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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, September 11, 1914, Image 4

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What do you Buy
When you Buy a
Typewriter?
?ww ii | yjp
You pay for neat, well-written correspond
ence, for perfect carbon copies, for the quality and
quantity of work your typist can turn out?in
short, for the years of service you get.
If your inventory were made on this basis,
you would find in the L. C. Smith & Bros, type
writer a much bigger asset than the price you paid
for it and a much bigger asset than in any other
writing machine ever made.
Ball Bearing; Lang Wearing
It isn't the machine?it's what the machine
will do for you.
Can we prove this statement? Absolutely.
Ask for our proof.
L. C. Smith 8 Bros. Typewriter Go.
Home Office and Factory
SYRACUSE, NEW YORK
E. S. HEWITT, 115 SEWARD ST. JUNEAU
"OLYMPIAN"'
The Train of Luxury
TO
Butte, Miles City, Sioux City, Minneapolis,
and St. Paul, Milwaukee, Chicago
All Points East, via the
"MILWAUKEE"
Leaves Seattle Daily at 10.15 A. Mo-.
"A TOUR DE LUXE" is an expression supremely fitting in con
nection with a trip to the East on this palatial all-steel transconti
nental train. It combines the enjoyment of rare scenic beauties
with the pleasure of a journey in absolute ease and comfort.
No Extra Fare on This Train
For further information regarding fares, train service, reservations,
etc., call on or address
Willis E. Novell. City Ticket A .-rat. Cbkaro. Milwaukee a St. rax! Ry.. Sewa* St.
JUNEAU. ALASKA, or
City Ticket Oftcea. Cikato. Milwaukee a St. Paul Railway, 441 Hasting? Sc West
VANCOUVER. B. C.. of
SECOND AVE. AND CHEEEY ST_ SEATTLE
\%i/A
"TiRSTCnsTROoTTTToARD"-"
Mrs. M. H. Lynch has opened
a new boarding house at 313
Fourth Street First class table j,
board at reasonable rates. Pa
tronage solicited. Special Sun
day dinner?75c. Phone 281.
V 11
McDonald & Hart
Cor tractors and Builders
)ffice at McCloskey's Cigar Store
Front Street
11111111 ,
Scandinavian Hand Laundry !! .
First class hand laundry done ; |
it 323 Seventh Street Table < - '
lnen a specialty. Experienced "\ 1
md guarantee satisfaction.
I
t
???aaaaaaaaf???????????
THE BEST LOAF OF
BREAD
?= \ 1
la Sold At C ?
tan Francisco Bakery ?!
Q. MKSSKRSCrtMIOT. Prop. ? 1
4
<
Fast Arrived--A full line of fall and <?
Suits $20.00 ::
samples , t
Work. Material. Style. Guaranteed < ?
SATISFACTORY < ?
-L HEIDORN. Merchant Tailor ' *
222 Seward Street, JUNEAU +
*
ARE YOU GOING TO BUILD? ?
?
Are you going to repair your +,
house? See George E. Brown. *
Contractor & Builder, Douglas ?
> +
!? CLASSIFIED ADV. *
> +
> + + + + +?!? + * + + + + + ??
Notice?Call up Eureka Bakery,
phone 2122, for prices on concrete or
brick chimneys, work guaranteed.?
-~9-8-5t.
FOR SaCE?Gas boat Rixl Apply
to F. F. Summers at the Treadwell of
fice. 9-6-tf.
FOR RENT?three partly furnish
ed rooms with bath. Terms moderate.
See Hugh Tracy. 9-7-6t
FOR RENT --- House, new and al
modern conveniences. I. J. Sharick.
FOR RENT?Two rooms, for men
inly, $20; can cook. Alaska Optical
2o. 9-8-tf
FOR KK.M?Aparimem nouse, o* |
"umished rooms, with 12 baths. Pot
it & Harvey. 9-5-tf.
Girl wanted for general houso work.
Mrs. Jas. Daniels. 750 The Pines,
rreadwell. 9-7-6t
i
FOR RENT?Six-room house. 317
Franklin street. 9-8-tf.
RENT?A first class shop for
i good watch maker and repairer, all
Stted up. Call Eureka Bakery. Rent
reasonable, phone 2122. 9-8-tf.
FOR RENT-?nice, clean rooms with
jr without board, apply at City cafe.
255 Lower Front St. 9-1-lmo.
uneau Transfer Co.
PHONE 48
WE ALWAY8 HAVE
COAL
Moving Care full'' D^n ?
STORAGE
laggage to and from All Boats
37 FRONT 8T.
THE BURNING Of
ANCIENT LOUVAIN
(By Richard Harding DavlB In the
Boston Globe.)
For two hours on Thursday night 1
was In what 600 yoars had been the
city of Louvaln. The 3ermans were
burning It. and to hide their work kopt
us locked' In the rail road carrlagos.
But tho story whs written against the
sky, was told to us by Gorman boI
dler Incoherent with excesses; and
we couid read It in the faces of wom
en and children being led to concen
tration camps and of citizens on their
way to be shot.
The Germans sentonced Louvaln on
Wednesday to become a wilderness,
and with the German system and love
of thoroughness they left Louvaln an
empty blackened shell. The reason
for this appeal to the torch and the
execution of non-combatants, as given
to me on Thursday morning by Gen
eral Von Lutwltz, military governor
of Brussels, was this: On Wednes
day while the German military com
mander of tho troops in Louvaln was
at the Motel do Ville talking to the
burgomaster a son of the burgomaster
with an automatic pistol shot the chief
of staff and German staff surgoons.
Uutwitx claims this was tho signal
>_Ka nlvll onnrrl In Hvlllnn nlnthna
on roofs, to Are upon the German sol
diers In the open square below. He
said the Belgians had quick-firing guns
brought from Antwerp. As for a week
the Germans had occupied Louvain
and closely guarded all approaches,
the story that there was any gunrun
nlng Is absurd.
Fifty Germans were killed and
wounded. For that, said Lutwltz, Lou
vain must be wiped out. So In pan
tonine with his flat he swept the
papers across the table.
"The Hotel de Vllle," he added,
"was a beautiful building; it Is a pity
it must be destroyed." z
Money cannot ever restore Lou
vain. And its people's handiwork be
longed to the world. With torch-and
dynamite the Germans have turned
their masterpieces into ashes and all
the Kaiser's horses and all his men
cannot bring them back again.
We were not allowed to speak to
any citizen of Louvain, but the Ger
mans crowded the windows, boastful
gloating, eager to Interpret. We were
I free to move from one of the train
to the other and for the two hours
during which it circled the burning
city was before us in its most
hateful aspect
Of 50 English prisoners all were
erect and soldierly. In the ocean of
gray the little patch of khaki-clad men
wjio had outnumbered but not defeat
ed them with calm but uncurlous eyes.
In one way ! was glad to see them
there. Later they will bear witness
I as to how the enemy make n wilder
! ness and culls it war.
i Outside the station in the public <
j square the people of Louvaln passed
I in unending procession, women bare- |
headed and weeping and men carrying
the children asleep on their shoulders.
All were hemmed in by a shadowy
army of gray wolves.
You folt it was only a nightmare. '
cruel and uncivilized. And then you
remembered that the German Emper- '
lor has told us what it is. It is, his '
holy war. 1
* * * ,
"THE DAY OF DAYS" <
SATISFIES BIG AUDIENCE ,
"The Day of Days" with Cyril Scott
featured iu the cast was presented to '
?a large house in Juneau theater last i
night for the first tlme.^ It was re- <
ceived with satisfaction and is a pro i
| nounced success?ono of the most
gripping stories ever told*with a cam
era. It takes five reels to produce
the great silent drama but there Is
not a dull or uninteresting moment
during the entire presentation. Mr.
Hepburn feels sb well satisfied with ,
it that he has billed the play for four ,
successive nights. It will be shott'n j
tonight, tomorrow night and again ,
Sunday night. A large crowd of out- <
of-town people are expected for the
latter nights of the season. ???
"ATOP OF THE WORLD"
DRAWS BIG IN SEATTLE j
???
According to Seattle papers B. B. ,
Dobbs' Alaska life in motion pictures J
entitled "Atop of the World in Mo
tion" is making a great hit in one of
the higher class moving picture play
houses of Seattle. It was billed for
six nights at the Alaska theatre. The
revised work contains new scenes in
Alaska as late as last spring.
UNTERMEYER TELLS WHY
STOCK EXCHANGE CLOSED ,
NEW YORK, Sept. 11.?Samuel Un- (
termeyer, the New York lawyer, says <
if the New York Stock Exchange had
been operated under government sup- .
ervision and the sale of stocks "short"
prohibited, it would not have been .
necessary fcr it to close. He says
gambling in stocks rather than buying .
and selling made It necessary to close.
SEATTLE HAS DRY YEAR; 1
AUGUST BREAKS RECORDS
SEATTLE, Sept. 11.?August of this
year had the lightest rain fall of any
for that^ month since tho establish
ment of*tho weather bureau In 1890. j
The prccipltatioun was .01 of an inch ?
for the entire month. The total rain- 1
fall from Sept 1. 1913 to Sept. 1, 1914 1
vas 30.C9 Inches. The normal annual 1
rainfall Is 36.59.
TRIBUTE TO FRENCH.
As a newspaper striving, under dif
ficulties of censorship and expense
which few outsido of journalism ap
preciate, to print authentic news, The
World must express Its gratitude to
the French War Office. From that
source the American press receives
day by day the only official informa
tion that is trustworthy.?New York
World. i
BAD WEATHER |
IN ARCTIC OCEAN
NOME. Sept. 1.?The United StatoB
revenue cuttor Bear, which arrived
her? laBt night from Wrangell Island
nftor an unsuccosBful attempt to res
cue the 22 caBtaways from tho Stof
niiBsou ship Kurluk, who have been
on the lslund siuco March 10 last, re
ports encountering terrible weather
otT the (Bland, and was obliged to turu
back owing to lack of coal.
Capt. Robert A. Bnrtlett, late mast
er, of the Karluk. who 1b on the
Bear, Is greatly worried about tho
Karluk refugees, who had supplies to
last them only until August.10. Even I
If they have eaten their dogs they '
must be near the point of privation, i
Tho Bear Is taking on coal and as
soon as this work Is completed she
will turn back to tho Arctic to rescue 1
tho prisoners. Nothing has been I
heard from the Russian Ice-breaking I
steamer Taimyr since she entered the I
Arctic to take oft the Karluk party, fl
and there la a hope that she may have 1
succeeded, for she is well equipped 1
for the task.
Snow Deep on Deck*.
The Bear, after leaving Nome, July
24, went to Point Barrow, the north
ern extremity of Alaska, to deliver
the United States mall. She then pro
ceeded west, between Wrangell and
Herald islands. About fifteen miles
from Wrangell she found her way
blocked by mountainous ice. She
cruised about three or four days, seek
ing an opening in tho ice. Drulng thiB
time a terrible gale arose, with heavy
snowfall. The Bear's rigging was
thickly Incased in Ice, the decks piled
high with snow and the wireless aerial
broken down by the burden of Ice.
Brings Elvira's Survivors.
On tho Bear were several sailors
from the whaler Klvira, which was
crushed in the Ice near Demarkatlon
point last fall,
A heavy southeastern gale is blow
ing here, and the Bear can not go out
until it abates.
LONDON BUYERS TAKING
AMERICAN SECURITIES ,
NEW YORK, Sept. 11.?The New
York Herald says the demand for
American securities grows in London
and that business has shown improve
ment during the past week, but that
brokers are still cautious.
French Think of Indorsements.
PARIS, Sept. 11.?Business being
done on the bourse is nil. The liquid
ation of open accounts has been post
poned until Sept. 30, but the question
of postponing again settlement of
carry-over loans is still undecided.
Considerable Interest iB being re
kindled In American Investments, and
It Is believed thut large Fronch buy
ing orders would be sent over to
market were Wall Street to reopen
confidently.
POLES QUIT GERMAN
FOR RUSSIAN SERVICE f
LONDON, Sept. 11.?'According to
the Times' Petrogrod correspondent, v
Russia's appeal to the Poles to re- t
unite against the Teutonic foe has f
iad extraordinary effect among Slav 1(
ioldlers in the German service. f
Information in Petrograd indicates ^
that Polish soldiers belonging to the ?
?th Breslau Army Corps, pf Germany, j
jervlng on western frontier, mutinied (
und killed their officers. t
Slav regiments in the Austrian ser
vice are also declared notoriously dls- /
iffected. Novoo Mremya sates that
une whole Austrian regiment went
aver to the Russian side.
ADMIRAL SCHLEY AT
'FRISCO WITH RECORD
?+?
SAN FRANCISCO, Sept. 4?Bearing
the distinction of being the first
stowaway successfully to have nego
tiated the Panama canal, John Jaug
lian arrived in San Francisco on the
new Admiral line steamship Admiral
Schley.
After his presence was discovered,
laughen was signed on as a member
it the crew and was employed polish
ing brass work for 23 days, for which
le will receive exactly 1 cent
The Admiral Schley made the pas
rage from New York in 19 days' sati
ng time.
MINORITY SHAREHOLDERS
WANT RECEIVERS FOR R. R. (
J
DES MOINES, la., Sept. 11. ? Re- r
:eiverships for Chicago, Rock Island 1
t Pacific Railroad company and Chi
:ago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway
:ompany, are asked in suit filed in
les Moines by Mrs. C. S. McNeil of
Columbus, Kan., who says she owns
130,000 stock in the former. She
iharges mismanagement, dishonesty,
raud and conspiracy against the Cen
ral Trust Co., of New York, D. G.
leid, W. H. Moore and other majority
itockholders and asks the removal of
leid and others as directors.
ENGLISH CONFISCATE
VANDERBILT'S HORSES
NEW YORK. Sept. 11.?Alfred G
fandcrbllt. Just back from Europe
>tnted that his entire stable in Eng
and was confiscated and 37 horses,
ill valuable, were taken by the Brit
sh government. \?hlch paid him $250
iplece for them.
ST. GEORGE HOUSE
Everything new Oood light und
veil ventilated rooms. Bt^hs, electric
ight. Good board
Reasonable rates by the day. week
ir mourn. 4-18-tf
.VI.7S. A. E. VESTAL.
"The store that has what you want j
?when you want it." Tho Juneau
Drug Co.,, phono "250. "Rain does not
Interfere with our service." 9-ll-3t
GREAT BRITAIN J
IN PREVIOUS WARS
(Prince Rupert Empire.)
Canada's proposed contribution of
25,000 men may look small, but judg
ed by the records' of history It is a
considerable force.
In tho battle of Wntrloo, the Brit
ish troops engaged numbered loss
than 25,000, the rest of the army be
ing composed of allies. It Is a s^nnge
and significant fact that never '.n the
whole previous course of her exis
tence has the United Kingdom put
50,000 of her own children in lino
upon any battlefield, and rarely ever
so many as 30,000.
At the Peace of Utrecht in 1713,
when tho world was as truly an arm
ed cump ns it is today, tho standing
army of England numbered only 22,
000 men. In Walpolo's day it declin
ed to 18,000. Canada's proposed con
tribution compares favorably with the
contingent sent by England to- fight
the famous war of the Austrian suc
cession. -This contingent numbered
enly 16,000 men. It was subsequently
Increased to 25,000, which left for tho
defence of England's shores a garrl
wn ot oniy id.uuu recruits, so that
when In 1746 Prince Charles Edward
landed on the island there were only
some 3,000 men In red coats to op
pose him.
Even at the close of the Seven
fears' War when Great Britain found
terself In control of nil America and
i great portion of the rest of the
vorld she hnd a military establish
nent of only 46,000 men. In the dark
lays following the American Revolu
Ion the garhson by discharges and
itherwlse was reduced to a force of
ess than 7,000 men. There was no
lotlceable Increase In this number
111 during the Napoleonic wars, when
he very existence of England was
hreatened. Then a regular army of
10,000 men was raised and with such
Wellington began nnd carriod throMgh
lis Peninsular campaign, which isono
>f the most brilliant In history.
ALASKA WOMAN TELLS
A GOOD GAME STORY
Mrs. Tola Wyman, who operates a
urge quartz mine on Prince of Wales
sland, In Southeastern Alaska, who
8 making a stay at the Frye, tells an
nterostlng story of an experience she
lad on the first of Juno. She went out
>no morning, when the sky had clear
id aftor a long period of rainy weath
?r, taking with her her small black
ind tan dog. Walking along the
>each, looking for indications of
luartz, she came upon a promising
edge. "I climbed up the slippery
ock and suddenly came on a crovas
le, where I saw. scarcely 25 feet away,
ho scarcely dead body of a deer, sur
ounded by a pack of gray wolves. I
ticked up the dog and started back to
amp, calling at the top of my lungs,
dy calls were without result, as I
ras so far from camp. The wolves
ollowed for a short distance, and
hen went back to their kill, without
ifferlng to molest us.
"I told some of the men at camp
rhat I had seen, and they set off up
he beach in a boat. The wolves took
right and ran beforo they could take
\ shot at them, but we had the satis
actlon of finding the deer scarcely
ouched. So wo had some flno deer
teaks which we couldn't otherwise
mve obtained, ns it was out of season
or shooting deer."?Seattle Post-In
elligencer.
tNTI-TAMMANYITES
FILL OUT TICKET
?fr?
NEW YORK. Sept. 11.?A commit
ee named for the purpose decided on
he candidates who are to run for
>tate offices on the anti-Murphy ticket
leaded by Franklin D. Roosevelt for
Jnfted States Senator and John A.
Jennessy for Governor. The select
ous are:
William Gorbam Rice of Albany
'or Lieutenant-Governor, Sidney
<fewberg of Now York for Secretary
>f State. George C. Davidson, jr., of
luffalo for Comptroller, Charles E.
lunderlln of Rochester for State
Treasurer, John Larkin of Westches
or for Attorney-General, Raleigh H.
Bennett of Watertown for Stato En
;ineer, and Justice Samuel Seabury
>f New York for Associate Judge of
he Court of Appeals.
FOR RENT?Two furnished rooms
vith bath; modern; close in; well
uitcd foj living room and sleeping
oom for two gentlemen. Address H.
1. J., care Empire.
bottled in bohp
*"* iHr010
i s&f/neb *V> i
Uj^>
FULL
QUART
< ? DrujJs, Butler Mauro& Co. I *Th.s?ore j
i I Stationery of
o ^'gars 96FroncSt. Next Alaskan Hotel ^"a*'ty
. 1
SALE OF CUT GLASS and FINE CHINAWARE AT
s I I CHARICK
JUNEAU, - ALASKA
PHONE 211
For Prices!!
Scandinavian Grocery
We Have the GOODS SPSS.
JNUTICK OF
DELINQUENT TAXES ON PERSONAL PROPERTY
IN THE CITY OF JUNEAU
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
Notice is hereby given that the delinquent tax roll of personal prop
erty for the City of Juneau, Alaska, for the year 1914, has been completed
and is now open for public inspection at the olllce of the City Clerk, and un
less the taxes delinquent together with the penalty for such delinquency are
paid the property upon which such taxes are a lien will be sold by the City
Marshal at public auction nt the front door of the city hall in the city of
Juneau, on September 24th, 1914, at the hour of 2 o'clock p. m.
The following list shows a description of the property contaiped in
the delinquent tax roll, the amount of the tax, and -the penalty theron. and
to whom assessed: Amount Pen
To Whom Assessed Description of Property of Tax -ulty
Dr. Flnley Dental equipment >8.00 >0.40
L. J. Van Lehn Mnchlnory and tools 6.00 .30
C. Secrlst Piano '. 6.00 .30
Peitlvlch & Dahl Stock and fixtures 4.00 .20
Madame Major Schwlnn Millinery Btock, etc ; 4.00 .20
Alaska Transfer Horses, wagons, etc 32.00 .1.60
H. H. Folsom Furniture, etc - 4.00 .20
Elizabeth Decker Personal property 2.00 .10
B. H. Jones Personal property 6.00 .26
A. Christopher Stocrc and llxtures .... 10.00 .60
Judge John R. Winn...?...!... Law library 40.00 2.00
Louvre Bar Stock and fixtures 80.00 4.00
J. J. O'Brien Barber shop 2.00 .10
Mrs. Hughes Bakery and furniture .....16.00 .76
Pioneer Rostaurant Restaurant equipment 5.00 .25
Arvld Johnson _ Stock and fixtures ? 16.00 .80
Arvld Franzen Stock, etc ? - _.....l2.00 ? .10
City Cafe Furniture and llxtures ? 20.00 1.00
Tom Cleveland Motor cycle ? 2.00 .10
Al. Cooper Motor cycle 2.00 .10
E. Hughes Motor cyclo 2.00 .10
Artemiso Parmentier Furniture, etc ..10.00 .60
A. A. Gabbs Gas boat "Fox" 50.00 2.60
Wm. Dlckesou Gas boat "Iowa" ... ? 18.00 .90
Wm. Dlckeson Gas boat "Grubstake" 12.00 .60
VnlenMnn fr Pnlver Hnn hnnt "I-ofim" 13.00 .66
Fred McGIU "Peerless" 60.00 2.60
Jack Johnson Gas boat "Clara D." 4.00 .20
Geo. Markrader Gas boat "Pilot" 2.00 .10
Thomas Thorsen Gas boat "Christine" 2.00 .10
Chas. Goldstein ..Gas boat "Grace E." 12.00 .80
Owners ?Gas boat "Imperial" 20.00 1.00
Owuers. Gas boat "Rolfe" 20.00 1.00
Jnmcs Christoe Gas boat "Tllllcuin" 10.00 .60
Ella T. Rowo Gas Boat "Anita Phillips 20.00 1.00
Dr. Kaser Gas boat "Santa Rita" ?10.00 .60
Dr. Kaser Gas boat "St. Nicholas" .?35.00 1.75
Enrle Hunter ... Gas boat "Querida" 8.00 .40
Lynn Adsit ; Gas boat "Union" 111.00 _ .80
Jas. Plunkett Gas boat "Lou" ?16.00 .80
Owners Gas boat "Highland Queen" 20.00 1.00
Neville & Ward Gas boat "Alaska" 8.00 .40
Neville & Ward Gas boat "Georgia C." 6.00 .30
Robert Saunders Gas boat "Ranger" 6.00 .26
H. Patterson Gas boat "M.R.P.'?. ? 6.00 ^ .26
Owners Gas boat "Magna" 6.00 .26
Fred Raum Gas boat "Dolphin" ?.' 20.00 1.00
John Raum Gas boat Launch 2.00 .10
Owners - Gas boat "Midnight Sun" 16.00 .75
Owners -Gas boat "Suorai" ..._ 15.00 .75
Magnus Hanson Bas boat "Robin" ? .' ??.10.00 .50
Owners Gas boat "Bee" ?. 4.00 .20
Trevor Davis...: Gas boat "Cordelia D." ? 6.00 .30
William Geddes Gas boat "North Star" ? ? 5.00 .25
A. S. Erickson Gas boat "Alecto" ? 16.00 .76
? - ? ?? < A AA r A
Miko Koskclla uas boat "uaesar xw.uw .?v
C.Steward or A1 Pederson Gas boat Launch 10.00 .60
ChaB. Olson , Gas boat "Confidence" 10.00 .60
Peter Holosboro Gas boat "Dauntless" ? ?.20.00 1.00
\Vm. & John and Chas. B. Wol
ford Gas boat "Wm. & John" 14.00 .70
Frank Iteld Gas boat "Nabob" 7.00 .35
Owners Gas ,bont "Mary L." 15.00 .75
Tom Cleveland Gas boat "Edith C." -15.00 .75
Indian George .'. Gas boat "Klnsle" 6.00 .30
IN WITNESS WHEREOF I have hereunto set my hand and affixed
the official seal of the City of Juneau, this 14th day of August,
A. D., 1914. E. W. PETTIT,
(Seal) City Clerk.
BOTTLED IN BOND
Has Had no Peers for Fifty Years
SOLD BY ALL DEALERS

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