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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, September 23, 1914, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. IV., NO. 574. JUNEAU, ALASKA, V\ KHNKSDAV, SKf'T. 2:s, I'.Ml.' ' ? ? PRICE, TEN CENTS
ALLIES TURN GERMAN RIGHT IN BATTLE OE AISNE
__ ? . ?
Austria Loses But Kaiser Gains In. East
GERMAN ARMY MAY RETREAT FROM FRANCE
AUSTRIANS
LOSING AT
PRZEMYSL
London, Sept. 23?A special
to Reuter'g says the railways
leading to Przemysl are all in
the hands of the Russians, and
that the Austrians are falling
back behind the forts.
The dispatch says the Russian
attack is proceeding with irres
istible force.
RUSSIANS TAKE STRONG
HOLD.
Petrograd, Sept. 23?The Rus
sians have captured the Aus
trian stronghold of Jaroslav.
RUSSIANS MOVING BACK
WARD.
London, Sept. 23.?The Rus
sian advance army in East Prus
sia is falling back to the main
army that is operating in that
country. They are bringing
their wounded and prisoners
with them, as well as all of their
supplies- What they are unable
to handle of the latter, they are
burning.
2.000.000 MEN FIGHT
IN BATTLE OF PRZEMYSL
LONDON, Sept. 23.?The third great
battle in Galicia. which began with
the bombardment of Przemyl. la wag
ing between the Russians and Aus-!
trlana. .It Is said that 2.000.000 men
are engaged In the contest which
this morning extends the full length
of the "Austrian line from Przemysl
to Cracow.
RUSSIANS SET
PRISONERS TO WORK
LONDON. Sept. 23.?A Reuter's dis
patch from Petrograd says the Rus
sians are taking advantage of having
so many German and Austrian prison
ers to put Into execution several large
undertakings in the way of canal con
struction and other public works.
Thousands of prisoners will be set to
work on these plans at once.
RUSSIA BUYING ARMS
FROM THE JAPANESE
?+?
TOKYO, Sept. 23.?Russian military'
authorities are in Tokyo buying arms
and ammunition. From here they will
go to America and China.
TURKEY INCREASES
TARIFF SCHEDULES
CONSTANTINOPLE. Sept. 23.?
Turkey has revised her tariff to im
pose a 100 per cent, duty on foreign
textiles, shoes and alcohol.
300.000 JEWS ARE
IN RUSSIAN ARMY
LONDON. Sept. 23.?It is under
stood that 300,000 Jews are serving in
Russian armies.
GREAT WHEAT CROP
FILLS ALL ELEVATORS
?*?
CHICAGO. Sept. 23.?Along the line
of the Missouri Pacific only 20- per
cent, of this year's wheat crop has
been threshed. All grain elevators are
:tg. and there Is no
further room for the crop at local
elevators, at Chicago, or the several
ports of export.
FOREIGN SHIPS ARE
BECOMING AMERICAN
???
WASHINGTON. SepL 23.?Twenty
six ships have actually changed regis
try. up to this date, and applications
for examination have been received
from 39 additional. The owners of ap
proximately 200 have signified their
intehtion to ask for American regis
try j.
THE WEATHER TODAY.
Maximum. 52.
Minimum. 44.
Precipitation, .41.
Cloudy; rain.
WAR BEGINS
IN SOUTH
AFRICA
London, Sept. 23.?The Union
of South Africa, co-operating
with Imperial army forces, will
immediately begin an expedi
tion against the German posses
sions in South Africa.
Gen- Louis Botha, command-!
er"of the Boer army during the'
Boer war and for many years
the Liberal prime minister of
the Union of South Africa, will I
have supreme command of the
British forces.
+ + + + + + + + * + *
? <?
* BRITISH BOMBARD *
+ AVIATION STATION *
+ ?>:
* ANTWERP. Sept. 23. ? A +1
+ British aerial bombardment of <?
+ the Burkensdorf aviation sta- +|
* tion at Cologne was announced * j
+ here today, according to news- *,
+ papers. +
* Five British aviators flew +
+ together across Belgium and +
+ dropped their bombs on the *5* i
* chosen spot and escaped. 4>
+ . *
COL JACKLING
COMING NORTH;
? 4*?
LOS ANGELES, Sept. 23.?Col. D.
C. Jackling attended the funeral of
his former wife, Jeanne B. Jackling.
who died here a week ago, yesterday,
and left Jor Alaska. He will return
in October and remove the body to
Salt Lake.
Jackling Leaves Seattle Tomorrow.
Word received at the office of Gen
eral Manager B. L. Thane, of the Al
aska Gastineau Mining company, is
that Col. Jackling will leave Seattle
for Alaska tomorrow on the City of
Seattle. He will be accompanied by
F. G. Janey, manager of mills for the
Jackling properties, and his private
secretary H. B. Tooker.
SWITZERLAND NEEDS
SOME MORE MONEY
NEW YORK. Sept. $3.?Paris dis
patches say that Switzerland avill soon
be In the market for a loan in addi
tion to the $37,000,000 recently bor
rowed. Preliminary negotiations are
said to be under way in the United
States.
CUBAN WIRELESS NOW
IN CENSORS' HANDS
WASHINGTON. Sept. 23.?The Cu
ban government wireless station at
Havana has been placed under censor
ship. .
Navy May Censor Wireless.
WASHINGTON. Sept. 23?Navy of
ficials state that Congress will be re
quested to pass a law giving the Navy
Department unquestioned and sweep
ing authority to impose censorship up
on all wireless stations.
EUROPEAN POWERS TO
USE AMERICAN HORSES
BUSS Okla.. Sept. 23?Ten thou
sand Oklahoma and Texas horses are
being collated to fill orders received
from the Nations of Europe involved
in the war.
PROTECTION FOR PEACEFUL
CITIZENS; DEATH FOR OTHERS
LONDON. Sept. 23.?Gen. von Molt
ke hasvis8ued a proclamation assur
ing protection to peaceful cilizens In
i French towns occupied by the Ger
mans, but warning that all armed
civilians will be shot.
NEW YORK LOAN IS
OVER SUBSCRIBED
NEW YORK. Sept. 23. ? New York
city's $100,000,000 loan at six per cent
was twice over subscribed. V
?
GERMANS
LOSE ONE
CRUISER
LONDON, Sept. 23.?The German
i cruiser Spreewald has been captured
< in the North Atlantic by the British
1 armored cruiser Berwick.
Two colliers that were supplying
the German cruiser were also captur
ed.
The Spreewald Is a protected cruis
er of 4281 tons.
The Berwick Is an armored cruiser
of 9800 tons, built In 1903.
Oty? SUBMARINE DID WORK.
BERLIN. Sept. 23.?Reports of the
German ndmlrallty show that tho de
struction of the three British cruisers
in the North sea was accomplished
by the German submarlno U-9 single
| handed.
BRITISH LOSE 1500.
LONDON, Sept. 23.?Less than 25
per cent of the officers and crews on
the British armored cruisers Abouklr,
Hogue and Cressy were saved when
they went down as the result of a
torpedo attack by a German sumbar
ine. The loss Is 1500, and about 420
were rescued.
AUSTRIAN CRUISERS DAMAGED.
LONDON, Sept 23..? A dispatch
from Rome to the Central News
Agency says travelers, arriving from
Sebenlc. state that the Austrian cruis
ers Maria Theresa and Staun had put
Into that port in a -badly damaged
condition.
MINE SINKS BRITISH
STEAMSHIP IN EAST
TREBISOND, Asia Minor, Sept. 23?
The British steamship Belgian King
was sunk yesterday by a mine. Twen
ty persons perished. A Russian steam
ship rescued 100 of those on board
the wrecked vessel.
_ . ? .
SOUTHAMPTON AGAIN
OPEN TO COMMERCE
NEW YORK. Sept, 23.?A London
special says the port of Southampton,
closed for several weeks for military
reasons, is again open for commerce.
VILLA MAY WAR
ON CARRANZA
NACO, Ariz., Sept. 23. ? There are
many indications that Gen. Villa is
about to Join Gov. Maytorena. of
Sonora, in open revolt against Gen.
Carranza and the provisional govern
ment of Mexico.
Gen. Villa holds that the giving of
orders to Gen. Hill by Gen. Carranza
directly instead of through him as
commander of the North is a specific
violation of the agreement by which
Gen. Carranza was permitted to be
come the head of the provisional gov
ernment of Mexico.
/
Huerta Pledge Worries U. S.
WASHINGTON, Sept. 23?The prin
cipal question being considered in con
nection with the transfer of authority
at Vera Cruz is over a pledge made
by Huerta a year ago in which he set
aside the customs receipts at that
place to securo a foreign loan of $7S,<
000.000, a part of which Is held by
United States bankers.
CHICAGO CONTINUES
HER RAPID GROWTH
' ?
CHICAGO. Sept. 23?The population
of Chicago is 2,437,526. according tc
the biennial school census. This is ac
increase of over 252.243 over the fed
eral census taken in 1910.
NEW FRENCH CAPITAL
' REOPENS ITS BOURSE
> BORDEAUX. Sept. 23.?At the ro
; quest of M. Ribot, Fiench minister o!
finance, brokers of Bordeaux have de
cided to reopen the Bourse there.
GERMANS
CONSIDER
- RETREAT
Berlin, Sept. ^3. ? That the
German government is seriously
considering retreating from
| France and Belgium in order to
secure more men to oppose the
| Russian invasion is admitted by
j the newspapers. The papers
I openly and in sober tone discuss
i the possibility of such a course.
| They say it is questionable
whether or not the Russian
menace in the East has not be
come so great that it is imprac
ticable to save the men neces
sary to carry on offensive ocr
ations on both borders, and the
desireability of punishing Rus
sia is admitted.
?
VICTORY CLAIMED FOR
KAISER.
Washington, Sept. 23. ? The
German embassy gave out a
wireless dispatch received today
which says that the French spir
it is weakening, and that their
center is retreating. It also said
that Verdun is being bombard
ed.
+ ^ f + ?;< v * |
+ '+
+ GERMANS LOSE ?
+ MANY GENERALS ?>
*? *
? BERLIN, Sept. 23.?The Ger- +
+ man casualty list published to? *
+ day shows the death of two ?
? German generals in the west- +
+ ern campaign?Gen. von Wroo- ?
?fr hem and Gen. von Arbou. *
? Maj.-Gen. von Throtha is al- *
? so given as among the killed. <?
? Among the wounded the +
? names of Lieut.-Gen. von Willi- ?
? sen nnd Cteut.-Gen. von Kue- +
? hue appear. +
?> -J
?*? ?Jt ?|? -*? A ?J? ?Jt ?Jt
BLACK LEADS TURNER
IN SENATE RACE
?*?
Seattle, Sept. 23. ? Complete
returns, most of which are offi
cial, give Judge W. W. Black a
very narrow lead over former
Senator George Turner for the
Democratic Senatorial nomina
tion.
Both sides claim the victory,
and it will require the. Secretary
of State's canvass to determine
the result.
OPERATORS WON'T
RE-EMPLOY MEN
DENVER, Col., Sept. 23.<-In a letter
to the President, tho Colorado Fuel
and Iron company has informed him
that it will decline to reemploy all
strikers who have not been convicted
of violating tho law as proposed by
the Federal mediators.
The coal minors and the unions had
decided to accept the terms proposed
by tho President.
MASSACHUSETTS DEMOCRATS
RENOMINATE GOV. WALSH
BOSTON, Mass.. Sept. 23. ? The
state-wide primaries yesterday result
ed in the ronomination of Gov. David
I. Walsh as the Democratic candidate
for Governor.
The Republicans nominated former
Congressman Samuel W. McCall, and
tho Progressives named Joseph Walk
1 er. former speaker of tho Massachus
' etts House of Represontatlvpa. for
1 Governor.
Virginia Goes Dry.
RICHMOND. Vu.. Sept. 23.?Virgin
ia yesterday adopted a prohibition
constitutional amendment by more
than 25,000 majority. It will become
' effective November T, 1915.
Course dinner, BOc, at the Tavorr
Cafe, from 5:00 p; >*. till 9:00 p. m. t
. II-'-fF
BELGIANS
MOVE ON
BRUSSELS
London, Sept. 23.?The Tele
graph's correspondent with the
Belgian army says the Belgians
emerged from the ramparts of
Antwerp today in a sortie again
st the German army at Brussels.
The advance guard followed the
enemy's outposts to the base
near Brussels. Shots were ex
changed within 13 miles of the
latter place
GERMANY INCREASES
PAY OF BELGIANS
ROTTERDAM, -Sept. 22 ? Germany
has increased the pay, of Bolgian gun
factory employees CO per cent.
COAL LEASING BILL
TO HOLD FRONT
WASHINGTON Sept. 23?The Unit
ed States Senate yesterday ngreed to
treat the Alaska coal lands leasing
bill as an emergency measure. The
bUL brought up by Senator Key
Pittmau, of Nevadu. chairman of the
Senate ?f^mmitteo ou Territories. The
agreement of tkn Senate will hold tho
bill at tho front until it shall have
t??i;n disposed of.'
BILL INTENDED TO
PREVENT MONOPOLY,
WASHINGTON, Sept. 23. ? During]
the debate In the Senate yesterday;
which resulted In the Alaska coal I
leasing bill being given the position j
of "unfinished business," Senator Reed j
Smoot, of Ufah, said that no such bill
would be necessary were It not for
f t ii< .'re to prevent monopoly of the
resources of Alaska.
To this statement. Senator John Ft
Shafroth. of Colorado, replied that the
laws of Alaska woro a guaranty again
st tho monopoly .of mining or selling
coal in Alaska.
+ + ? + ??? + ? + ?? ? ? 4* ? ?
?
? TWO SHIPS STANDING 4
? BY TAHOMA WRECK *
4? ?t?
+ Seattle, Sept. 23. ? A \yire- +
4* loss message received from 4? ]
4" the Victoria, bound for Nome, <?;
4? says the Steamship Senator, of 4?
? tho Pacific Coast Steamship 4>
? Company and the United States *>
4? survey ship Patterson, are 4-;
? standing by the wreck of the 4-i
? Tahoma near Attn island. 4*,
4? Tire officers and crew of the 4*
? Tahoma will probably be taken 4*
4? to Nome. 4?
+ + j
[ ? 4? ? 4* 4? + 4? 4> 41 4* ? 4* 4* 4* 4* 4? 4* j
EFFORTS TO PROTECT
COTTON PRICE CONTINUE
WASHINGTON. Sept. 23.?A com
mittee of 21 representatives from the
cotton states and from the National
Farmers' Union will" be created in
Washington to start a movement' for
advancing *300,000.000 to $400,000^00
in United States notes on the surplus
cotton crop of 6,000,000,000 to 7,000,
000 bales this year in the South.
LONDON EXCHANGE MAY
OPEN AT ANY TIME
-BOSTON, Sept. 23.?Dispatches from
London indicate thnt the London
Stock Exchange may open at any time.
Even now the Bank of Englnnd is free
ly discounting at 5 per cent and 30-day
brokors' lonns nre being discounted
? at tlio same rate.
New Yorl^May Follow.
NEW YORK. Sept. 23.?Two offers
to bet $10,000 that the Now York
. Stock Exchange will reopen on or be
fore the second Monday in October
, were made in Wall Street Friday and
, there were uo takers.
See back page for Mrs. Sherman'j
, | announcement of biggest milliner)
[ I sale ever held In Alaska.
BATTLE AT
DECISIVE
POINT
LONDON, Sept 23.?The Amiens
correspondent of the Times says
heavy fighting Is in progress this af
ternoon southeast of Amiens. He
says that it Is the beginning of the
decisive phase of the Battle of Aisne.,
"On the Issue of this fighting," he
says, "depends tne question of the
continued occupation of French soil
by the German Invaders, or their re
treat to strongly entrenched positions
which have been prepared for them
on the Sambrc river In Belgium.
"The enemy occupied Dousai yes
terday morning and seized the rail
way station at Soualn on the line con
necting Douai with Valenciennes. It
appears, therefore, that the Germans
are alive to the necessity of protect
ing their line of communication to
Monri, where the headquarters of the
field army have been established.
"Thus the German line has been ex
tended north from Cambrai, which
has been occupied In force.
"We learned today that a big battle
had begun and it was rumored that
the Germans had advanced as far as
Mantdldier." ?
ALLIES PREPARE TO
.DESCEND ON RIGHTj
LONDON, Sept. 23.?The situation
at the battle of Aisne last night may 1
be summarized by saying that the
Allies had compleaed plans to descend '
with terrific force on the German (
right, which was already bending
backward under the persistent pres
sure that had been making headway
slowly but surely for four days to
the Northward of the River Aisne.
German reinforcements, according
to Berlin reports, have beaten their
opponents in the race to the fighting
zone, and the result was seen In a
rapid series of strokes which Gen.
von Kluck had been able to deliver in
an effort to stem the Allies' envelop
ing movement around St. Quentln. ..
ALlTlES TRY TO BREAK
GERMAN RAIL CONTROL
PARIS, Sept. 23.?The attack direct
ed by the Allies against Gen. von
Buelow's portion of the German line,
which was weakening for the purpose
of aiding Gen. von Kluck's hard press
ed position, has been for the double
purpose of forcing a break In the ene
my's long front and to strike at his con
trol of the railroad from Laon to
Rethal.
NINE MILES OF
DEAD IN TRENCHES
LONDON. Sept. 23. ? The Dally
Mail's corrcnpondent says wounded
arriving at an unnamed plnco in
France from the front report that
there are nine miies of dead In the
I trencheg between the towns of Per
onno and St. Quentln.
BOMBARDMENT OF RHEIMS
REGARDED AS NECESSITY
WASHINGTON, Sept. 23.?A dis
patch received by the German embassy
last night said that Rhelms, which
v.as bombarded by the German forces,
was on the French battle line and
that the necessity for Its bombard
ment was greatly regretted by the
government.
The dispatch, which was received
by wireleis, also stated that the
French attack on middle Lorraine had
been repulsed..
GERMANS SHlT FRENCH
SUPPLIES BACK HOME
PARIS, Sept.'23.?Gaston Thomson,
i Minister of C&umierce, In. a report on
a visit to Lille and other cities and
. towns of the north recently evacuated
? by the Germans, says the Germans
I not only requisitioned provisions nec
essary for their troops, but they for
warded great quantities to Germany
s and have exhausted the resourcer
f of the regions through which thej
havo passed.
ALLIES
TURN LEFT
OEENEMY
BORDEAUX, Sept.23
?Confirmation of the
news of the turning* of
the German right Was
received here tonight.
LONDON, Sept. 23?
The Daily Mail's cor
respondent reports that
the German right has
been turned between
Peronne and St. Quen
tin.
beginningTof end.
Paris, Sept. 23.?An official
statement made this afternoon
says the Allies have materially
advanced the western wing of
their army today, and that a
German attack on the eastern
wing of the French limes has
been checked.
This is believed to be the be
ginning of the end of the Bat
t le of Aisne.
attack on st. BAUSSA1YT.
Paris, Sept. 23. ? When the
German right flank was thrown
back on the right bank of the
Oise river, an attack, was order
ed on St. Baussant.
germans come back
from lorraine.
Washington, Sept. 23.?A ca
ble to the French embassy says
the German left wing in Lor
raine had again crossed the
French border and that it had
reoccupied Demeore, north of
Nancy.
DESCRIPTION OF FLANK MOVE
MENT.
LONDON, Sept. 23. ? The London
Mail's correspondent wiring of the
movement of the Allies which result
ed In the turning of the German right
wing says:
"Peronne was evacuated by, the
Germans four days ago. The Germans
occupied a strong position with hills
behind and marshes In front. The Al
lies received orders to take the posi
tion at all costs. The reason for the
order being given was that If the Ger
mans were driven from here they
would be enveloped by the outspread
ing French Iqft wing. At first the
trenches were combed out by a hot
artillery fire but the Germans still
hung on and the German guns on the
heights behind were doing execution
among the French soldiers.
"It was then decided to storm the
position across the marshes In half
light immediately before dawn. The
French advanced In a number of nar
row columns and suffered, badly but
they never wavered.
"The Germans waited for them In
the trenches and there followed a
fierce struggle ? a breast to breast
fight. The French had the advantage
of dash and vigor and they stabbed
and stabbed until their arms ached.
Their losses were heavy but they gain
ed their point and the Germans fell
back to St. Quentin.
"The French were reinforced and
pursued tho Germans hotly into the
suburbs of the town. There was sav
age fighting in the streets but yard by
yard they were driven back until they
received orders to abandon the town.
I I hear that they are now making an
j effort to retake Peronne."
GOVERNMENT SEEKING
OFFENDING WIRELESS
PORTLAND. Ore., Sept. 23.?The
United States government Is Invest!*
gating a report that a wireless sta*
. tion In Inace8sible mountains either
, of Oregon or California are communi
i eating regularly with German war
r ships off the coast in violation of the
neutrality of the United States.

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