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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, September 22, 1914, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
V.OL. IV., NO. 573. ' JUNEAU, ALASKA, TUESDAY, SEPT. 22, 1914, PRICE, TEN CENTS
ENGLAND LOSES THREE GREAT ARMORED CRUISERS
Both Sides Claim Advantage At Aisne
SERVIANS DEFEAT AUSTRIANS IN BATTLE
SERVIANS
WIN GREAT
BATTLE
PARIS, Sept. 22?A
dispatch to the Havas
agency from Nish says:
"After a several day's
battle near Kroupani,
ten miles from the Bos
nian border, in which
250,000 Austrians were
engaged with the Ser
vian army, the Aus
trians suffered a com
plete defeat
"Ths Austrians are
flying in a panic from
the banks of the Drina
river. Servian cavalry
are&arrassing the re
creating forces."
The Servians who
were called back from
Syrrcia, Hungary* for
this battle are now ad
vancing toward Svor- j
nik.. _ ; ~
MISS SULLIVAN TO
SUCCEED MISS COUTURE
Word has "been deflniieiy received
from Miss Teresa Couture, the second
.grade teacher, that her mother's ill
ness will not permit her to take up
:>er work again in Juneau this year.
Mrs. Enoch Perkins has been acting
:as a substitute for Miss Couture and
will continue In that position until
the arrival cf Miss Evelyn H. Sullivan,;
who has been employed for the second
igrade.
Miss SiiUivan has be?n a successful
?primary teacher in Negaunee, Michi
gan far the past two years, and is
expected to arrive in Juneau early
rnejft week. j
A meeting of the high school stu
dent body will be held tomorrow morn
ing for the purpose of electing a stu
dent president, secretary and treas
urer.
During the course of the meeting
the matter of literary and debating so
cieties will also be taken up. The
high school is planning to have two
literary societies this year. One the
Seward Society and the other to be a
new organization which will be named
and established tomorrow.
Many interesting debates and dis
cussions are expected during the
year. . nd it is hoped that the Douglas
school will co-operate.
THE GREATEST LOAF OF
BREAD EVER BAKED HERE
In the H. J. Raymond booth at the
Kiks' Carnival is on exhibition of the
large*? loaf of bread over baked in
Juneau. It is eight and one-half feet
long. It is the product of the Peer
less bakery. At 11 o'clock Saturday
nigh* this loaf of bread is to be cut
into slices and be distributed to pa
trons of the Carnival. There is a five
cent piece somewhere in the loaf and
the party securing the slice of bread
containing the coin will be presented
with a complete line of "Schilling's
Rest" goods.
HUNTERS RETURN.
? ?
Attorney J. H. Cobb, V. A. Payne
.and I.ang Cobb returned last night
from a fishing and hunting expedition
to Glass peninsula. Admiralty Island.
They brought two deer home and re
port having had a good time.
THE WEATHER TODAY.
Maximum?49.
Minimum?13.
Rainfall?1.25 inches.
Cloudy; rain.
PRESIDENT
! IS HELPING
COAL BILL
WASHINGTON. Sept. 22. ? Unltod
p States Senator F. M. Simmons, of
North Carolina, yesterday evening as
sured President Woodrow WilBon that
the Senate will undertake the passage
j of tho Alaska coal lands leasing bill
1 at the present session of Congress.
The President believes that there Is
! a possibility, though probably re
; mote, of the cessation of the coal sup
ply of British Columbia for Alaska, as
a result of the war, which makes it
rnoro than ordinarily important that
Alaska coal lands be made available
at the earliest possible date.
Nenana Townslte Withdrawn.
WASHINGTON, Sept. 22.?At the
insistance of Secretary of the Interior
Franklin K. Lane, President Woodrow
Wilson has withdrawn from entry the
townslte at the confluence of the Ne
I nana and Tanana rlv.ers, preserving
the town of Nenan.
This action taken in connection
? with previous Presidential townslte
withdrawals last April Is considered
as indicative of-the route of the gov
ernment railroad that will be built
in Alaska.
POPE COMPLAINS
BURNINGCATHEDRAL
LONDON", Sept. 22.?Pope Benediot,
according to a telegram to the Cen
tral News, has telegraphed the Ger
man Emperor protesting against the
destruction of the cathedral at Rheitnn
by tliu German army In the Held.
PRIEST SAVES WOUNDED
PROM MOB VENGEANCE
?.
RHEI.VS, Sept. 22.?There was a bad
moment for the German wounded at
the Rheims cathedral when the French
physicians and nurses were removing
them from the burning structure. Ad
shell after shell had battered the struc
ture that is regarded by the inhabi
tants of Rheims as sacred and fire
had followed, the indignation of the
crowds gathered outside had become
intense. When the injured Germans
were brought from the transept door,
the crowd gave a howl of uncontroll
able rage, and some of the soldiers
leveled their riflos for the purpose of
destroying the Germans who were be
ing assisted to a place of safety to
save they from the guns of their coun
trymen. A priest of the abbe Andrieux
sprang between the Germans and the
rifles. "Don't shoot," he cried, "you
would make yourselves as guilty to
; they who have destroyed the house of
God."
TREADWELL BABY LEADS
CONTEST FIRST NIGHT
?4?
Baby Mclntyre Is reported to bo in
the lead at the Elks' Carnival contest
with Baby Mackay of Juneau a close
i second. Baby Hurley has Just learned
to walk, but is running strong. Baby
Brandenburg is fourth and leads the
eight eldest in the contest.
Saturday afternoon there will be a
special show for ladies and children.
The Skagway exhibit has arrived
and will be placed today for inspec
I tion tonight.
Natives' night is not for natives
alone, as might naturally be supposed,
! but is so named because on that night
the native war dances will be put on.
Present your bill against the car
nival now and let 'er buck.
TWO JUNEAUITES
FISHING FOR HERRING
Ed Jones and Sam Butts, two enter
prising Juneau boys, have engaged In
the herring Ashing business at Kake.
! Treir first haul netted 250 barrels and
! they are feeling very hopeful.
Mrs. Sherman will have a special
offering In Wednesday's Empire.
KING FOILS
ATTEMPT
TO KIDNAP
PARIS, Sept. *22. ? The Pro
gressive Du Nord, a newspaper
published at Lille, says:
"King Albert, of Belgium, nar
rowly escaped being kidnaped by
his own chauffeur and. being de
livered to the Germans this
morning.
"The King discovered that he
was being driven to the German
lines, and with his own hand
shot and killed his chauffeur.
"On the person of the chauf
feur was found papers showing
that he had been offered 200,000
francs for the job."
MEXICANS RUSHING
- JNJO BATTLE
NOGALES, Mcx., Sept. 22.?Troops
under command of Gov. Maytorena,
left here with the avowed Intention ol,
giving battle to the forces of Gen. Hill |
at Santa Cruz. The difficulty follows
recent severe clashes of authority bo
tw?en Gen. Hill and Gov. Maytorena>
rivers and harbors
bill to be reduced
WASHINGTON, Sept. 22?The Unit
ed States Senate yesterday evening
recommitted the rivers and harbors ,
appropriation bill to the committee
with Instructions to substitute for the
bill a measure appropriating the lump
sum of $20,000,000 to be expended on
existing waterway projects under the
direction of the Secretary of War and
the United States army engineers. |
wilson thanks congress
eor its sympathy
WASHINGTON, 8ept. 22?President
Woodrow Wilson last night extended
his thanks to Congress for the many
expresslons of sympathy extended by
the Senate and House of Representa
tives incident to the recent death of
Mrs. Wilson.
WRANGELL INSANE PATIENT
DIES AT POTLAND
Gov. J. F. A. StfOng 1b In receipt of
advices from the Sanitarium company,
Portland, Oregon, of the death of
Anna Dick, a native woman, on tho
17th Instant; death helng duo to val
vular heart disease. The deceased pa
tient was committed to the Sanitarium
from Wrangell on May 23, 1914. The
remains were interred In the Multno
mah cemetery, Portland.
AUTUMNAL EQUINOX OCCURS
AT ABOUT NOON TOMORROW
The autumnal equinox will occur at
Juneau at about noou tomorrow. The
sun will pass the equator on its Jour
ney south at 4:26 p. in. tomorrow,
| Washington time, and about four hours
earlier than that here. ,
For the last six raonthi the hours of
daylight have been greater in the
North than the South. Hereafter they
will get shorter in tho North.
DOLPHIN ON WAY NORTH.
SEATTLE, Sept. 22.?The Dolphin
left this port last night at nine o'
clock for the North. She had tho fol
lowing passengors for Juneau and
Douglas: Joseph Joyce, MIbs T. Grun
dler, Nick Stickmid, George E.
Phelps, Jose Redosko and two steer
age.
KLOPECK ON BEACH.
W. H. Case, took a photograph snap
shot of the fishing schooner Klopeck
lying on the beach of Marmion Island,
I while returning from the hunting ex
pedition Sunday.
ALLIES
REPORT
JiAINSj
Battle Front, via Paris, Sept.
22.?The Western wing of the
Germans were thrust back yes
terday a distance of seven miles
largely through the efforts of
fresh troops that have been ar
riving from the rear and sent
into action.
ALLIES ATTACK VON BUE
LOW'S LINE.
?+?
Paris, Sept. 22. ? The Allies
are bringing tremendous pres
sure to bear on Gen. Von Bue
low's portion of the German line.
The forces of Gen. Von Kluck,
on the left, were strengthened at
Von Buelow's expense, and the
Allies are trying to break the
weak line.
ALLIES CLAIM SLIGHT GAIJ1
Paris, Sept. 22.?The follow
ing official statement was made
tonight: "Along the entire front
from Oise to Joevre the Ger
mans manifest great activity
without results.
"On our left wing on the right
bank of the Oise the Germans
were obliged to fall back this af
ternoon before the attacks of
the Allies.
"Between the Oise and Aisne
the situation remains unchanged.
"On the center, between
Rheims and Souan, the enemy
attempted the offensive, but was
repulsed, with loss.
"Between Souan and Argonne
we have made some progress.
"Between Argonne and the
River Meuse there has been no
change." ^ -
CEASELESS ENGAGEMENT.
^?
London, Sept. 22.?The Battle
of Aisne is being fought with
the same ceaseless energy, and
all the previous phases of the
contest are being enacted.
There has been very little
ground won or losf, except that
the British have continued to
make gains on the left, but at a
cost that is terrific.
Every trench that has been
won on the left has been made at
a terrible sacrifice. Some Brit
ish regiments have paid dearly
for their successes, but they are
ready for the advance whenever
the order is made.
BIG GUNS AND REINFORCE
MENTS.
The French are bringing
heavy ordnance into action and
both British and French rein
forcements arc arriving and be
ing hurried into action. They
are coming by rail through Sois
sons directly behind the British
position.
A. E. Harris, genial agent of the
"Milwaukee" for Alaska, with heart
quarters In Juneau, took passage on
the Alameda last night for the West
ward.
AGAIN NO
CHANGE SAY
GERMANS
Berlin, Sept. 22.?Official an
nouncement was made here to
day saying:
"The strong hilly positions at
Craonne have been captured by
our troops who are advancing on
Rheims. 1
"Our troops have occupied thel
village of Bethany.
"We are attacking the strong
forts on the line south of Ver
dun, and the German troops
have crossed the east border in
the direction of Lorraine, which
is defended by efght Frehch
army corps*
"A stortie of the French from
the northeast of Verdun has
been repulsed.
"French troops camping to
the north of Toul have been sur
prised by our artillery.
"In the remainder of the
French war theatre there have
been no engagements.
"In the Belgian and eastern
battlefields the Situation re
mains unchanged."
ENGLAND WAITED
ALL DAY IN VAIN
? 4>' -
LONDON, Sept. 22.?The Times said
this morning:
"England waited all day yesterday
In vain for confirmation of the re
port that the army of tho enemy had
begun to retlro from France, and this
morning there is no assurance that the
groat contest will not continue for an
other week, notwithstanding favora
ble indications. The most hopeful
sign of the situation is the news that
the Allies have been putting fresh
troops into the held, and that they
have given impetus to the movement
on the left.
BURY ALLIES AND
BURN GERMANS
?+?
LONDON, Sept. 22.?A dispatch to
the Telegraph from Emevllle says the
British and French dead aro being
burled togother on the battlefields
where they foil.
The German dead aro being burned
by the Allies, following a custom es
tablished by the Germans themselves.
CUTTER TAMOMA
IS ON ROCKS
SEATTLE, Sept. 22?The United
States revenue cutter Tahoma ran on
a reef betweon Attu and Attu Islands
in the Aleutian archipelago Sunday
night but is Is no great danger unless
a storm or a heavy sea should rise.
The distress calls from the Tahoma
were picked up by the Bear, Patter
son, Tacoma Maru and Senator.
The Bear, Patterson and Cordova,
the latter sailing from Nome Sunday
at midnight, are proceeding to tho
rescue.
A wireloB dispatch to the cruiser
Buffalo, Commander Crisp, stated that
there 1b no Immediate danger to tho
Tahoma.
RECOVER 9 OF FRANCIS
H. LEGGETT'S DEAD
PORTLAND. Oro.. Sept. 22.?The
bodies of nine of those who lost theli
. lives on t))e Francis H. Leggett have
? been recovered. There are 64 stll
i missing, accepting 75 as the correc!
. number that were on the vessel at th<
time of her disaster.
ENGLAND
UNITED
UNTIL END
WASHINGTON, Sept 22.?A cable
gram received yoHlcrday from the
British foreign office by Sir Cecil
Spring-Rice, British Ambasador at
Washington, says that ail political
parties in Great Britain are united and
determined to see the war to a suc
cessful finish.
No Peace with Militarism.
LONDON, Sept. 22.?First Lord of
the Admiralty Winston Churchill said
last night in a speech in the Com
mons:
"England does not seek to subju
gate Germany, but that there will be
no peace with Prussian militarism
short df the grave."
Canada to Send 31,200 More Troops.
VALCARTIER, Canada,""sept. 22. ?
Canada will send 21,200 soldiers to tho
Continent in addition to those that
have already proceeded. The men will
start soon, and go directly to France.
India Backs England. ?
LONDON. Sept. 22. ? "All of my
troops and resources" arc at the com
mand of your government Is the worj
to come from India to the British gov
ernment from the Gaekwar of Baroda.
? . ?
JAPANESE BLOW UP TWO FORTS.
PEKING, Sept. 22.?Tho destruction
by Japanese airmen of two German
forts at Klaochou has been reported
hero. The Indications are that tho
Japanese are making progress In their
attack.
A British regiment took a transport
at Tientsin Saturday to proceed to the
aid of tho Japanese in the land attack
on Kiaochou.
REDMOND CALLS ON
IRELAND TO SERVE
LONDON, Sept. 22.?"The democra
cy of Great Britain having kept faith
with' Ireland, nt is now a matter of
duty and honor for Ireland to keep
faith with them," says John Redmond,
the Irish leader, In a manifesto, call
ing on Irishmen to bear their share
In the war in which the Empire Is
engaged.
NO CHANCE FOR
PLACE FOR TIME
?+?
WASHINGTON, Sept. 22.?Franco
has replied informally to Inquiries by
Secretary of State William J. Bryan
as to her attitude on peace negotia
tions. France is willing to talk when
definite terms are advanced, but will
Insist on driving the Germans from
the country and will demand that Bel
glum be Indemnified for the violation
of her neutrality. Dispatches say this
is a condition Germany would not
consider at present, and there is, there
fore, no chance of peace negotiations
being entered on at this time.
BETTERS PICK ATHLETIC8
TO WIN CHAMPIONSHIP
?+?
NEW YORK, Sept. 22?Betters on
Wall Street are offering three to one
with few takers that the Athletics
will win the World's baseball series
this year irrespective of who they
may have to play against.
GREAT BRITAIN ORDERS
MILITARY MATERIAL HERE
RICHMOND, Va., Sept. 22. ? The
British government yesterday placed
an order for 1,000 sets of artillery har
ness and 500 cavalry saddles at thii
place. The order is to be filled with
In six wee1, j.
i LOW TEMPERATURE EARLY
IN YEAR IN NEW ENGLANI
> , ?
1 BOSTON, Sept. 22.?Below zer
t temporature has already been expo
) lenced in the White Mountain distrle
J of New Hampshire.
GERMANS
DESTROY
3 CRUISERS
LONDON, Sept 22
A German submarine
today sank three of
England's great armor
ed cruisers, the Abou
kir, Hogue and Cressy
?each 12,000 tons dis
placement and armed *
with 9.2-inch and 6-inch
guns.
The submarines sank
the Aboukir, which was
on patrol duty,first. As
the torpedo exploded,
the Hogue and Cressy
started to the rescue of
the survivors, when
fresh torpedoes launch
ed by the Geeman sub
marine sent them to
the bottom.
The Aboukir, Hogue
and Cressy were sister
ships. All were built
in 1903.
RUSSIAN ADVANCE
SAID TO BE CHECKED
i.ONDON. 22.?It was
reported last night that the Rus
sian army had been checked in
its advance by the fortifications
and large Austrian army at
Przemysl.
NO WORD OF G ALICIA TO
DAY.
Paris, Sept. 22. ? There has
been no word of definite results
of the great battle that is under
way in Galicia between the Rus
sians and Austrians from Petro
grad or elsewhere.
AUSTRIANS DENY DEFEAT.
MANCHESTER, England,
Sept. 22.?A wireless message
picked up here from Vienna to
Austrian Ambassador Dumha
says that the Russian claim to
great victories are pure inven
tion. The dispatch said that the
Austrian have repeatedly defeat
ed the Russians.
GERMANS LOSE AT CRA
ONNE.
..Severe fighting continues
north of the Aisne river and the
Craonne district where the Ger
mans, according to a French of
ficial communication, have been
repulsed at different points with
considerable loss.
The Germans have been forc
ed across the line into Lorraine
| in the Verdun region.
" GERMANY AND AUSTRIA
1 TO STICK TOGETHER
COPENHAGEN. Sept 22.?The Vos
sischo Zeltung of Berlin declare that
previous to tho outbreak of the war
3 Germany and Auctria agreod, as now
have the parties of the triple entente,
o not to make peace separately,
r- ? ? ?
:t Course dinner, 50c, at the Tavern
Cafe, from 5:00 p. m. till 9:00 p. m.

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