60 miles from Cet
tinge, capital of Montenegro, and con
nected with that place by an automo
. bile road. It Is a town of 3.000 inhab
itants. and one of the most picturesque
cities on the shore of the Adriatic sea.
Americans Rushing Home.
LONDON. July 31.?The Hamburg
American Steamship company has not
ified 800 returning Americans who had
secured cabin passage on the Impera
tor. whose sailing has been cancelled,
that they must make their own ar
rangements for passage home.
Americans are beseiging all steam
ship offices for accommodations home.
Germany Forbids Exports.
BERLIN*. July 31.?The German Fed
eral Council, consisting of representa
tives of the various German States, to
day Issued a decree forbidding the ex
portation of grain, coal oil and food
stuffs of every description.
Dutch Army Mobilizing.
THE HAGUE. July 31.?Queen Wil
helmina this afternoon issued a decree
providing for the general mobilization
of the Dutch army.
German Ship Recalled.
NEW YORK. July 31.?The Ham
burg-American liner President Grant,
which sailed yesterday, was recalled
by wireless telegraph. She will re
turn and await orders.
EXCURSION TO SKAGWAY
S.S. GEORGIA SATURDAY
President Willis E. No well, of the
Juneau Steamship company, this morn
ing announced that the steamer Geor
gia would leave for Skagway Satur
day night at S o'clock. Excursion
rates will prevail, the fare for the
round trip being placed at $6, includ
ing berth and meals.
The excursion rate is given on ac
count of the crowd that want to at
tend the big exhibition baseball game
at Skagway on Sunday between the
Gastineau-Juneau and Douglas-Tread
well teams. Arrangements have al
ready been made to carry both teams.
FREIGHT CHARGES MUST
BE PAID IN ADVANCE
?
The Pacific Coast Co. and Munici
pal dock managements have Issued
a statement that hereafter, beginning
with August 1st. all freight must be
paid in advance of the removal of
goods from the docks.
RAILROAD PROMOTER
LEAVES FOR SOUTH
G. W. Mitchell, promoter of the pro
jected Taku-Atlin railroad, left for|
Vancouver on the Princess Alice this
morning accompanied by Pierre Dur
yea of Vancouver.
WHEN YOU BUY WRITING PAPER
remember that Symphony Lawn is to
stationery what Sterling is to silver, j
It is in evidence wherever the best
writing paper is sold. It is the hall
mark of quality and the guarantee of
per feet style. Mr. Britt, of Britt's
Pharmacy, is showing an elegant line
of this paper and It will pay you to
go and look it over. 7-28-tf.
O. !?. Coward. Alaska manager for
the General Electric company, took
passage on the Admiral Sampson last
night for Ketchikan to be gone three
or four days.
C. E. Bunnell, the well known Val
dez attorney, arrived on the Mariposa
enroute to the Democratic convention
at Skagway.
ST. GEORGE HOUSE.
Everything new. Good light and j
well ventilated rooms. Baths, electric
lghL Good board.
Reasonable rates by the day. week
>r month 4-18-tf
MRS. A. E. VESTAL.
THE WEATHER TODAY.
Twenty-four hours ending at 3 p. m.: ^
Maximum?53.
Minimum?18.
Precipitation?.33.
Clondy; rain.
TO BOTTLE UP
GERMAN FLEET
?*?
LONDON. July 31?The destination
of the British fleet which sailed from
Portsmouth is believed to be the North
sea in order to bottle the German fleet
up in the Baltic sea.
The British fleet is the most formid
able one ever to sail with the proba
bility that it would be engaged In war
fare before returning to port.
German Troops Move on France.
LONDON. July 31. ? English stu
dents. arriving from Germany after
huviug been ordered out of that coun
try say that they counted eight long
train loads- of troops moving toward
the French frontier.
Russian People Enthusiastic.
ST. PETERSBURG. July 31.?The
pro-war demonstrations, in favor of
Servia and against Austria and Ger
many have continued today. Great
crowds of cheering Russians constant
ly surround the British. French and
Servian embassies. The appearance
of the officials of the legations set the
people off into the wildest demonstra
tions of enthusiastic approval.
Germany Commandering Merchant
Craft.
BERLIN. July 31?The Hamburg
liner Vaterland has been ordered held
in New York for orders from the gov
ernment.
The Imperator's sailing from Ham
burg has been cancelled.
The Victoria. Louise and other ships
on the German government reserve
list have been detained in German
ports until further orders.
??
Germany Declares Martial Law.
LONDON. July 31.?Dispatches re
ceived from Germany say that martial
law has been declared in all the chief
military districts of Germany.
Dispatches Censorlzed.
LONDON. July 31.?All press dis
patches from Berlin and Vienna and
o'ther points In Germany and Austria
are being very strictly censorlzed. It
is with extreme difficulty that the
newspapers get anything about Ger
many's preparations for war or the
lighting along the Dunube and ad
jacent to Belgrade.
Military Controls Germany.
BERLIN. July 31? Emperor Wil
liam issued a proclamation declaring
martial law; also forbidding the pub
lication or news of the movements of
troops and vessels of the navy. The
inhibition against the publication of
news also applies to the movements
of war material.
ANOTHER PLEDGE ABOUT
TO BE FULFILLED
The Jones bill, introduced by the
author with the approval of the Presi
dent. fulfills another platform pledge.
It declares that it has never been the
intention of the people of the United
States to make the war with Spain
a war of conquest or territorial ag
grandizement. but that on the con
trary it has always been the purpose
of the United States to recognize the
independence of the Philippines as
soon as a stable government could be
established there. This bill provides
for increased participation by Fllipin
oes in their government and will,
when passed, restore the prestige
which the nation lost when it entered
upon a career of imperialism.?W. J.
Bryan in Commoner.
PROMINENT MINING
ENGINEERS DEPART
Carl Moore, of Salt Lake; A. P. An
derson. of Los Angeles, and Frederick
Lyon, of Boston, all of whom are well
known mining engineers connected
with the United States Smelting, Re
fining and Mining company, took pass
age on the Princess Alice this morning
for the South. The party arrived in
Juneau about two weeks ago and have
spent the time since coming here in
specting the development work being
done on the Ebner mine under the su
pervision of Downey D. Muir, and in
vestigating other properties and the
country generally.
WESTERN STEEL MILLS
TO INCREASE OUTPUT
PITTSBURGH. July 31.?A Chicago
special says the Gary mills of the
United States Steel Corporation and
the South Chicago mills will work
full shifts five days a week instead of
four days with reduced force as they
have been doing In the recent past.
L. C. Thompson, promoter of the
Gold Bullion Mining company at Knik,
is a Southbound passenger aboard the
Admiral Sampson.
DEMOCRATS PREPARE
EOR CONVENTION
Democrats are gathering from var
ious parts of the Territory on their
way to the Skagway convention. Na
tional Committeeman Z. R. Cheney
and Territorial Chairman Charles E.
Davidson left for Skagway on the Jef
ferson. Charles E. Bunnell, of Valdez,
a member of the Territorial commit
tee, delegate from Valdez and proxy
for the Seward delegation, arrived In
Juneau on tho Mariposa, and was In
Jitneau today. He left for Skagway
on the JefTerson. Joseph A. Baxter, a
delegate from Valdez, and .holder of
several proxies from that and sur
rounding sections arrived here on the
Admiral Sampson. He proceeded to
Skagway on the Jefferson. Charles H.
Schelfler, the Cordova newspaper man.
went as far as Skagway on the Mari
posa. He has the proxies of the oth
er delegates from that place.
Juneauites go on Georgia.
Practically all of the Juneau dele
gates and those of Douglas. Tread
well, Thane and Perseverance will at
tend the convention. All of them who
did not take the Jofferson will prob
ably leave tomorrow night on the
Georgia. Tho present indications are
that there will be a large attendance
at the convention from Gastlneaa
channel cities.
Democrats Look For Victory.
Joseph A. Baxter, of Valdez, who Is
engaged In mining at that place, says
the outlook Is very favorable for a
complete Democratic victory In the
Third Division. He says the move
ment there is all toward the Demo
cracy.
CURACAO WILL GO
UNDER OWN STEAM
?+?
Capt. C. P. McCarthy, of the Pacific
Coast company's Delhi, says that Capt.
Bissett told him that he would take the
| Curacao from Swift's cannery under
her own Bteam after cleaning her up
a bit. The only damage done to tho
I vessel at the time she was wrecked
| and sunk, according to Capt. Bissett's
I statement to Capt. McCarthy, was tho
loss of five rivets and the bulging In
of one plate. Aside from the havoc
wrought on the fine teakwood rail by
toredos little If any damage has been
done to the vessel during the months
she has lain in the water. Capt. BIb
sett states that ?10,000 will put the
j vessel In good shape.
I "The raising of the ship," said Capt.
McCarthy, "is the finest piece of engin
eering 1 ever witnessed. She was ly
ing In about 7 fathoms of water.
Capt. Bissett dug a channel toward
tho shore through which he expected
to drag the ship. He used three
scows for lifting, two abreast the fore
mast and one over the stem. Four
teen cable were dragged under the
bottom, each operated by a separate
windless. When everything was in
readiness the preliminary lift was
made. She was raised about two feet,
then hauled Inshore about 24 feet and
twisted round info tho channel where
she was allowed to rest until she was
given her final lift and floated free."
The Delhi arrived In Juneau yester-|
day and is discharging coal at the Pa
cific Coast company's dock.
Under Water 13 Months.
The Curacao struck an uncharted
rock near Warm Chuck on the West
Coast of Prince of Wales Island early
In the morning of June 21. last year,
and immediately began taking In wa
ter through a hole under her coal
bunkers. She was headed for Swift's
cannery, and settled to the bottom just
after the passengers and crew had
been taken Into the life boats. She
had almost a capacity cargo aboard
when she sank, much of which has
been salved.
WASHINGTON STONE
SET IN MONUMENT
WASHINGTON, July 31?The State
of Washington's slab of sandstone was
set In the niche In the Washington
monument reserved for that State yes
> terday.
SEARCHING FOR
YELLOWSTONE BANDITS
?*?
GARDINER, Mont., July 31.?Two
troops of cavalry, divided Into squads,
and a half dozen sheriff's posses are
searching for the bandits who robbed
four stage coaches and searched 165
people Wednesday, securing 33,000 in
cash from their victims. Traces of the
men have been found, and it is not
believed that they have reached a
railway station, but that they are hid
ing.
'DUSTIN FARNUM .IS AT
JUNEAU THEATRE TONIGHT
The great "Famous Players" produc
tian of Dustln Farnum in the "Squaw
man" will be presented to the people
of Juneau at the Juneau theatre to
night. The production will take up the
entire evening. Dustin Farnum is one
of America's greatest actors and the
"Squawman" is his greatest play.
Admission, 50 and 25 cents. Show
begins at 8:15. (?*?)
LONDON CEASES
HOPE OE PEACE
LONDON, July 31. ? Russia's
answer to Germany's protest on
the mobilization of her army was
a general order for a complete
mobilization. That means that
more than 3,000,000 men will be
called to arms. With this Infor
matlon, the last hope for peace
has been abandoned here. It Is
believed that only the complete
back down of Germany can avert
conflict between that country and
Russia. That France will aid Rus
sia and England will follow France
Is certain.
ASQUITH CONFIRMS NEWS.
London, July 31.?Premier As
qulth In a statement this evening
said:
"We have just heard, not from
St. Petersburg, but frcm Germany
that Russia has proclaimed a gen
eral mobilization of her army and
the first, second and third re
serves. As a result, martial law
was proclaimed In Germany."
GERMAN MAKES LAST EFFORT.
Berlin, July 31.?Emperor Wil
liam, as a final step In his efforts
in >;ehalf of peace, has dispatched
Grand Duke Hesse, brother of the
Empress of Russia, to endeavor
to arrange peace terms directly
with the Czar.
There is no attempt to conceal
the fact that the Emperor is des
perately in earnest In his effort
to prevent war In Europe. He feels
now as he did not a few days ago
that If Germany should become
involved Into war with Russia,
Great Britain and Belgium will at
tack him on his Western border,
and that such a conflict, no mat
ter what the fortune of watedr
might bring forth, would be dis
astrous to business and the peo
ple.
Canada Will Help.
OTTAWA, July 31. ? Canada Is
making preparations to raise several
regiments for the European war in
the event England should become in
volved in it. .. ^
PRESIDENT TRYING
TO STOP STRIKE
WASHINGTON. July 31.?President
Woodrow Wilson has summoned the
Presidents or managers of Western
railroads and representative men of
Chicago and other Western cities to
confer with him Saturday at the White
House for the purpose of devising
plans of preventing the threatened rail
road strike.
August 7th Set for Strike.
; CHICAGO, July 31.?August 7th has
been set as the date for the railroad
strike. All efforts to arrange terms
of settlement have failed, and the train
men agreed today that they will go
through with their original plans.
PERSEVERANCE MARRIED
MEN TURN TABLES
PERSEVERANCE. July 30?A re
turn game was played on the baseball
grounds at Perseverance mine be
tween the Married Men and the Sin
gle Men, resulting In a score: Married
Men, 14; Single Men. 4.
The wives of the married men held
a meeting and resolved that each
would attend the game and personalty
see that her man did his duty. The
result tells the effect.
Both teams did excellent work Ir
the Ave Innings played, the batting oi
Oscar Oberg attracting the attentlor
of all the fans. There were a few
changes In the line-up from the othei
game, which no doubt accounts foi
the balance on the other side. Tin
roster was as follows:
Married Men?Gravrock,- 1st; Ben
son. ss; Shattuck. c; McDaniels. rf
^rompen, p; Chamberlain. If; Edring
ton, 2nd; Doherty, 3rd, Oberg. cf.
Single Men?Jackson, let; Nichol
son, ss; Root, c; Wilson, rf; Smith
p; Mauerhan, If; Erickson, 2nd; Cor
bell, 3rd; Skuse, cf.
R. F. Scrlbener officiating as ura
pire, and it is reported that the mar
ried ladles will fete him to show thel
appi eolation of his favorable judge
ment.
Quite a few visitors attended th<
game, coming all the way from Jur
eau to see the fun.
GERMANY ACQUIRES
RIGHTS IN HOLLANI
LONDON. July 31. ? A despatc1
from The Hague to the London Stand
ard says: "After two years of pei
slstent diplomatic efforts Gorman
has Induced Holland to permit th
construction of a German private hai
bor and steel works on the no ther
banks of the new waterway connec
lng Rotterdam with the North Sea.
T.J. PATTERSON HURT
IN SEATTLE EIRE
SEATTLE. July 31?T. J. Patterson,
superintendent of the Swan Naviga
tion company, was seriously Injured
In tho Grand Trunk Pacific Dock fire
yesterday afternoon. He jumped from
the window of his office which was on
the second floor of the dock. It is be
lieved that he will recover.
T. J. Patterson Is well known In Ju
neau. He was in charge of the Unit
ed States cable ofilce here for several
years, and after retiring from the ser
vice, ho became associated with the
Swan Navigation company at Seattle.
Fire Lose $1,000,000.
SEATTLE, July 31.?Fire destroy
ed the Grand Trunk Pacific Dock and
the West Seattle ferry slip in this
city yesterday afternoon. One un
known man was killed, several ser
iously Injured and about $1,000,000
worth of property destroyed. The
Colman dock was severely damaged,
and the personal effects of 130 pas
sengers who were about to sail on the
Admiral Farragut for Son Francisco
were l.urncd.
Mary people In offices on the dock
were cut off by the fire and had the
narrowest kind of escapes. A dozen
of those who leaped from the second
story wero nil moro or less Injured.
Many leaped Into the bay, nnd were
picked up by rescuers.
A fireman, named Cooper, was ser
iously burned?possibly fatally.
The Pacific-Alaska Navigation com
pany, the Cosmos lino and other steam
ship companies had their offices on
tho Grand Trunk dock In addition to
tho Grand Trunk Pacific railway and
Its Prince Rupert steamers.
?
fRED BOALT LEAVES
FOR MEXICO CITY
Boalt Leaves Vera Cruz.
WASHINGTON, July 31. ? Fred
Boalt, the newspaper correspondent
ordered deported from Vera Cruz, has
moved to Mexico City, and is out of
tho jurisdiction of the American au
thorities.
May Bring Huerta Back.
EI. PASO. Tex.. July 31.?IC?te stat
ed thnt the Constitutionally will
seek the extradition of Huer%. from
whatever country he may attempt to
seek refuge, on the charge of murder.
Mexican Traffic Resumed.
VERA CRUZ, July 31.?Trnfllc has
been resumed between Vera Cruz and
Mexico City. Through trains now
operated on regular schedule.
GOETHALS TO USE
CANAL MONDAY|
PANAMA, July 31. ? Col. C. W.
Goethals announced this morning that
he would send the Cristobal through
the Panama canal Monday. She will
be followed by other ships, and the
fornittl notice to the world that the
canal is ready for service will be is
sued afterward. It is believed that
August 15 will be the date sot in the
notice, but if the canal works well he
will not wait for it before accommo
dating the shipping that accumulates
for it.
WHEAT RECEIPTS ARE
BREAKING ALL RECORDS
CHICAGO, July 31?Wheat arrivals
at Chicago for the week will top all
records, being 2,706,000 bushels In
excess of last week and 3,599,000
. greater than last year. Deliveries of
, j all grains aggregated 8,565.000 bush
I els, or 69.5% over last year and 47.4%
! over the five-year average.
! EMPEROR WILLIAM
J. IS IN BAD HEALTH
LONDON, July 31.?A Berlin cable
says Emperor William Is not In good
health, that the old trouble which af
. fccted his ear has returned; and thai
' his worn face Indicates that he suf
fers from insomnia again.
MRS. L. E. BUELL
REPORTED IMPROVING
Mrs. L. E. Buell, stricken wltl
. paralysis Wednesday night, Is report
.. ed to be improving at St. Ann's hos
r pltal this morning. Dr. Mahone is Ii
(. attendance. By the Issuing of a spe
cial permit Mr. Buell was allowed t<
e take passage on the C. P. R. liner Prln
h cess Alice from Skagway and he ii
now at Mr. Buell's bedside.
MAY AID CHINA TO
GET AMERICAN CAS!
WASHINGTON, July 31.?Secretar;
h of State William J. Bryan has Indlcal
|. cd that the administration is prepare
r. to support the American bankers li
y floating the Chinese loans that ar
e wanted for development.
r. ? ? ?
n George Butzer and Mrs. Butzer lef
t- on the Admiral Sampson for the Sout!
" and will visit In Portland, Oregon.
?4? '{?
4 4 4 * 4 4 4 4 * * -> + *
4 4
4 M'ADOO WILL HELP. 4
4 4.
4 WASHINGTON. July 31. ? 4
4 Cecretary of the Treasury Will- 4
? lam G. McAdoo today Issued a 4
4 statement In which he said: 4
4 "The Treasury Department 4
4 will aid New York as far as It 4
4 legitimately may, as well as 4
4 It will aid every other section 4
4 of tho United States where and 4
4 whne it becomes apparent that 4
4 assistance Is needed." 4
4 4
+ 44 4 444 4 44444444
BRYAN AGAIN
DEFENDS TREATY
?4 1
WASHINGTON, July 31.?Secretary
of State William J. Brynn Issued a sec
ond statement today In defense of the
Colombian treaty that has been signed
and submitted th the Senate. Ho urg
ed In strong language tho ratification
of the treaty and the payment of the
125,000,000 that It proposes we give
Colombia as compensation for her loss
on account of the Panama revolution.
FRAME HAS DIFFICULTY
IN GETTING TICKET
VALDEZ, July 31.?The "Progres
sive Democratic" (J. W. Frame) con
vention yesterday afternoon nominat
ed Delegate James Wlckersham as Its
candidate for re-election. Represen
tative Robert D. Gray, of Katalla, was
ndtnlnated for Senator; Charles Day
of Valdcz, S. L. Colwell of Seward, T.
B. Tansey of Kennecott and N. E. Old
ham of Sunrise, for representatives.
Mayor E. E. Ritchie and Represent
tatlve F. M. Boyle were nominated for
Senator before the nomination was
given to Gray, but they declined. May
or Ritchie announced that he would op
pose *he re-election of Delegate Wlck
ersham. Dr. Boyle was later nomin
ated for representative, 'but declined
that nomination also.
' It is believed thnt Representative
Gray will refuse to be tho candidate
of the party for Senator, and that oth
er candidates will also withdraw. Only
one nomination was made to stick to
anyone who was present.
There was very little interest In tho
convention here, and no one was in the
city as an attendant except E. C. Aus
tin, of Ketchikan.
CROWN PRINCE MAY
VISIT GERMAN COLONIES
BERLIN, July 31.?Crown Prince
William's trip through the German
colonies which the Emperlor refused
to consent, may be made In 1915.
According to a usually well Inform
ed source, the Emperor's consent has
been gained and all that remains to
be done is to Induce the Reichstag
to appropriate $45,000 for expenses.
This might be a difficult matter be
cause the Socialists and radicals are
strongly opposing it.
_% ^ ^ ^
GILL THINKS U. S.
WILL HELP CANADA
SEATTLE, July 31.?Mayor Hiram
C. Gill, addressing the Republicans of
Kitsap county at Bremerton last night,
predicted that every ton of steel for
the construction of the Alaska rail
road will be shipped via the Canadian
Pacific railroad to Prince Rupert and
transferred from there to vessels for
transportation to Alaska, and that not
one ton would pass through American
ports.
WARBURG AGREES TO
ANSWER QUESTIONS
?4?
WASHINGTON, July 31.?Paul M.
Warburg, whose nomination for mem
bership on the Federal reserve bank
ing board, yesterday telegraphed the
Senate committee practically agree
ing to answer any questions which the
' committee might ask him.
i > t ?
' CLAFLIN SEEKS TO
, REORGANIZE COMPANY
5 NEW YORK. July 31.?John Claflin,
? with the assistance of Judge Morgan
s J. O'Brien, his personal counsel, Is
working on a plan of reorganization
of the H B. Claflin company with a
view to saving his retail stores
1 throughout the country.
y WESTERN FEDERATION
FAVOR CONSOLIDATION
d DENVER. Colo.. July 31.?The West,
n ern Federation of Miners have voted
e to unite with the United Mine Work
ers of America.
t F. G. Barthoff, the well known mln
h ing man. Is a Southbound passenger
aboard the Admiral Sampson.
NEW YORK AND ENGLISH
STOCK EXCHANGES CLOSE
NEW YORK, July 31. ? The
New York Stock Exchange clon
ed today on account of the war
?Ituatlon In Europe. It will not
be reopened until further notice.
Before the cloae yesterday af
ternoon the bears were in com
plete control of the situation.
ENGLISH EXCHANGES CLOSE.
LONDON, July 31. ?* For the
first time In modern hlstcry the
London Stock Exchange did not
open this morning. Announce
ment was made that It had closed
until further notice.
The stock exchanges of Liver
pool, Manchester and Edlnburg
have also closed, and none of
them will open until notice shall
have been given.
NO SALE OF SECURITIES.
NEW YORK, July 31.?With
the close of the New York stock
exchange today for the first time
since the Jay Cooke failure and
resultant panic of 1873, transact
ions In securities all over the
world have been halted. There
is practically a complete suspen
sion of financial transactions ex
cept those connected with ordin
ary business affaire.
The crash In the stock exchange
Is a dli'ect result of the war de
velopments In Europe, and came,
after several days of depression
with the announcement that Eng
land had abandoned hope of peace.
In 1873, the stock exchange re
mained closed for ten days.
Time to Keep Cool.
NEW YORK, July 31.?J. Plerpont
Morgan said today:
"It is a time for the owners of Amer
ican securtles to keep their heads. The
actual properties represented by Amer
ican securities will not suffer greatly
by war in Europe. Crumbling values
should not frighten investors."
Americans Not Scared.
NEW YORK, July 31.?Banks re
port no apparent activity In with
drawals of deposits, and are not ex
pecting anything approaching a run
on the banking establishments.
Many leading bankers have given
out reassuring statements.
Run on Bank of England.
LONDON. July 31.?Long lines of
depositors have been at tha cashiers'
windows of the Bank of England today
demanding gold for their deposits and
exchanging bank, notes for gold and
presenting drafts and checks for pay
ment.
At the Bank of England and at the
other banks of the city, people are
demanding payments In gold. Tho
Bank of England today raised the rate
of discount for gold to 8 per cent.
' Gold Goes to Premium In Paris.
PARIS July 31.?Gold went to a pre
mium of one and one-half per cent
here this afternoon.
Bank of Belgium Meets All Demands.
BRUSSELS, July 31.?The Bank of
Belgium today met the demands of
10,000 depositors, paying all accounts
in gold when that was demanded,
which was the case In most instances.
Berlin Banks Raise Discount.
BERLIN, July 31.?A concerted at
tempt was made today to prevent tho
outflow of gold when the banks raised
the rate of discount.
France Protects Banks.
PARIS, July 31.?The French gov
ernment today issued a decree limit
ing withdrawals from savings banks
to $10 to each depositor and requiring
the depositor to give two weeks' no
tice.
PARIS, July 31?The run on Paris
banks is growing more serious rather
than abating. Long lines of men are
standing in all the banks of the city.
They are handing in notes and de
| manding their redemption in gold as
I rapidly as they can be accommodated.
Run on Paris Banks Continues.
BERLIN, July 31.?The run on Paris
banking establishments have Increas
ed as the indications point more and
more directly toward a foreign war
Involving the principal countries of
Europe. The employees of the Bank
of France worked all night last night
paying ot,f gold to those desiring it
for their balances.
SENATE MAY HAVE CHANCE
AT GOOD ROADS BILL
?+?
WASHINGTON, July 31.?The Sen
1 ate committee on postofflces and post
roads will report, probably without
recommendation, the so-called Bourne
bill, which involves a possible issue
? of $500,000,000 government bonds to
? raise funds for loans to States for
highway betterments.

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