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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, August 29, 1914, Image 3

Image and text provided by Alaska State Library Historical Collections

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020657/1914-08-29/ed-1/seq-3/

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| What do you Buy |
When you Buy a
i| Typewriter?
You pay for neat, well-written correspond
;; ence, for perfect carbon copies, for the quality and \;
X quantity of work your typist can turn out?in
'< I short, for the years of service you get <!
0 If your inventory were made on this basis, J!
? you would find in the L. C. Smith & Bros, type
1 ? writer a much bigger asset than the price you paid I!
!! for it and a much bigger asset than in any other < I
i J writing machine ever made. j ?
I | Ball Bearing; Long Wearing < [
? > < ?
It isn't the machine?it's what the machine <?
| > will do for you. < ?
* ? < >
Can we prove this statement? Absolutely. <?
<; Ask for our proof. <;
* ? ?
i ? *
<; LC.Smith 8 Bros.TypewriterCo. <?
4, Home Office and Factory 4 4
i\ SYRACUSE, NEW YORK JI
O E. S. HEWITT, 115 SEWARD ST. JUNEAU o
^ALE OF CUT GLASS and FINE CHINAWARE AT ^1
S, I I CHARICK
P I. I. . jJEWELER and
OPTICIAN
JUNEAU, - ALASKA
frl? ?>
I PHONE 211 Scandinavian Grocery!
For Prices!! We Have the GOODS arss. |
I fl
i: Juneau Transfer Co.:
J; PHONE 48 i
WE ALWAYS HAVE
COAX.
\! Moving Carefull'' Dona ?
;; STORAGE 1
< > Baggage from All Boats X
37 FRONT ST. X
4 >
'miiiiiiiiiiiinmiiMi
? ?
? ARE YOU GOING TO BUILD? ?
? +
> Are you going to repair your +
> bouse? See George E. Brown, + j
Contractor tt Builder. Douglas ?
****************
F1KST CLASS ROOM BOARD II
Mrs. M. H. Lynch has opened
a new boarding house at 318
Fourth Street First class table
board at reasonable rates. Pa
tronage solicited. Special Sun
day dinner?75c. Phone 281. '
ARE YOU GOING TO BDILD?
M.M.GIMSE SSNTbcildee 11
BnQda (MOM both trie and mall and docs re
pedr week at rcssnnchlc rates. Sss mc at the
DemUi Hardware Store or Phone 55
u
J j Scandinavian Hand Laundry ' 1
' ' First class hand laundry done ) )
! ! at 323 Seventh Street. Table ? ?
' ; linen a specialty. Experienced \ [
? ? and guarantee satisfaction.
I I I I III I I 1
1! THE BE8T LOAF OF
BREAD :
? f
J ; Is Sold At
II San Francisco Bakery $
| j O. MESSBRSCxtMIDT, Prop. $
> ;
11 Just Arrived?A full line of fall and < I
"y. Suits $20.00 up. j;
4 ? Work. Material Style. Guaranteed 4 ?
4 . SATISFACTORY 4 .
? ? H. HE1DORN, Merchant Tailor J'
} [ 222 Seward Street. JUNEAU *
C W. WINSTEDT
ARCHITECT
SUPERINTENDENT
Sketchee Free
Office, Room 7, Gartide Block
Juneau, Alaska.
* +
+ CLASSIFIED ADV. *
!* +
FOR SALE?Furniture and carpets
and house for rent all refitted and
ready for occupancy by September 1.
Enquire Ebner residence, corner 4th
and Franklin streets. 8-27-3L
FOR SALE ? Furniture, new and
good, in three-room rented house, with
hot and cold water and all modern con
veniences. on Calhoun road. 8-24-tf
LOST?Brown water Spaniel puppy.
Return to Dr. Finley and receive re
ward. 8-28-3C
FOR RENT ? House, new and al
modern conveniences. I. J. Sharick.?
8-27-tf.
LOST?About ten days ago, a hand
carved brooch, with three small whole
pearls. Return to Treadwell P. O. and
receive reward. 8-27-tf.
JUST RECEIVED.
. *
A full line of D. M. C. COLORED
COTTONS; also linen sheeting and
pillow tubing, now towelling and plain
damask. Mrs. Albert Berry, The
Vogue, 317 Seward ? (Tu, Th Sa.)
ST. GEORGE HOUSE.
Everything new. Oeod light and
well ventilated rooms. Baths, electric
ight. Good board.
Reasonable rates by the day. week
>r inontn. 4-18-tf
MRS. A. E. VESTAL.
BOWLING
Is an Ideal sport for all.
W. V. Thompson, world's
?hamplon bowler, says
bowling reduces, and It Im
proves the lines. Bowling
has become a society fad
- In every country. Bowlers
never get appendicitis.
The Brunswick
Alleys ^ ^ ^
William Pallister, M.D., Seattle |
Specialist in the treatment of I
diseases and deformities of the X
eye, ear. yiose and throat 11
Main Street JUNEAU
URGES UNION OF
TWO SERVICES
? '? "?
SEATTLE. Aug. 22.?That the Unit
ed States llfesaving service and Un
united States revenue cutter service
should be combined because of the
similarity of tho duties of both in res
cue work, 1b the opinion of Capt. Q.
W. McAfee, commander of tho Neah
Bay lifesuvlng station, known as ono
of the largest if not the largest of its
kind In America. Capt McAfee ex
plained that a union of tho two ser
vices is even now being considered in
Congress, and because tho two could
work together with far more satis
factory resultB than with each under
separate Jurisdiction, he bellevos that
the merger will meet with the favor
of its lawmakers.
"One of the chief duties of the reve
nue cutters," explained Captain Mc
Afee, "is to aid boats in distress and
by tar the greater part of their an
nual activities is taken up with this
rescue work. The crews are trained
in manning and opt rating the non
slnkable lifeboat in the same manner
as is the craw of a llfesaving station.
On many occasions !r conducting res
cue work I have fouDd that the reve
nue cutter and llfesatlng crews could
work in perfect harmony in carrying
on the work and prodioe far hotter re
sults than if both worked independ
ently. * (
"There is no question but that the
llfesaving crew is tho more efficient ,
in rescue work, as its entire attention j
is devoted to this breach of the serv- ,
Ice, wUilo tho revnt-e autter drew ;
must become efficient in other lines as
well. The revenue cuttor, on the other
hand, furnishes bettor accommoda
tions for resuscitating those rescued
from the sea and mere comfortable (
quarters for carrying :'or the persons
saved by the lifesavln;; crew. In con- ^
junction, then, the serrice of the two t
would be far more efficient than un- ,
der the present separate course of ac- f
tlvities, and the number of lives saved
would be greatly Increased. On many
occasions the rescued victims die of "
exposure before they tan be brought
to the llfesaving station by the small
boat, which must be .>uilt light and
buoyant in order that it may be ma- t
neuvered in a heavy sen, and the num- s
ber of such deaths wculd bo greatly t
lessened under the combined service, i
"While the lifeboat vas riding the ?
heavy seas close to the rocks and col
lecting the passengers from off the 1
craft, the revenue cutter could lie off ?
at a distance with her boat just be- 1
yond the heavy sea. Passengers could i
then be taken from the wrecked ship t
to the revenue cutter's lifeboat by the
llfesaving boat, which could again re- 1
turn to the scene of the disaster and I
proceed with its rescuo work.?Seattle J
Times. 1
FRENCH WARSHIP ADDS ]
TO CANADIAN DEFENSE t
?+?
The French warship Montcalm was c
a very material addition to the do- f
fense of the Canadian waters of the c
Pacific. She is much more powerful S
than any vessel the British has had 1
in the North Pacific for many years. 0
The Montcalm is an armored cruiser,
with a displacement of 0,517 tons and ,
a crew of 583. She is 454% feet long,
623% feet beam and 24% mean draft.
She carries two 7.6-inch guns, eight
6.4-inch, four 4-inch, sixteen 3 pound
ers and torpedo tubes. She was com
pleted in 1902. Her speed Is 21 "
knots, and maximum coal capacity 1,
600 tons, with oil. She cost $4,375,000. {
ACTING HEAD OF d
CATHOLIC CHURCH v
Cardinal Francesco Delia Volpe, as tl
camerlengo (chamberlain), is now the u
acting head of the Roman Catholic a
Church. He will conduct affairs until
the conclave elects a new pope. He e
is 69 years old. He wan at the time E
of his elevation to the cardinalate the n
magglordomo of the Pope and con- f<
trolled the whole administration of the o
papal residence, supervising the Vati- c
can employes. He had held that post- s,
tion for eight years, having previous
ly been the maestro dl camera, the of- A
Bcial who has charge of srranging for tl
papal audiences. Many An erlcans who o
visited Rome when Catdinal Delia vt
Volpe held this office remember his af- p
table manner and courteous attention.
He has spent all his life <a Rome. Ho s
is archbishop of Bologna.
A GREAT WORK.
?+? a
The big thing President Wilson ac- tl
compllshed in the Mexican matter was tl
not with Mexico so much as with the d
United States. How big a thing it is n
to allay an aroused war spirit is c
shown by tho European troubles. Only w
x commanding personality could have ti
played with fire (as Mr. W ilson played si
with it when he ordered the fleet and fi
the soldiers to Vera Cruz), and not t?
have been scorched or have set the h
country in conflagration?Kansas City If
Star (Ind.) A
> ? ? h
FRUITS OF MEXICAN POLICY. a
To the patience, the foresight and e
the broad democracy of the Wilson t
administration, is due very largely b
the just and beneficent solution toward f
which the Mexican problem is now
working.?Atlanta Journal.
FOR SALE. f
I am forced to sen my fine small |]
pony (part Shetland and part Arabian) c
and two-seated carriage. Will sell to a
right party cheap. Enquire Jaxon's c
rink. 8-3-tf. H
* * ? o
You'll have to hurry if you get any s
of those fine Elberta peaches. We're a
taking orders now. Goldstein's Dept. t
Store. 8-26-tf c
I
Automobile for hire. Careful driver. "
Call up 57 or 321. 7-9-tf. <
ADMIRAL WATSON
TO BE REBUILT
SEATTLE, Aug. 20. ? Reconstruc
tion of the steamship Admiral Watson
at & cost of approximately $150,000 and
the establishment of the deadweight
ton systom aa a basis for freight
charges have boon definitely decided
on by the Pacific Alaska Navigation
company, operating the Admiral Lino
in the Seattle-Sau Francisco and Se
attle-Alaska routes.
Announcement of the program
ndopted was made this morning by
General Manager C. W. Wiley, of the
cpmpany, in connection with the re
ceipt of advices that the line's new
Bteamshlp Admiral Dewey passed
through tho Panama Canal yestorday
on her way to eSnttle. The Admiral
Schley, the company's other new liner,
Is oxpected to pass through the canal
today.
The company expects to rebuild the
Admiral Watson at the plant of the
Seattle Construction & Drydock com
pany. Her passenger accommodations
will bo greatly enlarged. At present
:he vessel has accommodations for 60
Hpst-class passengers and a limited
number of steerage passengers. She
will be robullt to provide accommoda
tions for 138 first-class passengers and
150 steerage. The reconstruction
work will be similar In practically ev
sry detail to the rebuilding of the Ad
niral Evans last winter when the Ev
ips was transformed Into one of the
track liners of the Alaska route. The
IVatson will be provided with cold
itorage space and machinery, and in
idditlon her fuel oil capacity will be
mlargcd.
Will Be Withdrawn.
The Watson at present is operated
m tho Seattle-San Francisco run, but
>n the arrival of the Dewey und Chley
rill bo withdrawn from the route for
ho reconstruction work. After she Is
ebullt she will be added to the com
iany'8 Alaska fleet.?Seattlo Times.
rURKEY'S POSITION
AND HER STRENGTH
?+?
Turkoys' attitude In the present con
[let of tho great European Powers Is
till doubtful, although there seems to
ie an uneasy feeling in Britain that
t will eventually align Itself with Au
tria-Hungary and Germany.
Turkey has had a long foud with
tussla. It feels a natural antipathy to
tervia, which recently aided in drlv
ng It from Its European domains, and
t bitterly resents Greek activity in
he same conflict.
Area: In Europe. 11,100 square
alles; in Asia, 682,960 square miles,
'opulatlon: In Europe. 2,000,000; In
isla, 17,683,000. Capital, Constantl
oplo. Ruler, Mohammed V.
Army: Peace strength, 400,000; rc
erves, 300,000. War strength, 700,000;
vallable but unorganized, 2,000,000;
otal 2,700,000. ^
Navy: Modern battleships, 2; cruls
r battleships, 1; older battleships, 3;
rst-class cruisers. 2; second-class
rulsers, 2; third-class cruisers, 1;
unboats, 2; monitors, 2; destroyers,
0; torpedo boats, 8; personnel, 30.
00 officers and men.
tESTORED CREDIT; NOT
LIQUIDATION NEEDED
No such problems as the present
ne has ever been faced by the busi
era world. But it is of the nature
f problems that they largely lose
letr terrors when they aro bravely
iced.
The task before us is not to llqnl
ato the world, but to restore the
'orld's credit Business never has
een liquidated ? except perhaps In
ie time of Noah's flood?and never
ill be, without a return to barbarism
nd barter.
Why should we regard well-regulat
3 gold shipments with such terror?
efore we get a normal condition, we
tust help to restore the credit of our
irelgn neighbors, If only to make our
wn good. If they need gold, and we
in dispense with it under proper
lfeguards, this is a necessary step.
Everybody must make concessions,
nd not to do so Is to circumscribe
ie area of credit, to extend the area
1 war, and to stimulate liquidation
here extension of credit Is the lm
eratlve need.?Wall Street Journal.
TRIKING LESSON IN
DISINTERESTED PATRIOTISM
Just now men, born In foreign landB,
re quitting good jobs in Alaska that,
tey may travel to the other side of
le globe to cast their lives into the
eadly maelstrom in defense of their
atlve country. And wo sometimes
all these men ignorant foreigners,
hen without a doubt they have at
ilned a degree of personal patriotism
Jldom equalled In this land of the
?ee and homo of the brave. They go
> offer their lives on the altar of the
ome land. What a deep lesson there
i in their brave sacrifice. To the
.merlcan citizen who holds himself in
igh esteem as a citizen of a great
nd glorious republic, comes the ques
on: What disinterested act have you
ver performed for the benefit of your
jwn, your stato or the nation 7 We
rag sometimes. ? Douglas Island
Tews.
OUR MAN OF PEACE.
Thanks to Woodrow Wilson's stead
tst adherence to the ways of peace,
i face of a widespread and hysterical
lamor for war, this country is today
vast workshop instead of an armed
amp. Instead of having sown the
eed of lasting hatred in the breast
f a neighboring nation, wo have
trengthened the bonds of friendship,
nd won the respect and trust of all
he nations of the two Americas. Nor
an anyone say that we have lost
restlge in the eyes of the warlike
ations of Europe.?Boston Advertiser,
Rep.)
HORRORS OF WAR AS
SEEN ON GROUND
P. J.. Philip, New York World and
London Nowb correspondent at the
front, gives this graphic picture of the
field of the aBttle of Haelen after the
conflict:
"Across the battlefield of Dlest there
(s a brown stretch of harrowed ground
ovor a hundred yards long. It is the
grave of twelve hundred Germans who
foil in the fight of Wednesday. All
over the field there are other graves,
some of Germans, some of Belgians,
some of their horses.
"When I reached the place this af
ternoon, peasants with long mattocks
and spades were turning up the soil. {
For two full days they have been at
tho work of burial. They were sick
at heart. Their corn Is ripe for cut
ting in the battlefield, but little of it
will be harvested. The paths In their
turnip fields are sodden with the blood
of men and of horses.
"The battleground should be called
Haelen rather than Dlest, for it was
In and through and behind the little
village of Haelen that the deadly test
of strength took place. Tho result
has been already stated. Tho Ger
mans lost three-fifths of their force of
5,000 men. Two thousand wore killed,
eight hundred wounded and three hun
dred taken prisoners.
"So far as numbers go the fight was
small, considering the enormous ar
mies in the field; but there is ample
ovldence that it was fierce out of all
nroDortion to It s slez."
ANOTHER TRANSLATION
OF T0L8T0Y'S PROPHECY
"This Is a rev&l&tlon of events of
a universal character, which must
shortly come to pass. Their outlines
are now before my eyes. 1 see floating
upon the Burface of the sea of human
fate the huge sllhouotte of a nude wo
man. She is?with her beauty, her
poise, her smile, her Jewels?a Super
Venus. Nations rush madly after her,
each of them eager to attract her es
pecially. But she, like an eternal cour
tesan, flirts with all. In her hair or
naments of diamonds and rubles Is
ongraved her name: 'Commercialism.'
As'alluring and as bewitching as Bhe
seems, much destruction and agony
follow in her wake.
"And behold, she has three gigantic
arms with three torches of universal
corruption In her hand. The first
torch represents the flame of war, the
second torch bears the flame of big
otry and hypocrisy, and the third
torch is that of the law.
"The great oonflagaratlon will start
about 1912, set by torch of the first
arm In the countries In the Southeast
ern Europe. It will develop Into a de
structive calamity in 1913. In that
year I see all Europe in flames and
bleeding. I hear the lamentations of
huge battlefields. But about the year
1915 a strange figure from the North?
a new Napoleon?enters tho stago of
the bloody drama. He is a man of
little militaristic training, a writer or
journalist, but In his grip most of Eu
ropo will remain till 1925.
"The end of the great calamity will
mark a new political era for the old
world. There will be left no empires
or kingdoms, but the world will form
a federation of tho United States of ,
Nations. There will remain only four ,
great giants?the Anglo-Saxons, the
Latins, tho Slavs and the Mongolians." ,
CANADIANS LEAD OTHER
FOREIGNERS IN SEATTLE
Canada leads in the number of for
elgn-born citizens, who have register
ed for elections in Seattle. The total
registration for the city is 73,919, and
of this number 3,323 voters were born
in Canada. Sweden is second, Ger- -
many third and Norway fourth. Eng- (
land falls into fifth place, with Ireland
sixth and Scotland seventh.
Mr. Gaines' compilation follows :
Canada, 3,323; Sweden, 2,621; Ger
many, 2,255; Norway, 1,866; England,
1,588; Ireland, 1,053; Scotland, 609.
The total number of foreign-born citi
zens registered it 15,924. This in
cludes persons born in other countries
than the seven mentioned. The total
registration of those born in English
possessions amounts to 6,833 persons.
NO SPIES HAVE BEEN
SHOT IN ENGLAND
LONDON, Aug. 28. ? It wad an
nounced last night that no spies have
been shot in England since the be
ginning of tho war as has boon re
ported.
BRAZIL A8K8 FOR
EXPLANATION AND ACTION
BERLIN, Aug. 28.?Brazil has ask
ed Germany to explain the attack on
Ex-President Campos and to punish
the guilty soldiers therefor.
Chimney Sweeps.
Flues and chimneys cleaned and re
paired. First class work; guaranteed.
Phone 314. 8-28-4t.
Travel East
OVER THE
"MILWAUKEE"
The Newest and Shortest Line to the East
Crossing the Cascade Mountains, the Kittitas Valley, the Colum
bia River, the Bitter Root Mountains and Montana Canyon, trav
ersing a country of surpassing scenic grandeur, historical interest
and wonderful development.
TWO FAST THROUGH TRAINS DAILY
"The Olympian" and "The Columbian"
The NEW ALL-STEEL TRAINS to
BUTTE, MILES CITY, SIOUX CITY,
MINNEAPOLIS. 9T. PAUL. MILWAUKEE and CHICAGO
For further information regarding fares, train tervice, reservations, etc.,
call on or address
Willis E. Nowell, City Ticket Agent,
Chicago, Milwaukee Sc St. Paul Ry., Seward St., Juneau, Alaska, or
City Ticket Offices, Chicago, Milwaukee Ic St. Paul Railway
443 Hastings St. West, Vancouver, B. C.
OR
Second Ave. and Cherry St, Seattle
-
AN "OLD LINE" COMPANY WITH "NEW LINE" IDEAS
INSURANCE CO.
0*^ |J T 4200,000.00 Deposited with Stat* Ttcssorer
k 3 in 1 p&v&
MU1 I ft ACCIDBNT A 1 rovidiotf
? I Pre m la mi Paid for Ton on Tour Life luiut-aco If
i Permanently Disabled
Bone Office, White Building, Seattle, V. S. A.
PETTIT & HARVEY, Local Agents
CALL FOR DEMOCRATIC ?
DIVISIONAL CONVENTION
By virtue of tho authority veBted In J J
us by the Territorial Democratic Con- < >
ventlon held at Skagway, Alaska, Aug. J \
S, 1914, n call is hereby lsauod for a < >
primary election for tho purposo of 1
electing delegates to a Divisional Con- < >
ventlon, to be held at Juneau, Alaska, ?
September 7th, 1914. Said convention < >
to be for the purpose of nominating < >
a Territorial Legislative ticket, the * J
naming of a Divisional Committee and < >
for such other business as may come * J
before 1L <?
The number of delegates to said J J
convention are apportioned as fol- <?
lows, towit: Juneau, 12; Douglas, 6;
Tread well. 3; Haines, 1; Chilkat, 1; <>
Sulzer, 1; Wrangell, 3; Silver Bow Ba
sin, 1; Kllllsnoo, 1; Skagway, 3; Ket- < *
chikan, 7; Sitka, 2; Gypsum, 1; Pet- ?
Yakatak, 1; Tenakee, 1; Charcoa _
Point, 1; Sheep Creek, 1; Craig, 1; ff
ersburg, 1; Chlchagoff, 1; Jualln, 1; I
Kasaan, 1; Hadloy, 1; Lorlng, 1.
Primary elections for the purposes fl
mentioned should bo held on or before J|
August 28, 1914.
Credentials of delegates selected for
said convention must be In tho hands
of the Territorial Committeemen on
or before Septembor 6, 1914.
Dated at Juneau, Alnska, this 7th
day of August, 1914.
j. p. Mcdonald,
D. NOLL,
Territorial Committeemen for First
Division.
DONT PAY RENT.
Will build four room modern bunga ?
low on good view lot and sell for $L
750 on easy terms.?ED. KANE, phon
S04. 8-20-tf
If You Waixt the Best?
ASK FOR
ca
EPSTYN & McKANNA g.
Alaska Agents p<
ALASKAN j!
HOTEL
? ?
Juneau's Leading Hostelry
<>
Steam beat, running hot and < ?
cold v/ater In all room*?six- ! 1
teen rooms with bath?strictly ;*
first class cafe?centrally loc&t- ?k
ed?big sample rooms. Auto < ?
meets all steamers?rates: $1.60 J
per day and up?commercial '>
trade solicited. ! >
P. L. Gemmett, Pres. A Mgr. t
F. H. McCoy, Secy-Treas. J;
(>
^ B
)elmonico
FIRST CLASS
EATING PLACE
BEST OF EVERYTHING
Moderate Prices
New and ZACcat
McDonald & Hart
Contractors and Builders
Office at McCloskey's Cigar Store
Front Street
HMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIII ?
THE HEGG::
CAPT. P. MAD8EN
Leaves C. W. Young Co.'a !
float every Monday for Kake < 1
and way ports. Carries mall, j |
passengers and freight. . .
h1111111111111111ii111 iT
Peerless Bakery
Bakers of Fine Pastry of all
kinds. Only the best of mater
ial used. Try the Peerless brand.
Its duality Insures its continuous
use. + + ? + + + +
PEERLESS BAKERY
(Formerly Lempke's)
THEO. HEYDER, Propr.
125 Front St Phone 222
Elberta peaches are the best for
inning. A car load is coming for
oldstein's Dept. Store on the Marl
>sa. S-26-tf.
I
T7 1. C* I ProPer mixture or Vanadium Ore with High Speed Steel
T anaaium l^lCGI oaws gives the toughest and the fastest cutting saw known today.
W? alio hare VANADIUM STEEL HAMMERS and a large shipment of NEW. TOOLS, atanjr of them Barer before shown la jnaeau
THE ONLY UNION MADE SAW IN AMERICA
Gastineau Hardware & Machinery Company
?

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