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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, August 17, 1914, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. IV., NO. 544. JUNEAU, ALASKA, MONDAY, AUG. 17,1914. . PRICE, TEN CENTS
DESPITE REPULSES GERMANS CONTINUE TO ADVANCE
Japs Demand Germans Surrender Feu- East
CONSTITUTIONALISTS OCCUPY MEXICO CITY
Tokyo Sends Ultimatum
To German Empire
I
TOKYO, Aug. 17?Japan has
sent an ultimatum to Germany
to withdraw from Japanese
waters armed vessels of all
kinds; to disarm at once those
which cannot be withdrawn and
to deliver not later than Septem
ber IS to imperial Asiatic
authorities without condition or
compensation Germany's entire
leased territory at Kiauchau with
the view of its eventual restora
tion to China.
EXTRA
GERMANS LOSE
OREAONAUGHT
London, Aug. 17.?A dispatch to
the Central News Agency says the
captain of the Dutch steamer Ep
silon, arriving from Vnniden, re
ported that a German dreadnaught
Is lying in the harbor of Trond
hjem, Norway, out of commission
with her funnels shot away and
holes In her sides.
GERMANS LOSE AS
FRENCH ADVANCE
London. Aug. 17.?A War Office
report says French are advancing
over German trenches in upper Al
sace and that th?? are finding
the evacuated trenched filled with
German dead and wounded. Ev
erything Indicates that the slaugh
ter of the last few days fighting
has been Immense.
JAP CRUISERS GETS
ORDERS TO BE READY
SAN DIEGO. Calif., Aug. 17. ? The
Japanese cruiser Idgumo received or
ders today from Takyo to be ready to
sail on 30 minutes notice.
JAPAN ACTS UNDER
TREATY AGREEMENT
WASHINGTON. Aug. 17.?The text
of the offensive and defensive alli
ance between Japan and Great Britain,
under the terms of which the former
.has sent an ultimatum to Germany, in
jfcart provides:
i^(a) The consolidation of their
forces for the maintenance of general
peave in Eastern Asia and India, (h)
The preservation of the Independence
and integrity of the Chinese Empire,
(c) T1?C maintenance of the territor
ial righf* of the hlRh contracting par
ties in thV regions of Eastern Asia and
India, ani1 the defense of their special
inter"*,j^tn said regions.
' > ? ?
famine threatens
\ scotch metropolis
GLASGOW. Aug. 15.?A food famine
is threatened in Glasgow. Sugar has
risen from -5 cents a pound, the price
prevailing before the outbreak of the
war. to 12 ceTts.
50 Per Cent Advance at Liverpool.
LIVERPOOL* Aug. 15.?The retail
price of provisions in Liverpool have
advanced 50%.
henry brafnober
is ill at tacoma
Henry Braruober. well known at Ju
neau. Is ill at Tacoma. The Tacoma
Tribune, o* August 7th. says:
"Henry Bratnober. one of Tacoma's
best ythown citizens and an authority
-?fTl Alaskan questions, is ill at the
from Alaska a few days ago, during
Tacoma hotel following his return
which he made several hard trips ov
er bad trails. Mr. Bratnober's condi
tion is very serious. It is said, the
trouble being located In the kidneys."
leipzig anchors in
san francisco bay
SAN FRANCISCO. Aug. 17. ? The
German cruiser Leipzig anchored In
side Golden Gate this morning and
sent word to the American authorities
that It was desired to get into com
munlcatoin with the German consul.
the weather today.
Twenty-four hours ending at 3 p. m.:
Maximum?54.
Minimum?49.
Precipitation?58.
Cloudy; rain.
'GREECE MAY
MAKE WAR
ON TURKEY
LONDON. Aug. 17. ? Official dis
patches say that Greece has received
Information that Turkish troops are
crossing the border into Bulgarian ter
ritory. and that Turkey has been no
tified that if the report is confirmed
that Greece will take corresponding
military measures against Turkey im
mediately.
RUSSIA USES RELIGION
AND RACE FEELING
? ?
LONDON. Aug. 17.?The St. Peters
burg correspondent of the London
Standard says Russia is using the re
ligious fervor and racial solidarity of
*he Russian people to stimulate zeal
among the troops in the war with Ger
many and Austria.
Troops are preceded as they go off
to the front for action by black robed,
long bearded priests of the Orthodox
church, carrying crosses and saying
prayers. Bands, playing religious] and
barbaric aris alternately are also used.
It is said the efforts are producing the
desired effect.
C. E. BUNNELL LEAVES
FOR VALDEZ HOME
???
Charles E. Bunnell. Democratic nom
inee for Delegate to Congress, left on
the Alameda for his home at Valdez,
after a preliminary campaign trip ov
er Southeastern Alaska. After a short
stay in the Third division. Mr. Bun
nell will go to Fairbanks and Nome.
He will return from the latter palce
and resume his campaign in the First
division in October.
Bunnell Maxes t-rienos.
Mr. Bunnell made many friends for
himself and his candidacy in Southeast
ern Alaska during his visit here. Sat
urday he spent most of the day on
Douglas island, speaking to a large
and interested crowd in the evening.
Mr. Bunnell's friends are highly sat
isfied with tho condition of his cam
paign and the fine reception that has
been accorded him as a candidate and
the platform upon which he Is running
by the people of Alaska.
BUNNELL IMPRESSES
DOUGLAS FAVORABLY
?+?
DOUGLAS. Aug. 17.?That he cre
ated a favorabl"Impression, would be
a weak way of expressing the feeling
produced among Douglas and Tread
well people by Charles E. Bunnell, the
Democratic candidate for Delegate to
Congress from Alaska, by his visit to
the Island and at the reception held
for him at the Lyric theatre last Sat
urday.
In the evening at the reception Mr.
Bunnell, when called upon to speak to
those present, gave a short history of
himself by way of introduction and af
ter stating the Important issues of the
coming campaign, said he was not run
ning for the purpose of sacrificing him
self to the party, but that he was out
to win.
The candidate will return before
election, and he may be assured of
crowded houses when he comes again.
ORPHEUM PLANS FOR
THE COMING SEASON
Manager John John T. Speckett of
the Orpheum theatre returned from a
month's visit at Seattle and other
cities of the States on the Spokane.
Mr. Splckett made arrangements while
in Seattle for films for the Orpheum
theatre for the coming year. Among
other things he signed a contract with
the General Film company for the ex
clusive right to use in Juneau the films
controlled by it. They include the
productions of the Biograph. the Vita
graph. Pathe's Weekly, the Essanny,
Kalem. Lubin, Edison and Melles..
Electric Irons, guaranteed for five
years. $3.00 and $3.25 ? none better.
Vanadium steel hammers (something
new). "Test the bite." Gastlnean
Hardware & Machinery Co. 8-6-tf
DISTRICT COURT
CONVENED TODAY
The August term of the district
court convened at 10 o'clock this morn
ing, both grand and pet tit juries re
porting for work.
District Attorney John Rustgard,
who tendered his resignation to take
effect June 1. Is still holding the of
fice and was personally present at
court this morning and conducted the
examination during tho empanelling
of the grand Jury. Mr. Rustgard says
that ho has some private practice
cases coming up at this term of court
but that for the present he will con
tinue to perform the duties of the dis
trict attorney's office.
Out of the original venire of 23
drawn for the grand Jury, fifteen qual
ified for service and an open venire for
eight was made returnable at 1 o'clock.
Charles West and William Livle both
of whom live on Douglas island, were
excused on account of not being citi
zens of the United States. Those who
qualified were: William Albertson,
William Dickinson, W. Engberg, I.
Goldstein. L. G. Hurlbutt, Fred Maglll.
Juneau; L. Keist, Douglas; M. Benson,
David Kinzie, A. Murphy. J. W. Wil
son. Tread well; J. E. Gamble, Bernard
Hirst, Sitka; J. Dennerlln, James Don
o%'an, W. B. Ford, William Holgate. Ira
H. King, Haines; George Fickhart, L.
C. Gault, W. H. Warren, Skagway.
The following cases will bo Investi
gated:
Jose Ramirez, Juneau; Mike Talty,
Skagway; J. W. Felix, Juneau; Alice
Cox, Juneau; John Radcliff, Skagway:
Manuel Solano, Juneau; John Smtlh,
Juneau; Tom Jimmy, Haines; John
Santone, Juneau; Nicholas Lopez,
Wrangell, Ed. Ericson, Wrangell;
Frank Estrada, Juneau; Ernest
'Mowlds, Juneau; Chris Chalmus, Ju
neau; Edward Jacobs, Haines; John
Davidson, Juneau; Alphons Jiver, Pet
ersburg; Pedro Rodriguez, Douglas; J.
L. Curtin, Juneau, selling liquor to
Indians; Joe Gonzales, Yakutat, as
sault with dangerous weapon; Mamie
Harper, shooting with Intent to kill.
Douglas; G. Whitnig. pocket-picking,
Douglas; G. Whiting, pocket-picking,
hsita, Sitkoh bay, Chatham, murder in
first degree; Michael Kcane, Wrang
ell; Steve Etepanoff. Juneau; H. P.
Kittoe, larceny; Peter Sing, burglary
In dwelling house, Sitka; H. J. Keat
ing, forgery, Juneau; J. Burns, larceny
in dwelling. Juneau.
Pettit Jury.
The pettlt panel as drawn Is as fol-'
lows: H. Burton, C. A. Fox, Win. Jen-!
sen, L. M. Rltter, Robert Sanders, W.!
K. Zott, Juneau; L. Church, Gust;
Grundler, H. K. Irvine, Frank Simp
son. Hugh Tracy, J. G. Zimmerman,
Douglas: T. F. Demldoff, W. P. Mills,
Jo hn Trierschleld, Nick Trlerschleld,
Sitka; Ed. Fay, T. A. Page, George
Vogel. Haines; W. B. Batson, W. C.
Blanchard, Emll Rlchter, J. M. Tanner
Skagway.
W. Jensen, L. M. Rltter and J. G.
Zimmerman asked to be excused. The
request of the latter was granted and
the others token under advisement
GRAND JURY AT WORK
?DAVE MARTIN BAILIFF
? ?
The grand jury was completed with
a special venire of eight and com
menced Its labors this afternoon.
Dave Martin was appointed bailiff for
the grand Jury. The special venire
consists of the following: John P. Lin
thai, P. V. Woodhouse, Frank Gehr
Ing, Frank Johnston, J. W. McMillan,
W. M. Price, William Stewart, and J.
E. EsteB.
? ? ?
BUTZER'S CONDITION
REGARDED DANGEROUS
?+?
"That George Butzer will be an In
valid the remainder of his life if he
recovers at all from his automobile
accident seems to be the opinion of
those acquainted with his condition,"
said John T. Spickett, who has just re
turned from Seattle. Mr. Spickett
says Dr. F. B. Whiting, formerly of
Alaska, and Dr. George M. Torton, an
other of the leading surgeons of Seat
tle, were planning to operate on him
last Friday.
Mr. Spickett says T. J. Patterson,
who was injured In the Grand Trunk
Pacific dock fire, Is out and about
again, though he had a narrow escape.
He was nearly suffocated when a clerk
got him to a window where the fresh
air sufficiently revived him to permit
him to jump.
That J. F. Malony is Improving con
stantly at Seattle Is the cheering
news that Mr. Spickett brings back to
the friends of that pioneer Juneau
lawyer and business man.
NEW RULE
, BEGINS IN
MEXICO
MEXICO CITY, Aug. 17.?Gon. Ob
regon, with 10,000 troopB, took pos
session of Mexico City and the palace
Saturday in the name of Provisional
President Carranza.
Tho palace was turned over to Gen.
Obregon at 3 o'clock in tho afternoon.
The movement was peaceful in every
respect, and the incoming army was
welcomed by the people by signs of
relief that tho transfer has been
made, and that stable authority was
again established.
GOV. GLYNNTND
SULZER TO CONTEST
?*?
NEW YORK, Aug. 17.?Gov. Martin
H. Glynn and former Gov. William
Sulzer today announced thoir candida
cies for tho Democratic nomination for!
Governor, subject to the action of the
party primaries.
NEW YORK DRIES
NOMINATE SULZER
SYRACUSE. N. Y.. Aug. 17.? The
Prohibitionists nominated former Gov.
William Sulzer for tho Governorship
of New York at their convention here
Saturday.
PAYROLL BANDITS
ALL KILLED
?+?
WILLIAMSON. W. Va., Aug. 17.?
The five bandits who killed coal mine
ofllclals and robbed them of $15,000
pay roll money last week were chased
into a cave this morning and dynamit
ed. All five of them were killed.
The killing of tho Ave pay roll baud
its makes eleven deaths all told as a
result of the incident. The robbers
killed three men at the time of the
robbery and three of their pursuers
were killed.
WAR HITS COPPER
MINING HARD BLOW
BUTTE. Mont, Aug. 17.?Two
thousand miners in the copper mines
of this vicinity have been thrown out
of work on account of the curtailment
of copper production on account of the
loss of the European markets for cop
per caused by the war.
Refined copper has dorpped to 10
cents a pound.
Information received here is that
tho copper production of the United
States will be cut in half on account
of the closing In whole or part of cop
per mines throughout the United
States and Mexico.
FOREIGNERS IN STATES
DO NOT HAVE TO FIGHT
WASHINGTON, Aug. 17.?Secretary
of State William J. Bryan issued a
statement Saturday saying that for-)
eigncrs in the United States and na-j
turallzed citizens of the country can-!
not bo forced to Join the armed forces
of any of the warring Nations so long
as they remain in the United States. J
NEGRO KILLS DIVORCED
WOMAN AND CHILDREN
?+?
MADISON, Wis.. Aug. 17.?Mrs. Ma
mah Berthwick Cheney, tho divorced
wlfo of a Chicago manufacturer, and
her children, John and Martha Ber
wick Cheney, aged 10 and 13 years, re
spectively, and three others were mur
dored by Julian Carton, a Negro chef.
Tho slaughter took place in a bunga
low where Mrs. Cheney and her lover,
Frank Lloyd Wright, a wealth Chica
go architect, had been living. He used
a hand axe.
PRISONERS BROUGHT
FROM ADJACENT TOWNS
Deputy Marshal W. D. Grant arrived
from Wrangoll today with the follow
ing prisoners who are held to await
nctlon by the grand Jury: Nicholas
Lopez, Ed. Erickson for selling liquor
to Indians; Michael Kcane, for lar
ceny. Deputy John C. Allen of ePt
ersburg, brought from that place A.
River, charged with selling liquor to
Indians.
WILSON OPPOSES
FOREIGN LOANS
-WASHINGTON, Aug. 17.?President
TOfcow Wilson Saturday morning
formally disapproved of American
bankers floating loans for any of the
belligerent European countries in the
United Statos.
New York Approves.
NEW YOUK, Aug. 17.?Conservative
banking sentiment In this city approve
tho action of President Woodrow Wil
son in objecting to the floatlon of
loans for tho countries of Europe en-j
gaged in war in the United States.
Said the president of a leading bank:
"While the commissions that could
be secured on European loans at the
present time are very attractive and
tho temptation to secure the profits
is groat they would add immensely
to tho strain that is on the country
at a time when foreign trade is inter
rupted by the luck of transportation
facilities and the accustomed mar
kets."
CANADA WILL
REGULATE PRICES
OTTAWA. Aug. 17. ? Tho Govern
ment will pass a special bill to regu
late all food prices throughout the
Dominion during the war. This will
be done at the meeting of Parliament.
The criminal code will be amended
also, giving the Government power to
deal with all alien suspects.
CANADIAN AUTHORIZES
INCREASE IN MONEY
OTTAWA, Aug. 17.?Tho Canadian
government has notified banks that
it will increase the note Issue to any
amount required, taking bank secur
ities In the form of commercial paper
as collateral. This is done to lessen
the demnnd for gold.
NO NEWS OF WAA
FROM WASHINGTON
j.
WASHINGTON. Aug. 15?An order
issued by President Wood row Wilson,
prohibiting nil government officials in
subordinate and semi-subordinate posi
tions from giving information respect
ing the government's activities in con
nection with the European war situ
ation, and even from expressing opin
ions which might bo interpreted as
coming from an official source has re
sulted in closing the lid on news of
Washington's* official operations.
ENGLISH BANKS ARE
USING SELF-MADE PAPER
NEW YORK. Aug. 15. ? Clearing
house certificates will bo issued in
London according to the present ex
pectations, and the general methods
used in the United States in meeting
the financial panic of 1907?methods
which at the time were severely criti
cised In England?are being adopted.
LONG DISTANCE FIGHT
IN ATLANTIC OCEAN
HALIFAX, Aug. 17.?For half an
hour Thursday night H. M. S. Bristol,
the smallest British warship on the
North Atlantic, fought a long range
duel with the Karlsruh, one of the
largest and fastest Gorman cruisers,
[ which is trying to intercept British
shipping on tho North Atlantic.
ALCOHOL MAY BE
USED FOR HEATING
WASHINGTON,4 Aug. 15. ? The
House ways and means committee has
reported bill to permit the mixing of
domestic and wood alcohol and so to
cheapen the manufacture of that ar
ticle that it will bo brought into gen
oral use for heat, light and power.
GOWEY SHEPARD TO
LEAVE FOR STANFORD
Gowoy Shepard has arrived in town
from the Kensington mine where he
hns been employed for some time, and
will leave for tho South on the Admir
al Sampson to matriculate at Leland
Stanford, jr., University.
Gowey Shepard secured his high
school education at Juneau and Seat
tle, graduating from the Quoen Anno
school in tho last named city in 1913.
Since his graduation he has been em
ployed by tho AlaRka-Gastineau com
pany, spending most of his time at
their Kensington property.
He expects to take a mining course
at tho university.
FRENCH SINK
AUSTRIAN
WARSHIPS
LONDON, Aug. 17.?A dispatch to
Reuter's news agency says a battle
which began In" the Adriatic sea yes
terday between French and Austrian
warships continued for an hour. Two
Austrian ironclads were sunk, one set
on fire and the fourth fled towards
Cnttaro.
The damage to tlio French vessels
was slight.
FRENCH AIR MEN DROP
BOMBS ON CITY OF MET2
PARIS, Aug. 17.?Two French aero
planes flew from Verdu to Metz
where two bombs were dropped on a
building in which Zeppelin airships
were housed. They returned in safe
ly through 200 cannon shots that
were fired at them.
FRENCH BEGIN OFFENSIVE
OPERATIONS ON BORDER
PARIS, Aug. 17.?Official dispatches
yesterday morning from the frontier
say that tho French offensive move
ment began in great force from Saare
bourg on the Franco-German frontier
to Lunevlllo.
FRANCE REPLIES TO
PRESIDENT WILSON'S ORDER
PARIS, Aug. 17.?Premier Vlvanl,
replying to the offer of President
Wood row Wilson's offer of mediation
In tho war in Europe, said that "France
has been attacked despite her steady
refusal to take the aggressive."
He added:
"You may be assured that the
French government and people will
recognize in your idea new evidence of
your interest in tho destinies of
France."
Germany Acknowledges Offer.
WASHINGTON, Aug. 17.?Germany
has acknowledged the receipt of the
President's proffer of mediation.
CANADA TO RAISE
SECOND CONTINGENT
OTTAWA, Aug. 17. ? Canada will
mobilize a second contingent for
abroad as soon as the present one
starts.
VOLUNTEERS MUST GET
CONSENT Or WIVES
.MONTREAL, Aug. 17? Every mar
ried man volunteering for active ser
vice in the army will be compelled
to secure the written consent of his
wife to his enlistment before he can
he accepted according to a military
order issued by the government Sat
urday.
"LITTLE BOB" TO
COMMAND COLONIES
LONDON, Aug. 17.?The king has
appointed Lord Robert to colonel-in
chief of the overseas services that
may come to England.
BERLIN HAS NOT HEARD
OF MRS. WILSON'S DEATH
THE HAGUE, Aug. 17. ? The ef
fectiveness of the German censorship
of the telegraphic news may be judg-|
ed from the circumstance that the
death of Mrs. Woodrow Wilson was
not known in Berlin as late as last
Wednesday.
TENNESSEE REACHES GREAT
BRITAIN WITH RELIEF
FALMOUTH, Eng., Aug. 17. ? Tho
American armored cruiser Tennessee
arrived here today with $5,000,000 in
gold to help Americans who are
stranded in Europe.
German Batallions
Sweeping up Meuse
LONDON, Aug, 17?Despite
repeated repulses, Monday
morning finds the German
batallions in Belgium contin
uing the forward movement
toward an inevitable decisive
encounter. They are sweep
ing along up the valley of
the Meuse river against the
allied armies, which, en
trenched and confident,
await the clash when the
two armies shall come to
gether in full force.
LINES DRAWING CLOSER
In the meanwhile the line
along the Alsace and Lor
raine frontier are drawing
closer and colser.
+ + + + + + + ?
?fr ?
? EMPEROR OFF ?
+ TO THE FRONT ?
t ? ? ? ?
+ LONDON, Aug. 17.?A d!a- ?
? patch from Amsterdam to the ?
? Central News Agency says re- ?
+ ports from Berlin says that ?
+ Emperor William has loft for ?
+ the front again. ?
+ ?
BELGIANS WIN BATTLE
NORTH OF MEUSE
LONDON, Aug. 17. ? Tho Central
News Agency received a dispatch yes
terday which says a rider from the
Belgian outposts reports that Jthe
Belgians won an important engage
ment Saturday evening between Dlest
and Ilasselt.
Tho Germans lost 3,000 killed and
wounded, and the Belgians lost 200.
GERMANS DRIVE 2.000
PEOPLE FROM METZ
LONDON, Aur. 17.?An official an
nouncement made yesterday by the
military bureau of Information Bays
the Germans expelled 2,000 persons
from Metz across the French border,
KivinR as their reason that thoy would
have to be fed if they were permitted
to remain in Metz, and it was prefer
red that the French bear that expense.
BATTLE LINE IS THREE
HUNDRED MILE8 LONG
PARIS, Auk. 17.?The Fronch Mini
ster of War yestorday issued a state
ment settinK forth the conditions un
der which the battle that is now being
fought between the allied forces and
the German army will be waged. He
shows that the battle line will be 300
miles long, adding:
"Tho whole French army will battle
with the exception of those German
troops which are concentrated on the
Kastern frontier of the German Em
pire. The violation of the neutrality
of Belgium has caused tho extension of
the French and Belgian lines to the
frontier of Holland, and the next bat
tle, therefore, will bo from Basel to
Maestrlcht with several million men
engaged on each side. The battle will
be fought on the soil of Belgium,
France, Germany and Luxemburg. The
battle at ihe north end of the long line
will start in Belgian territory. That
In the central part will be partly on
French and partly on German soil,
| which in tho south it is already under
! way on German territory."
Tho statement adds that news of
definite results need not bo expected
for at least a week and possibly long
er.
SATURDAY FINDS ALLIES'
LINES FARTHER EAST
LONDON, Aug. 17.?Dispatches re
ceived yesterday morning from Brus
sels says darkness Saturday night
found the lines of tho allied armies
entrenched In a long line in eastern
Bolgium extending from the extreme
northern portion of the Kingdom far
south Into Luxemburg, ready for de
fesonsive or offensive operatlonss,

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