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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, August 19, 1914, Image 2

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE i
JOHN W. TROY, Editor and Manager.
Published by the EMPIRE PRINTING COMPANY
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
One year, by mail ?$10.00
Six months, by mail 5.00 !
Per month, delivered _. 1.00
Entered as second-class matteiO'Jovember 7, 1912, at the poatofllce at Ju
neau. Alaska, under the Act of March 3. 1379.
A "DOLLAR DIPLOMACY" LESSON.
WHY has Japan declared war on Germany? What rightful
place has that country in the contest in Europe? Where
are the affairs of the little island Nation of the Pacific
in the Far East involved in this crash that has resulted from a
Balkan dispute?
Is not the answer that, unlike the United States, Japan has
not abandoned "Dollar Diplomacy," and Germany has colonies
lying around loose that offer temptation that could not be re
sisted ?
Japan's entrance into this European quarrel is one of the
strongest testimonials that could be presented for the wisdom of
the foreign policy of President Wilson and Secretary of State
Bryan.
Had the United States continued the "Dollar Diplomacy"
policy?the diplomacy that insists upon being "counted in" on'
the deal every time a small country is required to mort
gage its soul and turn over to "The Powers" functions that of
right attach to National sovereignty in order to secure a loan.1
the diplomacy that uses military strength to assist its citizens
to drive hard bargains, the diplomacy that makes the Navy De
partment the collector of bad debts for sharp traders?it is doubt
ful if we would have been able to have kept out of the war in
which every Nation of the first magnitude in the world except,
our's is engaged. "Dollar Diplomacy" has created a sort of un-l
written partnership among all the countries that have been en-j
gaged in that form of National piracy?piracy notwithstanding
that it is conducted in the name of "protection to citizens and
their rights."
"Dollar Diplomacy" leads to alliances and "understandings"
among some of the partners for protection against treachery
or greed or envy of others.
Had the United States continued on the course that has
at last plunged Europe into war. we would have had our own a
year ago in Mexico. The lust for blood would have been roused. The
war spirit would have been abroad, and it is not conceivable that
things would have progressed to the point they have among
the powers without involving the United States at some place;
where some "understanding" would not call for the service of
American swords; or where "National Honor" would not require
vindicating; or where the "rights" of American citizens would
not demand the "protection" of our military strength; or where
some spite or grudge would not come to the surface for satiation;
or where some colony or small Nation, ripe for plucking, would
not inspire the greed of imperialism.
There is probably not a student of affairs in the country
who does not now recognize how much greater is the strength
of the United States among the Nations of the World because
President Wilson and Secretary of State Bryan discarded "Dol
lar Diplomacy" and adopted in its place "National Service" as
the basis for the American foreign policy. There is probably
not a small or weak power anywhere that does not feel more
secure and more willing that its trade and commerce should
come to the United States because this country has ceased to
boast about being a "world power," and has gone about her bus
iness, recognizing the right of complete independence in action
on the part of all Nations, great and small alike, doing right and
trying to serve the cause of freedom and righteousness every
where.
The Governor General of Canada is uncle of both the King
of England and the Emperor of Germany. What must he think of
his nephews?
WICKERSHAM PRESS "ARGUMENTS."
THE Wickersham newspapers have started tfce campaign to
elect their man. The manner of the campaign Jhey are
conducting may be judged by the "arguments" they pre
sent. For instance, the following selections are taken- from one
issue of the Ketchikan Mail:
"Mr. Bunnell's nomination eminates from the wrong
source."
"There is no use of you fellows to prat about your clean
hands."
"You have been discovered with the stolen goods in your
possession."
"You have to stand trial with the direct evidence against
you."
"He (Frame) is not one of your luke warm policy curs."
"Of course the grafter is still fighting him (also Frame)."
" ? ? ? seven out of eight Senators being traitors."
The Governor General of Canada is uncle of both the King
of England and the Emperor of Germany. What must he think
of his nephews?
COST TO LITTLE NATIONS.
THE countries at war are not the only sufferers among the
Nations of Europe on account of the armed hostilities
there. The neutral powers are required to keep standing
armies in the field under arms and provisioned in order to pro
tect their neutrality. The expense of this added to the loss of
trade is proving a very hard burden for some of the little Na
tions to bear. Switzerland is among the sufferers, and already
she is forced to the point where a National loan is said to be a
necessity.
The gold that goes to Europe to buy war supplies will pretty
soon come back to buy food.
The Tacoma See America First Magazine should experience
a large increase in its circulation. j
ITALY HAS HARD
FOREIGN PROBLEM
(By Gertrudo E. Mallette.)
The determined neutrality of Italy
in the present war Is not based upon
nny vory recent agreement nor upon
the outgrowth of any one Bet of re
cent events, but is In fact the result
of a succession of developments which
led in an almost unbroken lino to the
foundation of the Kingdom of Italy in
1860. Aided by Napoleon III, acting
under secret alliance, Italy had prac
tically succeeded In expelling the Aus
trlans from her territory, when sud
dontly Napoleon became fearful of the
attitude of Prussia, deserted his allies
and instituted pence negotiations at
Villafranca. Victor Emanuel, fore
saken by the French, had no choice
but to jol^ in the "Infamous treaty"
which was signed at Zurich in Novem
ber, 1859. This treaty provided that
Lombnrdy be annexed to Piedmont,
but Venetia was left to Austria, the
rest of Italy was to be restored to its
condition before the war, and a
scheme of Italian confcreration under
the presidency of the Pope was pro
posed. This proposition could not be
carried out for Italy had revolted
from its rulers and, after the peace,
Napoleon, who had his eye on Savoy
and Nice, connived at the Pledmoa
'cse Annexation of Tuscany, Parma,
Modeua, and the northernmost Papal
>thtes. In 1861 by overwhelming votes
Sicily and Naples declared for union
with-Piedmont, and in March of the
fame year Victor Emanuel was pro
claimed King of Italy.
In 1864 frussia anu Aupiriu ??nru
successful war against Denmark to
protect the Germans of Sleswich and
Holstein. then under Danish rule, and
the two Duchies were taken tempor
arily under the joint rule of the vict
ors. Comes In the adroit Blsmark,
and by a series of Intricate Bteps
brings forth his long contemplated
war with Austria. In this conteBC
Austria was supported by all the south
German states, and by Hanover, and
it seemed that Prussia must certainly
be crushed. Italy had, however, sec
retly promised to aid Prussia In re
turn for the promise of the Austrian
province of Venetla. The thorough
preparation of the Prussian decided
the struggle in their favor and the affair
was over in seven weeks, culminating
in an overwhelming defeat of the
Austrians at Sadowa by the Germans
under Von Moltke. who, by the way,
was an uncle of General Von Moltke,
who is Germany's Chief of Staff of the
Army in the present European con
flict. Venetla was taken from Aus
tria, and Bismarck offered her a liber
al peace, annexing for Prussia only
Sleswick-Holstein (1867.)
To this alliance with Prussia and
to the strong backing of British di
plomacy in her opposition to Franco,
Italy owes the completion of her
emancipation, and for about eleven
years following the Franco-German
war of 1870, she was practically Iso
lated. France had taken her armies
out of the Papal states and had con
sented to their annexation, meanwhile
remaining on friendly terms with the
Pope. Then at the Congress of Berlin
in 1878 Austria acquired Herzegovinla
and Bosnia, the Russian frontier was
extended to the Danube, and by means
of a secret treaty Cyprus was "leased"
by Turkey to Great Britain, while
Italy went off empty handed, danger
ously alone. Germany and Austria at
once sensed the situation; and each,
appreciated the interest of Austria and
its conflict with that of Russia. Bis
marck's policy had been to maintain
cordial relations with both Austria
and Russia as a check on France and
to that end he formed, in 1872, the
League of the Three Emperors (Ger
many. Austria and Russia.) When
Italy's isolation grew threatening,
Austria and Germany dissolved this
League and formed the Alliance of
1879. Then, appreciating the possibil
ity that an attack on them by Russia
would be aided by France, they en
deavored to secure Austria against
Italy and then turn Italy's forces
against France by taking Italy Into
their Alliance.
Italy saw the advantages of the
German and Austrian alliance, And (
weighed them carefully with the ad- (
vantages of a French alliance, and,
finding them nicely balanced, her
statesmen hesitated. Finally Bis
marck's threatening, Austria's coax
ing and France's invasion of Tunis in
1881 decided her. Italy's Interests in
Tunis were large, and her supremacy
in the Central Mediterranean would be
dependant upon her maintaining pos
session of that protectorate. Italy
needed the good will of France, and
she had put her faith in France's
promise that she had no intention of
annexation, and, although urged by
Austria and Germany to avail herself
of the Province of Tunis in compensa
tion for Austria's acquisition of Bos
nia, she delayed in taking any defin
ite action. France then precipitated
the matter by establishing a protector
ate over Tunis in the invasion above
mentioned, thereby firing the wrath
of hot-tempered Italy. Bismarck with
his usual cleverness helped things
along by re-establishing the embassy
to the Pope and starting a press cam
paign endorsing an international guar
anty of the Pope's Independence. The
treaty which at ^cemented the
natter was formed in ^882j binding
Vustria, Germany and Italy "*ttto an
alliance which has several timeiybeen
?cnewed.
Since that time many events hav^,
veakened the bond then formed. Antl
derlcal France is now a fact, while
taly grasps more firmly the Papal
itates. England urged Italy, her pro
ege, to take part in the occupation of
Sgypt in 1882 and encouraged her ac
tuisltion of colonies on the Red Sea
ind in making her influence felt over
Abyssinia. Then came a secret treaty
>etween German and Italy in which
he former traded her favorable in
fluence in the Balkans for tho guar
antee of tho neutrality of Austria and
Russia In case she wns involved In war
with Franco. Tho supplanting of thlB
alliance by the Franco-Russian agree
ment, endorsed by Britain, resu.tcd
in the favorable terms of renewal of
the alliance in 1887. Since that time
England has served in tho capacity
of mediator between France and Italy
and the acquisition of Tripoli has
practically wiped out Italy's grievance
at the loss of Tunis.
At present there Is a great weight
of public sentiment against the alli
ance, which is augumented by Aus
tria's refusal to further tho education
al Interests of Italians at Innsbruck
and by her stand in the matter of
Trieste, which one of Italy's political
parties wishes to get back under
Italian rule. Austria has virtually
broken her word in the Albanian ques
tion by her continued propaganda In
the Balkans and has thereby caused
Italy to counter her. Then, angered
by the annexation of Bosnia, Italy
forced Austria to withdraw from Novi
pazar and to renounce under the Ber
lin Agreement, her right to police the
coast of Montenegro and to prevent
that country from having a navy. Con
sequently Austria built a road from
the coast ns a sort of a threat and
Italy and Russia immediately combin
ed their capital in the improvement
of the harbor of Antivari on the Mon
tenegrin coast. In 1908 France, Italy
and Servla financed the Danube-Adri
atic railway and there have been many
speculations as to the real reason for
the nlllnnce, among the best founded
of these being, probably, the possi
bility of war between Austria and
Italy.
"There are sentimental reasons for
Italy's present attitude, aside from
racial sympathy with Austria's Latin
subjects. Tho King's marriage to
Princess Helen of Montenegro was a
love match and her Influence is very
strong, not only with the King, but
with his subjects who Idolize her. Nat
urally, Italian sympathy would be won
by people striving for racial unity, for
Italy has gone through a like strug
gle. The people are democratic In
spirit and have more community of
sentiment with England and Franco
than with autocratic Germany and
Austria, and they are grateful for
I
England's assistance In their struggle .
to achieve Italian unity."
But the crulcal point of Italy's at
titude In tho present struggle in
Europe Is centered in tho fact that by
holding aloof, by maintaining her own
neutrality, Bho may regain the Italian
provinces now a part of Austria, and "
also a share of the east coast of tho
Adriatic Sea. That gained, as alli
ance with Franco and England for
the mastery of tho Mediterranean Sea
would bo comparatively simple. But
even if somewhat selfish, as Is the
way of nations, Italy is also loyal, and ;
tho two combine in making her with
hold her aid from Austria today,
though do not lead to aid Austria's
enemies.
WHITEHORSE MEN
PREPARE FOR WAR
?*t* -
Donald Ross, secretary of the local
unit, Legion of Frontiersmen, reports
a general revival of that organization.
All the former members still here arc
renewing their membership and sever
al new ones, among them several of
the best men in town, have been re
ceived during the past week. The roll
may be seen at any time at the bank
where it will be kept open a few more
days before a cable will be sent to
London, the headquarters of the or
ganization, volunteering its services
in the present crisis.
The Legion of Frontiersmen is com
posed of men suggestive of the name
?not ofilce men or would-be officers,
but hardy, experienced, real frontiers
men who are not afraid of the menial
work necessary in all armies. There
are many such in this locality and
all who have not reported for enroll
ment are respectfully requested to do
so at once.?Whitehorse Star.
CHINO COPPER CO. DID
BIG QUARTER'S BUSINESS
The Chino Copper company, one of
the Jackling properties, showed a
profit of $1,102,104 for the quarter end
ing Juno 30 as against a profit of $716,
758 for the corresponding quarter last
year. The production in pounds this
year was 17,032,871 against 11,990,
832 last year.
If you want a Joy ride call up 57
or 321. 7-9-tt
I
OLDEST BANK IN ALASKA
The B. M. Behrends Bank
Juneau, Alaska
Established 1891 - ----- Incorporated 1914
BANKING SERVICE
develops improvements as business requirements
demand them. This bank constantly aims to
meet the requirements of its customers' business
consistent with legitimate banking rules.
Officers:
B. M. BEHRENDS, President
J. K. WILLIS, Vice-President.
GUY McNAUGHTON. Cashlor
*'? ==*
McDonald & Hart
Contractors and Builders
Office at McCloskey's Cigar Store
Front Street
Juneau Transfer Co.i:
PHONE 48 J!
WE ALWAY8 HAVE
COAL I:
i >
Moving Care full % < ?
STORAGE
Baggage to and from All Boat* \ [
37 FRONT 8T.
?
Peerless Bakery
Bakers of Fine Pastry of all
kinds. Only the best of mater
ial used. Try the Peerless brand.
Its quality insures its continuous
use. * + + * + * *
PEERLESS BAKERY
(Formerly Lempke's)
THEO. HEYDER. Propr.
125 Front St. Phone 222
i FItBE TROUSERS FREE i
4, Until Aug. 3 we will give an <?
< ? extra pair of trousers free with < >
< * each suit of Kahn Tailoring * |
< > Co.'s clethes. Price $25.00 up
J! H. HEIDORN, Merchant Tailor J!
4 222 Seward Street, JUNEAU X
BJW?W?
Sporting
Goods
CW.YoungCo.
HARDWARE
Cutlery I
Etc. I
comp"t?8?ockotp Mining, Logging and Fishing Supplies aua.ka I
Plumbing ? Tining -- Pipe Fitting
Estimates and prompt attention given all kinds Job Work
PAINTS-YARN 1SH-WALL PAPER?BRUSHES
r^V'uou: WAUGH ROCK DRILLS and
EVINRUDE DETACHABLE MOTORS
MODERN AND UP-TO-DATE
Furniture Rugs Office Desks Go-Carts Etc.
FIRST TERRITORIAL BANK OF ALASKA
? Douglas, Alaska
Every facility for banking. Foreign and domestic ex
change. Commercial accounts solicited. Interest allowed
on time deposits.
M. J. O'CONNOR. Pres. - - - A. E. GURR, Cashier_
ALASKA MEAT COMPANY John Reck. Mgr.
Wholesale and Retail Butchers
Manufacturers of all Kinds of Sausages Our Hams and Bacon Arc
I Home-Smoked
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
OF JUNEAU
UNITED STATES DEPOSITORY
Capital $ 50,000
Surplus and Undivided Profits 50,000
DIRECTO RS
T. F. Kennedy, Pres. rk Kennedy
John Reck, Vicc-Pres. ceo. f miller
Harold H. Post, Cashier
R. H. STEVENS. Assistant Cashier
Under tho samo management
FIRST TERRITORIAL BANK OF ALASKA
In tercet Da id on Time Deposits
i mill 'iiiii?lam?ii?iiin?? ?
Groceries and
Men's Goods
Alasfea-Gastineau Mining Co.
THANB, t P t * ALASKA
C W. WINSTEDT
ARCHITECT
SUPERINTENDENT
Sketches Free
Office, Room 7, Garslde Block
Juneau, Alaska.
William Pallister, M.D., Seattle |
Specialist In the treatment of H
diseases and deformities of the j|
eye, ear, nose and throat.
Will be in Juneau till Sept 1, 11
1
Get the Habit
Hire Berry's Auto
Cheaper Than Walking
Office Phone 22 ALL HOURS Garage.Phone 294
,?
TABLE LINENS FOR FALL
JUST BEGINNING TO ARRIVE?
REAL SILESIAN Pattern Cloths
SIZE 22x90 Each .... $3.50
SIZE 72x108 Each .... $5.00
GERMAN LINEN Pattern Cloths
SIZE 70x80 Each .... $3.00
SIZE 72x108 Each .... $3.50
MERCERISED DAMASK CLOTHS
SIZE 63x63. Each - - 52.00 SIZE 72x72. Each - - S2.50
BEAUTIFUL BLUE and WHITE SILESIAN SETS, $10.00 For the Set
MADEIRA SETS MADEIRA SCARFS MADEIRA DOILIES
I
Lovely Assortment of Damask and Hucks T /"l \\T 17 I C That Delight the Eye, and
AT ALL PRICES -1U WLL j- Don't Hurt the Purse
4jaska-Treaclwell Gold Mining Co.

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