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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, August 15, 1914, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020657/1914-08-15/ed-1/seq-5/

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i I
\.! rj I ?] wTt 11?J
Wo Sell Them Exclaslrely
Juneau Furniture Co.
Td. 261. M and Seward
i i
JUNEAU STEAMSHIP CO.
United States Mall
STEAMER GEORGIA
Juneau-Sitka Route
Usvet Juneau lor Douglas. Kun
tsf, Hoonah. Gypsum. Tenakee.
Killlsnoo, Chatham and Sitka every
Wednesday at 12:01 a. m.
Juneau-Skagway Route
Leaves Juneau for Douglas. Eagle
River. Sentinel Light Station, El
drld Rock Light Station. Comet.
Haines. Skagway every Sunday at
12:01 a. m. Returning, leaves 1
Skagwav the following day at 12:02
a. m.
WILLIS E. NOWELL. MANAGER
?
The Alaska Grill ? I
The Bert Appointed
Place in Town
Best of Everything Served !!
at Moderate Prices
MI I I I I II I I II
BUMHOHHOB
GOODSEGARS
POCKET BILLIARDS
1 Dave's Place g
A Pipe for Eoery Fact
PIPE REPAIRING
In tha intarast of our town
lata patronize our home
merchant*
F. WOLLAND
Will giro you the Beat in
Clothing, both aa to atyle,
and quality, and at the right
price, too.
Ili L Sacoad St.. Phone 66
: SHEEP CREEK f
i LAUNDRY
| \ A wagon will call and deliver <?
<? laundry Wednesdays and Fri-' *
\ J day* of each week. Cleaning <?
< > and pressing delivered to yon ''
\ I tlrst-clasc shape. <?
o ALASKA STEAM LAUNDRY o
* J Phone IS J. H. King, Mgr. o
II GRAPPSNU-STYLE BAKERY
-DOVE BRAND" lfe-S?yU Br?<d
No other like it. Try it.
You'll want it all tho time
Cakee Baked to Order
32 9 FRANKLIN STREET
? 999999999
ARMY OFFICER
DEFENDS ALASKANS
The allegation of Archdeacon Hud
son Stuck., of Alaska. In his recent
book. "Ten Thousand Miles With a
Dor Sled." that the Influence of the
white man Is general and of the Ameri
can soldier in particular on the native
population of Alaska is for evil, Is de
nied by Capt R. H. Pierson, who has
been the surgeon at Fort Gibbon, at
Tannna, for the past two years. Capt.
Pierson. who has Just been transferred
reached Seattle on the steamer Jeffer
son yesterday and is registered at the
Hotel Washington, says the Seattle
Post'Intelligencer. awaiting orders
from the government.
"I havn't read the archdeacon's
book." said the captain yesterday aft
ernoon.'"but 1 know the contents
pretty well. He charges the white
I population with debauching the In
| dians and with selling them liquor In
large quantities. Now. I am not de
nying that these thingH go on. They
do everywhero that the white men
have had any dealings with a leas
civilised population. But I think that,
on the whole, the soldiers and the gen
eral white population of Alaska are a
pretty fine lot of people. Let me tell
you something about what those same
people whom he denounces so unspar
ingly have done.
Give Money to The Church.
"Last winter, by sales and bazars,
the people of Tanana. raised $900 for
the support of the Episcopal mission.
The same amount was raised for the
work of the Roman Catholic church.
Then the Episcopal mission burned,
and they raised $300 toward the erec
tion of a new one. And at Christmas
they raised $500 for a Christmas tree,
through which a present was given to
every child in the neighborhood. The
Episcopal mission was without n mis
sionary last winter, and the people
asked me to hold services, which I did,
and they all turned out for them. That
doesn't look as though they were an
irreligious and wicked lot. does It?
"As concerns the selling of liquor to
the natives, I believe that the regula
tion whfch prohibits It is as much re
sponsible for the existing evils as any
thing. If an Indian could buy his
whiskey over the bar, under proper re
strictions. there would be much less
drinking. But where ho has to buy it
in quantity to get it at all. he doesn't
stop until it is all gone. That white
men sell the ltquor to the Indian in
that way is simply the result of the
government restriction.
What Evil There is It Open.
"I think very highly of the Alaska
white men.' There are evil men in
every community, and in Alaska the
evil is likely to be open rather than
glossed over and sn -aking. as in more
highly civilized communities. Alaska
has made a great contribution to the
world from her mineral resources, but
far greater than this, I believe, has
been her contribution to the world
through the men that she has de
veloped. They are of heoric mold, en
during hardships that people else
where could never stand, and they do
not deserve the condemnation that has
been heaped upon them. I believe
that their wickedness has been ex
ploited for the benefit of the mission
aries. If they didn't have stories to
tell of the wickedness that exists
there they couldn't get as much money
as they do."
PITTSBURGH WATCHMAKER
LOCATES IN JUNEAU
H. V. Jackson, an expert watchmak
er and engraver of Pittsburgh, Pa.,
has accepted a position at Mendham's,
the Front street Jeweler store.
If You Want the Beat?
ASK FOR
EPSTEYN & McKANNA
Alaska Agents
WHY NOT GOVERNMENT
OWNED MERCHANT SHIPS?
i Why should not-the Amorlcan gov.
eminent buy, own and operate a mer
chant marine to carry tho European
commerce of the United States?
such a step on the part of Congress?
Do not existing conditions counsel
loft of tho American merchant marine
What the Confederate cruisers had
after the civil war was immediately
protected off the face of the wa-tora by
tariff laws and navigations laws.
Monopolistic tariffs have made it
cost 50 per cent more to build a ship
in American yards than in foreign
foreign yards,, notwithstanding the
fact that we command the steel trade
of the world.
Oppressive navigation laws make it
cost 50 per cent more to operato an
Amorlcan ship than a foreign ship.
Hence the American money that Is in
vested in deep-sea shipping sails un
der British and Belgian flags. Under
the pretext of protecting our sailors
we have driven them off the sea.
Every attempt to rehabilitate the
American merchant .marine is met
with a demand for subsidies, not with
a demand for a modification of anti
quated statutes. In consequence even
the threat of a great European war in
stantly paralyses American foreign
commerce. We do not have to wait
, until hostilities begtn. At the first in
. timatlon of hostilities the foreign ships
are at once withdrawn from service
and the European trade of the United
States !b left to shift for Itself.
No sooner is a proposition made that
tho navigation laws be amended to en
courage the immediate purchase of for
eign-built ships than the Coastwise
Monopoly that so Impudently demand
ed a broken treaty and a concealed
subsidy at Panama issues its formal
protest. "We are against it," an
| nounces tho Secretary of the Ameri
can Steamship Association, which Is
the Coastwise Monopoly for which Mr.
: O'Gorman and other Senators were
willing not only to wreck the Wilson
Administration, but to stain the hon
or of the Republic.
ii i? iiicuiiucivu'jiu LiiuL me Ameri*
can people will forever rest content
to leavg their deep-sea uhipplng In
foreign bottoms and their commerce
at the mercy of every European
threat of war. If private greed will
not permit a modification of repressive
navigation laws. If monopoly will not
tolerate the thought of even casual
competition, nothing remains but for
the United States government Itself
to own and operate a merchant marine.
There is far greater necessity for
that than for the construction and op
eration of a government railroad In
Alaska.
Government ownership nnd opera
tion of a merchant marine would of
fer a scanty competition to American
private capital. It would not be like
a parcels post which has cut so deep
ly Into the business of the long-estab
lished express companies. The com
petition would bo largely between gov
ornmcnt-owned hips under foreign
flags.
We should regard such an enter
prise as a last resort , shrort of pay
ing outrageous subsidies, but it is in
finitely preferable to present-day con
ditions. It would be far better than
subsidies; for if the American people
are going to spend public money on a
merchant marine they should control
It and have something to show for
the investment. Certainly if there is
no other way ou of an intolerab:9 situ
ation, the United States government
has the power and the money and tue
administrative machinery to own and
operate a merchant marine under the
Amgrican flag.?New York World.
, STIRRING WAR DRAMA
AT THE GRAND TONIGHT
In these times of war one mny get
an Idea of what war means by witness
ing the stirring war drama as pictured
at the Grand theatre tonight entitled,
"War Sentinel."
Tonight Is the last night to see this.
I It pictures the North and South in the
death-struggle. It Is a two reel drama,
. full of action every minute, and one of
; the most exciting features yet seen In
; Juneau. It is both entertaining and
education.
? And all for the same price we show
' besides ??The Top of New York," an
I other interesting and entertaining dra
r ma.
< Also four good comedy pieces with a
| laugh in every line. (???)
?
' NOTICE.
? ?
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that
In accordance with a city ordinance
all chimneys other than brick or con
: crete must be removed within 30 days
from date of this notice, after which
t date the ordinance will be enforced.
Dated August 12, 1914.
WM. McBRIDE,
8-12-61. Chief of Police.
Automobile for hire. Careful driver.
Call up 57 or 321. 7-9-tf.
1
1 SUGAR IS ADVANCING |
gjIF YOU ARE GOING TO PUT UP ANY FRUIT THIS
IJSEASON WE ADVISE YOU TO GET YOUR SUGAR
NOW, as the Sugar Market is Advancing Every Day.
FRESH FRUITS We'll Supply You
H. J. RAYMOND
|/ ? JLWU- Jk -JL i-T-* J? J PHOXE NUMBER 28
BOV SCOUTS MAY'
BE WAR FACTORS
(By Oortrude E. Mallette.)
Boy Scouts.
Among mnny other phrases of tho
War's Influence that the world at large
Is likely to overlook In Its Interest
In the greater things, Is tho activity
of the Boy Scouts. A scout movement
was begun in Juneau Inst ycnr, a fnct
which will naturally bring nearer
home the bigger significance of the
movement In foreign lands In this
time of strife and struggle.
Already tho Scouts are playing nn
Important role In connection with the
military operations in tho European
conflict, though their work will be
rather Incidental than a part of the
active campaign. Several Scouts have
been taken as spies In Belgium, thus
early In tho war, while on duty as
bridge guards. Essentially an organ
working for peace, the largest work of
the Scouts will undoubtedly bo con
nected with the enormous task of
harvesting tho crops In tho warring
countries. Baden-Powell, one of the
foremost organizers In the Scout work,
remarked a few days ago: "It should
be remembered that though we are
against war, we are not, therefore
against self-defense. It follows that
evory patriotic Scout, should necessity
arise, will respond to his country's
call for such aid as he may be able
to render."
Through their training In signal
work, undoubtedly a large number of
the older Scouts will be called into
service In the capacity of officers' at
tendants, orderlies and messengers.
Baden-Powell lg careful to state, how
ever, that whatever part they may
play in such connection will be in their
Individual capacities, and not as Boy
Scouts, but simply as young men well
trained for the duties required of
them.
liiivo muiiv Uiun vi^uuiAaiiuiio ouuu
Ing permanence ahd power, the Scout
movement can be traced back to
widely differing sources where con
structive Ideas came to boy workers
and were tested with varying degrees
of success. The emphasis of tho move
ment has always been laid upon peace
interests, rather than otherwise, and
the greatest aim is efficient citizen
ship, service and character building.
England was tho pioneer in the move
ment, nnd since its first establishment
In that country it has been establish
ed in twenty-seven countries. There
are approximately 500,000 Boy Scouts
In Europe, divided as follows: Great
Britain, 200,000; Germany, 50,000;
France, 8,000; Austria-Hungary, 15.
000; Russia-Poland, 8,000; Servia. 4.
000; Scandinavia. 30,000; Scattered,
35,000.
CASE AGAINST ARVID
FRANZEN DISMISSED
The case against Arvid Franzen,
chargod with using obscene language,
was dismissed In the commissioner*
court yesterday after a trial in which
the jury failed to agree. Testimony in
troduced tended to qhow that there
was enmity existing between the de
fendant and the principal witness for
the government.
GEORGIA ARRIVALS.
The Georgia, arriving from Sitka,
brought the following named passen
gers for Juneau: From Sitka?Mrs. A.
Fleck, J. D. Harrington, Charles
Hughes, Charles Desenpluer, A. Van
Dyck, John Goodell, Peter Sing; from
Excursion Inlet?J. Toner; from Fun
ter^-P. F. Viam.
PETER SING BROUGHT
TO FEDERAL JAIL HERE
Peter Sing, the Oriental held on the
charge of burglary was brought over
from Sitka yesterday by Deputy Mar
shal John Goodell, to be held in the
Federal Jail.
SOCIALIST SOCIAL.
The Socialists of Juneau will give an
entertainment and dance at the Doug
las natatorlum hall Saturday evening.
Chris Fox will deliver an address.
A novel feature of the program will
be a demonstration of clay modeling.
Three ploce orchestra. Ferry for Ju
neau at 2 a. m. 8-14-21.
JUST RECEIVED.
A full lino of D. M. C. COLORED
COTTONS: also linen sheeting and
pillow tubing, new towelling and plain
damask. Mrs. Albert Berry, The
Voguo, 317 Seward ? (Tu, Th Sa.)
"IMOGENE."
Just arrived the new and lasting
odor of perfume "Imogene," including
Imogene toilet water and face pow
der. Something new and distinctly in
dividual, ask to bo shown at Doran's
Proscription Pharmacy. Phono 6.?tf
> t t '
ST. GEORGE HOU8E.
Everything now. crood light and
well ventilated rooms. Baths, electrlo
IghL Good board.
Reasonable rates by the day, week
I >r month. 4-18-tf
MRS. A. E. VESTAL.
! "Hello Jack; what-s happened, you
? look as happy as a clam?"
! "Just had one of those good lunches
? at the Bergman Dining Room. Only
I cost mo 35c, too. Bettor try one.
' 'Nuff' to make anyone feel good.?
; ?(8-6-tf.)
> Daughter would like to know where
; abouts of her father, named Peter
> Smith; last heard of in about '95 or
I '97. Please communicate with Anna
? Erland. Waldorf Hotel, No. 402B, Se
I attlo, Wash. 8-14-3t
y ? ? ?
?
? If you want a Joy ride call up 6?
{ or 321. 7-9-tf
ADVERTISEMENT OF ATTACH
MENT.
WHEREAS, A libel has been died in
tho District Court of tho Territory of
Alaska, Division Number One, at Ju
neau, AJaska, against Bort Lang, own
er, and the gnsollne launch White
Star, alleging that between the 16th
day of October, 1912, and the 21st day
of March, 1913, at the special request
of said owner, libellants furnished said
launch merchandise, stores and sup
plies, on the credit of said owner and
said launch, to the value of $153.85,
and which has not been paid, and
praying that tho said launch, her en
gines, boilers, machinery, tackle, ap
parel and furniture, may be con-j
demned and sold to pay the demands J
of tho said court to me directed, I do I
hereby. In pursuance of the monition of
the said court to be directed, I do here
by give public notice to all persons
claiming, or otherwise having, any in
terest in the said vessol, her engines.
boilers, machinery, tackle apparel and;
furniture, that they be and appear bo
fore the said court on the 3d day of
September next, at 10 o'clock In the
forenoon, then and there to Interpose
their claims and make their allega
tions In that behalf.
Dated July 31st, 1914.
H. A. BISHOP,
U. S. Marshal.
By HECTOR McLEAN, Deputy.
A. B. CALLAHAM,
H. B. LE FEVRE,
Proctors for LIbellants,
Juneau, Alaska.
First publication, July 31, 1914.
Last publication, August 15, 1914.
FIRST CLASS ROOM nd BOARD
Mrs. M. H. Lynch has opened
a new boarding house at 318
Fourth Street. First class tablo
board at reasonable rates. Pa
tronage solicited. Special Sun
day dinner?75c. Phone 381.
?h-i ii m in n 11 n 1111 hi i
:: DR. H. VANCE::
The
;? osteopath;:
Rooms 5 and 9 Malony Bldg.
Consultation and Examination 1!
| i i Froo. Phono M2.
Graduate American School of |
I Osteopathy, Klrksvllle, Mo. [
Seven years' active practice.
Office hours, 9 to 12 m. 1 to C
ii p. m., or by appointment
i n i n m i u 1111 u i n 11 u ?
milimmimiiininiiii j
j A. Benson
Stand at Wills' Grocery Store J
X Phone* 4-9 or S-S-6 ! ,
? ORDERS PROMPTLY EXECUTED - ?
11 n 111III ill ??a 1111H I H>
?
Before the Season Grows Old
WE KNOW YOU'LL ENJOY WEARING A BENJAMIN
SUIT. THE NEW FALL SUITS ARE NOW HERE.
STETSON
t.i IJIBI' 7\ I. 'H-. 1 L . . V.V>
I"nrHE Cock of the
*walk" has noth
ing on us fof pride
?we are just that proud
of our new Fall Stetsons,
An assortment of styles,
blocks and colors that
you won't find in every
store, and, of course,
you know what Stetson
style and service mean
to the man who is
critical about his dress.
Just take a few minutes
today to see them, even
if you are not ready
to buy. Soft and Stiff
Stetsons for Fall.
An Ideal
Shoe
for Wet
Weather
Service
The unusual construc
tion of the Mayer Dry
Sox Shoe makes it the
greatest shoe special of
the times.
It is designed espe
cially for rain, snow and
slush, and general wet
weather service, and for
this purpose is in a
class all by itself.
The construction can
not be improved upon
for a shoe of this char
acter.
Try a
DRY SOX
and be convinced.
"It's Lots of Fun to
live in a trunk if
the trunk is a
STERLING."
When you travel your
trunk is your home.
You want a home that
has a good appearance.
There must be "some
thing individual" about
the place that you call
home. STERLING
travel goods have that
"something individual".
There is a feeling of
satisfaction when you see
STERLING travel goods
in the hands of the bag
gagemen. You don't
worry about breaksor loss
es if your trunk bears this
Back of every STERL
ING trunk is our guaran
tee assuring satisfaction
in every particular.
And best of all?
reasonable prices.
B. M. Behrends Company, Inc. I
i: |
! We Sell Electric Washing Machines |
< ? 1 < >
< ? o
0 O
i; Sold on Instalments madTcwi"payforit8elf/ YouronIy H
1 ? - outlay is the first payment?the saving in < ?
? 4 *
] I laundry bills will more than make the future payments. Wash-day has no ter- 11
O * |
o rors for the woman who owns an electric washing machine. The cost is so low <>
o that any family can afford to own one. Cost of operation will not exceed five ..
? ?*". . < >
\ I cents per hour. Come and look at it. Demonstrations any time. < ?
EXCLUSIVE FEATURES j
4 ?
4 ?
f
?
?
; A Reversible Wringer that can be operated
? by either Hand Lever or Foot Treadle.
A patented one piece Metal Wringer Box.
\ This box is in every way superior to the best
?
; wood wringer box that can be constructed.
Shaft Driven Wringer ? Noiseless, Safe
? and Certain.
>
\ No mechanism on top of tub. All working
?
\ parts being under tub, entirely protected and
? out of the way.
! Washer is designed for power exclusively
>
\ and is more substantially built than compe
\ titive Machines.
?
? <
Metal drain cock on bottom of tub drains
i ?
tub completely without tilting. 31
i ?
1-6 H. P. Electric Motor having ample pow- < 3
er to handle the wash at all times. < ?
< >
i ?
Complete Washer is mounted on castors ; J
and can be easily moved. - *>
i *
By reason of the fact that the wringer on 3 3
< ?
the Voss Electric Washer is controlled by 3;
either foot treadle or hand lever, it is the <?
safest power wringer in the world. The ac- 33
< ?
tion is positive and instantaneous. Must be 3 3
< ?
seen to be appreciated. <;
< ?
i >
< >
i >
I The Alaska Supply Co. |
r 4 ? " < >

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