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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, September 22, 1914, Image 2

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIREA
JOHN \\. TROV. Editor and Manager.
PublishedTby the EMPIRE PRINTING COMPANY h
SudsCAifrYibKi AATES: ?
Ono year, by mall ...J10.0C ?
Six months, by mail ! ~ 5.00
Por month, delivered 1.00
Entered aa~second-class matter November 7, 1912. at the postofllce at Ju
neau, Alaska, under the Act of March 3. 1870.
THE LESSON OF IT ALL. 1
c
DELEGATE WICKERSHAM says that he will give his first [
attention during the next session of Congress to secur- j
ing the passage of his fisheries regulating and taxing (
bill. This recalls that during the long session that is now in its J
seventeenth month there have been three important bills con- ,
cerning Alaska passed by Congress?the railroad bill, the bill val
idating the revenue laws and making it legal for the Territorial
Legislature to bestow additional authority upon Federal offic- i
ials. and the law removing the $100 a mile operation tax on rail
road trackage. Before Congress adjourns there will probably be
a fairly satisfactory coal leasing bill passed?howbeit the Dele
gate says the bill as it passed the branch of the National Legisla
ture in which he has a seat i? of indifferent value, to say the
least. The work of preparing and securing the passage of this
legislation has been very toilsome. In addition to the industrious
efforts of the Delegate to Congress, the President made a special
investigation through a personal representative: Seattle sent a
delegation to Washington which included Charles G. Heifner, Mau
rice D. Leahey and Will H. Parry; the Governor of Alaska made a
trip to Washington, and there were a number of lobbyists,
including Falcon Joslin, John E. Ballaine, Donald A. McKenzie
and others, to boost. Two United States Senators were former
Alaskans, and they and other Western Senators and Representa
tives, as well as many from the East, South and Central
States, gave a great deal of their time and talent toward pressing
the bills. The President and members ~of his Cabinet interfered
several times to add the pressure and prestige of the administra
tion to the weight behind them. And all of this work was to se
cure legislation from a decidedly friendly Congress.
There are many bills pending that have not been acted up
on. Some of them properly Federal in their scope, others of a lo
cal nature as was the case with two or three important bills
passed?the railroad taxation bill and the revenue law validating
bill.
What is the lesson of it all?
Clearly that the United States is a great Nation. Its affairs
are multitudiness. and of Congressional time and talent consum
ing importance. Its legislative authority has many things to
consider besides Alaskan affairs.
The remedy?
Let the people of Alaska manage as much of the Territory's
affairs as possible throught their own legislature, without Con
gressional meddling. Let us have the full Territorial form df gov
ernment that President Wilson said that we should have. Let us
elect Charles E. Bunnell to Congress jjnd approve the platform up
on which his candidacy rests.
As long as the people of Washington can pronounce such!
home names as Stillaguamish, Skykomish, Swinomish, Skamo
kawa. Wawavvai. Washtucna and Wahkiakum there should be no
scoffing at Przemysl. Rzeszow and Wlosezowa.?Seattle Post In
telligencer.
Why not add Docewallips, Duckabush, Bogachiel Dickey
dactadah. Humptullips. and a few more names that worry tender
feet "on pyget Sound?
THE PARAMOUNT ISSUE.
(Cordova Alaskan.)
CHAIRMAN JOE BAXTER, of the Democratic Territorial
committee, struck the key note at the convention last 1
night when he declared that local politics and petty
squabbles should fade away before the one great idea of extending ,
support to the Alaskan policy of the National Administration. And
he declared this could best be done by giving a generous support i
to the candidacy of a man who would go to Washington and im- 1
mediately take a seat in the high councils of the Democratic party.
He declares that in the election of Charles E. Bunnell to Congress
there would be a deserved and commendable acknowledgment of
the appreciation of which the voters of Alaska feel for the splendid .
work done by the administration toward opening up for develop
ment the rich resources of the Territory. And as a member of the
Democratic party Congressman Bunnell could be counted on to se- ,
oure needed results for Alaska from the colleagues who would i
recognize him as a member of their own political party. Chair- i
man Baxter insists that it is the plain duty and should be the '
appreciated privilege of all thinking men and women in this 1
Territory to endorse the splendid efforts of President Wilson, ,
Secretary Lane and other members of the administration by aid- i
ing in sending to Congress a Democrat and able representative, '
such as Candidate Bunnell. 1
t
?
Raisuli, the Moorish brigand, once more bobs up in the news t
as having died again. Alone and unaided in the last few years
he has furnished quite a list of causalties by his periodical de- '
mises.
f
FRUIT OF "WATCHFUL WAITING." [
L
THE WONDERS worked by a brief time of "watchful waiting" ?
in connection with the Mexican situation were testified a
to last Wednesday when the people of Mexico, in celebrat
ing the anniversary of Mexican independence, linked the name of e
President Wilson with the names of Hidalgo, Guerroro, Juarez
and Bolivar, and gave cheer to the Great American President as ^
frequently and as vociferously as to the early day saints of Latin 1(
American liberty. t(
For the first time in a generation, the United States is looked r<
upon by the people of the Spanish American Republics as a friend- *'
ly power. What Blaine and Root dreamed has been accomplished v
by Wilson and Bryan. cl
+
The best step that we can think of quickly for the people of +
Colorado to take if they desire to settle that coal fields trbuble +
would be to elect former Senator Tom Patterson Governor. He +
is big enough to figure out a solution of the proposition. *
MERICAN SECURITIES if
HELD IN EUROPE
BOSTON.?The Wall Street Journal
as been making Inquiries of the larg
r corporations of tho United States
s to tho amount of their capital stock
old in Europe. This information will
e published from time to time.
Four large companies have already
nsworod as follows:
Reading
Of a total of 6705 stockholders reg
stcred on tho books of the Reading
Jo. as of June 30, 1914, 425 were Eu
opssn. On June 30, 1913, there were
1562 stockholders, 'of 417 were Euro
>ean. Sock of company totalB $140,
?00,000, consisting of $70,0000,000 com
non, $28,0000,000 first preferred and
142,0000,000.second preferred. In 1906
hore were 6388 stockholders.
Pennsylvania.
Ot a total of 90,114 stockholders reg
istered on books of Pennsylvania
Railroad as of Juno 30, 1924, 11,822
were European, holdings amounting
to 374,490,422 par value of a total out
standing stock of 3449,265,700. On
Juno 30. 1913, thero wcro 84,244 stock
holders, of whom 11,215 were Euro
pean, holdings totaling 373,003,614
par value. Number of women stock
holders Juno 30, 1914, was 43,454 as
compared with 40,325 on June 30,1913.
Total number of stockholders in 1906
was 40,153, and in 1901, 27,540.
Delaware A. Hudson.
Of a total of 6842 stockholders reg
istered on bouks of Delaware & Hud
son Co. 48 were European, holdings
amounting to 3289,300 of a total out
standing stock of 342,503,000. On Juno
30, 1913, there were 6555 stockhold
ers, of whom 45 were European, hold
ings totaling 3275,900. Number of
women stockholders Juno 30.1914, was
3102 compared with 2968 on Juno 30,
1913. Total number of stockholders
in 1906, 3571, and in 1901, 3176.
American Sugar Refining.
Of a total of 19,136 stockholders -eg
Istorcd on books of American Sugar
Refining Co. as of Juno 30, 1914, 71
were European, holdings totaling 3292.
600 out of a total outstanding 3tock of
390,000,000 ( 345,000,000 common and
345.000,000 preferred). On Juno 30,
1913, there were 18,149 stockholders,
of whom 65 were European, holdings
totaling 3260,300. Number of wom
en stockholders June 30, 1914, 9950,
as compared with 9606 June 30, 1913.
Total number of stockholders 1906,
12,312, and in 1901, 10.816.
BUNNELL POPULAR
IN THE INTERIOR
CHITINA. Sept. ll?Charles E. Bun
nell, the regular Democratic candidate
for Congress, who has been campaign
ing the Copper River valley, left hero
today on the Sheldon Ford machine
for Fairbanks.
The work of the Valdez candidate
here has resulted in securing fo* the
Democratic candidate a large vote In
this section. It Is freely predicted
that the Guggenhelms will be unable
fo control the vote of the laboring
men, as they did two years ago, when
all Guggenheim towns voted solidly
for Wickeraham.
Following/- the policy outlined by
Mr. Bunnell In his speech In Valdez
he has promised the people here that
if elected he will be the people's agent
at Washington and will not use his
office to worluout his personal spite
against the men In Alaska who are
opposed to him, but on the contrary
will use his every endeavor to secure
for Alaska the greatest possible aid
from the Democratic administration
now In power, and which has nlroady
ilone much for the development Qttho
Northland.?Valdez Miner.
JUDGE LYONS IS
A CANDIDATE
?+?
VALDEZ, Sept. 17.?After oxertlng
their efforts for some time past yie
friends of Judge Lyons have finally
prevailed upon him to announce him
ielf as a candidate for the House of
Representatives. He has a large ac
luaintance throughout the division
ind many personal friends in every
lection. It is also said that "Dad"
ngram, who was a member of the
ast legislature, will soek to be re
urned. Al. White Is also a pronounc
ed candidate from this town and has
ilready conducted a lively campaign.
VBOUT RUSSIANS IN
WESTERN ARMIES
A groat many Americans returning
rom Europe report having seen that
tusslan army alleged to have boen
irought around from Archangel and
snded In France. Yet Great Britain
ifflclaly denies that any such army has
cached Western Europe. What's the
nswer??Seattle PosMntelllgencer.
IXPRESS COMPANY TO
HEL1? BOOST TRADE
NEW YORK, Sept. 22. ? The New
'ork Central railroad and the Amer
:an Express Co. have taken steps i
> help the development of closer trade i
stations between the United States i
nd South American countries by pro- I
idlng better transportation and flnan
ial facilities.
****** **********
? 1
If you don't eat with us we * (
both lose. The Tavern Cafe, 4> x
Hotel Cain. * f
+ + + 4? + + ** + + + 4.+4.* + I
KOYUKUK MINER
ROBBED ON YUKON
DAWSON, Y. T., Sept. 15?Nearly
11,000 in virgin gold dust was stolen
from two pokes belonging to Ed Pet
erson, a miner from the Koyukuk, who
boarded the steamer Yukon at Boaver
landing on his way to Dawson. Detec
tive work by the Captain and purser
resulted In obtaining a confession
from one of the waiters. 1A1 but six
teen ounces was recovered. Peterson
left yesterday for the coast.
CHEA8TY ESTATE IS
LARGER THAN ESTIMATED
Edward C. Cheasty, pioneer Soat
tle merchant, who on Juno 12 last fell
to. his doath from a window in his
rooms In the Now Washington hotel,
left an estate valued at $286,384.07,
according to' the report of the apprais
ers. It was larger than estimated.
CENTRALLIA BANKING
H0U8E CLOSES DOORS
CENTRALLIA, Wash., Sept 22. ?
The United States National Loan and
Trust Company, with deposits amount
ing to $1,260,000, failed to open its
doors yesterday morning. A receiver
will be named.
RED MEN MEET IN
FAIR CITV NEXT YEAR
PORTLAND, Me.. Sept. 22. ? The
great council of the Improved Order
of Red Men decided to moet next Aug
ust in San Francisco. A proposition
to hold conventions biennially was
laid on tho table.
WHITEHOR8E CONTRIBUTES
BIG PATRIOTIC FUND
Fhltehorse contributed $2,170 to the
latriotic fund that is being rained in
Canada to support tho families of
hose who otTer themselves as soldiers
or the British Empire in the Euro
>ean war.
'jnr
The Oldest
Bank in
Alaska
?
Established
1891
I ncx>ca ported
1914
THE
B. ML Behrends Bank
TERRITORIAL BANK
Resources Over 51,000,000.00
A service based on the facilities and
experience gained during over a quar
ter of a century is extended to our
customers. * f t t
i ' 1 " | | lltfltll |j| | | | I | I
=
B. M. Betircada
Fre?ldcnt
J. X. Willi.
Y'lce-Prenldeat
Guy McN.uijkl0*
C.ililcr
E
?I I I I I I I II I I H II I
$5,000
;; Northern Life Pays $5,000 to Al- ;;
; askan for Loss of Eyesight ;;
) ! Wrangell, Alaska, Sept. 12, 1914. ',
? ? Northern Life Ins. Co., ? ?
\ | Soattle, Wash. " I
! . Gentlemen:
? ? I hereby acknowledge receipt of ; j
I | your check for $5,000.00, In full pay- ' \ \
mcnt of my claim for loss of sight, un
? ? der my "3 in 1" policy, for $5,000.00.
I | In looking back over my experlenco \ \
I cannot help but feel very thankful
to your representative, Major Ransom, 1J
1 ; for his Insistent "do It now" which ! I
< ? he used when soliciting my business ? >
;; last February. At that time I wanted \ J
!! to put off taking the insurance for !!
? ? six months, thinking I would then be ? >
J J in bettor shape financially to pay for \ |
? . it, although I knew at the time that ..
my wife and little girls needed tho pro
\ | tection. As it was, the policy was only \ \
received by me a few days beforo tho
,ammonia explosion which cost me the
;\ sight of both my eyes. \ |
< > 1 certainly appreciate the difference
\ ; between tho "Three in One" of tho J J
! ! Northern Life and the Life only poll- ! !
? ? cies as written by othor Life Insur
| | ance companies, which would have \ \
. been a burden under my present clr- . , J
! 1 cumstances, whilo as it is, I have re- ? >
] I celved the face of the policy in cash J | i
. . and my Life insuranco is not affected
thereby. Again thanking the company 1 ?
) | for the prompt and satisfactory settle- j I
? i mcnt, I remain . ?
? ' Very truly yours, ' ?
I ! JOHN J. McTAGUE. 1 |
I I For particulars regarding the Three \ |
In One policies see A. E. RANSOM, ! !
? ? Division Superintendent, Northern Life ? ?
j Insurance Company, for Alaska, Cain ) j
Hotel. , ,
AN "OLD LINE" COMPANY WITH "NEW LINE" IDEAS
INSURANCE CO.
ill I* S200,000.00 Deposited with State Treasurer
Klo aflj3?lPHr
I ? ll Premiums Paid (or Yoa on Your Life luuiitul.' If
Permanently Disabled
Home Office, white Building, Seattle, 0. S. A.
A. E. RANSOM, Dir. Supt. for Alaska. CAIN HOTEL, Janeaa
Sporting
Goods
C.W.Young Co.
HARDWARE.
Cutlery
Etc.
CQMarLtTT?S?ocK*oTr Mining, Logging and Ftotiln^ Soppllca
Plumbing -- Tining ? Pipe Fitting
Estimates and prompt attention given all kinds Job Work
PAINTS-VARMISH-WALL PAPER-BRUSHES
tah?.,n,I'mofS.t WAUGH ROCK DRILLS and
EV1NRUDE DETACHABLE MOTORS
MODERN AND UP-TO-DATE
Furniture Rugs Office Desks Go-Carts Etc.
?THE?
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
OF JUNEAU
UNITED 8TATE8 DEPOSITORY , <?
Capital WOOOO
Surplus and Undivided Profits 50,000
N THE USE OF ACTUAL MONEY
In mo3t transactions is unnecessary. It is much better to pay
by check and thus have a record and receipt at the same time.
Tho FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF JUNEAU checkc are as good
ns cash any time, better than cash many times. Why not start an
account there? You'll find it a convenience and an advantage.
26 Front Street JUNEAU, ALASKA
FIRST TERRITORIAL BAM
===== OF ALASKA
DOUGLAS JUNEAU
65 FRONTJSTREET
THE SAVING HABIT-?
Once a person has formed the habit of saving a portion of his in
come, the saving of money becomes a mere matter of routine. It
is easy for the man who has learned to save to lay aside a part
of the money that comes into his hands. :: :: ::
M. J. O'CONNOR. President T. F. KENNEDY, VIcc-Prealdent A. E. CURB. Cashkr
H. M. POST. AuUiUnt Cashier R. H. STEVENS. Assistant Cashier
Groceries and
Men's Goods
Alaska-Gastineau Mining Go.
THANE, * P t f ALASKA
I $19.00 FARE TO PORTLAND $12.00
FIRST = SECOND
PORTLAND STEAMSHIP CO.
Steamer. J. B. STETSON and QUINAULT - - Freight and P Z or. I
Steamer THOS. L. WAND .... Freight and Combustible.
Same Rate. Prevail a. out of Puget Sound
===== WEEKLY SERVICE ==========
? C. S.-LINDSAY. agent. juneau L. W. KILBURN. Aqcnt
207 seward bloo. phoni 203 douglas, city dock
Dry-goods Department
NEW
Fall and Winter
STOCK
Pouring in
Your Special Attention is
Called to Our Carefully
Selected
Raincoats ]
Wraps
Shirt Waists
Neckwear
Ruchings ' <
Childrens'coai.
<
1 ? ? <
New Patterns in Silk and
Woolen Dress Goods ::
Exclusive Line Novelty
Trimmings.
Alaska Treadwell Gold Mining Co.
MERCANTILE DEPARTMENT :: LATEST STYLES, BEST VALUES

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