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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, August 26, 1914, Image 1

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T HE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. IV., NO. 552. JUNEAU, ALASKA, WEDNESDAY, AUG. 26, 1914. PRICE, TEN CENTS
ADMIRAL SAMPSON SINKS AND FIFTEEN LIVES LOST
?' y
Allies Begin Another Battle In Lorraine
WAR WILL STRAIN BRITAIN TO UTTERMOST
CapL Moore and fourteen
Perish on Alaska Liner
SEATTLE. Aug. 26. ?The
Steamship Admiral Sampson,
Capt. Zimero S. Moore, master,
which sailed from Seattle for the
southern coast of Alaska at 4
o'clock this morning, was run
down in the fog and sunk by the
Canadian Pacific stamship Prin
cess Victoria, Capt. Hurkey, mas
ter, at 6 o'clock this morning off
Point No Point, 20 miles north
of Seattle. Fifteen lives were
lost.
THE DEAD:
CAPT. ZIMERO S. MOORE,
Master.
E. F. KENNEY, Chief Officer.
A. J. NOON, Chief Engineer.;
MISS M. CAMPBELL, Stew
ardess.
MRS. GEORGE BANBUR i,
passenger, wife of the Agent of
the Admiral Line at Skagway Al
: aska. |
? G. W. BRYANT, passenger, of
Seward Alaska.
EZRA BYRNE, stowaway. j.
EIGHT MEMBERS OF THE <
CREW.
TOTAL?15. j
SAMPSON CUT IN TWO.
#
The Admiral Sampson was cut
in two by the Princess Victoria
which struck her port side near !
the after hatch. She sunk in 4 J
minutes after the blow was (
Struck. il
1
PRINCESS VICTORIA RES
CUES SURVIVORS. |]
i'
The Princess Victoria stood by
the wrecked vessel, rescued the J
survivors, and brought them to i
Seattle.
The bow of the Princess Vic- j
tori a is badly damaged. t
That only two passengers lost 1
their lives is regarded as re
markable. because the Admiral j
Sampson was afloat only four <
minutes after being struck by>
the Canadian ship. ]
VICTORIA CATCHES FIRE. jl
SEATTLE. Aug. 26. ? Fire
broke out in the bow of the
Princess Victoria after she had
been in collision with the Admir
al Sampson, and Ezra Byrne, one
of the dead, lost his life in the
fire after he had been rescued
and taken refuge in the forward
part of the ship.
Mrs. Banbury, who was one
of the drowned, was the wife of
the Admiral Line agent at Skag
way. '?
G. W. Bryant, the other pas
senger to lose his life, was a res
ident of Seward, and was en
route home.
i
Steel Passenger Ship.
The Admiral Sampson was a pas
sengercarrying, steel steamship. 280
feet in length. 36.1 feet beam; 22.7 feet
of hold; 2262 tons gross and 1432 tons
net register, with twin screws and
wireless equipment She was built
at Philadelphia in 1898, and registered
from Portland. Maine. She was a sis
ter ship of the Admiral Dewey, Admir
al Farragut and Admiral Schley. She
(Continued on Page 6.)
THE WEATHER TODAY.
Twenty-four hours ending at 3 p. m.:
Maximum?57.
Minimum?17.
Rainfall?.15 inch.
Cloudy; rain.
GERMANS |
LEVY BIG
WAR TAX
LONDON, Aug. 26?Germany
has levied $90,000,000 to be paid
before September 1 as a war tax
on the province of Brabant, Bel
gium.
This is believed to be in addi
tion to the $40,000,000 levied on
the city of Brussels for the same
purpose.
? +
* JUNEAU TEACHERS +
* WERE ON SAMPSON +
> +
fr Miss Lavina Willson and ?>
f Miss Lorraine Andrews, teach- +
l- ors in the Juneau high school. +
b were among thoso rescued ?
? from the Admiral Sampson. +
? ?
. - .
iuneau elks
have big time
The Juneau Elks have made great
preparations for the social session
that will take place in their hall to
night. It will be one of the affairs
that this order which is noted for its
high quality of entertaining has ever
pulled off in Juneau.
In addition to a short program, there
will be dancing and some good thingB
to eat.
The affair will be strictly Informal,
md Exalted Ruler Forrest says any
>ne wearing a dress suit will be
Ined.
The members of Juneau lodge desire
particularly that visiting members of
:he order and their families shall at
:end. Single men ^.re urged to bring
:helr sweethearts.
V COURT HOUSE BRIEFS 1
h ?
The grand Jury returned four Indict
ments this morning one of which is se
cret. Alfonzo Jlver was indicted for
selling liquor to Indians: J. Burns for
pocket picking, and Joe Gonzales for
assault with a dangerous weapon.
The last nomed indictment charges
that Gonzales attacked Ned Williams
at Yakutat on August 4 last, cutting
him with a knife on the head. The
complaining witness is an Indian and
there is said to be a woman involved
in the case.
K. Yamaguchi and H. Yamashita,
charged with the murder of T. Kagita,
the Japanese foreman at Sitkoh Bay
cannery, entered pleas of not guilty.
Chris Chalmus. charged with selling
liquor to Indians, and Peter Sing,
charged with burglary, plead not
guilty.
The jury in the case against Franz
en returned a verdict for plaintifT after
being out a short time.
John Johnson today filed suit
against Henry States to foreclose on a
note and mortgage for $695.58.
Sentenced.
J. W. Felix and Ernest Mowlds, both
of whom plead guilty to selling liquor
to Indians were sentenced, the form
er to 15 days in the Federal Jail, and
the latter to pay a fine of $20. Ex
tenuating circumstances were shown
in both cases.
TRIAL JURYMEN EXCUSED.
Judge R. W. Jennings today excused
the following members of the pettlt
jury for the remainder of the term: R.
H. Ferry. T. A. Page of Haines; W.
P. Mills. T. F. Demidoff, Sitka; J. M.
Tanner, Skagway.
Miss Ester Gibson, the well known
trained nurse in the government ser
vice. arrived In Jueau on the City of
Seattle from Sitka and will leave for
Y&kutat soon.
I
WILSON EXPECTS NO
WAR IN MEXICO
WASHINGTON. Aug. 26.?President
Woodrow Wilson Is confident that the
differences between Gen. Villa and
Gen. Carranza can be settled without
recourse to arms. ?
The expressed desire of Gen. Villa
to settle tho problems which he desires
arranged throught negotiations is bo
lieved to be in good faith.
NATIONAL FOREST :
MONEYS COMING i
Territorial Treasurer Walsteln G. '
Smith has been notified by tho aud- ?
ltor of State and other departments ]
for the Federal government that his <
claim for $31,803.04, on account of Al- J
aska's share of receipts from the sale ]
of timber in the National forests lo
cated in Alaska for the years 1906 to
1912, botrf inclusive, has been trans- j
mitted to the Secretary of the Treas
ury for issuanco and transmittal of (
warrant
This money under the law must be .
devoted to schools and roads within 1
the Territory. The law was designed <
more particularly to apply to^he na- |
tlonal forests in the several States I
and diflnltely provides that the mon- J
ey must be appropriated prorata .
among tho counties in which the na- I
tlonal forests exist There are no ^
counties in Alaska and the comptroller .
of the treasury has forwarded the do- ]
clsion that the moneys accruing to
the treasury of Alaska through the
national forests must go to tho Torri- C
tory at large.
Treasurer Smith says th^t it will bo
up to the legislature to appropriate
the money in this fund in accordance r
with that decision and in the mean- i
time the money will be deposited in (
the banks of the Territory pending ac- v
tion by the legislature.
d
* + + ? + + + + ? + + + ?? + + V
? MARINE NOTES + f
++?????+++++*+++
The Jefferson was expectod from tho e
South early this afternoon. e
The Princess May Is expected from c
the South today. f
The Spokane should arrive from the p
South tomorrow night.
The Humboldt should arrive from j
the South Saturday night or Sunday i
morning. t
The Mariposa should arrive from t
the South Friday. ii
The Admiral Evans is due from the p
Westward Friday. a
The City of Seattle sailed south this
morning. (1
The Al-Ki sailed south this morning, s
The Alameda sailed south this morn- n
ing. d
COLORED WOMAN CHARGED c
WITH COAL FRAUD o
?+? c
Yesterday afternoon an elderly col- r
ored woman, whose name could not 1
be learned but who claimed her res- c
idence was down on lower Front street
made complaint at the United States t
marshal's office that she had been
duced the truant to come homo for the
neighbor into paying $20 for a small
lump of very black coal, weighing less
than an ounce, under the representa- j
tlon that it was a charm endowed with t
mystic powers sufficient to bring her r
absent spouse back to his own Are- i
side. Court house attaches say that 1
this is the highest price ever paid for t
coal in Alaska so far as known. I
The complaining woman declares i
that her wily neighbor claimed to be
a voodoo priestess and would under
take to make a charm that would in- '
duce the truant husband home for the
aum of $20. She wanted her man and
parted with the twenty. After days
and days of weary waiting she bo- i
came suspicious and commenced an in- i
vestigation with the result that the i
article sold as a charm developed in- ?
to nothing more than a lump of coal <
?hence the complaint. It is being in- ]
vestigated. ;
NEW SCHOOL BUILDING
FOR METLAKAHTLA
According to Superintendent W. G.
Beattle of the Southeastern Alaska In
dian school division, there will soon
be a new government school house
erected at Metlakahtla. The plans
for the structure have been forwarded
to the department of the interior for
approval and this Ib all that is lack
ing in order to start work.
Former U. S. Marshal J. M. Shoup
is a passenger aboard the Humboldt
enroute to Juneau.
KITCHNER
SAYS WAR
TO BE LONG
LONDON, Aug. 26
In a speech delivered to
the House of Lords last
night Lord Kitchener
said that "the war will
strain the resources of
the British Empire and
its colonies to the utter
most limit."
He said that the con
test would be of long
luration.
"The sacrifices that
;his strain will entail,"
said Kitchener, "will be
:>orne willingly and
jravely for Britain's
lonor and the preser
vation of her position
n the world."
)UTLOOK GLOOMY
TO TENDON TIMES
LONDON, Aug. 26.?An undercur
ent of pessimism over England's mili
ary chances runs throughout an ar
Icle of the Times military expert,
rhich says In part:
"Lord Kitchener does not find un
ler his hand the meanB for waging
var on a great scale. We are droad
ully in arreurs.
"The president generation by.. its.
fforts and its very patriotism is call
d on to make up for neglect, selflsh
less and calloused indifference to de
ence which has characterized one
ieace-loving nation.
"What is the situation? We are
Ighting a nation of 70,000,000 peoplo.
t is in arms to crush us. Franco has
hrown the whole of her manhood in
o war. She can do no more. Russia
s a mighty power with immense ca
>acity for defence but with untried
>nd unproved offensive powers.
"We must take it that Gormnnv will
Ight this flghKthrough as the Kaiser
aid to the last breath of the last man
;nd the last horse. Under such con
litlons war may be long, very long.
"There must be no question of peace
ixcept at our own terms, even If all
iur allies are struck down. We should
ontinuo the war until tho enemy has
elaxed her grip. Wo are fighting for
iberties and for the very existence
?f Europe."
ARGENTINA IN WAR
WITH STEAMSHIP LINES
?*?
BUENOS, Ayres, Aug. 26. ? Moat
?ackers in Argentina are warring with
he steamship companies over freight
?ates.^and are refusing to kill for ex
>ort. Several steamship sailings have
ind to be cancelled as a result Argen
ina will place an embargo on the ex
>ortations of wheat. Food prices are
?ising throughout the republic.
DANISH PAPERS MAKE
NO WAR COMMENT
COPENHAGEN, Aug. 26. ? Danish
aewspapers have been warned by the
3ovornment to observe the strictest
neutrality and they are publishing all
ivar news without comment. Tho gov
arnment has renewed the Anglo-Dan
ish export and import trade agree
ment.
AMERICANS NEVER
ARRESTED AT ALL
WASHINGTON, Aug. 26. ? Archer
M. Huntington and wife were not ar
rested at Nuremburg, Germany, as
reported, according to a report from
American Consul Skinner at Ham
burg received at tho State Department.
The Huntlngtons never were confined
in any manner, Skinner reported, but
their automobile was requisitioned by
the Germans. Tho Huntlngtons' man
servant, a British subject, was im
prisoned for a Bhort time, but the par
ty was otherwise unmolsted.
BRITISH SEIZE I
KETCHIKAN COAL 1
?+?
KETCHIKAN, Aug. 26.?Coal
on board the Princess Ena, con
signed to the Northland Dock .
company, of this city, was seized
by the British cruiser Rainbow J
at Prince Rupert Tuesday and /
taken on board that vessel.
Prince George Gets Fuel.
The ^tish hospital ship
Prince George put in here Mon
day and secured fuel oil.
TURKEY WILL KEEP
TWO GERMAN CRUISERS
?#? \
PARIS, Aug. 26?Riffat Pasha, Turk
Ish ambassador to France, says of the
purchase by Turkey "of the German tl
cruisers Goeben and Breslau: jj
"We Blmply seized the opportunity .
to assure the equilibrium of our naval 1
forces with those of Greece. England g;
oxorclsed the right to requisition two ^
cruisers Just being finished for us in
English yards. Greece bought two
battleships from the United States. 01
The arrlvnl of the German cruisers in
the Dardanelles was a windfall. You
may bo sure wo shall keep them." A
BELGIANS CAPTURE A
ZEPPELIN AND CREW
?+? at
ANTWERP, Aug. 25.?After several in
bombH were dropped Into the city by th
a German Zeppelin, doing heavy dam- th
age, tho airship was brought to the
ground within tho Belgian lines with
a shot from an aeroplane. The Zep- C!
pelln gun crow consisting of 25 was
captured.
FINNS ARE LOYAL
TO RUSSIA IN WAR ml
t III
NEW YORK, Aug. 26. ? A cable he
from Finland to the New York Times jil
declares that rumors of a revolution
among Finns are entirely false and au
that they are absolutely loyal to Rus- up
sta. th'
DAVID R. FRANCIS REFUSES th
APPOINTMENT AS AMBASSADOR pQ
WASHINGTON. Aug. 26?David R. th
Francis, former Mayor of St. Louis,
former Governor of Missouri, for Sec- t.a
rotary of the Interior and former Ja
president of the St. Louis Exposition, ua
yesterday declined tho proferred np- p.,
polntment to be the first Ambassador
to Argentina.
* * * Rl
LEADING SEATTLE BUSINESS
MAN FINED FOR SPEEDING
?+?
SEATTLE. Aug. 26.?E. G. Andor- pa
son, president of the Western Dry Ca
Goods company, one of Seattle's whole- to
sale houses, was fined $10 yesterday wl
for automobile speeding.
***_ Rl
rUHfcULUSUHfc 5UH
SETTLED OUT OF COURT
?4>?
The foreclosure suit of Henry Cas- j
sieu against Mrs. A. Billedcau came 8Q
to an abrupt end In the district court ni
yesterday and all the other litigation
growing out of it was dismissed on q,
stipulation of opposing counsel to set
tle all of the matters out of court. At
torneys Winn and Burton represented
the defendant, and Attorney Z. R. Che
ney represented the plaintiff. The
property involved in the dispute is to
bo sold according to the agreement ar
and tho money divided nccording to
the settlement agreed upon. cc
? , , th
WELL KNOWN DEER
HUNTERS SUCCESSFUL M
H. J. Fisher, H. T. Tripp and B. 8.
Dafter, who went out Saturday after
deer, returned yesterday afternoon S'
bringing in five. Mr. Fisher had the li"
misfortune of spraining a foot and Is fr
a bit lame, otherwise the trip was very
satisfactory to all. ?l
- - - fc
THE ALAMEDA TAKES ' T
MANY SOUTHBOUND M
The Alameda, sailing for the South V
at four o'clock thlB morning took the ai
following passongers from Juneau: C
Mrs. A. Moasli, Mrs. H. R. Ward and M
children, Miss H. W., Augustine, E. J. D
Wright, William Hanson, J. L. Lap
lant, C. S. Hubbell and W. S Hard
ing.
? ? " n
WAR CAUSES MAN 0
IMMIGRATION TO CEASE it
WASHINGTON, Aug. 26.?Alien ar- d
rivals into the United States for the
first nine days of August totalled only
15,000, against 42,837 a year ago.
\USTRIA
LOSES
60,000:
PARIS, Aug. 26.?A dispatch I
) Reuters' says that in the bat- 1
es on the Drina river between *
le Servians and the Austrians
lere were 300,000 Austrians en- ^
aged, and that their losses to- ^
died 60,000 men, as follows: .
Killed, 15,000; wounded, 30,
)0; prisoners, 15,000.
USTRIANS ARE FORCED 1
OUT OF SERVIAN TERRITORY ,
1
LONDON, Auk. 27.?There Is not
the present time an Austrian soldier 1
Servla except the prisoners of war j
at that country has captured since
e war began. ?
(
ZAR WITHDRAWS i
FROM POLAND
-j. H
NEW YORK, Aug. 25?The Oor- *
in Ambassador, returning from Ber- ^
i, said today that since arriving ^
re ho has been informed that the ^
isslan civil and military authorities
ve been withdrawn from Poland, I
d that the Polish people have sot +
an Independent government with ^
elr capital at Warsaw. .j,
Germans All For War. ^
The German Ambassador said fur
er that the German people are sup
rtlng the war as one man, and that *
ey would win.
Japan to Control Orient
Speaking further, the German Am- *
ssador said that the entrance of '
pan Into the war meant that event- *
lly the Japanese will control the *
iclfic ocenn. *
?I
JSSIA PROMISES HOME 4
RULE TO POLAND 4
COPENHAGEN, Aug. 26.?A nows
.per dispatch from Berlin says that F
:ar Nicholas of Russia has promised
grant the Poles homo rule If thoy
111 remain In tho present war.
, t t * a
USSIA TO HAVE 3,000,000 ?
MEN ON FOREIGN SOIL *
g
ST. PETERSBURG, Aug. 26?Rus- e
i will have 1,000,000 men on Austrian p
11 within a week and twice that c
imber on German soil nccordlng to c
statement of an ofllcial In tho War
dice this morning. F
USTRIANS CONTINUE
TO BOMBARD BELGRADE
LONDON, Aug. 26.?The Austrlans 1
e continuing the bombardment of t
slgrado. Tho city has been almost i
implctcly wrecked by the shells from
io heavy selgo guns. t
? *? ? i
ANY LEAVE ON THE
CITY OF SEATTLE p
The City of Seattle, Bailing for the
onth at three o'clock this morning,
>ok the following named passengers
om Juneau: For Petersburg ? An- j
rcw Lawson, J. C. Allen; for Wrung
I?Frank Spau'dlng, H\ G Welgle; .
ir Kotchikan?J. L. Goldstein, Dave
erwilliger; for Seattlo-^W. A. Lord, (
'Iss Vera Dugan, R. C. Hunt, Henry
Hrt, Lucy A. Dailey, Alfred Huntly
id wife, Miss R. Brennan, James Mc
loskey and Mrs. McCloskey, Eugene I
[cCloskey, James McCloskey, jr? H.
. Allison.
IMPORTANT NOTICE. 1
Regular meeting Wednesday eve- '
Ing. Aug. 26, 8 o'clock, of the Juneau <
rder of Elks. All members and vis- 1
Ing^Elks are requested to bring la- '
ies. Bigsoclal session will be held.
Thero will be dancing and good cats.
? GEO. F. FORREST, E.R. '
H. I. LUCAS, Secretary.
French and British
Are Again Aggressive
??????, ?
PARIS, Aug. 26--The'
War Office issued the
following statement to
day: "The allied forces
in Lorraine have again
taken up a combined
offensive movement.
The battle which was
recommenced yesterday
is still raging as this
statement is issued."
The War Minister
continued: "It is not
the purpose of the allies
to remain on the defen
sive along the Meuse.
Offensive operations'
will be renewed at all
points just as they have
been renewed in Lor
raine. We shall not be
jontent until we inflict
i decisive blow on the .
memy and defeat his
nvading armies."
?
- NAMUR FORST STILL ?
HOLD AGAIN8T ENEMY ?
?
LONDON, Aug. 26?Four of ?
1 the Namur forts continue to-re*- +
slst nil efforts to capture them ?
according to information re- ?
ceived at The Hague. ?
?
++*++?+?*?????
+?++*+++++++???
?
CHARLEROITAKEN AND ?
RETAKEN FIVE TIME8 ?
?
PARIS, Aug. 26. ? The War ?
Ofllce announced today that ?
Charlerol was taken and retak- ?
en five times in the battle be- ?
tween the Germans and the ?
French Sunday and Monday. ?
?
? * * ? -i- + * +++++?+ ?
:RANCE MAY USE
ISLAND AS PRI80N
PARIS, Aug. 26.?France will prob
bly keep its Gorman prisoners on
no of the small Islands off the south
Ireton coast. Tho number on hand
ave outgrown the capacity of the
overnment prisons. Belgian has ask*
d France to take care of its German
risoners on account of small size of
ountry, and the danger of their re
apture.
?AMOUS REPUBLICAN
POLITICIAN IS DEAD
WASHINGTON. Aug. 26. ? Powell
Mayton, for many years Republican
eader iln Arkansas and prominent in
ho National affairs of that political
>arty, died here this morning.
Clayton was closely identified with
ho "reconstruction' period, and held
nany high ofllces.
'HYS'CIANS SUCCESSFULLY
OPERATE ON DEER FAMILY
Dr. Pallistor and Dr. Bevlns, Juneau
>hy8lclans and surgeons, and Dr. Fin*
oy, of Juneau, and Dr. Mathla, of
Douglas, dentists, made up a success*
ul hunting party to Twin Point Sun
lay. They captured five deer, and
:Iaim the season's record, for one of
hem tipped tho scales at 175 pounds.
NEW NATIVE INDIAN
SCHOOL BUILDING
Superintendent W. G. Beattie Is hav
ing a new portable school house erect
ed for the government native schools
lust beyond the electric light plant and
near the new plank highway that Is
now built past the place.
A carload of peaches coming on the
Mariposa for Goldstein's Dept. Store,
?8-26-tf.

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