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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, August 26, 1914, Image 3

Image and text provided by Alaska State Library Historical Collections

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020657/1914-08-26/ed-1/seq-3/

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| What do youBuyii
| When you Buy a
| Typewriter?
;; You pay for neat, well-written correspond- ^
\ l ence, for perfect carbon copies, for the quality and J3
3; quantity of work your typist can turn out?in 3!
33 short, for the years of service you get. 11
3 3 If your inventory were made on this basis,
; 3 you would find in the L. C. Smith & Bros, type
33 writer a much bigger asset than the price you paid 33
3I for it and a much bigger asset than in any other 3 3
3! writing machine ever made. 3!
3 3 Ball Bearing; Long Wearing 3 3
< ? *>
3 3 It isn't the machine?it's what the machine 33
j; will do for you. 3 3
<3 Can we prove this statement? Absolutely, j;
| 3 Ask for our proof. *;
< * < >
i ? O
? > LC.SmitliS Bros. Typewriter Co. <>
i > Home Office and Factory <,
3 3 SYRACUSE, NEW YORK 3 3
33 E. S. HEWITT. 115 SEWARD ST. JUNEAU 33
? ?
AN "OLD LINE" COMPANY WITH "NEW LINE" IDEAS
INSURANCE CU.
S200.000.00 Deposited with Sute Treasurer
L I F E n i 1-kOllCY
HEALTH < IN I KEKFECI'
ACCIDENT U 1 1 ru.idiaU
Premiums Paid for Yoa on Your Life luiutaaee If
Permanently Disabled
Home Office, White Building, Seattle, U. S. A.
PETT1T & HARVEY, Local Agents
- A
~ *
SALE OF CUT GLASS and FINE CHINAWARE AT
UCHARICK
_ . fJEWELER and
? ^ OPTICIAN
JUNEAU. - ALASKA
;
!: Juneau Transfer Co.:
j[ PHONE 48 J
!! WE ALWAYS HAVE
I! COAL ij
! I Moving Care full'' Do no < >
i; STORAGE \\
< ? Baggage to and from All Boata ] [
37 FRONT BT. j I
? +
? ARE YOU GOING TO BUILD? +
? ?
> Are you going to repair your +
> house? See George E. Brown, +
Contractor & Builder, Douglas +
rUtST CLASS ROOM .>d BOARD
Mrs. M. H. Lynch has opened
a new boarding house at 318
Fourth Street. First class table
board at reasonable rates. Pa
tronage solicited. Special Sun
day dinner?75c. Phono 281.
ARE TOU GOEIG TO BlILD?
M.M.GIMSE ?d'NTBCILDBR J
Baflda booses both bir and small and does re
pair work at reasonable rates. See me at the
Dos|lu Hardware Store or Phone 35
1111111111111 n 111 n 111111
I! Scandinavian Hand Laundry !!
[ ' First class hand laundry done j '
t . at 323 Seventh Street Table ? >
) J linen a specialty. Experienced j
? ? and guarantee satisfaction.
i111 I I I I 1 11 I I I I I I 1 I 1 II II I I
o THE BE8T LOAF OF
BREAD |
ila Sold At J
San Francisco Bakery j
O. MXSSKRSCaMIDT. Prop. J
?
< | Ju?t Anrrod?A full line of fall and ! !
:: XT.. Suits $20.00 ?:i
< > Wort. Material. Style. Guaranteed 4?
< > SATISFACTORY 4 >
; ; H. HE1DORN. Merchant TaUor ] *
. I 222 Seward Street, JUNEAU
<? +
+ CLASSIFIED ADV. ?
+ +
* + + + + + * + * + + + + + * +
: FOR SALE ? Furniture, new and
stood, in three-room rented house, with
; hot and cold water and all modern con
; veniences, on Calhoun road. 8-24-tf.
FURNISHED ROOMS ? For rent,
; close in, 123 West third street 8-20-6t
FOR RENT ? Large double front
room, also single room; good view,
bath, hot water heat, phone 605.
For Sale?20 root pleasure launcn,
18 h.p. engine, good condition, terms,
i See Wm. R. Merchant. 8-24-3L
FOR SALE?Furniture of a three
room cottage. Cottage for rent cheap;
tinelocation. equlre at Empire office.?
8-24-3L
FOR SALE?Lot 90 x 40?Two-room
house. Casey-Shattuck addition, P. O.
Box. 590. 8-25-2L
FOR SALE?five pedigreed Cocker
Spaniel popples. -Orvllle Olts, 11] E.
3rd St. 8-22-6t
ST. GEORGE HOUSE.
Everything new. Good light and
.veil ventilated rooms. Baths, electric
ight. Good board.
Reasonable rates by the day, week
?r month. 4-18-tf
MRS. A. E. VESTAL.
? -
Washington Fir
Direct to User
Build of Hewitt-Lea-Funck
Co. Washington Fir ? the
wood that won't shrink, pull
apart, crack, check or warp.
Timbers for Mines;
Send List for Price
Lumber from our own forests, cut
in our own mills and sold direct.
Send list for proof of saving.
Square deal guarantee backed by
One Million Dollars invested in
tbc business. Millwork Catalog
free. Prise Plan Book (all practi
cal homes) . Ten Cents
HOW GERMANY GOT
PROVINCE OF KIAOCHOU
(By Gertrude E. Mallotte.)
Kiaochou the present bono of con
> tentlon between Japan and Germany,
| is one of the ancient walled citlos of
the Chinese Empire, located on the
south coast of the province of Shan
tung on the bay of Kiaochou. At one
I time this city was very Important us
a trade center, but the bay became
clogged with silt carried down by the
live streams which empty into it. This
hay of Choochou measures fifteen
miles each way, and the harbor of
Tsingtao, at the extreme end of tho
ponipsula of Lao-shan which forms
ono side of the bay, is the best harbor
on the coast.
Tho City of Kiaochou and Its ex
tensive group of suburbs, all within
one wall, became German property in
rather an unusual way. Two Germun
missionaries wero murdered by Chin
ese on November 14, 1897, and Kiao
chou, the scene of the tragedy, was
seised by a German fleet as a result
Negotiations followed which culmin
ated in Germany's securing a 90-year
lease covering the two hundred square
miles of tho Kiaochou domain. In
1S98 it was declared a protectorate of
Germany, Tsing-tuo was made a free
port and by agreement with the Chin
ese government the custom houso is
managed by the Chinese Imperial
.Maritime Customs.
When the Germans took possession
of the protectorate they bought out
tho Chinese merchants and made tho
port of Tslng-tao the foreign settle
ment and capital of the zone. Strange
ly at a variance with tho old native
idea, fine wide streets have been made,
electric lighting, telephone systems
and waterworks have been installed,
European houses constructed, and a
railway has been built connecting the
capital with Wcl-hien, which Is locat
ed in the center of a large and valu
able coal district
The administration of the colony is
to a certain extent autonomous. At
the head of affairs is a German naval
officer with the title of Governor, who
is assisted by a council composed of
the heads of departments, and three
elected members. The garrison num
bers 3125 men, consisting of German
marines and Chinese soldiers.
Francis Joseph.
I lie Ut'IllUU Ul U11D1V1 IUUC owuto WW
have stalked ever lu advance of Aus
tria's hoary Emperor, who has lately
.been spoken of as the "saddest man
in Europe." In 1848, a popular and
handsome youth of eighteen, Francis
Joseph, mounted the Austrian throno
upon the abdication of his weak-kneed
uncle. Emperor Ferdinand, and his
people hoped that he would be able
to quiet the dangerously conflicting
interest of the monarchy. As a boy
he had learned the various languages
spoken in the heterogeneous Austrian
domain, and he had seen military ser
vice under Radetzky In Italy, and the
whole Empire looked to this scion of
the house of Hapsburg to straighten
out its fearful political tangle.
His first step as Emperor was to
promise a free and constitutional gov
ernment in his country, but the Hun
garian revolt very shortly forced him
to close the National Assombly and
assume absolute power. The first of
his great international troubles began
when in 1853 ha endeavored to In
fluence Russia to abandon her am
bitious designs against Turkey and
the autocratic Czar Nicholas was fur
ther displeased by Austria's refusal
to assist Russia against the Western
Powers, and they in turn were ag
grieved because Franz Josef declined
to throw the weight of tils name into
their scple. Historians agree that the
unwillin ness of Austria to take up
the cause of the Western Powers has
been severely punished, for had she
joined the alliance against Russia in
1854, in all probability Louis Napoleon
would not have crossed the Alps and
dictated the Peace of Villafranca.
In April, 1854, Francis Joseph mar
ried the daughter of Duke Maximilian
Joseph, the Princess Elizabeth Amalie
Eugenie, a cousin on her mother's side
to the King of Bavaria. This year is
important in his record for another
reason, the conclusion of the Con
cordat with the Pope which put the
educational and ecclesiastical affairs
of the Empire entirely Into the hands
of the Papal See. It established an
ecclesiastical censorship of the press,
and placed all schools, even private
ones, under the surveillance of the
Klohnna* If ne/\/?ln imA.I a M
uiuuvyu f aw |/l wmiuicu UIC CUUiyiClU
independence of the bishops in rela
tion to the civil government so that
all decrees proceeding from Rome
might be published without obtaining
the Royal permission, and it author
ized the bishops to convoke the pro
vincial councils without the consent
of civil authority.
When, in 1867, Francis Joseph was
crowned King of Hungary tho concord
at came up for discussion almost im
mediately, and as the result of the
strenuous demands of tho Liberal sec
tion of the Relch8ruth the concordat
was abrogated in 1870. This natural
ly incurred the great wrath of the
Pope, and to add to the Emperor's
troubles, his only son Rudolf commit
ted suicide just a few days before a
mossage was received from the Pope
declaring the revocation of the agree
ment "abominable."
The chief cause cf all of Austria's
trouble is undoubtedly tho great di
versity of peoples. languages, and
ideals united under one government,
and the tragic history of the Haps
burg family sinco the accession of
Francis Joseph is laid at the same
dcor. After the cancelling of the
concordat, a new constitution, per
haps one of tho most liberal in Eu
rope. was drawn up by the Reichsratb,
was approved by the Emperor and
promulgated as the law of the Empire.
At the death of Rodulf, the succession
passed to the Archduke Francis Fer
dinand, recently assassinated in Ser
via. This assassination, coupled with
Austria's alliance with Germany again
st Russia, whoso hatred sho had In
curred years ago, are tho background
of tho present awful plcturo of war
which confrouts the aged Emperor.
And the Emperor Francis Joseph
has known his army In the present
struggle for a polyglot army, an army
of all races, of all creeds, aud there
fore an army of no race and no
creed; and, necessarily, to some ex
tent a disorganised army. Neverthe
less, this very army Is perhaps one
of tho strongest bondB which hold the
dual monarchy together In tho present
day, and this very characteristic has
undoubtedly had much Influence to
ward steadying the internal struggles
of tho country.
The patience, wisdom and sterling
falraiindedness of Francis Joseph, as
well as the ghastly tragedies of his
prlvute life, have done much to hold
the monarchy socuro In tho affections
of tho people, who have also a very
strong affection for the Hapsburg dy
nasty, an attitude which has been re
enforced by the fact that In their var
ious wranglings many of the small
groups have looked to the throno for
a settlement of their difficulties.
"Francis Joseph 1b so adequate nnd
well beloved, and comes so near to
the Ideal of what a constitutional mon
arch should be, thereforo tho Empire
must go to pieces when ho Is with
drawn," thus did a prominent studont
of the affairs of Austria-Hungary ox
press himself only a few years ago.
How nearly fulfilled may this
prophecy be, as tho famous Hapsburg
lies on bis deathbed, his Empire in
volved In the greatest war the world
has known?
GOVERNMENT MAY NOT
ESTABLISH CENSORSHIP
NEW YORK, Aug. 26.?Washington
spocial says that the government may
abandon its plan to extend censorship
of the wireless stations so as to em
brace cable messages.
Cable Companies to Reelst
NEW YORK, Aug. 26.?The transat
lantic cable companies are prepared
to resist in the courts any order from
tho United States government estab
lishing a censorship over cable mes
sages to Europe. This was made plain
by Vice-Pres. Clapperton of the Com
mercial Cable Co., who said he would
regard such action as a form of un
reasonable search.
RUBY CREEK WILL
ALL BE PROSPECTED
?4?
RUBY, July 26.?Several prominent
business men of this city and E. W.
Griffin of Fairbanks, met here last
night and subscribed $5,000 for the
purchase of a drill to be used in pros
pecting all tho creeks between Ruby
and Long.
Tho newly organized company In
tends to leave no promising ground
unprospected, and the drill is to
be ordered at once.1" Mr. Griffin,
who has been here for a few weeks,
is returning to Fairbanks on the
steamer Tnnana.
LIPTON'S CHALLENGING
YACHT AT BERMUDAS
NEW YORK, Aug. 26.?Word has
reached the New York Yacht Club of
tho Shamrock's safe arrival in Bermu
da. She Is not expocted to come here
until hostilities in Europe cease. While
tho America's cup races have not been
officially postponed, they no doubt will
be, until October 10, a month from
the first date set in Sir Thomas Lip
ton's challenge, and if England Is still
at war then they will be put off until
next summor.
PROBE ATTORNEY URGED
TO RUN FOR GOVERNOR
NEW YORK, Aug. 26.?Anti-Tam
many Democrats aro urging John A.
Hennessy, the attorney who conduct
ed the probo into the affairs of New)
York State boards and Tammany po
litical methods and was the principal
stump speaker in the campaign last
years in behalf of the election of May
or John Purroy Mltchel, to become a
candidate for the Democratic nomina
tion for Governor of New York.
?
MRS. ROBERT ABRAMS
DIES AT SEATTLE
?+?
SEATTLE, Aug. 25.?Mrs. Robert
Abrams, a pioneer of Seattle, died
here last night. She is survived by
her husband, who has been one of the
leading citizens of this city for over a
third of a century, and son who is
prominent in the city.
NEW YORK BROKERS
GO THROUGH BANKRUPTCY
NEW YORK, Aug. 26.?J. C. Wilson
& Co., members of the New York
Stock Exchange, New York Cotton
Exchange, Chicago Board of Trade
and the San Francisco Stock & Bond
Exchange, have decided to go into
voluntary bankruptcy.
HEAT ALMOST RUINS
PICTURE OF MORGAN
NEW YORK, Aug. 26.?The valu
able portrait of the late J. P. Morgan
hung at the Morgan memorial In Hart
ford has been almost ruined by the
extreme humid heat of this summer.
CONGRESS NOT TO
LEVY WAR TAX
WASHINGTON, Aug. 26.?It is be
lieved that Congress will take no ac
tion In the direction of a war tax un
til the next session of Congress at
least.
AMERICANS MAY MAKE
BLANKETS IN ENGLAND
BOSTON, Aug. 26.?The American
Woolen company's mills have been
asked to namo quotations on a rush
order of army blankets for England.
NEWSPAPER SUPPORT
DEVELOPMENT BOARD
Various newspapers of tho States
aro supporting Socrotay Laue In
his efforts to have a development
board appointed to take charge of af
fairs In Alaska. That such a simpli
fying of the control of affairs in Alas
ka Is essential for tho early develop
ment of the Territory is gradually be
coming tho popular belief and probab
ly this sentimont of the poople of the
country will aid Mr. Lane in getting
his bill passed.
Concerning the present "red-tape"
method of handling Alaska's affairs,
tho Christian Science Monitor of
Boston says:
"Such a complex, heterogeneous
state of affairs is repugnant to a mod
ern administration with a sense of
order, a desire for efficiency, a dislike
of red-tnpo and a sincere belief In the
superiority of concentration of power
and responsibility."
Continuing tho same editorial sup
ports the development board plan as
follows:
"Some such plan of closo-range,
offectlvo dealing with territorial ad
ministrative problems is likely to
commend itself to congress sooner
or later, and tho sooner tho better."
Tho New Orleans Tlmes-Picayuno
says:
"Alaska, fabulously rich, practically
helpless, and long neglectod by con
gress, probably has suffered much
more than tho navy did from red
tape, circumlocution and othor bur
eau devices. Secretary Lane has
'started something' worth while.
Whether ho can finish It successfully
is another question."
From the Milwaukee Free Press,
tho following is taken:
"Why doeB congress hesitate?
Why has the Democratic party fail
ed to take thcBO measures on Its
legislative program? What possible
objection can there be to freeing
this great empire of its tangle of
archaic laws and unharmonlzed jur
isdictions, to unlocking its treasures
for the welfare of Alaska and the
advantage of the whole nation?"
The Indianapolis Star remarks:
"Much Is to be said in favor of Sec
retary Lane's plan of creating a gov
ernment board to control Alaskan af
fairs, for It has long been evident that
this rich territory to the north Is re
maining undeveloped and unfruitful
very largoly because of tho present
circumlocution and red tape that en
uingies an us departments.'
Tho St. Louis Republic says:
"The principle behind this sugges
tion is sound, if there^ is anything
sound in tho American Idea that
government should bfe close to the peo
ple. Absentee government is never
the best government, and if Alaska
Is not ready for self-government, it is
at least ready for some form of con
trol over its natural resources which
should be near enough to know and
respond to the needs of the people."
Commenting upon tho proposed de
velopment board plan, tho Asheville,
N. C., Gazette News says:
"It is earnestly to be hoped that
Secretary Lane will be able to put
through his Alaska government
scheme without any hindrance."
The Lynchburg, Va., News praises
Secretary Lane and asks:
"Shall we not aid Secretary Lane
in securing these reforms while he is
secretary?"
CANADA BUYS FLOUR
FOR GREAT BRITAIN
CHICAGO, Aug. 26.?Canada has
bought 1,000,000 bags of flour from
American millers for immediate ship
ment to England as a present from tho
Dominion to Great Britain.
"OLYMPIAN"
The Train of Luxury
TO
Butte, Miles.City, Sioux City, Minneapolis,
and St. Paul, Milwaukee, Chicago
All Points East, via the
"MILWAUKEE"
Leaves Seuttlc Dailyal 10.15 A.M.
"A TOUR DE LUXE" is an expression supremely fitting- in con
nection with a trip to the East on this palatial all-steel transconti
nental train. It combines the enjoyment of rare scenic beauties
with the pleasure of a journey in absolute case and comfort.
No Extra Fare on This Train
For further information regarding fares, train service, reservations,
etc., call on or address
Wlllii IL Newell. City Ticket Arent. Chicago, Milwaukee A St. Past Ry., Seward St.
JUNIAU, ALASKA, or
City Tlckr* Officer, Ciucigo. Milwaukee A St. Paul Railway, 441 Martian St. Wen
VANCOUVER. Ik C.. or
SECOND AVE. AND CHERRY ST... SEATTLE
n.
FAIRBANKS LOSES
TURNER BRIDGE AGAIN
?+?
FAIRBANKS, Aug. 17. ? Constant
rain during the Inst week has caused
a flood in the Tunana valley and to- I
day the river was higher than it has
been since the flood of 1905. The Tur
ner street bridge, which connects the
business district with the Tanana Val-|
ley railroad yards on Garden Island
was washed out today, the second
time this year. The bridge, which
goes out every spring when the ice
breaks up, is easily replaced and the
damage was not great. The water
still is rising.
NEW YORK EXCHANGE IS
IN DEMAND IN LONDON
NEW YORK, Aug. 26.?A London
special says that an improvement is
evident in Now York exchange, but!
In other foreign exchanges business
continues absolutely blocked.
If you want a Joy ride call up 57 ,
or 321. 7-0-tf. |
11 i I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 11 I
I THE HEGG f
CAPT. P. MADSEN f
J.eaves C. W. Young Co.'s 1
float every Monday for Kake r
and way ports. mall, T
passengers and freight. w X
1 I I I I I I II I I IiI I I I I I 1111 11
Ill?WP?
Peerless Bakery
Bakers of Fine Pastry of all
kinds. Only the best of mater
ial used. Try the Peerless brand.
Its quality insures Its continuous
use. * 4> * ? * + ?
PEERLESS BAKERY
(Formerly Lempke't)
THEO. HEYDER, Propr.
125 Front St. Phone 222
. I
EMPLYOMENT AGENCY
Good, reliable laborers can
be had quickly by calling phone
Main 242.
If You Want the Beit?
ASK FOR
II EPSTYN & McKANNA
Alaska Agents
0 ^ I
Delmonico
FIRST CLA!S~|
EATING PLACE I
?X*
BEST OF EVERYTHING I
Moderate Prices
New and &?cat
McDonald & Hart
Contractors and Builders
Office at McCIoskey's Cigar Store
Front Street
1 1
? PRESSED STEEL LEVELS ?
CALL AND SEE THE BEST LEVEL EVER PUT ON THE MARKET
VANADIUM STEEL SAWS
Try These Against Your Best Disston and Just Received the Best Asssrtment of HIGH
Sec the Difference GRADE TOOLS Ever Shown in Alaska
OUR PRICES ARE RIGHT TOO
Gastineau Hardware & Machinery Company
IB!
FULL
QUART
IffnfiMfflinifMiTfl!?!
BOTTLED IN BOND
Has Had no Peers for Fifty Years
SOLD BY ALL DEALERS

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