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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, September 05, 1914, Image 3

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!j What do you Buy jj
| When you Buy a ;;
| Typewriter?
;; You pay for neat, well-written correspond- ;;
3 3 ence, for perfect carbon copies, for the quality and j;
33 quantity of work your typist can turn out?in ;;
3 3 short, for the years of serv ice you get. 3 I
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33 If your inventory were made on this basis,
33 you would find in the L. C. Smith & Bros, type- 3!
3 3 writer a much bigger asset than the price you paid 3 3
3 3 for it and a much bigger asset than in any other 3 3
3 3 writing machine ever made. < 3
<3 Ball Bearing; Long Wearing 33
< ? < ?
<3 It isn't the machine?it's what the machine <3
< 3 will do for you. 3 3
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<3 Can we prove this statement? Absolutely. |3
; 3 Ask for our proof. ; 3
< ? i ?
? 4 >
j; LG.SmithS Bros. Typewriter Go. j;
< ? Home Office and Factory < ?
Jt SYRACUSE, NEW YORK it
o E. S. HEWITT, 115 SEWARD ST. JUNEAU <t
4 * - ?
SALE OF CUT GLASS and FINE CHIN AWARE AT
i I I CHARICK
r I-J - i JJEWELER and
' ^ OPTiCIAN
JUNEAU, - ALASKA
I PHONE 211' Scandinavian Grocery
For Prices!! We Have the GOODS STSS.
:: Juneau Transfer Co.;
;; PHONE 48 I
J! WE ALWAYS HAVE
\\ COAL j
o Moving Carefuilv Don ?
| j STORAGE I
< > Baggage to and from All Boata x
37 FRONT ST. f
<?> :
? +
? ARE YOU GOING TO BUILD? ?
? +
? Are you going to repair your +
> bouse? See George E. Brown. *
Contractor & Builder, Douglas +
FIRST CLASS ROOM .nd BOARD
Mrs. M. H. Lynch has opened
a new boarding house at 318
Fourth Street. First class table
beard ac reasonable rates. Pa
tronage solicited. Special Sun
day dinner?73c. Phone 281.
McDonald & Hart
Contractors and Builders
Office at McCloekey's Cigar Store
Front Street
11 1111 11 I I I I I 1II I I I I I I I I I I
!! Scandinavian Hand Laundry I
)} First class hand laundry done T
1 ? at 323 Seventh Street Table I
|) linen a specialty. Experienced T
? ? and guarantee satisfaction. t
ill II I I I IH I I 1 I I i I i I I I I I I I
X THE BEST LOAF OF
| BREAD ?
X ' *
X Is Sold At
| San Francisco Bakery;
? G. JdESSERSCnMIDT. Prop. ?
?????????????????????????#
<! Just Arrived--A full line of fall and < >
o ^ffn, Suits $20.00 up- o
4 ? Work. Material. Style. Guaranteed < ?
4 . SATISFACTORY 4 ?
< ' H. HE1DORN. Merchant Tailor \ \
4 ! 222 Seward Street. JUNEAU +
4
I William Palfister, M.D., Seattle I
Specialist in the treatment of I
diseases and deformities of the I
eye. ear. nose and throat
Main Street JUNEAU
> +
+ CLASSIFIED ADV. ?
* +
+? + + + + ? + + + + + + + + + +
FOR SALE?Cheap; good residence
| lot and furnished cabin; new water
| front St.; easy terms. Inquire at 488
Front SL 9-l-6t
FOR KENT ? House, new and at
modern conveniences. I. J. Sharick.
S-27-tf.
FOR SALE ? Several choice teams
of mules and horses. See Kennedy
Jualin, Alaska. 8-31-6t
FOR RENT?nice, clean rooms with
or without board, apply at City cafe,
355 Lower Front SL 9-1-lmo.
WANTED ? Woman for general
housework. SL George House.? 9-3-tf.
FOR SALE.
I am forced to sen my fine small
pony (part Shetland and part Arabian)
and two-seated carriage. Will sell to
right party cheap. Enquire Jaxon's
rink. ' 8-3-tf.
1B0WLING
is an ideal sport for all.
W. V. Thompson, world's
champion bowler, says
bowling reduces, and It Im
proves the lines. Bowling
has become a society fad
in every country. Bowlers
never get appendicitis.
??????
The Brunswick
Alleys ^ ^ ^
PETTIT & HARVEY
Rentals and General Collection*
REAL ESTATE BROKERS
Auditing and Accounting
Agents Northern Life Insurance Co.
Cheney Oldg. Phone 297
Peerless Bakery
Bakers of Fine Pastry of all
kinds. Only the best of mater-?
ial used. Try the Peerless brand.
Its quality insures Its continuous
use. + + ** + + +
PEERLESS BAKERY
(Formerly Lempke's)
THEO. HEYDER, Propr.
125 Front St Phone 222
SALMON PACK WILL
BE WORTH MILLIONS
The smashing of all provoius records
for "off years" In the Puget Sound sal
mon Industry by the bIzo of the 1914
pack in Sound waters, coupled with
the extraordinary demand for local
canned fish In European markets be
cause of the world war now being
waged, spells prosperity for the entlro
Industry and Indirectly through It for
the Pacific Northwest and Seattle, says
the Soattlo Times.
Inquiries for quotations on the food
fish are pouring Into Seattle from all
sections of this couutry and Europo,
and with the providing of sufficient
transportation facilities a hugo "clean
up" will take place.
Such Is the enthuslastlo declaration
made today by salmon canners and
statisticians, following the announce
ment that the present reason, although
falling on a year following a quad
rennial "big run" when the salmon
flood Puget Sound waters, would pro
duce a pack of 600,000 cases on the
Sound alone, including heavy gains at
Bellingham and other points.
In 1913, when the fish, according to
the law of nature flocked to Sound wa
ters after three years of small catches,
an unusually large pack was made, but
advance figures for this year's produc
tion indicate that tho pack thlB year
will not suffer. At Bellingham it was
said that the pack from the Sound
would total 275,000 cases as against
260,000 cases four years ago, the cor
responding "off year," or year in which
no "big run" took place.
The entire Northwest pack, includ
ing Alaska and British Columbia, will
reach the enormous total of 5,257,500
cases, according to an estimate made
by Miller Freeman, secretary of the
salmon canners* associations, and
while reports from Southeastern Alas
ka indicate that rainy weather has in
terfered to some extent with the catch
In that vicinity, Western Alaska will
produce an unusually large pack and
other gains are predicted for other
sections.
Season Leads 1912.
While an Immense quantity of fish
was taken from Puget Sound last
year during the big run, the 1914 seah
son will lead that of 1912, an "off year,"
by 50,000 cases and under normal con
ditions In Southeastern Alaska would
duplicate the same feat with the year
1911, which was remarkably large.
With the exception of other "big
years.' 'the present pack will lead pre
ceding years outside of 1912 and 1911
by at least 1,000,000 cases, it is be
lieved.
Despite the unfavorable weather con
ditions, the Southeastern Alaska pack
is expected to total 1,600,000 casos. J.
T. Barron, president of tho Thinklet
Packing company, carefully investigat
ed conditions In Northern waters dur
ing August and on his return to Seat
tle prepared figures indicating that the
total from this region would be 800,000
cases below the first forecasts made
early in the season.
On August 15 the pack in this dis
trict amounted to 1,203.000 cases, with
the red pack completed and the pink
pack practlcaly finished in two-thirds
of the section. Two hundred thousand
more cases of pink salmon will be
packed, it is believed, and the remain
der will comprise chums and cohoes.
Western Alaska will produce a total
of 1,400,000 cases; while British Co
lumbia is credited with 70,0000 and
Central Alaska with 445,000 cases. Tho
Columbia River district is expected to
yield 337,500 cases.
CARRIER PIGEONS ARE
USEFUL IN ALASKA
?+?
FAIRBANKS, Sept. 15.?It was the
intention of the millionaire hunting
party when It left Fairbanks last night
for the ML McKlnley country to take
with it some carrier pigeons which
were to be turned loose from time to
time with messages from the boys.
However, in the hurry of departure
they were forgotten. Perhaps they
will be taken in later over the trail
from here.
The plan is entirely feasible. Four
years ago Fred Douse sent several
to Iditarod with Mrs. Carrie Stover,
who expected to keep them there.
True to their homing insticts, how
ever, they started for Fairbanks as
soon as they were able to escape
and reached here without difficulty.
It is a great wonder to those who
know of the practical uses to which
carrier pigeons may be put, taht
more of them are not used in Alaska
where very often messages of im
portance might be sent from remote
points easily and safely?Fairbanks
News-Miner.
LONDON FINANCES ARE
BEGINNING TO IMPROVE
NEW YORK, Sept. 5. ? A London
special says that the extent of theN im
provement in the London's financial
position Is shown by the fact that
banks are already beginning to waive
their right to protect thomselves
through use of the moratorium. Con
ditions, as between banker and de
positor, are practically normal.
WHEAT EXPORTS ARE
GROWING VERY FAST
?+?
WASHINGTON, Sept. 5.?The total
wheat and flour exports last week
amounted to 6,000,000 bushels and
144,000 barrels respectively. This
compares with only 1,308,000 bushels
the previous week and 5,577,000 the
corresponding time last year.
CARNEGIE INCREASING
HIS STEEL HOLDINGS
NEW YORK, Sept 6.?Andrew Car
negie Is said to be a heavy purchaser
in United States Steel corporation
bonds, which are now selling at par.
He is already the largest holder of
these bonds.
HIGH WATER KILLS
FORTUNE IN FOXES
I To secure soveral excellent speci
mens of live fox, to build castles In
tne air regardlug tho starting of a
mr Turin, and to loso the animals in
a raging torreiH, was the fortune, I
good ana bad, tbat overtook William
L.tnk almost two months ago in the
Donnitlold country. Llnx, who Is a
prospector and trapper, reuchod Fair
oauks recently, and tho story that ho
tells is an Interesting one of good
fortune, which later turned Into 111
luck.
During tho eurly part of June, Link
caught four live pup foxes. Two of
them wero black, one was an excel
lent silver gray, and the fourth was
a cross breed. The quartette made
an excellent start for a fox farm and
the owner started Immediately to
figure how many dollars they would
bring within a few years.
Shortly after catching tho animas,
however, Link's supply of grub be
gan to run short, together with his
ammunition. He tried to feed tho ani
mals as best he could, on anything
that he could find, but as his own
supply of food dwindled he doclded to
return to town and bring tho foxes
with him.
The foxes wero small, and he had
no difficulty in carrying them, as ho
placed them In a box, wjhlch in turn
was placed on a packhorse. Upon
reaching tho Totalanlka, the river was
swollen by tho recent rains and was
apparently impassable. Had the trap
per had more grub he would not have
attempted to cross under the condi
tions, but bolng almost desperate, he
started to ford the stream. Tho horse
lost its footing and was swept under
a sweeper, taking with it practically
the whole load.
While the horse was being washod
under the sweeper, the owner attempt
ed to cut the rope holding tho box of
foxes, and thought ho had it, but
found that it was only his blankets
that he was saving while the foxes
were washed downstream.
Tho value of tho foxes which were
lost is approximately $4,000, according
to Air. Link, and he would not have
accepted $5,000 for them as ho ex
pected to start a fur farm.?Fairbanks
Times.
FAIRBANKS NEEDS
CHEAPER PRODUCTION
The timo will come when the fer
tilo valleys of Interior Alaska will
support a large population. Agricul
tural development Is going ahead nip
idly, considering tho manner in which
the country is hampered, and each sea
son furnishes additional evidence that
the Northland some day will be al
most, if not quite, self-supporting.
When that time comes, it will matter
little to Alaskans what takes place in
other parts of the world. Wo will bo
independent of those captains of fl
nance who lay awake nights figuring
out schemes for adding to their pro
fits at the expense of the common peo^
pie. We will be independent of the
men who control the markets of the
United States and who are boosting
the cost of living so rapidly that only
the moderately rich can keep up with
it. We will have our own crops to
carry us over the wintor, our own
coal to run our machinery, and plenty
of gold for the purchase of those
things which wo must buy elsewhere.
In tho meantime, "however, we aro
up against a tough proposition. We
are dependent upon the markets of
the Outsido for practicaly everything
that we eat and wear and use in our
mining operatious; our transportation
facilities aro inadequate and the cost
of fuel is such that our chief industry
is seriously crippled. In fact, we have
gone about as far as we can under the
present condition. Further develop
ment is impossible until tho cost of op
eration is reduced. We must have
cheaper power and cheaper provisions.
In the present undeveloped state of
our Territory, we cannot hope to regu
late the price of provisions. We must
pay whatever price is demanded. But
there is no good reason why we
should be without cheap power so
long as there is an abundance of coal
and water power in the Interior. We
can hnvo it if we will make an effort
to get it, and when we do get it, we
will have paved tho way to better
times in Intci'lor Alaska. ? Fairbanks
Times.
CABINET'S UNKNOWN QUANTITY.
Thomas Watt Gregory became a
Special Assistant Attorney-General of
the United States on the strength of
his work In anti-trust prosecutions as
special counsel for the State of Texas.
He is named to succeed Mr. McRey
nolds as Attorney-General on the
strength of his work In the Depart
ment of Justice, where he Is best
known for his handling of the New
Haven case.
It is testimony to his strong quali
fications for the higher office that In
his prosecution of tho New Haven
case he sought none of that publicity
which might have made him better
known to the -country at large, and
was content with the consciousness
of having performed a laborious work
with care and thoroughness. But It
Is none the less true that he comeB
to the Attorney-Generalship with a
wider reputation to make than has
been the lot of recent occupants of tho
office.
Mr. Gregory Is presently the un
known quantity in the Wilson Cab
inet. But it Is a broad opportunity
which has been given him to become
one of the best and most favorably
known of this group of Ministers.?
New York World.
DRUGS of QUALITY, of pooplo of
QUALITY at the store of QUALITY?
The Juneau Drug Co., 107 Front St,
opposite Alaskan hotol. Phone 250.?
9-4-2t.
CANADIANS MAY
ALL HAVE CHANCE
There is not the slightest doubt but
that a second Canadian contingent
will be mobilised ns soon as the first
contingent Balls for the seat of war.
With the formation of the Prince Ru
pert regiment, some of Its members
at least are suro of bclngv given an
opportunity of forming part of the
second contingent. Those desirous of
serving their country are pretty Bure,
therefore, of getting abroad by enlist
ing with our new regiment. Bofore
the war 1b ended, Canada will un
questionably again prove her worth
to the British Empire, and It will In
deed bo a proud day for us all If
Prince Rupertors can figure In any
achievements to bo won.?Prince Ru
pert Empire.
HONOR AMONG FOES.
War necessitates suspension of
many privileges which aro rights in
time of peace.
In fact, business honesty in some
cases becomes national treason.
A British merchant is not allowed
to pay his debt to a Gorman creditor.
Hence, tho announcement from Mon
treal that the imperial government has
Instructed the Canadlun Pacific Rail
way to withhold dividend payment
from stockholders In Germany and
Austria.
It does seom unfortunato that when
generous investors in foreign lands
have been broad-minded enough to
help develop an English dominion,
they should bo discriminated against
now that a state of war exists.
But such are the fortunes of war.
There may be honor among thieves,
but as far as paying over money is
concerned, there can be none among
foes.?Boston News Bureau.
A LONG WAR.
Lord Kitchener's warning that tho
war may last three years or more and
that it will Btrain all tho resources of
the British Empire is a professional
opinion that cannot be waved lightly
aside.
Now that the allied forces have ex
perienced their first serious defeat,
nnd the temper and purpose of Ger
man Imperialism are more clearly re
vealed, it must be plain to London
and Paris alike that this Is no holiday
war.
me North sutrered two years of
almost continuous defeats before It
began to wear down the reslstenco
of the Confederacy. It Is not Incon
ceivable that Great Britain, France
and Russia may battle a full year be
fore the military strength of German
imperialism is seriously weakened.
When all tho impedimenta of civili
zation are thrown aside, armies can
remain In the field as long as they
did in Napoleon's time. In a conflict
of this kind the advantage rests first
with tho power that can Immediately
put the greatest number of trained
soldiers into action. In a long-drawn
out war the final advantage rests with
the powers that have the superior
natural resources, as it did a century
ago. It all depends on tho temper of
the contestants nnd the sacrifices that
they are prepared to make.
"Skin for skin, yea, all that a man
hath will bo given for his life." If
Great Britain and France are deter
mined to throw their last man and
their last loaf of bread into the bal
ance before making peace with Gor
many on any terms except their own,
no man can guess how long such a
strugglo may continue. If the result
is to be determined by strategical
triumphs .in the field, no man can
guess how soon it may bo finished.
The Germnns are now whero they
expected to be three weeks ago; but
the tremendous Gorman military ma
chine is working with startling pre
cision despite the setback at Llego.
If Paris and London are chagrined by
the first defeats of the allied forces,
they must begin to realize that tho
war is barely begun and that there
will be many other bloody battles be
foro the tide of German invasion can
bo rolled back. The struggle for the
mastery of Europe, Asia and Africa
is not a campaign but a death-grapple.
"Others go to battle," said Tacitus
of the Catti tribesmen; "these go to
war." Great Britain and France are
squarely confronted with a test not
merely of their military gonlus but
of all their Vital resources as great
nations and of all their tenacity of
purpose to remain great nations.
Armours}
"STAR 1 cious I
Dinner
and BACON?too Sapper
"SWEET AS A NOT"
Travel East
OVER THE
"MILWAUKEE"
The Newest and Shortest Line to the East
Crossing the Cascade Mountains, the Kittitas Valley, the Colum
bia River, the Bitter Root Mountains and Montana Canyon, trav
ersing a country of surpassing scenic grandeur, historical interest
and wonderful development.
TWO FAST THROUGH TRAINS DAILY
"The Olympian" and "The Columbian"
The NEW ALL-STEEL TRAINS to
BUTTE, MILES CITY. SIOUX CITY,
MINNEAPOLIS, ST. PAUL, MILWAUKEE and CHICAGO
For further information regarding fares, train service, reservations, etc.,
call on or address
Willis E. Nowell, City Ticket Agent,
Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Ry., Seward St, Juneau, Alaska, or
City Ticket Offices, Chicago, Milwaukee Ar St. Paul Railway
443 Hastings St. west, Vancouver, B. C.
on
Second Ave. and Cherry St, Seattle
GOOD GOLD STRIKE IN
HEALY RIVER DISTRICT'
A strike made on Kenyon creek, a
tributary of Hoaley river, caused a
stampede of some dimensions from
Fairbanks.
The news of tho strike was carried
to Fairbanks in a letter from E. Ham
mer, who spent nearly a year on the
claim on which the strike was made at
a depth of 120 feet.
The letter said:
"We have drifted toward the left
limit and have uncovered about thirty
feet of what 1 call good pay. Rest
prospects were In the face when we
quit. How much further It goes I do
not know as 1 have not the time at
present to go ahead. I also put one
thaw upstream about ten feet back
from the face which pans good. Pann
ed one bucket that ran from 15 to 25 '
cents a pan. Rocked 200 pans out of
the dump. I have no scales but judge
we got between $10 and $13. I am
satisfied without a doubt that we have
good pay."
The Fairbanks News-Miner says:
"The strike Is on Kenyon creek, a
tributary of Healey river, eight miles
above the Healey. It Is 94 miles from
there by trail to McCarthy, then 13
miles up the Tanana river to the Clear
water roadhouse. From there It is
27 miles to Healy po3t, at tho mouth
of Healey river, and 8 miles further
to the strike. This makes a total of
48 miles beyond McCarthy, which Is
tho end of the automobile road, or 142
miles from Fairbanks by trail. Steam
ers navigate easily to tho Healey."
CALL FOR DEMOCRATIC
DIVISIONAL CONVENTION ,
By virtue of the authority vested in
us by the Territorial Democratic Con
vention held at Skngway, Alaska, Aug.
3, 1914, a call is hereby issued for a
primary election for the purpose of
electing delegates to a Divisional Con
vention, to be held at Juneau, Alaska,
September 7th, 1914. Said convention
to be for the purpose of nominating
a Territorial Legislative ticket, tho
naming of a Divisional Committee and
for such other business as may come
before 1L
The number of delegates to said
convention are apportioned as fol
lows, towlt: Juneau, 12; Douglas, 6;
Tread well, 3; Haines, 1; Chllkat, 1;
Sulzer, 1; Wrangell, 3; Silver Bow Ba
sin, 1; Killisnoo, 1; Skagway, 3; Ket
chikan, 7; Sitka, 2; Gypsum, 1; Pet
Yakatak, 1; Tenakee, 1; Charcoa
Point, 1; Sheep Creek, 1; Craig, 1;
ersburg, 1; Chicbagoff, 1; Jualin, 1;
Kasaan, 1; Hadlcy, 1; Loring, 1.
Primary elections for the purposes
mentioned should be held on or before
August 28, 1914.
Credentials of delegates selected for
said convention must be In the hands
of the Territorial Committeemen on
or before September 6, 1914.
Dated at Juneau, Alaska, this 7th
day of August, 1914.
j. f. mcdonald,
d. noll,
Territorial Committeemen for First
Division.
NEARLY 10,000,000 UNDER
ARMS IN EUROPE
LONDON. Sept. 5.?A conservative
estimate of men under arms in Eu
rope in September, says tho London
Economist, "is that there were 9,250,
000 men to be maintained."
"IMOGENE."
Just arrived tho new and lasting
odor of perfume "Imogene," including
Imogene toilet water and face pow
der. Something new and distinctly in
dividual, ask to be shown at Doran's
Prescription Pharmacy. Phone 6.?tf
It Jl I
Delmonico
'NMHH HHflHH
FIRST CLASS
EATING PLACE
?X*
BEST OF EVERYTHING
Moderate Prices
New and ZNjeat
1
ALASKAN ;i
MOTEL
4 ?
Juneau's Leading Hostelry
< >
i ?
Steam heat, running hot and < >
cold water In all rooma?six- 1 ,
teen rooms with bath?strictly J J
first claBB cafe?centrally locat- < ;
ed?big samplo rooms. Aato ?>
moetB all steamers?rates: $1X0 J \
per day and up?commercial J J
trade solicited. < >
P. L. Gemmett, Pre?. & Mgr. ! ,
F. H. McCoy, Secy-Treaa. ' |
R. P. NELSON
Alaska's Pioneer
8TATIONERY STORE
Headquarters for nil -kinds of
STATIONERY
OFFICE 8UPPLIE8
FOUNTAIN PENS
All Kinds BLANK BOOKS
DRAFTING PAPERS, EAC.
COR SECOND A. SEWARD 8T.
* *
?I ! I I i 1 I 111 1 111 1 I I I I 1 I I I t ?
:LDR. H. VANCE ::
The
;; osteopath;:
;) Roots 5 and 8 Malony Dldg.
? ? Consultation and Examination !
Freo. Phono 282.
Graduato American School of [
| Osteopathy, Klrksvllls, Mo. |
Seven years'active practice.
Office hours, 9 to 12 m. 1 to 6 ! ,
] p. m., or by appointment j)
T-11 I III I I 1 ' I I I I I I I I I I I I I I ?
EMPLYOMENT AGENCY
Good, reliable laborer! can
be had quickly by calling phone
Main 242.
AMERICANS MAY BUY
BRITISH SHIPS AL80
LIVERPOOL, Sept. 5. ? The Liver
pool Journal of Commerce says the
American government is making in
quiries on the Tyne and Clyde for a
considerable number of ships which
can be used for the conveyance of
foodstuffs and passengers during the
war. Options are being secured with
the purpose of purchase in view.
-
?7 1. a ProPer m,Iturc or Vanadium Ore with High Speed Stee.
V anaaium OlCCI l33WS gives the toughest and the fastest cutting saw known today
We alio hare VANADIUM STBEL HAMMERS and a large shipment of NBW TOOLS, many of them never before shown la joaeae
THE ONLY UNION MADE SAW IN AMERICA
Gastineau Hardware & Machinery Company

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