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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, September 12, 1914, Image 3

Image and text provided by Alaska State Library Historical Collections

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020657/1914-09-12/ed-1/seq-3/

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| What do you Buy j
| When you Buy a
I Typewriter?
You pay for neat, well-written correspond
ence, for perfect carbon copies, for the quality and
quantity of work your typist can turn out?in
snort, for the years of service you get.
If your inventory were made on this basis,
you would find in the L. C. Smith & Bros, type
writer a much bigger asset than the price you paid
for it and a much bigger asset than in any other
writing machine ever made.
Ball Bearing; Long Wearing
It isn't the machine?it's what the machine
will do for you.
Can we prove this statement? Absolutely.
Ask for our proof. -
L C. Smith & Bros. Typewriter Go.
Home Office and Factory
SYRACUSE, NEW YORK
E. S. HEWITT. 115 SEWARD ST. JUNEAU
; 111111111111>l11111II111i
:: Mrs. Evelyn Cloetta ??
, , Rmfjuoitoirr. d J{,c Venus Martell .!
Corset MTg. Co., of Seattle \ |
and A. LindberiJ Company.? '
? ' Manufacturers of Atdomlail ? ?
| | Supporters. Elastic Stockb|J?.
? ? Rn?e Caps. Aoplets and , ,
Ortltopfdic Appliances. ... ? ?
Office: 308 THIRD STREET j ||
T PHONE 298
Tl I I I II I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I H
?
; Juneau Transfer Co. ?'
PHONE 48 \
; : WE ALWAYS HAVE
COAL
o Moving CarefuJI - " !
|| STORAGE I;
< < Baggage to and from Alt Boats ] |
j | 37 FRONT 8T. j |
FIRST CLASS ROOM ad BOARD
Mrs. M. H. Lynch has opened
a new boarding house at 31S ,
Fourth Street. First class table
board at reasonable ratee. Pa
tronage solicited. Special Sun
day dinner?75c. Phone 281.
McDonald & Hart
Contractors and Builders
Office at McCloskey's Cigar Store
Front Street
111111;:iinii>>11 ii 111111
1 Scandinavian Hand Laundry X '
T First class hand laundry done t
2 at 323 Seventh Street. Table
T linen a specialty. Experienced t ,
J and guarantee satisfaction. I j
THE BE8T LOAF OF | <
1 BREAD ?,
? t.
X U 8old At *
X ?;
| San Francisco Bakery I;
t Q. MESSKKSCrtMIDT. Prop. \ -
< ! Just Arrived--A full line of fall and < >
;;S5L Suits $20.00 ?
4 ? Work. Material. Style. Guaranteed O |\
4 ? SATISFACTORY < >
< * H. HE1DORN. Merchant Tailor '! 8
o 222 Seward Street, JUNEAU * 1
< 1
????+???++?++*?+
? ARE YOU GOING TO GUILD? 4
? * I
? Are you going to repair your *
f boose? See George E. Brown. + c
Contractor & Builder. Douglas 4 3
I
EMPLYOMENT AGENCY
Good, reliable laborer* can '
be had quickly by calling phone
Main 242. ,
PAUL MAUSER IS
AMONG RECENT DEAD
Id the person of Paul Mauser there
passed away recently one of the best
known inventors of modern times.
Like his contemporary, the Irish
school master John Holland, the in
ventor of the submarine. Paul Mauser
was a noble and modest personality,
a self-made man, who rose from sim
ple conditions to the highest rung
of the ladder of fame. In spite of
many reverses and disappointments
the perserving Suabian inventor pa
tiently Improved his gun inventions
until success crowned his efforts, and
the Mauser rifle was introduced in
most armies of the world. Though
his biography is a history of modern
industries in Germany, Mauser ever!
remained to his last day the modest,
light-hearted son of the Black For
est. Success did not make him proud;
for over 60 years he belonged to the
choir in his native parish, and during
the past ten years contributed in var
ious ways to the progress of Church
music after the heart of Pope Pius
X. Judging from his peaceful dis
positions his invention was doubtless
ly intended by him as a deterrent of
bloody warfare: could he have fore
seen the ravages that his murderous
instrument would create in the pres
ent war. In all likelihood he would
never have divulged the secret of his
Inventive genius.
He died a few days before the pres
ent war was declared.
*++++?*++++*++??
<? *
* CLASSIFIED ADV. +
? +
++++*+*+??+*?+*?
FOR SALE?Gas boat Rex. Apply
to F. F. Summers at the Treadwell of
fice. 9-5-tf.
FOR RENT?three partly furnish
ed rooms with bath. Terms moderate.
See Hugh Tracy. 9-7-?t
FOR RENT ? House, new and al
modern conveniences. I. J. Sharlck.
5-27-tf.
juk kent?two rooms, ror men
jnly, $20; can cook. Alaska Optical
?o. 9-S-tf
FOR RENT?Apartment house, 54
'urnished rooms, with 12 baths. Pet
It & Harvey. 9-5-tf.
FOR RENT?Three room cottage
with first class furniture. Apply at
[tellable Grocery. 9-10-2t
Girl wanted for general house work.
Mrs. Jas. Daniels, 750 The Pines,
rrcadwell. 9-7-6t
FOR RENT?Six-room house. 317
"ranklin street. 9-8-tf.
PAD DCKTfT ~ J
i vu uti.ii x ? 1 wu luruisuvu rwuiu
vith bath; modern; close In; well
mlted for living room and sleeping
oom for two gentlemen. Address H.
3. J., care Empire.
KOK KENT?A tirst class shop for
l good watch maker and repairer, all
Itted up. Call Eureka Bakery. Rent
easonable. phone 2122. 9-8-tf.
FOR RENT?nice, clean rooms with
ir without board, apply at City cafe,
(55 Lower Front St ~ 9-1-lmo. ?
WX^TteD ? A maid, enquire Alas
tan hotel Room 22. 9-ll-3t.
ST HpfSpftVuKnoe 1
Everything new. Oood light and
tell ventilated rooms. Baths, electric
Ight. Good board.
Reasonable rates by the day, week j
r month. 4-18-tf i
MRS, A. E. VE8TAL. ,
I
t *
;[ Something of Berlin ;;
' ' By Gcttruilr E. MdJetl*
.? <? c
o ? ? ,
? * ;d
t
Walking through Derlln'B fnr-famed j1
Unter den Linden for the first time,!{
one is always impressed with the mag- s
niflcence o?' tho Germau capital, that *
booty for which more than one uutlon I
today is crouched to spring. At the 5
western extremity of the thoroughfare <
stands the stately Brandenberg Gate, (
an imitation of tho Propylae at Ath
ens, which is surmounted by tho cur *
of victory so loved by all the Germans. <
This particular pleco of bronze has '
been several times tho prize of vie- '
tory. Napoleon carried it oft to Par- 1
is In 1807 and Victorious Germany 1
carried it back on the last day of '
March In 1814, Just seven years aftor 1
its captui-e, when Bluchor led his fore- '
es into the capital of the defeated Na
noleon. '
From thls^point the broad avenue ;
extends toward the east with two fine
rows of lime trees In the middle, from 1
which It derives its name. On each
side rise the palaces, dwellings and
hotelB, and at the cross streets one
gets> a glimpse of the long lines of
glittering shops spreading away as 1
far as the eye can see. At the west
ern end of the avenue stands Rauch's
great equestrian statue of Frederick,
which is regarded as the finest mon
ument In Europe. To tho right is
the plain palace of the Emperor, and
back of it the Royal library. Again,
to the left, one sees the academy and
university buildings. And then, before
one stretches out a long "square" and
the view is termnlnted In every direc
tion by numerous statutes of warriors
and palaces and public buildings. Crit
ics have found fault with the details,
but every stranger is impressed by
the magnificence of the combined ef
fect. and everyone acknowledges Ber
lin a worthy head of the Empire.
As one advances further and crosses
the bridge over the River Spree, like
wise adorned with statutes, he sees
upon the right the old royal palace
with tho grand colonnade of the mu
seum upon thg left. Here again stat
~g_ ??nomi? risn in every
Ufa VI KHIIVUO
direction, tor this is tho Walhnlla of
a military nation, and whero one finds
one monument to a private In the rank
of fame, he meets a dozen reared to
soldiers. Leasing and Kant may claim
a place on the pedestal of the statuo
of Fredorlck the Great, but their spot
is at the rear.
Berlin University, one of the leaders
of the world's educational institutions,
is established in the former palace of
Prince Henry, brother of Frederick
the Great, which was presented to the
University In 1809 by Frederick Will
iam III. The main building consists
of three wings, which form three sides
of a rectangular court, leaving the
fourth sido open toward the street.
Perhaps no other city in Europe so
soon convinces an 'American of the
real worth of our boon of freedom of
moving around as does Berlin, for the
capital of the German Empire is with
out doubt the most police ridden of
the continental cities, and one is com
pelled to exhibit his passport even in
order to glance through the books in
i the public library.
One wonders what the ravaging
hand of war may wreak as Berlin lifts
| her head today the target of the Al
lies. and who knows but the historic
bronze of Brandenburg may once
[ more be snatched from its lofty ped
| estal the taunting prize of wnr?
WOMAN'S INFLUENCE
ON PEACE MOVEMENT.
; The disposition to let things that
j are tending in the wrong direction
take their own course is a generally
recognized and much to bo deplored
human characteristic. From the be
ginning of history to the present hour
the theory of allowing things that are
wrong to take their own course has
worked out mischievously. It is a
common belief today that no good
can result from an effort in any quar
ter to check the course of events in
I Kurope, because they are bound to
take their own course, and should be
allowed to do so without interference
| of any kind. The United States gov
ernment has taken a step entirely
contrary to this conception of what is
right, what is wise and what is feas
ible. It is, of course, acting entirely
upon moral grounds. The organized
women of the United States, it is un
derstoop, are to be asked by their
leaders to follow the example set by
their government
To those who would reconcile them
selves comfortably to the situation as
it is, allowing eveuts to take their own 1
course, the idea of the women of the
United StAtes raising at this juncture 1
a cry ror p-ace, win, no douDt, seem ?'
no less futiie than absurd; but, as a 1
matter of fact. It is neither. No more 1
powerful Instrument can be wielded 1
against the war emotion in Europe 1
than a sentiment of woman's creation,
and thiB sentiment cannot be created (
in any part of the world with greater
moral cfTect than in one country that
is free, and disposed to regard all
the participants in the dispute with
absolute impartiality and justice. 1
We doubt the wisdom of underesti- j
mating the potency of woman's in
fluence. If anything is to be allowed
to take its course at this time, let
it be a force for good and not a force !
for evil. Woman's voice should not
be silent because it may seem to her
or to others only as a cry in the wild- !
erness. The still, small voice of right
eousness never goes unheard.?Chris
tian Science Monitor. i
GOVERNMENT STOPS SHIPS
FROM USING WIRELESS
BOSTON, Sept. 12.?Wireless ap- <
paratus. on 12 foreign ships in Boston <
harbor has been put out of commis- <
Bion by the government, either by t
dismantling or sealing wirelesB room. <
IUBBER FOOTWEAR COST 1
NOT TO BE RAISED
OlllclnlB of tho. United States Rub
ier Company have decided after much
onsideratlon not to make any lmme
llato advance in the price of rubbed
toots and nhocs. With the prlco of
rude rubber doubling In less than a 1
uouth and with tire prices up to 15 !
o 20 pur cent all around, it would
mem as it the big rubbor company
iad a plausable argument to put up 1
jricos. This is particularly the case '
is the company cut prices the first j
>f tho year by 7% cents due to lower (
[notations Jor crudo rubber.
But tho rubber company haB taken
he broad position that it is not Jus
fifled in view of the artificial condi
lons which have boosted rubber in
.aklug advantage of Its customers'
lecessltles. Tho rubber company has
\ throe months' and perhaps slightly J
onger supply of crude rubber on
Sand. It will keep on with the pres- '
ant price schedule.
If the commerce of the world Is kopt
off the high seas and if the foreign ex
change market continues closed, rub
i? iiv,aIu tjn ruin at 11 or even '
uci io hhvi/ ?-w * -.v ?- t- -
moro.
If such conditions rule for three
months then would be the time, when
United States Rubber would advance
footwear prices and would be obliged
to look to Para for its stocks. The al
ternative would be the acquisition of
a neutral or best of all an American
vessel to go to the east and bring
home a big rubber cargo.
The difficulty with Brazil as a rub
ber producer, is that it is constantly
dropping in its output. In 1913 the
production was 39,000 tons. This
year the most optimistic do uot go
ubove 36,000 tons and some go as low
as 30,000 tons. Less than 33 per
cent of the world's mbber in 1914
will come from Brazil compared with
60 per cent to 70 per cont three or
four years ago.
The United States Rubber has re
opened Its footwear factories, which
have been shut down for the sum
mer vacation, and running nearly full
in this department
Prices of mechanical goods have not
ben advanced. The samo price poli
cy will prevail here as with boots and
shoes.
"ERIN GO BRAGH."
Nothing has so strikingly demon
strated "the call of the blood" that
cements the various parts of the
British empire as the refponse of all
parties in Iroland to the summons to
the- Union Jack. Mr. Redmond's
speech declaring that Nationalist and
Uistorman would fight shoulder to
shoulder in Britain's cause evoked the
most remarkable outburst of emotion
ever witnessed in the house of com
mons. It was at once soen to be the
deathblow to German diplomacy and
Germanic intrigue. It has been the
burial-ground of the civil war that
seemed inevitable, and has proved a
triumphant vindication of Irishmno's
stern sense of responsibility and un
flinching loyalty to the crown. Na
tionalist has since Joined the Ulter
man in marching together through the
streets of Dublin to serve the empire,
which Unionist and home ruler have
proved equally proud and eager to
sorve. Ireland has, in short, given
splendid evidence of her loyalty of
heart and ability to govern herself in
complete hnrmouy with imperial In
terests.
The best laid schemes of men and
politicians "gang aft agley." So the
well-laid plans of the Kaiser were
fated to miscarry at their birth. It
is an open secret that the German gov
ernment had reckoned upon the out
break of war setting light to the torch
of civil war in Ireland. Though Ger
many and its ambitious ally had al
lowed for most eventualities, they ov
erlooked three things: The bravery
of the Belgians, the Integrity of Great
Britain, and the Intense patriotism of
the Irish people.
Much of the glowing patriotism of
the United States owes its inspiration
to those of Irish blood. Not even our
own nation has a more passionate love
pf country than the IrlBh. Only those
among us who were born or who have
lived in Ireland can know the intensi
ty of the national spirit, which for
more than twenty centuries of repres
sion from within and oppression from
without has burned unquenchable with
the pure Are of a patriotism and a
pride of race that transcend the pas
sion of the Pole or the supreme self
sacrifice of the sons of Nippon. Thus
has the German war lord boon the
means of stopping the intorneclno
strife in Ireland to stir the blood-tie
of that dauntless nation to whom pa
triotism is a religion, and whoso
country is alike to Protestant and
Catholic a common mother. Thus Is
it that the Kaiser is faced by such a
trinity of British "war lords" as Kitch
ener, French and O'Callaghan ? the
three Irishmen to whom has been giv
en the suprome command of the forc
es of the British empire by land and
sea.?Seattle Post Intelligencer.
CANADA COURTS TO
CONTROL PRICES
OTTAWA. SepL 12.?A law for the
control of the prices of fuel and all
necessaries will be enacted by the
Canadian Parliament next week.
The government will make a law by
which the prices charged by manufac
:urers, wholesalers and retailors may
oe reviewed by a judge, and if it is
found that advantage has boon taken
)f conditions, prices may be reduced
)y court order.
AMERICANS TO MAKE
NECESSITIES AT HOME
NEW YORK. Sept 12.?It is rumor
id that a New York 5100,000,000 syn
licate may be formed to produce nec
essaries heretofore made abroad but
hat are not being imported in sufll
iient quantities.
WAR DEVELOPS AN
AMERICAN POET
Ono of tho compensation* of the
war in Europe haB boon tho develop
ment of an Amorlcan poot heretofore
unknown to fame. B. F. Qrlflln, for
15 yenrs newa editor and editorial
ivriter on tho Boston News-Bureau,
sno of the leading financial journals
jf the United States, through his two
poeinB, "If' and "Our Lossen," has at
tracted the attention, of literary Amer
ica to him.
It was sometime after "If" was
printed In modest manner in the
magazine page of the Boston News
Bureau before the author's identity
was discovered, though the t poem,
which was not copywrlghted, made an
Instantaneous hit, and was reproduced
hv uhn Mow York Evening Post and
other publications.
Immediately the Boston* Nows-Bur
cau wuh besiegod by inquiries as to
the author of tho poem, but Mr. Grif
fln modestly forbade the gratification
of the desire for the information.
However, Anally tho paper, refusing
to be dictated to by an associate edi
tor longer, published the following:
"Such complimentary notes have
been received by the Boston News
Bureau concerning the poem first pub
lished in its magazine page on Aug.
1, entitled 'If and signed 'Boston
News Bureau Poet,' that it seems be- <
coming now to say that tho Boston <
News Bureau Poet is and has always <
been Bartholomew F. Griffin, to <
whom for 15 years the readers of the <
Boston News Bureau have been in- <
debted for a largo part of the masterly 4
condensation and accuracy of the Bos- <
ton News Bureau Bulletins which are <
the foundation of the paper. <
"Mr. Griffin put himself through
Harvard, dropped into tho Boston
News Bureau after graduation, and
has refused ever since to budge from
the iiews desk, although the governor
has wanted him for public office and
his employers have tried to push him
- **-- -? tr? ??? ??.u?
into LUO siruui. iiu tau n?uv ?
most beautiful four pages of English I
to resist and to explain that his J
work at the ends of the wires and
cables, receiving with one hand the
news of the world and passing out
with the other hand the vised and
proof corrected bulletins, is quite as
important as meeting face to face the
men of financial affairs.
"For recreation he writes poetry,
makes up the magazine page, the I
major part of the best editorials and
devotes himself to hlB home. This
Is one of the few articles that he is '
not invited to pass upon or correct."
(
Richard Underwood Johnson, form
er editor of the Century, who, writing
of "If said: !
"You would do a public service if
you would send it to the whole Ameri- (
can press. It has the war question .
in a nutshell and is, moreover, ad- (
mirably written from a poetic point
of view." j
Elbert Hubbard says of "If":
"It is the biggest and best thing In
a literary way America has produced
In a decade. ' I am going to pass it 1
along."
Francis G. Penbody, professor of ]
theology at Harvard University, writ
ing to the author, says:
"Will you allow me to express to
you something of the satisfaction and ?
gratitude I feel in reading your noble
poem reprinted in the Now York Ev
ening Post from the Boston News
Bureau? It is a most appealing and ,
adequate expression of the fundament- ,
al emotion with which one must re
gard the present orlsls. The English
poets, Bridges, Kipling, Austin and .
Noyes, have all tried to meet the
need ard all have lamentably falbsd.
I am proud not only that an American,
but that a Harvard man, should have
risen to the occasion."
The two poems that have brought
fame to Mr. Griflln follow:
1
"IF" - j
Suppose 'twere done!
The liuidyard pulled on every shotted
gun; 1
Into the wheeling death-clutch sent
Each mlllioned armament,
To grapple thero <
On land, on Ben and under, and In air!
Suppose at last 'twere come?
Now, while each bourse and shop and
mill is dumt- j
And arsenals and dockyards hum,?
Now all complete, supreme, ]
That vast, Satanic dreamt?
Each field were trampled, soaked,
Each steam dyed, choked,
Each leaguered city and blockaded !
port
Made famine's sport;
The empty wave
Made reeling dreadnought's grave; ,
Cathedral, castle, gallery, smoking fell '
'Neath bomb and shell;
In deathlike trance
Lay industry, finance;
Two thousand years'
Bequest, achievement, saving, disap
pears
In blood and tears,
In widowed woe
That slum and palace equal know,
In civilization's suicide,?
What served thereby, what satisfied?
For Justice, freedom, right, what
wrought?
Naught I?
Save, after the great cataclysm, per- t
hap i
On the world's shaken map
New lines, more near or far,
Binding to king or czar 1
in festering hate
Some newly vassnled state;
And passion, lust and pride made
satiate; f
And Just a trace f
Of lingering smile on Satan's face! n
Travel East I
? OVER THE n ||
"MILWAUKEE"
The Newest and Shortest Line to the East
Crossing the Cascade Mountains, the Kittitas Valley, the Colum
bia'River, the Bitter Root Mountains and Montana Canyon, trav
ersing a country of surpassing scenic grandeur, historical interest
and wonderful development.
1WU PAST lUUUUtiU TRAINS RA1 LI f
"The Olympian" and "The Columbia"; J
The NEW ALL-STEEL TRAINS io ^ ^
BUTTE, MILES CITY, SIOUX CITY.
MINNEAPOLIS. ST. PAUL. MILWAUKEE and CHICAGO
For further information regarding fares, train service, reservations, etc.,
call on or address * . . .
Willis E. Nowell, City Ticket Agent,
Chicago, Milwaukee k St. Paul Ry., Seward St., Juneau, Alaska, or ^ j/\i
City Ticket Offices, Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway ,
443 Hastings St. West, Vancouver, B. C.^
OR
Second Ave. and?Chcrry St., Seattle
Drugs, I Butler Mauro & Co "Tfie Store ' .*
Stationery ? of
Ci<*a" 96 f rone St. Next Alaskan Hotel Qga*ity JT
?
SALE OF CUT GLASS and FINE CHINAWARE AT
& I I CHARICK
V I.J. I jJEWELER and
? OPTICIAN
JUNEAU, - ALASKA
? I ?
PHONE 211 Scandinavian Grocery
For Prices!! We Have the GOODS
^1IW Mill I???
OUR LOSSES ?
[Button and gourmet, War,?'gainst I ?
thee,
3f myriad, name I losses three:
I
Maurice Maeterlinck.
Still is the mystic, magic pen _
rhat knew lives, loves, of bese and I
men;
Hand that moulded the wizard word, M
rhat begged, too old, a Belgian sword; I
Jrips the scythe?in the fields uncrop- fl
ped?
Unlettered conscript youth hath drop- I
Fritz Krcialcr.
Hushed is the wonder tone; yields I j
place ,
To scabbard now the (Iddle-case;
Fingers that oft. caressing curled
Round lyric bow, bewitched a world, |
Tuned to a strange an dharsher m
touch; H
Today an Austrian sabre clutch.
Alexia Carrel. 'jf
Here waits idle each shlng blade
That bare the body's secrets laid; I Jl
There, for your bands to stanch, the
flood KG
Of France's crudely lavished blood; I
Gainst plain death, in drudging strife, I
Chance lost of vastly more for life! I
Cheaper than such. O greedy War,
Tour every king and chancellor!
TWINS. ?]
In garret, with clockworks deft mlng- u
led R
'Mid powder and slugs they release. I
Lone skulking nssassln weaves parcel 1
That lurks In the mall-bags of peace. ??
E^int cloud 'gainst the stars o'er the ?
chimneys,? X
Beneath it steel peudulum flits; ?
Cathedral and hovel are blasted,? f
In palace the murderer sits! ?
LOUVAIN. ?
Not only smite live foe with sword, ?
But strike with torch held high X
Dead hand that builded, painted, ?
carved, X
And every unborn eye! ?
SPAIN WILL TAKE \\
PART IN 'FRISCO FAIR <>
SAN FRANCISCO, Sept. 5?E. J.
Molera, firth commissioner to Spain o
'rom the Panama-Pnciflc Exposition, \ >
las returned to San Francisco having ?
>rought to successful cultimation the **
>bject of his visit?the participation
)f Spain in the exposition *>f 1915.
This apparently Impossible achieve- !
ncnt had already been decided ad- I
tersely four times.
i
? ?
BURNING WORDS?
?+?
"What will those German war ves- i
tels do when they can get no more |
:oal?"
"I don't know, unless they split up J
he ship's log and burn that."?Boston
icrald. I
\ . ?.
ro AID FAMILIES OF |
CANADIAN SOLDIERS 1
TORONTO, SepL 12.?The patriotic
und raised at Toronto to assist the
amilles of those who go to tho war c
iow amounts to more than $1,000,000.
FOWLING
is an ideal sport for all.
W. V. Thompson, world's
champion bowler, says
> bowling reduces, and It Im
. proves the lines. Bowling
' has become a society fad
In every country. Bowlers
never get appendicitis.
The Brunswick
Alleys ^ & f
? mi ?
"^T ? . 'I
)elmonico
FIRST CLASS
EATING PLACE
w
BEST OF EVERYTHING
Moderate Prices
New and ZNjeal
ALASKAN
HOTEL
Juneau's Leading Hostelry
Steam heat, running hot and
cold v/ater la all > rooms?six
teen rooms with bath?strictly
first cla8H cats?centrally locat
ed?big sample rooms. Auto
meets all steamers?rates: |L50
per day and up?commercial
trade solicited.
P. L. Gemmett, Pres. & Mgr. ?
F. H. McCoy, Secy-Treaa.
R. P. NELSON'
Alaska's Pioneer ?
8TATI0NERY STORE f\
Headquarters for all kinds of
STATIONERY
OFFICE 8UPPLIE8
FOUNTAIN PEN8
All Kinds BLANK BOOK8
DRAFTING PAPERS. EAC. j
COR 8ECOND A, 8EWARD 8T. j
ft. ). v vi I
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>ETTIT & HARVEY
RenlM and General Collection*
REAL ESTATE BROKERS ?/
Auditing and Accounting
Agents Northern Life Insurance Co.
heney Bklg. Phone 297
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