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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, October 06, 1914, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. IV., NO. 584. ? JUNEAU, ALASKA, TUESDAY, OCT. 6, 1914. PRICE TEN CENTS.
ALLIES FORCE FIGHTING NORTHWARD AND EASTWARD
? ?
Senate And House Agree on Alaska Bill
GERMANY CONTINUES" TO REPORT SUCCESSES
GERMANS
CLAIM
SUCCESS
??
lierlin, Oct. fi.?The German
War Office announced today
that both German wings in Nor
thern France are advancing, and
moving into position that hither
to have been held by the Allies.
The statement also says that
Vienna reports that the fortress
of Przemysl defies capture, and
that the Russian forward move
ment in Galicia has been stopped.
AU STRIAN'S REPORT
CONTINUED SUCCESS
London. Oct. 6.?An official
statement issued today from Vi
enna says the combined German
and Austrian armies have forced
the Russians from Opatow and
Klimontow toward the Vistula
river.
5.000 HORES ARE ON
WAY TO THE FRONT
PITTSBURGH. Pa.. Oct. 6. ? The;
first thousand of a.10.000 shipment of
horses from St. I.ouics to the British
government has passed over the Penn
sylvania railroad for the coast to be
shipped from there to Europe.
HOMESTEADERS FILE WITH
JUNEAU LAND OFFICE
Ole .Martin, Otto Bergstrom and \V.
A. McPherson. all of Seward have
made homestead filings with the local
land office for lauds near Seward and
Simon Stevenson has made home
stead filings for land on Douglas isl
and. The last named is filing for 51
acres, and all of the other filings are
for 320 acres in each instance.
KNIK HOMESTEADS
BECOMING POPULAR
?
It is reported that there are 12?
homesteaders in the Knik section
who Lave filed their apolications with
the U. S. court commissioner of that
district during the past stunt tor.
KENDALL APPOINTED ON
CIVIL SERVICE BOARD
???
Ed. P. Kendall, of the Surveyor
General's office in Juneau, has recent
ly been appointed a member of the
civil service hoard for Alaska.
COMING AND GOING
ON THE GEORGIA
.The Georgia, arriving from Lynn ca
nal ports, brought the following pas
sengers for Juneau:
From Kensington?R. V. Ageton. H.
Holmes. B. B. Nieding. W. Harris. J.
Savono. Tony Purepet. A. .Miller. H.
Hendrickson: from Jualin ? William
Peterson. Pete Miller. Ed. Johnson. E.
Holmes. A. Foreman. Pete Popovich,
V. Rotu. G. Erlckson. Y. Yashimura, J.
Sweeney. Joseph Barnes. Gus Holmes,
William Juth: from Eagle River?C. 0.
Whipple. Mrs. Whipple, George Vola
mous, John Yolamous.
Departing for Sitka tomorrow morn
ing the following have engaged pass
age: For Hoonah?Frank Davis; for
Tenakee?Mrs. Hokirk. J. Zavadyn
F. W. Butters. Mrs. Butters; for Sitka
?W. O'Brien. F. Taseher. R. J. Diven
C. X. Stock well. R. C. Forduev, Miss
M. B. Mallett. Levi Dobbins.
COURT HOUSE BRIEFS.
The divorce action or Mrs. Eller
Carlson against her husband. Fred
Carlson, had a hearing in the district
court yesterday and was dismissed foi
want of proof without prejudice.
The Yamaguchi murder case was se
this morning by Judge Ft. W. Jeuning:
for four o'clock this afternoon.
F. W. Butters and Mrs. Butters havi
taken passage on the Georgia for Ten
akee.
THE WEATHER TODAY.
Maximum?48.
Minimum?12.
Cloudy
Trace of rainfall.
RUSSIAN
REPORTS
FAVORABLE
Petrograd,. Oct. fi.?The Rus
sian General StalT reports:
"The movement along the
East Prussian front continues
forward.
"The forces in Russian Po
land are continuing to sweep
Germans out of that country.
"The battle before Cracow is
in satisfactory condition.
?"The siege of Przemysl pro
gresses. It is believed that short
age of food, if nothing else, will
cause it to capitulate soon."
RUSSIANS CONTINUE
ON THE OFFENSIVE
Petrograd, Oct. fi.?An offi
cial statement this evening says:
"The Russian offensive cam
paign continues. All their for
tified positions near the frontier
are under heavy artillery fire.
"The enemy has received re
inforcements from troops land
ed at Koenigsberg.
"There has been particularly
desperate lighting in the vicinity
of Bakalargeworsbin.
"In East Prussia the roads
are crowded with troop trains,
and our aerial scouts report an
uninterrupted movement of
Germans in a westerly direction.
"German columns and German
troop trains are withdrawing
across the frontier."
?> + ?> ?> + 4* + ?> ?> 4? 4*
<? t
? ALLIES ARE AFTER +
? GERMAN CRUISERS 4
& PORTLAND. Oct. 6. ? Mer-. +
-> cliantmen arriving here report ?
?> sighting the Japanese cruiser 4*
? Idzuma. the British cruiser 4
:? t'astle hnd the French 4*
? cruiser Montcalm steaming 4*
+ South Sunday. They aro sup- 4*
4- posed to be going to remove H
> German cruisers which have ?
4* been harrassing shipping in the 4?
?> South Pacific. +
I ?> 4?
?> ?> ?> ?> 4* 4* ?> 4? 4* 4 ? 4* 4* 4* 4> 4? 4* 4
CITY PRISONER ATTEMPTS
SUICIDE WITH CASE KNIFE
Ed. Donnelly was arrested by Chief
of Police William McBride yesterday
..?renins on a charge of insanity and
locked up in the city jail. About six
o'clock Donnelly was in the kitchen
where other prisoners were preparing
i the supper and quietly stealing a case
| knife sneaked back to his cell and at
tempted to kill himself by slashing his
rhroat. He had bled considerably be
fore his condition was discovered and
': Dr. Sloanc was called. After his
wound was dressed he was taken to
the Federal jail where he will remain
pending a hearing into his mental con
. dition.
[ GREAT HUNTERS RETURN
WITH PLENTY OF GAME
The great hunting party which left
.Juneau five days ago on the good ship
St. Nicholas, returned this morning
, after a five days' cruise in the section
I about Itockv pass. The expedition
t1 was very successful. Every membei
r ?f the party reports having had a dan
dy time and they brought back th(
t goods too?15 deer and five or six doz
en of ducks and geese.
The party consisted of P. E. Jack
son. Henry Shattuck. J. Payne. F. G
L. Barnes. Alex Prussing. Victor Quist
. C. W. Carter. Archie Allen, J. C. Hyde
J. Lindsay.
. MARSHAL BISHOP ILL.
U. S. Marshal H. A. Bishop is con
lined to his home today with an in
? cipient attack of Lagrippe.
ANOTHER
U.S. SOLDIER
IS SHOT
NACO.. Ari., Oct. G. ?Private Leroy |
Bradford, of Troop C., Tenth United
States cavalry, was struck In the
breast today by a bullet fired from the
trenches occupied by Gen. Hill, who Is
defending the town of Saco, Sonora,
from ,he attacks of Gov. Maytorena.
Bradford was In a trench dug for
the protection of American troops on
the border when 3hot. His wound is
serious.
This is the second American soldier
to be shot by Gen. Hill's men.
Arizonians Ask for Protection.
NACO, Ari.. Oct. 6.?Citizens of this
place have joined in an appeal to the
President for protection from shot
fired by those engaged in battle across
the Mexican border.
PEABODY IS RESERVE
BANK DIRECTOR
WASHINGTON. Oct. 6? Charles E.
Peabodv, of Seattle, formerly Presi
dent of the Alaska Steamship com
pany. has been appointed by the Fed
eral reserve board to be a director of
the Central reserve bank that is being (
established at San Francisco, for Re
serve District No. 12.
Charles E. Peabody is well known In j
Alaska. Kor 20 years before his re- j!
tirement from active business a few I
years ago. he was engaged in Alaska!
transportation, operating flrst the Wil-j1
lipa on the Juneau run, and later or-i
ga sizing the Alaska Steamship coni-|
pany of which he was president until
sometime after the company was ac- '
quired by the present owners. He was
special agent of the Treasury Depart
ment in the early '80's with head
quarters at Port Townsend. Ho is a
millionaire.
The appointment is regarded as ex
cellent by the multitude of people who
know hiin.
SCHOOL SOCIETIES
ELECT OFFICERS
In order to effect the organization
of two literary societies in the high
school the entire student body has
been divided into two groups of the
same number, each group being com
posed of upperclassmen and under
classmen. These two groups, desig
nated for the time being as Group A
and Group B met last night under the
supervision of Miss Lorraine Andrews
! and Miss Lavlna Willson for the pur
| pose of electing officers and appoint
i ing the necessary committees.
Group B. with Miss Andrews as fac
i ulty adviser, elected the following of
flicers: president, Cyril Kashevaroff;
vice-president, Lawrence Hurlbut; sec
; retary-treasurer, Anne McLaughlin.
The constitution committee for Group
' B includes Burdett Winn. Veta Wol
I cott, and Kussell Cramer. In addition
i to these electious a program commit
tee consisting of Ruth Umstead and
j .Martin Jorgensen were chosen to act
i in conjunction with the officers of the
i society for the purpose of arranging
the programs and appointing the stu
dents to take part at the several meet
ings.
, The selection of a name for the soci
, oty has been put in the hands of a i
j committee consisting of Melmi Aalto, |
i Tom McCartney and Regina Epsteyn.
i This committee will receive sugges
! tions from any student in their group
| who cares to submit a name.
Group A, with Miss Willson as fac
; ulty adviser, elected Simpson McKin
I j non as president, William Taschek,
>' vice-president, and Mary Connor as
II secretary-treasurer. The constitution
1 i committee of this group is formed by
"| \Vaino Hendrickson, Vera Pettingill
? j and Eugene Nelson.
M Hazel Jaeger and Almnod Richards
? will act with the officers in the matter
| of deciding upon programs through
- out their term of office.
?; The matter of a name has been en
>; trusted to Helen Smith, Lily Korho
. nen? and Charles Skuse, who will re
i ceive suggestions from the members
of their group as in the case of Group
B.
? ? ?
Mrs. A. Dortero, of Skagway. and
-! her daughter are Juneau visitors,
j and guests of Mrs. Fred Cliff.
COAL BILL I
TO PASS
AT ONCE)
WASHINGTON. Oct. 6.?The Sen
ate and Mouse conferees have practi
cally agreed upon a report on the Al
aska coal land leasing bill. Seuator
Henry I.. Myers, of Montana, is pre
paring tho conference report, which
will be submitted vto tho House confe
rees today.
The Jones amendment, giving claim
ants for coal lands the right to have
the legality of their claims tried in the
law courts will probably be defeated,
but the provision that all claims shall
bo passed upon with the laws and
regulations in effect at the time of the
initiation of the claims may be re
tained.
It is believed that t|ie bill will be
in tho hands of tho President for his
signature this week.
Senate Amendments Eliminated. ,
The leasing bill approved by the
conferees eliminates most of the Sen
ate amendments and retains most of
the House provisions. The clause
that gave the original locators pre
ferential rights in leasing has been
eliminated.
The Senate amendment appropriating
$100,000 for a resurvey was retained.
Johnson Changes Bill.
WASHINGTON. Oct. 6. ? Represen
tative Albert Johnson, of Washington,
lias changed his assessment work bill
as to provide that the 1914 assess
ment work might be performed at the
same time the 1015 assessment work
must be done, before the end of 1915.
The bill is a compromise measure,
the public lands committee having dis
approved the other bill.
GERMANY AGREES
TO BRYAN TREATY
??
WASHINGTON. Oct. 6.?Secretary
ui State William J. Bryan announced
yesterday evening that Germany lias
agreed to the principles of the peace
treaties the United States is negotiat
ing with various countries, and that
the signatures will be attached to a
convention between the two powers
shortly.
It was also announced that the Jap
anese Ambassador is negotiating with
the State Department concerning such
a treaty with this country.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
CLOSING SEASON!
NEW YORK, Oct. C.?The Eastern
teams of the National League will
close their baseball season today,
with doubleheader games as follows:
At New York, the New York
"Giants" against the Philadelphia
'"Phillies"; at Brooklyn, the Boston
"Braves" against the Brooklyn "Su
perbas."
The Western Clubs, including Chica
go. St. Louis, Cincinnati and Pitts
burgh will close tomorrow.
The American League games close
tomorrow.
Boston Player Breaks Leg.
NEW YORK. Oct. 6. ? James C.
Smith, third baseman of the Boston
team. National League, broke his leg
above the ankle while sliding into
second base in the ninth inning of the
first game played with Brooklyn to
day. He will be unable to play lu
the National series. His place will
probably be taken by Deal, Dugey or
Whitted".
JAMES R. WHIPPLE
IS NEAR TO DEATH
B. L. Thane yesterday evening re
ceived a cablegram from Los Angeles
stating that James R. Whipple, who
was operated upon recently for can
cer, was expected to live but a few
hours. The news caused a distinct
shock to the people of Juneau. Mr,
Whipple's brother, Charles C. Whip
pie, came in from Eagle river mines,
accompanied by Mrs. Whipple, and
took passage on the Admiral Watson
last night for the South.
FOR RENT?Flat, 4 rooms #nd bath
I. Goldstein. 9-30-tf.
ANTWERP
DEFENDERS
AGGRESSIVE
Antwerp, Oct. G.?Some idea
of the ferocity of the fighting
at this place may be gained from
I he circumstance that tne Allies
were eight hours at one point
making an advance of half a
mile. The enemy is gradually
being forced back. The fighting
has been furious, with the
British and Belgians the aggres
sors.
ATTACK DECREASES
Antwerp, Oct. G.?The attack
on this place has decreased in vi
olence. The British and Bel
gians have eflTectualy stopped
the German attempt to cross the
River Net he, and the forts in
cluded in the city's defenses are
all intact.
? ? ? ?
ANTWERP NEWS
IS FAVORABLE
Bordeaux, Oct. (5.?News de
scribed as "most 'jncouraging"
was received here this evening
from Antwerp.
"The German attack is slack
ening in intensity, and the at-j
tacks against their positions
have been marked by successes."
AMERICAN SAYS ITALY
WILL ATTACK AUSTRIA
XKW YORK, Oct. 6?President Lo-i
ree, of the Delaware & Hudson, who!
has returned from abroad, says that!
Italy will attack Austria, that Italian
n erves have been called out and
that ^ammunition is continually pass
iny through the Italian cities to the
various mobilization headquarters.
Italy Buying War Supplies.
NEW YORK. Oct. G.?The Italian
government has entered the American
market for the immediate delivery of:
upward of $5,000,000 worth of army
regulation shoes, military accoutre
ments, horse saddles, mule saddles,
leather belts and knapsacks for sol
diers and promises to pay cash against
hills of lading.
CITY OF SEATTLE IS
ON HER WAY NORTH
?A?
SEATTLE. Oct. 6.?The City of Se
attle sailed for the North last night
with the following named passengers:
For Juenau?W. P. Hohson, T. C.
Austin. T. M. Dunn, M. D. Farrell. S.
Wharton. S. C. Hoover, Arthur Van
Maycrn, J. H. Crow and two steerage.
For Douglas?C. Banninan, Mrs. J.
0. Zimmerman and one steerage.
RESERVE BANK BOARD
HELPS COTTON GROWERS
???
ST. LOUIS. Oct. 6.?The hanks of
this Federal reserve banking district
have planned creating a pool of $150,
000,000 to aid the cotton growers of
the South, who are unable to market
their cotton on account of the war in
Europe.
SEATTLE MOTHER KILLS
BABY ACCIDENTALLY
SEATTLE, Oct. G. ? Mrs. Charles
Somers, jr.. while automobile riding
last night and seeking to protect her
baby from the wind, covered It so that
it was smothered to dentil.
MURDER AND SUICIDE
? ON WEDDING EVE
WILLOWS, Calif., Oct. G. ? Henry
Cavier. a clerk, nnd Miss Rlanch Rab
bit were found dead in an automobile
yesterday evening. The case was
[ clearly one of muder and suicide,
i Cavier had procured a marriage li
ceuse early yesterday, and when the
dead bodies were found he hold the
license and a revolver in his hnnds
? | The killing had been done with the
j revolver.
FRENCH
HOLDING
ALSACE
London, Oct. (5.?Telegraphic
dispatches from J'elfort from
the regular correspondent of the
London Daily Mail says:
"The Germans are trying to
make the world believe that they
still hold Alsace. As a matter
fact, the French are there in
thousands and are so well estab
lished that the enemy has not
dared to attack them.
? ?
VON MOLTKE
MAY BE DISMISSED
London, Oct. 6.?It is report-j
ed here that Emperor William
has announced the dismissal of i
Count von Moltke, hief of the
German Staff, on account of his
refusal to sanction the Emper
or's plan to attack England with
Zeppelins and aeroplanes.
,BRITISH EMBASSY
MOVES T OPARIS
Bordeaux, Oct. (5.?The Brit
ish embassy was moved to Paris
today, and the embassies of oth
er countries are following.
This action was taken because
it is believed that there will be
no further attempts to capture
Paris.
The American embassy was
never removed from Paris, but
has remained there in charge of
Ambassador Myron H. Herrick,
who has been asisted by the Am
bassador-elect W. G. Sharp, who
has not yet presented his creden
tials.
?*? ??? ?J? ?|? ?J? ?*? ?J? ?J? ?}*
* +
? FRANCE ACCEPTS +
? GIFT OF HOSPITAL *
.j. +
? BORDEAUX, Oct. 6.?A dc- +
? cree lias been issued authoriz- *
?> ing the acceptance of $100,000
? from the Canadian government *
? for the establishment of a +
?t- Bed Cross hospital in France +
?:* for the care of wounded in the *
? fighting on the continent. *
?j. +1
.;. {. .J. .t? + -I* ?!* 4- *!* <? + ???
JAPS CAPTURE GERMAN
SOUTH SEA ISLANDS
?4?*
TOKYO, Oct. G. ? It has been an
nounced that the Japanese squadron
which was delegated to destroy the
I German fleet in the South seas, has
J captured the Marshall islands, land
ing bluejackets on Jaluit Island, tbe
seat of government.
ALLIES DESTROY FORT
ON ADRIATIC SEA
LONDON, Oct. 6?The Anglo-French
fleet has destroyed another of the out
er defensive forts of Cattaro, Austrian
Dalmatia.
CLAYTON BILL WILL
BE READY THIS WEEK
WASHINGTON, Oct. G.?The Sen
ate yesterday evening agreed to the
conference report on the admlnistra
tion anti-trust bill, usually referred tc
as the (Clayton bill. The measure wll
probably be in the hands of the Presi
dent before the end of the week.
GOVERNMENT TO TAKE
RECORD OF SNOWFALI
! SEATTLE, Oct. 6.?Capt. G. W. Pot
j ter, of San Francisco, observer for tin
- Alaska railroad engineering commit
1 sion, will leave Seattle tonight for A!
> aska to take notes on the snowfall am
. barometric conditions during the wir
3 ter at several points where the go\
ernment railroad is likely to pass.
ALLIES'
PROGRESS
CONTINUES
Paris, Oct. 6. ? Throughout
forenoon and extending into this
afternoon, in the vicinity of Ar
ras and on the right bank of
the Oise river.
"Our forces have continued
advances and withdrawals,"
says an official statement, "but
constantly the general advance
northward and eastward of the
right wing continues."
The statement proceeds:
"Our left wing has been ex
tending widely all the time.
"Masses of German cavalry
are appearing in the vicinity of
Lille, coming from the enemy
which is is making a movement
in (he region northwest of Lille."
ALLIES RAIDING
GERMAN REAR
London, Oct. 6.?While never1
since it started has the Battle
of Aisne, which has become vir
tually a siege of the German
positions, shown such a dearth
on news as is presented today,
the 25th day of the struggle, one
or two things have been made
plain. The Allies have shown
very strikingly that their forces
possess greater mobility than
I heir foes, and that their num
bers are probably greater. They
have been able to raid the Ger
man lines of communiciations,
cut the railroads and destroy
supply trains belonging to the
artillery of the German artillery
guard.
That all this should have been
accomplished today, and report
ed to the newspapers in spite of
the fact that the military infor
mation bureau has completely
closed down on current news of
vthe front is creating a feeling of
?^pectancy on the part of the
/ews-gatherers that important
| events are being planned.
ALLIES GAINS MAY
RELIEVE ANTWERP
? ??!? ?
Paris, Oct. 6.?The Allies are
moving their left wing slowly
but surely northward and bear
ing eastward toward the Bel
gian frontier. While advanced
positions are often temporarily
abandoned, the general move
ment has been sure and certain.
Already the distance covered
since last week has been consid
erable.
, It is hoped that this constant
movement, which is pushing the
enemy farther and farther from
? the coast toward the east and
' constantly backward will relieve
, the German pressure on Ant
l werp.
LONDON CAN FIND
ZEPPELINS IN FOG
J LONDON, Oct. 6.?Actual tests In
a sferies of demonstrations over this
"* city have proved that the searchlights
0 that have been stationed throughout
'? the city can detect Zeppelins and air
'? craft in the foggiest of weather. It
<1 has been generaly believed that if
l" there should be an attempt to attack
'* London with Zeppelins that the at
tack would be made upon a foggy day.

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