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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, August 19, 1914, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. IV., NO. 546. JUNEAU, ALASKA, WEDNESDAY, AUG. 19, 1914. ?" PRICE, TEN CENTS
ITALIAN BLOOD IS SHED BY SOLDIERS OF KAISER
Britain s Second Army Is 120,000 Strong
GRAND TRUNK S. S. PRINCE ALBERT IS LOST
Britain lias 220,000
Men on Continent
LONDON, Aug. 19?
The Inewly landed Brit
ish expedition to France
which completed disem
barkation yesterday
numbered 120,000 men,
many of whom saw ser
vice in South Africa.
They include men in all
branches of army ser
vice. They are already
under way to the front
where they will join
their comrades in the
field.
This makes 220,000
British soldiers on the
Continent with the Bel
gian and French armies.
Gen. Dorrin Commands.
The second expeditionary ar
my is in command of Gen. Sir
Horace Smith Dorrin, Gen.
Grierson having died before em
barkation.
King Delivers Message.
Gen. Dorrin caused the King's
message to the troops to be read
to each company. The K?ng
said:
"You are leaving home to light
a powerful enemy for the safety
and honor of my Empire. Bel
gium, whose country we are
pledged to defend, has been at
tacked, and France is about to
be invaded by the same powerful
foe. I pray God to bless, guard
and bring you back victorious."
Kitchener's Last Words.
LONDON, Aug. iy. ? L?ora
Kitchener delivered a soldierly
homily to the men of the Brit-!
. ish expeditionary force. After'
^?Eing that they had been order
tM^abroad to help their French
comrades against the invasion of
a commbn enemy, he enjoined:
"Do j\yr duty bravely, fear
God and horifcr the King."
?HT"?
FRENCH FIRST TO
VIOLATE NEUTRALITY
LONDON, Aug. 19.?A Berlin dis
patch quotes Gen. Stein as saying that
French officers were sent to Liege be
fore the war to instruct the Belgians
in the defense of their fortifications.
He added:
"This conduct had to be regarded j
as an infraction of Belgian neutrality
by France."
AMERICANS VOLUNTERRING
TO AID FRANCE IN WAR
PARIS. Aug. 19.?The American vol
unteers corps now totals 120 men.
These have offered their services to
France for the purpose to "in a small
measure repay the service La Fayette
rendered the Americans in the Revo
lutionary War."
INDIA TO HELP
ENGLAND IN WAR
?+?
LONDON, Aug. 19.?India is pre
paring to send two army divisions to
Europe to join in the war against Ger
many.
THREE MUSKETEERS.
"Three Musketeers" at Juneau thea
tre. Friday. Saturday and Sunday
nights.
SKATING tonight at Jaxon's rink.
THE WEATHER TODAY.
Twenty-four hours ending at 3 p. m.:
Maximum?69.
Minimum?61.
Cloudy; rain.
Precipitation?.43 inches.
PRENCH
ADVANCING
IN ALSACE
PiAlRIS, Aug. 19?
The French invasion of
Alsace continues. The
advance which is pro
ceeding north is within
less than twenty miles
i of Strassburg. It is es
timated here that near
ly halt of the province
is under French con
trol.
Army in Germany.
PARIS, Aug. 19.?Gen. Jos
eph Joffre, commanding the
French armies, reporting to the
War Office, said:
"We have conquered a large
portion of the Vosges valleys on
the Alsation watershed, and oc
cupied a position 32 miles inside
the German frontier.' '
ABANDON SAARBURG.
LONDON, Aug. 19.?An offi
cial dispatch from the British
embassy says the Germans
abandoned Saarburg yesterday
evening. They were strongly
entrenched there with artillery.
GERMANS ADMIT REVERSES
IN ALSACE PROVINCE
BERLIN. Aug. 19?The Wolffe News
Bureau admits that the Germans have
sustained reverses In Alsace since
their victory at Mulhausen. It says
that after the first series of French vic
torie in Alsace they were driven out of
the country toward Belfort: that later
the French returned and defeated the
small force of German artillery that
was in their front, capturing two bat
teries which had become disabled.
PATRIOTIC CANADIANS
WANT MEN TO GO
?+?
WINNIPEG. Aug. 19. ? Colonel
Frank Melghen, president of the Lake
of the Woods Milling Company, has
advised the employees who have to
go to the front that they will have
their situations kept open for them
and will receive full pay during their
absence.
SWISS REPUBLIC HAS
240,000 MEN ARMED
PARIS. Aug. 19.?Switzerland has
her army mobilized for the purpose
of protecting her neutrality in the
! European war. There are 240,000 men
i under arms in that country.
CITY OF SEATTLE
SAILS FOR NORTH
SEATTLE. Aug. 19.? The City of
Seattle sailed for the North with 40
round trip passengers and the follow
ing named for Gastineau channel:
For Juneau?H. Nightingale. William
Jenkins. Mrs. Mabel Gilpin, and R. H.
Wilson.
For Douglas?Mrs. A. Van Weed.
For Treadwell?Mrs. Katherine Ed
ley.
NORTHWESTERN COMING.
SEATTLE. Aug. 19. ? The North
western sailed for Alaska points from
this port this afternoon. The follow
ing cabin passengers were for Juneau:
J. W. Clark. E. W. Ferris, Hulda Hel
bert. Joseph Cloots, Joseph Borne, J.
Sey, F. Doeshe. Lester D. Henderson,
John Rex Thompson, Miss Margaret
Scott
PROGRESSIVE PARTY
LACKS SUBSTANCE
SARATOGA. N. Y.. Aug. 19. ? The
Republican State convention convened
here yesterday, and was addressed by
Senator Elihu Root, the only Republi
can remaining in high office In the
Empire State. Senator Root declared
In favor of another trial of the Repub
lican policy of a protective tariff. He
assorted that In tho controversy with
the Democratic party the Republican
party stands alone a sane adversary
"as it Is plain that the Progressive
party never had any real substance,
having only the poworful personality
of Col. Theodore Roosevelt behind it."
ANOTHER PIONEER
OVER LAST DIVIDE
Nicholas Haley, aged 75, one of Alas
ka's oldest pioneers, who has roslded
In Sitka for 47 years, died at St. Ann'B
hospital this afternoon from old age
and general breakdown. His daugh
ter, Miss Julia Haley, accompanied
him from Sitka a few days ago and
was with him to the last. Deceased
leaves besides his wife and daughter,
three sons, two of whom are now in
Sitka, and one in Oregon. Dorothy
Haley, who was Goddess of Liberty on
the Fourth of July at Juneau, and her
brother, Donald, are grand children.
Nicholas Haley came to Sitka about
the time Alaska was being taken over
by the United States from Russia. He
was a United States soldier. Mrs. Ha
ley accompanied him to Sitka. Haley
later engaged in prospecting and oth
er pursuits about Sitka and accumu
lated much valuable property.
No arrangements have as yet been
made for the funeral.
Weldeleiche Laid Away.
Death came to the Sitka pioneer,
while members of the "Alaska '87 Plo
neerss" and of Igloo No. 6. Pioneers of
Alaska, were gathering for tho funer
al of Wes Weldeleiche, Juneau pio
ner, who was buried here at 2 p. m.
Rev. George E. Renison delivered the
address in the chapel of the C. W.
Youn company. The following served
as pall bearers: W. J. Harris, Allen
James, Jack Overman. Tom Smith.
Willard Northrop, Doc Carver. There
was a very large attendance.
AMERICAN WOMAN SEES
BATTLE OF AEROPLANES
?4-?
NEW YORK, Aug. 19.?Mrs. M. E.
Harris, of West Montgomery, Ala.,
arriving from Europe today told of
witnessing a battle in the air be
tween French and German aeroplanes
near Elten, Belgium. She said: "Many
shots were exchanged. The train
on which we wero riding baited sud
denly. Soldiers disembarked, and
trained their guns on the Frenchmen.
Presently ono of the French machines
wobbled for an InstanL and then fell
to the ground."
GERMANS LOSE FIVE
AVIATORS AT BRUSSELS
PARIS, Aug. 19.?Five German avia
tors were killed by Brussels civil
guards according to a dispatch from
that place.
Four German Airships Destroyed.
PARIS. Aug. 19.?Paul Doumar, for
mer Finance Minister, returning from
Belgium, says he saw four German dir
igibles maneuvering over the war zone
destroyed by Belgian gunners.
WILE REPRESENTS
ROYAL FRUIT CO.
?
According to the Nome Nugget Al
bert Wile, postmaster at Iditarod and
well known in Juneau, is representing
the Royal Fruit company, which is op
erating at Juneau, Nome, Seward and
Iditarod. at his home town. James
Protopapas, head of the Royal Fruit
Co., is now at Nome and will remain
there until the close of the present
season when he will return to Juneau.
MASTER BUILDEA MOUNTS
EAGLE ON ZYNDA BUILDING
This morning Master Builder Orvlllo
Olts, who has superintended the con
struction of the big 5-story concrete
Zynda building, climbed to the top of
the 35-foot flag staff and mounted an
immense gilded spread eagle on the
top. The big bird has a spread of
three feet from tip to tip of the wings
and creates a striking appearance
from its loty height.
POPE IS
DEAD
???
ROME, Aug. 19.?Pope Pius
died this evening of a broken
heart.
He took the holy sacraments
late this afternoon when it be
came evident that the end might
come at any moment, and re
vived. He quickly passed into
a state of coma again, and the
end came tonight.
BRUSSELS
DOOMED
LONDON, Aug. 19.?Brussels
will be the first European capital
to fall
The largest German force
whi?h has yet shown itself is ad
vancing from the East.
Belgians and French are stub
bornly contesting their advance.
The Council of State, in tears,
abandoned the city.
The statigists of the allied
armies have not dispaired, and
have yet other plans for defeat
ing the Germans.
G.-T7UNER
IS TOTAL
WRECK
VICTORIA, B.C., Aug. 19
?The Grand Trunk Pacific
steamship Prince Albert,
bound for Prince Rupert, is
reported a total wreck in
Brown Pass, Chatham sound,
near Prince Rupert. The fate
of the crew and passengers
is not known,but itis believed
that they cure safe. She is
supposed to have struck the
rocks while in a fog.
The Prince Albert is one
of the smaller craft of the
Grand Trunk line and a sis
ter ship of the Prince John.
She is said to be about the
size of the Dolphin.
SEATTLE, Aug. 19?The
passengers of the Prince Al
bert are safe.
IMMIGRATION FIGURES
SHOW NEAR RECORD
WASHINGTON, Aug. 19.?Allen im
migration for the fiscal year 1914
reachod 1,218,480. With exception of
1907 this is tho greatest number ever
admitted.
There was a total of 71,728 immi
gration aliens admitted into the
United States in June.
BRITISH STEAMSHIPS
TO BECOME YANKEES
NEW YORK, Aug. 19?W. R. Grace
and company, operating 12 British)
lines of steamships, announced this
morning that many of their ships
would be placed under an American
registry at once.
TRIAL JURY EXCUSED.
The trial jury was accused this
morning by Judge R. W. Jennings of
the district court until JLO o'clock to
morrow morning.
j;
\
TEXAN TO BE
ATTORNEY-GENERAL
4> + + + + ^,l, + + + + + + + ,l? + +
+ +
* M'REYNOLDS AND +
* GREGORY NAMED +
+ +
+ WASHINGTON, Aug. 19.? *
?fr Prsldent Woodrow Wilson this +
* afternoon signed tho noralna- +
* tlons of Attorney-General Jas. +
+ C. McRcynolds to bo Justice of +
+ the United States Supreme +
+ Court and T. W. Gregory to bo +
+ Attorney-General. +
+ +
+ + + + + + + +<? + + + +
WASHINGTON, Aug. 19.?President
Woodrow Wilson has decided to ap
point T. W. Gregory, of Texas, Attor
ney-General to succeed Attornoy-Gcn
oral James C. McReynolds, who will
be appointed to tho Supreme Court
bench to succeed the late Justic Ho
race H. Lurton. Gregory has been spe
cial assistant prosecutor In the New
Haven cases; and is an expert on the
operation of the Sherman Anti-Trust
act and tho powers of the Interstate
Commerce Commission.
PRESIDENT NAMES NEW
ASSAYER AT SEATTLE
*
SEATTLE, Aug. 19. ? President
Woodrow Wilson has nominated John
W. Phillips, a local attorney, to bo
assayer of the Seattle assay office to
succeed Calvin E. Vilas. Phillips has
been a resident of Seattle for a few
years and was formerly a resident of
Texas. <
PRESIDENT WILSON
SIGNS SHIPPING BILL
WASHINGTON, Aug. 19.?President
Woodrow Wilson last night signed the
law granting American registry to for
eign built ships.
COUNTRY NEEDS SHIPS
AND EXCHANGE
WASHINGTON. Aug. 19?Secretary
of the Treasury William G. McAdoo
says: "It is of vital Importance to
the country that two things bo done
as quickly as possible, first, provide
sufficient ships to move our grain and
cotton crops to European markets,
and, second, Testore through tho bank
ers the market for foreign bills of ex
change.
"Grain Is a very pressing problem
at the moment, because crops have
been largely harvested and movement
is already well under way. Tho cot
ton movement is not advanced and
will not be for a few weeks."
UNCLE SAM PROTECTING
NEUTRALITY OF COUNTRY
WASHINGTON, Aug. 19. ? United
States navy officers have taken chnrgo
of German wireless stations at Say
ville, L. I., and Mannasquan, N. J., for
the purpose of preventing infraction
of tho neutrality laws.
AMERICAN CRUISERS
MAY CARRY MAIL
WASHINGTON, Aug. 19?The Swift
United States scout cruisers Birming
ham and Chester will probably bo
used for carrying mall between thiB
country and Europe.
RUSSIA ALSO BARS
NEWSPAPER WRITERS
PARIS, Aug. 19. ? Russian govern
ment will not allow nny war corres
pondents with the army in tho field or
any of the army stafT headquarters.
N, Y. DEALERS WON'T
TOUCH OUTSIDE SECURITIES
NEW YORK, Aug. 19.?At a meeting
of 100 bond dealers in Now York, it
was practically agreed to sus
pend business in outside securities
pending the reopening of tho New
York Stock Exchange. It was left
lnrgely to the discretion of each
house to restrict trading that might
unsettle security values.
LONDON MAY TRADE
STOCKS* FOR CASH
LONDON. Aug. 19.?London Stock
Exchange commlr.tee has been unable
to reach a decision regarding the op
ening Stock Exchange for cash trans
actions. Tho committee considering
tho matter is bvllevcd to fear numer
ous failures.
GERMANS
HALT IN
BELGIUM
LONDON, Aug. 19.?The
German army invading Bel
gium halted in its advance.
Its front is still 20 miles
away from Brussels.
BELGIANS RETIRING.
Paris, Aug. 19.?An offi
cial announcement has been
made by the French War
Office that it is rumored at
the front that the Belgian
troops are retiring toward
Antwerp, but that the ru
mor is unconfirmed.
+ *
+ NAVAL ENGAGEMENT ?
+ IN NORTH SEA +
+ +
* LONDON, Auk. 19. ? A dis- +
?> patch to the Central News from +
+ Harwich sayfi it severe naval +
+ engnKcment occurred in the ?
* North sea 200 miles off Har- +
wlch Tuesday morning. No de- <?
? tails of the engagement are giv- 4>
en. 4>
+ +
? ?> ? ? ? ? ?> ?!- ? ? ?> ?!- ?> ? <? +
ENGLISH FLEET EASILY
SURPASSES GERMANY'S
?*t*?
LONDON, Aug. 19.?The tonnage of
the British homo floet in the North sea
exceeds the North sea floet of Ger
many by more than 365,000 tons, and
projectile capacity is greater by over
100,000 poundB.
ALLIES CAPTURE SHIPS
WORTH $300,000,000
LONDON. Aug. 19.?The Dally Ex
press estimates the number of large
German vessels seized by the British,
French and Russian warships at 200
and their value at $300,000,000.
ATLANTIC LINER IS
NOW GERMAN CRUISER
LONDON, Aug. 19.?The North Ger
man Lloyd lino steamship Kaiser Wll
helm der Grosse Is said to have been
painted black and converted into an
armed cruiser with guns and a search
light.
GERMANY HAD 5,000
SHIPS ON HIGH SEAS
NEW YORK. Aug. 19.?When Eng
land declared war on Germany there
were 2000 German steamships and 3,
000 Germnn sailing ships on high seas.
AMERICANS IN PARIS
ARE NOT DESTITUTE
PARIS, Aug. 19.?Ambassador My
ron H. Herrick cables state depart
ment from Paris thnt the financial
condition of Americans in Paris is
practically relieved, and ho suggests
that money on tho Tennessee be used
to assist Amoricnns in other parts of
Europe.
CANADIAN NURSES
TO COUNTRY'S AID
VANCOUVER, B. C., Aug. 19.?The
Canadian National Association of
Trained Nurses has undertaken the
formation of a corps of nurses to aid
the nation in the present crisis and
to this end hns Instructed all provin
cial associations to call for volunteers
from among their ranks.
CANADA LIMITS AREA
OF COUNTRY'S MARKETS
OTTAWA, Aug. 19. ? The govern'
; ment has prohibited exporting to all
. European ports except France, Spain
Russia, and Portugal.
Germans Fire on
Troops of Italy
LONDON, Aug. 19?
A dispatch from Rome
says refugees fromMad
eburg, Germany, report
that German soldiers
fired on 3,000 Italians
who were in the bar
racks there, killing 7
and wounding 37.
Some of the Italians
had shouted "Hurrah
for Italy," and the Ger
mans became excited.
The Rome dispatch
says the Italians are
greatly excited.
**?*++*+++++++???
+ ?
* POPE URGES CATHOLIC8 ?
* TO PRAY FOR PEACE ?
?
* ROME, Aug. 19.?The Pope *
addressed an exhortation to the ?
<? Catholics of the world today *
+ to pray for peace. ?
+ Hearing from Venice of the *
echoes of cannonading In the +
+ Adriatic, His Holiness com- ?
+ mented: ?
* "The bones of the Doges ?
+ must thrill in their scpulchers *
* at the familiar sound of bat- ?
tie, which recalls the heroic ?
+ days of old." +
+ The Pope's condition Is ro- ?
+ ported as improving. ?
4> +
WILLIAM TALKS OF
ORIENT -TO WIL80N
?+?
WASHINGTON, Aug. 19.?President
Woodrow Wilson received a long mess
age from Emperor William last night.
The contents of the message wore not
made public, though It is understood
that it was mostly with reference to
the situation in the Orient, and dis
cussed the proposition of turning the
German Chinese interests back to the
Chinese government. Germany is
seeking to get the United States to
agreo to assist in the maintenance of
the neutrality of China.
CHINA MAY* GET
KIAOCIIAU BACK
?+?
WASHINGTON, Aug. 19. ? Charge
d'Affalrs von Helmhuson, of the Ger
man embassy at Washington, yester
day Informed Secretary of State Wil
liam J. Bryan that "the best thing
Germany could do to prevent the
slaughter of Germans at the Chinese
province of Klaochau, China, would
bo to cede tho province back to Chlno."
He sounded the Secretary of State
on the proposition as to whether tho
United States would use her Influence
to protect the neutrality of the coun
try as Chinese territory In the event
It was so turned back absolutely with
out any reversionary rights.
JAPAN PUTS EMBASSY
IN AMERICAN HAND8
WASHINGTON, Aug. 19?Japan has
asked the United States to take charge
of the Japanese embassy at Berlin In
case of an emergency. The United
States, through Ambassador James W.
Gerard, already has charge of the Brit
ish and French embassies at that capi
tal.
JAPAN'S ULTIMATUM
REACHES GERMANY
WASHINGTON, Aug. 19. ?Japan's
ultimatum to Germany was delivered
to the latter country through Copen
hagen yesterday.
SERVIA AND MONTENEGRO
ARE IMPORTANT FACTOR8
PARIS. Aug. 19.?Tho ferociousness
of the attack on Austria by Servla and
Montenegro and the success that was
attended their arms has delighted the
French War Office. It Is believed that
. It will necessarily put a stop to the
I transfer of troops out of Austria-Hun
, gary to the French border to aid tho
Germans In the war In the Wes{,

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