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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, August 04, 1914, Image 2

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE!
JOHN W. TKOY, Editor and Manager.
Published by the EMPIRE PRINTING COMPANY
t
Kntsrsd as secoud-class matter November 7, 1912 at tbe poet office at Ju
neau. Alaska, under the Act of March 3, 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATE8:
Cfc?e .Year, by mail 110.00
Six months, by mall 5.00
Per month. deliYered 1.00
THE UNITED STATES AND EUROPE.
WHAT effect the war now being waged in Europe will
have upon the United States is a matter of more than
passing interest, viewed from almost any angle. Of
one thing we may be assured. This country will not become em
broiled in it. A dignified and a strict neutrality will be main
tained. No combination of circumstances can possibly arise I
that would make this nation an active participant in the Eu
ropean conflict.
The first direct result of the declaration of war in Europe,
so far as the United States is concerned, has been to. paralyze
the stock market. European holders of American stocks are
responsible for this condition. In a panic they wished to re
alize upon their holdings and the wholesale dumping of stocks
demoralized the market to such an extent that the New York
Stock Exchange was compelled to close its doors. This does
not mean that there is a scarcity of money in America. There
is plenty of it, but flooding the country with stocks held in Eu
rope necessarily would affect unfavorably American stocks cf
all kinds no matter by whom they were held.
The demand for our agricultural products by Europe will
no doubt be greater than ever before: and this may also be
true of our manufactures. With most of Europe's industries
paralyzed by what is termed in the dispatches the most terri
ble war since the fall of the Roman Empire, America will be
called upon to meet the needs of the nations involved in it. Con
ditions in the United State* will speedily adjust themselves to
meet those of the European countries, and we will profit large
ly because of the insensate strife that has been precipitated by
the act of a European war lord. The United States could get
along exceedingly well without the kind of prosperity that fol
lows in the wake of war. Prosperity for us in this war means
starvation, desolation and death for the unhappy countries of
Europe now embarked upon a titanic struggle the net result of
which will be the sacrifice of much human life, the waste of treas
ure, and the impoverishment of the combatants.
BITING THE HAND THAT WOULD FEED IT.
IT may be stated as a postulate that Seattle has benefitted, di
rectly and indirectly, by the gold discoveries in Alaska, and
the development that has followed, much more than any
other city; also that Washington State has been a large bene
ficiary. Much Alaska money has been invested, wisely and un
wisely, in Seattle buildings and real estate; much money
wrung from the goldfields of Alaska and the North has been
planted in the soil of the Evergreen State, sometimes with pro
fit to the planter, sometimes to his sorrow and grief. Seattle
through the force of circumstances?adventitious and otherwise
?has been enabled to command a large share of the trade and
gold of Alaska. Alaskans are good customers and usually they
pay their bills promptly and pleasantly. And so when business
has been active in Alaska and the mines yielding generously of
their riches, Seattle has grown and prospered and waxed rich
and great When business has declined in Alaska, through a
decrease in the mineral output or by reason of the crass and
stupid Alaskan policies of the two preceding National adminis
trations. Seattle languished; business suffered perceptibly and
the boom in real estate diminished with promptness, coupled with
disappointment and disaster.
In justice to Seattle and her live citizenship let it be admit
ted that the importance of Alaska as a valuable "asset" of Seat
tle is fully recognized by them. Their withers are wrung when
ever the business of Seattle with Alaska decreases; for what
ever may be the faults, follies and foibles of Seattle and her
people, overlooking a good thing is not one of them. Also let
it be admitted that the people of Seattle have exhibited a keen?
if somewhat selfish?interest in Alaska's prosperity. On many
occasions they have rendered good and efficient service, and
they have rendered it ungrudgingly. For which, at all times,
thanks.
With the coming of the present National administration
into power t\ me the initiation of adecidedly new Alaska policy.
The do-nothing-bottle-up-the-country-dog-in-the-manger policy of
the two preceding administrations has been abandoned, and in
its place a constructive, developing policy is assured. The im
portance of Alaska as a country abounding in marvelous natural
resources has been recognized for the first time by this National
government and the first steps have been taken to thrust in the
master key and unlock the doors so that these resources may be
used legitimately for the benefit of the people, including those of
Seattle. And yet the leading newspapers of that cityT and one
of its representatives in Corgress miss no opportunity to mis
represent and pillory the administration that is attempting to
bring grist to the Seattle mill by striking the shackles that have
hitherto bound Alaska. It is surely like biting the hand that
would feed it. But to what base uses may the pursuit of bittetr
political partisanism come!
* 1 11 G
OLDEST BANK IN ALASKA <
The B. M. Behrends Bank 1
Juneau, Alaska
Established 1891 Incorporated 1914 2
BANKING SERVICE ]
develops improvements as business^ requirements c
demand them. This bank constantly aims to J
meet the requirements of its customers' business
consistent with legitimate banking rules.
g
Officers:
B. M. B EH RENDS, President l
J. R. WILLIS. Vice-President
GUY McNAUGHTON. Cashier ^
> ?
1
| What do you Buy |
ij When you Buy a ij
II Typewriter?
<? You pay for neat, well-written correspond- <>
j > ence, for perfect carbon copies, for the quality and < ?
<; quantity of work your typist can turn out?in <?
<3 short, for the years of service you get. <3
;; If your inventory were made on this basis, ;;
33 you would find in the L. C. Smith & Bros, type- 3;
3 3 writer a much bigger asset than the price you paid 33
3; for it and a much bigger asset than in any other 3;
3; writing machine ever made. 31
33 Ball Bearing; Long Wearing 33
o o
< ? < ?
33 It isn't the machine?it's what the machine 33
3 3 will do for you. ' 3 3
< > o '
< ?
33 Can we prove this statement? Absolutely. 33
3 3 Ask for our proof. 3 3
<? o
<? o
o o
i: L.C. SmithS Bros. Typewriter Co. i:
33 Homo Offico and Factory J 3
; 3 SYRACUSE, NEW YORK * 3 3
o O
MINING APPLICATION NO 01672
? nited State* Land Office, Juneau, Al
aska, May 14, 1914.
NOTICE
Notice Is hereby given that the Al
.ska Gastlneau Mining Conpany, a
corporation organized and oxstlng un
der the laws of tho State of New
York and qualified to do and doing
business as a corporation at Juneau,
Alaska, has made application for pat
lent for the Cross Bay, Expector and
Avalanche lode claims, Survey No.
989, situated on the north shore of
Gastlneau Channel about threo miles
southeast of the town of Juneau, Al
aska. in the Harris Mining District,
l^rritory of Alaska, particularly de
scribed as follows,jto-wit:
Cross Bay Lode.
Beginning at Corner No. 1
whence U.S.L.M. No. 1 bears N.
75* 22' W. 7465.16 ft. distant;
thence N. 38* 08' E. to Corner No.
2; thence 47* 26' E. 1492.20 ft.
to Corner No. 3; thence 38* 08'
W. 385 ft. to Corner No. 4; thence
N. 65* 39' W. 152 ft to Corner No.
5; thence N. 43* 59' W. 352.70 ft.
to corner No. 6; thence N. 68*
01' W. 106.70 ft. to Corner No. 7;
thence N. 20* 16' W. 94.70 ft. to
Corner No. 8; thence N. 57* 39'
W. 291.50 ft. to Corner No. 9;
thcnco N. 40* 46' W. 257.70 ft
to Corner No. 10; thence N. 46*
26' W. 265.90 ft. to Cornor No. 1,
the place of beginning. Contain
ing an area of 14.603 acres. Va
riation at all corners 31* 45' E.
Expector Lode.
Bcglnlng at Cor. No. 1 whenco
U. S. L. M. No. 1 bears N. 82*
45' W. 62*3.64 ft. distant; thence
N. 38* 08' E. 482 ft. to Corner No.
2. thence S. 45' 08' E. 1498.80 ft
to Corner No. 3; thence S. 38*
08' W. 535 ft. to Corner No. 4;
thenco N. 62* 02' W. 129.20 ft. to
Corner No. 5; thence N. 45' 41'
W. 320.30 ft. to Corner No. 6;
thence N. 49* 41' W. 159.20 tt. to
Corner No. 7; thence N. 39* 48'
W. 394.50 ft. to Corner No. 8; !
thence N. 38* 02' W. 314.70 ft. to ;
Corner No. 9; thence N. 36" 26'
W. 199.60 ft to Corner No. 1, tho
place of beginning. Containing an
area of 18.920 acres. Variation
31* 45' E.
Avalanche Lode.
Beginning at Corner No. 1
whence U.S.L.M. No. 1 bears S.
87' 42' W. 5081.78 ft. distant;
thence N. 38" 08' E. 550 ft to Cor
ner No. 2; thence S. 45* 48' E.
1498 ft. to Corner No. 3; thence S.
38* 08' W. 482 ft to Corner No.
4; thenco N. 36* 26' W. 82.40 ft
to Corner No. 5; thence N. 59*
59' W. 431.60 ft. to Corner No. 6;
thence N. 40* 44' W. 401.90 ft. to
Corner No. 7; thence N. 54* 37'
W. 280.60 ft to Corner No. 8;
thence N. 39* 57' W. 3*5 ft. to Cor
ner No. 1, the place otN^.tlnnlng.
Containing an area of 18.639 acres.
Variation 31* 45' E.
Tho names of the adjoining claims
ire tho Mammon. North Star, Evening
Star. Morning Star,( unpatented lode
slalms and the Homestead patented
ode claim. So far as is at present
mown there are no outstanding, valid
ind subsisting conflicting claims.
The location notices of the Cross
Jay and Expector lode claims were r?i
torded on the 15th day of June, 1894,
n Book 9 of Lodes, at pages 286 an<J
:87, respectively, of the records of
he Recorder for the Juneau Recording
telnet. Alaska. The location notice
>f the Avalanche lode claim was re
orded on the 23rd day of May. 1901. In
look 16 of Lodes, at page 73, of the
ecords of the Recorder for the Ju
leau Recording Precinct, Alaska.
This notice was postod on the
round on the 14th day of May. 1914.
ALASKA GASTINEAU MINING
COMPANY,
ly?B. L. THANE. Agent and At
torney In fact
United States Land Offloe, Juneau,
ilaska.
It Is hereby ordered that the fore
tolng notice be published In the Dally
Empire, a nowspaper of general clrcu
atlon published at Juneau, Alaska, for
he statutory period of Blxty days.
C. B. WALKER,
Register.
First publication, May 29, 1914.
l^st publication,
Try a
Mecca Fizz
"Smooth as Silk"
Pabst'a Blue Ribbon Beer
On Draught
AT THE MECCA
42 FRONT ST.
CONWAY & SECREST
o SHEEP CREEK J
!! LAUNDRY:
<> < ;
, , ~ i 4 i
3 | A wagon will call and dollrer < >
< > Laundry Wednesdays and Frl- < |
3I days of each week. Cleaning 4.
< > and pressing delivered to you * [
33 flrst-claso shape. 4
33 ALASKA 8TEAM LAUNDRY <>
3 3 Phone 15 J. H. King, Mgr. 3 3
4 > ?
>???!!!!!!!?,
0 THE BEST LOAF OF
1 BREAD j
| la Sold At |
j San Francisco Bakery |
I o. M'iSSEUscHMLOT, Prop. X
If You Want the Best? 8
ASK FOR
SEPSTEYN & McKANNA
Alaska Agents 1
i
111111 1111111111111111111 s
'THE HEGG
; CAPT. P. MADSEN T
! Loavos C. W. Young Co.'s I
? float every Monday for Cake +
J and way porta. Carries mail, X
? passengers and freight. ?
11111111111111111111111 Ifr
William Pallister, M.D., Seattle I
Specialist in the treatment of I
diseases and deformities of the I
eye, ear, nose and throat.
Will be in Juneau till Sept. 1, I
^O/floowlthDrSloiine^Stonjlna^nhrB
r 1
G. K. GILBERT
PLUMBING and j
8HEET METAL WORK8
121 Front 8t Phone S58
I - | I
* 4 j
? I I I 1 I I I I II I I I I I I I I I I 1 II I ?
" PENNANT BREAD
! The Best Thafs Made X
Doughnuts, coffee cake, cup +
II cakes, cookies, pies?always T
fresh. Eureka Bakery. X
;; Phone 2122?302 Front SL +
? II I I II I I I I I 111 I I I I 11 1 I I 11
McDonald & Hart
Contractors and Builders
Office at McCIoskey's Cigar Store
Front Street
1 FHEK TROUSERS FREE ! |
> ? Until Aug. 3 we will glvo an , >
< ? extra pair of trousors free with < >
4' each suit of Kahn Tailoring J J
<? Co.*3 clothoB. Price $25.00 up < >
41 H. HE1DORN, Merchant Tailor J J
o 222 Seward Street, JUNEAU o
mmmmmmmmaammmmmm
Peerless Bakery
Bakers of Fine Pastry of all
kinds. Only tho best of mater
ial used. Try the Peerle?3 brand.
Its quality inuurcs Its continuous
I use. + + + * * ?
PEERLESS BAKERY
(Formerly Lempke's)
THEO. HEYDER, Propr.
125 Front St. Phone 222
B. D. STEWART
MINING ENGINEER
U. 8. MINERAL 8URVEYOR
P. O. Box 'M - - - Juneau
C W. WINSTEDT ~~j
ARCHITECT
SUPERINTENDENT
Sketchc* Free
Office, Room 7, Garelde Block
Juneau, Alaska.
Sporting
Goods_ HaRD WARE LilL.
Largest and most complete stock of Min
ing, Logging, Fishing Supplies in Alaska
PLUMBING-TIIMING-PIPE PITTING
Estimates and prompt attention given all kinds Job Work
PAINTS-VARNISH--WALL PAPER-BRUSHES
AGENTS FOR THE FAMOUS
WAUGH ROCK DRILLS and EVINRUDE
DETACHABLE MOTORS
MODERN AND UP-TO-DATE
Furniture Rugs Office Desks Go-Carts Etc.
/.FIRST TERRITORIAL BANK OF ALASKA
Douglas, Alaska
Every facility for banking. Foreign and domestic ex
change. Commercial accounts solicited. Interest allowed
on time deposits.
M. J. O'CONNOR, Pres. - - - A. E. GURR, Cashier
ALASKA MEAT COMPANY John Reck. Mgr.
Wholesale and Retail Butchers
Manufacturers of all Kinds of Sausages Our Hams and Bacon Are
Home-Smoked
I FIRST NATIONAL BANK
OF JUNEAU
??? .. I UNITED STATES DEPOSITORY
Capital ? 60,000
Surplus and Undivided Profits 50,000
DIRECTORS
T. F. Kennedy, Pres. & k' Kennedy
John Reck, Vice-Pros. , ceo. f. miller
Harold H. Post, Cashier
R. H. STEVENS. AnaUtant Caihler
Under the seme management
FIRST TERRITORIAL BANK OF ALASKA
In tercet Dtid on Time DeooeiU
Groceries and
, Men's Goods
Alaska-Gastineau Mining Co.
THANE, / 0 P / ALASKA
Get the Habit
Hire Berry's Auto
Cheaper Than Walking
| Office Phone 22 ALL HOURS Garage Phone 294
The Home of Hart Schaffner & Marx
CLOTHING
Suits from &15.oo to S30.oo
::: wnuMXSTiT " ffliVi wiriH?MBatBBB??
Alasfca-T readwell
Gold Mining Go.
Treadwell
Alaska
Han V&aObcr * Mux '

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