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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, September 04, 1914, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020657/1914-09-04/ed-1/seq-5/

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1?3
JWo Sell Them ExcluslYely
Juneau furniture Co.
Tel. 261. 3rd and Seward
JUNEAU STEAMSHIP CO.
United State* Mail
STEAMER GEORGIA
Junean-Sitka Route
Loaves Juneau lor Douglas, Fun
ter. Hoonah. Gypsum. Tenakee.
Kllllsnoo. Chatham and Sitka every
Wednesday at 12:01 a. m.
Juneau-Skagway Route
Leaves Juneau for Douglas, Eagle
River, Sentinel Light Station, El
lrid Rock Light Station, Comet.
I&ines. Skagway every Sunday at
:01 a. m. Returning, leaves
agway the following day at 12:02
a. m.
WILLIS E. NOWELL, MANAGER |
i
jmhiuhihiimmhuh*
ij The Alaska Grill::
________ \'\
! ! The Bed Appointed ?;
! Place in Town
*; Beat of Everything Served 1
!! at Moderate Prices
' ?IIIHIHIHHIHIMHIH
GOOD SEGARS
POCKET BILLIARDS
/
I Dave's Place |j
A Pipe for Every Fact
PIPE REPAIRING
Il " ll
In the interest of our town
lets patronize our home
merchants
F. WOLLAND
Will give you the Best in
Clothing, both ra to style,
and quality, ancfttt the right
price, too.
I lib E. Second Sc. Phone 66 ||j
i; Alaska
o Steam Laandry, Inc.
< ? =========== ,,
! I When yoa want the best \!
of work give as a trial <?
; [ and have the pleasure of J M
:: - BEING SAflSFlEP - |
o Phono 1S J. H. King, Mgr. <?
IGRAff'S NU-STYLE BAKERY
"DOVE BRAND" NVSryU Brr.d
No other like it. Try it.
Yoa'U want it all th? time
Cakea Bakrd to Order
329 FRANKLIN STREET
HOPE THINKS WELL
OF PORT WELLS
Tracy Hope, member of the well
known family for whom the Hope
mining camp in the Cook Inlet coun
try was named., and himself a mining
man of many years experience In Al
aska, believes that the Port Wells dis
trict has a good future. He recently
arrived from that section accompan
ied by Mrs. Hope and they are now
visiting with friends in Juneau.
Speaking of tho Port Wells coun
try Mr. Hope said that thoro were two
producing properties already operat
ing successfully and one near that
stage. The Granite mine in three
months, he sold, had cleaned up $64,
000, milling only 20 tons per day. The
Gold Eagle mine has just begun pro
ducing and the little 5- stamp mill Is
operating but as yet they have not
made the first clean-up. Tho Ohm
property is prospecting well and a
good showing Is being made.
'There are three other properties,"
said Mr. Hope, "that have been de
veloped to the point where the owners
are warranted In putting in mills?
these are the 'Herman,' 'Hobo,' and
*George.' In addition there have been
three Important discoveries made dur
ing the summer, although prospecting
has been greatly retarded by an es
pecialy wet summer."
9TR0NG BILL PREPARED
FOR GRAND SATURDAY
An unusualy strong bill has been
prepared for the Grand theatre Sat
urday and Sunday evenings to Include:
Miss Maude Fearly In King Rene's
Daughter Iolanthe, In her garden. A
poetic drama from the Danish of Men
rick Herl, produced in three reels with
a notable Thanhouser cast.
"His Crooked Career," or the largest
vessel ever launched In the world
sidewlse. This is a side-splitting frace
comedy.
The Animate Weekly contains a
championship meet of athletes; a
fake steamer crash; newsies at the
ball: Orangemen's days; historical
events, coaching club meet; navy yard
Inspection; Are fighters' reunion, aq
uatic sports, the Kaiser's Jubilee, "and
motor boat races, etc. ???
VALDEZ MAN GETS
WINTER VAIL CONTRACT
?+?
VALDEZ. Aug. 30.?W. E. Hansel,
of Valdez, was the lowest^ bidder tpr
the contracV^o-takftig'tEe winter mail
from jUHlez to Tonslna. The contract
calls for two trips a month. No bond
was required by the department with
the bid but that when the contract
is let the contractors is equipped to
handle the mail.
WANTED ? Woman for general
housework. SL George House.? 9-3-tf.
i
I I
Delmonico
FIRST CLASS
EATING PLACE
?X*
BEST OF EVERYTHING
Moderate Prices
New and [A[eat
iJ\J 'fM'j w wfiCTWMi
If You Want the Best?
ASK FOR
? llll -1
EPSTYN & McKANNA
Alaska Agents 1
PLANKED HIGHWAY
IS NOW FINISHED
Tho lost planks wore laid this
morning on tho Wllloughby avenuo ex
tension carrying the great waterfront
thoroughfare across Gold creek to tho
solid ground of tho Casey Shattuck
addition. Residents of North Juneau
may now como to tho buslnoss sec
tion of town with dry feet and without
making the long detour over the nar
row hill road. One of the great ad
vantages to bo obtained with the com
pletion of tho now artery will bo tho
elimination of much heavy traffic
through the residence section and ov
er the Calhoun Road.
It is probable that Councilman Will
iam Geddos, who has devotod nearly
all of his time to this highway since
active construction began, both in
raising money among tho peoplo to
assist the city government in the un
dertaking, and in seeing that the mon
ey was judlclaly spent, will make a re
port at tonight's meeting of the coun
cil.
It is expected that the owners of
the Casey-Shatuck addition will im
mediately open up the connecting
thoroughfare from the end of the
plank roadway to tho government road
leading through North Juneau to Sai
nton creek.
YUKON LOYAL TO
MOTHER COUNTRY
DAWSON, Y. T., Aug. 24.?The cit
izens of Yukon are proving their loy
alty to tho Empire by sending men and
money to the support of tho mother
country in the struggle with Germany.
The response to a call for 500 volun
teers has been answered, many of
them being veterans In the service of
Britain In former wars.
Formor members of the mounted
police were given preference but the
enrollment embraces Montenegrins,
Russians, Italians, as well as a few
Americans. One young man born In
Yukon Is on the list. He Is Charles
O'Brien son of Thomas W. O'Brien,
the Yukon pioneer.
The Dawson branch of the Daugh
ters of the Empire have forwarded
56,500 toward the equipment of the
hospital ship, which will bo presented
to the British admiralty by the wom
en of Canada.
German residents of Yukon have
been notified that they must not leavo
the territory In an effort to return to
their native land to take up eriD9
against (ft-eat Britain. There are a
number of German reservists In the
North, all of whom received the call
to arms.
The first Yukoner to leave for the
front was Jack Watt, who spent the
winter In Chlsana. He has seen ser- (
vice In India, China and Egypt, and
left on the first boat after war had
been declared.
BUSINESS TRANSLATED
BY FLOATING COURT
VALDEZ, Aug. 30. ? S. Mortomoro
was brought here by the returning
floating court party enroute to Mc
Neils, where he will serve ten years
for the murder of another Jap at tho
Nushagak cannery.
D. S. Minor and Jose Tamagc were
brought here to be taken to the In
sane hospital near Portland, Ore.
Harry Robles and Jose Millndez
were brought over to await trial, the
first for atempted murder and the
latter for murder committed at the
Larson bay cannery.
Emll Anderson will serve 6 months
In the Yaldcz jail and pay a fine of
$250 for assault and battery.
Several witnesses were also brought
to Valdez.
Court was held at all tho ports from
Bristol bay to Kodlak and then tho
cutter came direct to Valdez, but was i
held off the entrance to Prince Will
lam Sound by a heavy storm.
A small cannon used by the Rus- I
slans at Unalaska when that point was
a trading port for the Russian Fur
company was brought here by the i
court to be placed on the lawn at the <
court house. The cannon Is probably <
more than 100 years old and will be i
Interesting to the tourists who call. \
?-?? ? ? l
TERM OF COURT AT 1
RUBY IS FINISHED 1
FAIRBANKS, Aug. 29.?Judge Fred- \
Brie E. Fuller and other court officials j
returned to Fairbanks today from Ru- r
by, whero they have been holding a I
:erm of court They report the lower
?Iver camp as being optimistic of Its
'uture. A term of court will be held \
>ere at an early date, the Jurors hav- ?j
ng already been drawn.
TELEGRAPH HEADQUARTERS
ARE MOVED TO VALDEZ
The headquarters for the United g
States military telegraph lines In the j
nterlor of Alaska has been removed ^
rom Fairbanks to Valdez. ? fl
i rnmrnon r.i)apr are in now. we loot for i
ii LUNLUKU V3l\/\rLj another big shipment of El- ii
:: berta Peaches this week. WATCH OUR ADD.
o y o
< ? We have in stock this week, Italian Prunes and Gravenstein Apples at reason- <>
able prices. We will have Cling Peaches in this week. We are now receiving <>
ii N ALASKA CELERY ?? ii
o N o
? Come and see our big lines of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables. We will have <;
<? more Crab Apples and Fresh Tomatoes for preserving this week. P F P F o
H. J. RAYMOND S2SBE I
J ? m. W -i_ -*? i-?-* V-^ X- 1 m-r PHONE NUMBER 28
< ? N ?'
U. S. MARSHALS
TO BE PAYMASTERS
Funds have been croated In tho
United States marshal's ofllceB
througout tho country for the payment
of salaries to Judgo and othor court
officials, and the United States mar
shals throughout the country will have
the duty of paying such salaries add
od to their prosent duties as soon as
tho law goes Into cfTect which will be
October 1, 1914- The now .act also
provides for an Increase of tho bonds
of United States marshals so afToctod.
In the caso of United Stntes Marshal
H. A. Bishop, of Juneau, the bond
must be Increased from $30,000 to
$40,000 and he Is made custodian of
four new funds and will pay salaries
which have heretofore been paid at
Washington, D. C.
The funds created are for the sal
aries of tho Judgo of the District
Court, United States District Attor
ney, United States Marshal, Clerk of
the District Court, clerks to the Unit
ed Statos District Attorney, regular
assistant District Attornoy, and deputy
United Stntes Marshals.
Mr. Bishop received letters from
Washington yestorday apprising him
of the new order of things, also copies
of the act. The paragraph In the act
applying to tho situation in Juneau
follows:
"From and after Oct. 1, 1914. It shall
be the duty of United Stntes marshals
to pay, undor regulations prescribed
by the attornoy general, tho salaries
of all judges of tho United States
courts, except the justices of the Su
premo Court of the United States, the
salaries of judges retired under sec
tion 714 of the revised statutes, and
the judges, officials, and employees of
all courts whose sessions are held in
the District of .Columbia, whoso sal
aries shall bo paid through the dis
bursing officer of the Department of
Justice as hitherto provided, United
States District Atorneys, their regular
assistants, clerks, and messengers, and
United States marshals and their dep
uties; Provided, that every United
States marshal operating under bond
executed prior to the passngo of this
act shall give bond effective thereafter
for tho faithful performance of tho
duties of his office, including the pay
ment of salaries above mentioned."
THE LOSS OF THE
ADMIRAL SAMPSON
Til? Toss"of"the ilne steaniSli.'P# -J.'Xr ?
Admiral Sampson, Is to be sincerely
regretted, chiefly, of course, because
of the sad loss of life accompanying
It, but also because In the Admiral
Line Seward has always had a staunch
friend that always tried to give this
city the best service and the bes-; treat
ment possible.
The loss of the Sampson le not due
In the least to the line and Seward's
old friend, CapL Zlm Moore, was sec
ond to none In the care given to his
ship and In ability as a navigator, but
it Is felt, in spite of all that, that the
company and Its officers feel a per
sonal loss in the sinking of tho ves
sel that had become so familiar to
them as weel as to ourselves, and It
may not be regarded as assuming too
much to oxpress through this paper
the regret that the company has met
with such n mishap.
For the poor members of the crow
who had stopped off at Seward so of
ten and who have now lost their lives
there Is nothing but regret. From the
genial Capt. "Zlm" himself to the
humblest member of the crew nono
ever showed anything but the greatost
consideration for those who travelled
up and down on their vessel. Like all
tho ofllclals of the line they wero men
with whom It was a pleasure to be ac
quainted and It is not at all saying too
much to state that In those who were
drowned Seward feels thnt she has
lost those who were close to her.
What better panegyric could be ut
tered about tho same crew than to re
peat tho story of the wreck: "Capt.
Moore refused to leave tho ship?Of
ten men drowned eight were members
pf the crew?Of those eight three were
chief officers?The rest were a stow
irdess whose duty It was to look after
the women passengers, a watchman,
the wireless operator whose post must i
>e held to the ond in honor, and a hum- i
pie messboy?The captain, the chief 1
snglneer, the third officer went down
vith vessel when all the women were
taved with the exception of one who,
10 doubt, forgot herself In caring for
ler helpless charges."
That is the story of the Sampson
rreck?the story which in itself speaks |
ouder than any words of duty nobly
lone.?Seward Gateawy.
CAPT. ZIM MOORE.
?+? .
Capt. ZIm Moore is dead. Ho lived
L' man's life and died a man's death.
?o greater praiso can be given any
nan. Commanding the Admiral Samp
on with fifty-five passengers aboard,
>y his presence of mind he Baved
Ifty- throe of the passengers and all
>ut nine -of the crew, when his ship
rns hit a mortal blow by the Princess
Victoria in the fog. One of his pas
tengers died in the arms of his chief
mgineer, A. J. Noon. It was a splen
lid record and the people of the
^lorth, who havo known Capt. Moore
or many years, are not surprised that
n dying he left the remembrance of
i heroic death. We are all sorry that
'apt Moore has been taken away, but
ve are all proud that in the going ho
eft us the memory of a noble end.?
k'aldoz Miner.
ST. GEORGE HOUSE.
Everything new. Oood light and
veil ventilated rooraB. Baths, electric
ight. Good board.
Reasonable rates by the day, week
>r month. 4-18-tf
MRS. A. E. VESTAL.
A Big Shipment of
Fall Suits
We .iust unpacked a large advance ship
ment of Benjamin New York style, Fall suits
for men. Three and four button coats, with
loose backs, straight front, all the popular colors,
assorted in stripes and fancy mixtures. We'll
be glad to have you visit this store and examine ,
these new arrivals.
?
A Very Special^Quality Suit
at
$20
^??j4n;ln C'otKc*
On View
Our new Fall styles of soft and stiff shirts,
with style that you can recognize as far as you
can see the shirt, and quality that will bear the
closest inspection under a magnifying lens?
Prices: $1.50 to $2.00
Man^ a man finds that it takes him a week
to break in a new pair of shoes so it's comfort
able. Perhaps you are one of them? Try our
famous Hanan shoes and your shoe worry is
over.
&. M. JBetirends Company, Inc. I
*
* PERSONAL MENTION ?
fr *
.j. + * * * .j. ?$. 4* ? + ?
William Ferguson popular commer
cial man travelling out of Juneau, re
turned from Wrangell on the Ala
meda last night
Miss C. Kuykendall, who Is to teach
the school at Mendonhal, arrived on
the Alameda last night from Seattle.
C. R. Chadwlck, well known com
mercial man with'headquarters in Jun
eau, arrived from Wrangell on the
Alnmeda last night.
B. D. Palmer, representing the
Falcs Paper company of Seattlo, took
passage on the Alameda last night
for points to the Westward.
Mrs. J. H. Guffey and the children
arrived in Juneau on the Alameda
last night joining Mr. Guffey whore
they will establish their home.
MIsb Crystal B. Snow returned on
the City of Seattle from a vacation
spent with her parents in Seattle.
Miss Snow will teach one of the grades
in the Juner.u public schools beginning
next week.
Mrs. Bradley, wife of the new gener
al superintendent of Treadwell, ar
rived on the City of Seattle this morn
ing. )
Miss Blanche Dyer, one of the
grade teachers of Juneaus' public
schools returned on the City of Seat
tle this morning a'fte rspending a va
cation in the States.
Dr. Bcvis* office is in the offices
formerly occupied by Dr. J. K. Simp
son on Second St. 9-2-6t '
Start the Day Right with I
a. Breakfast of I
?/frmoarrs I
"STAR" BACON (*
ALASKA MEAI COMPANY John Reck, Mgr.
Wholesale and ket?.'A Butchers
Manufacturers of all Kinds of Sausages Hams and Bacon
??*i??
AN "OLD UNE" COMPANY WITH "NEW UNE" IDEAS
INSURANCE CO.
?. ? ? r\' 1200,000.00 Dcpoalted with Sun Ttcunter
k I nflvt 3IN1 P???s
[XlX/1 lp?e ACCIDBNT x x rorldimf
j " Premium! Paid lor Yon on Yoor Life loiutaacj If
Permanently Diaabled
Uome Office, White Building, Seattle, U. S. A.
PETTIT & HARVEY, Local Agents
H I I I I I I I I Ml I II I I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 11 I 1111??11111111
:: Yourself and Friends ;;
;; are cordially invited to attend ??
;; THE LABOR DA Y BALL \ \
? ? Given by "
:: The Juneau Band ::
?; Monday Evening, September Seventh ; ?
i; At J AXON'S RINK \\
?; Admission: jj
!! Dancers, One Dollar; Ladles, Free
? ? Spectators, Twenty-flva Cents; Ladles, Free
iw+H-ww-i-iH 1-1 n 11 m i n ?111111111111111111111111':
FULL
QUART
?in 1
BOTTLED IN BOND
Has Had no Peers for Fifty Years
SOLD BY ALL DEALERS t

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