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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, October 06, 1914, Image 2

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
JOHN W. TROY. Editor and Manager.
Published by the EMPIRE PRINTING COMPANY
* SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
One year, by mail $10.00
Six months, by mall 5.00
Per month, delivered 1.00
Entered as second-class matter November 7. 1912. at the postolllce at Ju
neau. Alaska, under the Act of March 3. 1S79.
FACTS TO REMEMBER.
AFTER all is said and done the fact remains, and every
fair man or woman in Alaska must admit it, that Charles
E. Bunnell is the candidate who represents President Wil
son and his administration in the Alaska campaign. His elec
tion would unquestionably demonstrate that the people of Al
aska endorse and approve the progressive, constructive Alaska
program of the Democratic party at Washington. He stands
fairly and squarely on a patform which endorses without res
ervation the administration of President Wilson and all of his
Alaska policies. He is the only candidate for Delegate to Con
gress who does so stand. To defeat him could be construed
into disapproval of the administration.
That is not all. Mr. Bunnell is a splendid representative
of the principles for which the administrations stands. He is
able, clean, progressive, democratic, fearless, positve and thor
oughly Alaskan. He has developed from his boyhood to the full
stature of a man. capable of representing the people of this
Territory and the great political party of the Nation which is
in control of its country's affairs, as a private citizen of Al
aska. He has made good in the walk of everyday life as
it confronts the average man in the North. He is a concrete
example of what Alaska offers to young men?to those who are
growing to manhood here and to those who may come here to
better their conditions.
In introducing its story of the Wickersham meeting at Ju
neau the Dispatch said:
"With a smashing right and a clever left Delegate
James Wickersham last evening lighted into the political
straw men which his opponents had been erecting and,
carrying out the figure of speech still further, knocked
them about the stage at will and juggled them about like
a magician tossing hither and thither glass balls at will."
In view of the developments, we move to amend by strik
ing out the clause, "which his oponents had been erecting."
A LAST RESORT APPEAL.
MR. WICKERSHAM will go back to Congress as the success
ful candidate of the politically legitimate democratic
party of Alaska. Were Mr. Bunnell successful he would
simply be representing a politically outlaw branch of the demo
crats of Alaska.?Ketchikan Mail.
As a last resort appeal to Democrats for support of Dele
gate Wickersham, the Mail advances the foregoing contention
in behalf of the so-called convention of the Frameites at Val
dez, which re-nominated Delegate Wickersham, as the "main j
issue" of the campaign, and dares the discussion of the propo
sition. The Empire devoted a good deal of space to this ques-:
tion sometime ago. It showed that the so-called organization
which was responsible for the Frame convention was the out-'
growth of forged proxies?among the names of those forged
was the name of at least one man who had been dead for a long
time. It showed that the subcommittee of the National con
vention credentials committee and afterward the creden
tials committee, itself, both UNANIMOUSLY rejected the dele
gates selected by Frameites, and recognized the regular Demo
cratic delegation. It showed that the Frameites' candidate for
Delegate to Congress received only 281 votes in the entire Terri
tory. It showed that the candidate for Delegate to Congress of!
the so-called convention, the man selected by it for National Com-:
mitteeman, and, so far as known, every prominent person of
standing at his home connected with the movement, had dis
covered the fraud, and repudiated the organization.
But that is not all. Delegate Wickersham, in his campaign,
has waived all claims to the support of any and all kinds of
Democrats as party men. He claims to be independent, and he
says the administration is not entitled to the credit the people
of Alaska have given it for the comprehensive program that has :
been adopted, but that the credit is largely due to himself, the \
Taft administration, and Gifford Pinchot, and he terms the Pres
ident's declaration for a "full Territorial form of government" j
a "false note." i
It is time for the Giants to establish a literary defense com-1.
mittee that will explain that they fell back merely as part of a
stragetic movement.
PRAYING FOR PEACE.
THE GENERAL observance of the day set apart by Presi
dent Wilson for Americans to pray for peace in Europe
presents a majestic lesson. It was proof of a Christian in
terest in America for all mankind. It demonstrated that this!
country recognizes the brotherhood of man?the fraternal spir
it. Cain's implied philosophy in the question, "am I my brother's
keeper?" has no place in the American creed.
Whatever may be the result on the peace of Europe of the
American day of prayer, it cannot help but be beneficial upon
those who participated in its observance, nor can it fail to have
lasting effect in the United States. When a whole Nation prays
for peace among other Nations it is not likely to entertain
thoughts of war for itself. At least the prayers that were ut
tered or breathed last Sunday have made the danger of armed
strife on the Aemrican continent more remote.
President Wilson is thinking more of settling all the prob
lems possible during his first administration than he is of sec
ond term.
The question has suggested itself, how many times will the
Russian reserves be ordered mobilized?
The South may yet have to cross Mason and Dixon's line
to get a drink. I
BOSTON IANS "HOME
AGAIN, GONE AGAIN"
Tho Juvenile Bostonlans arrived
home last Frldny morning on the S.
S. Farragut. There was a happy
bunch of youngsters when the dock
was reached at 10:30 o'clock and In
stead of hearing tho mournful music
the kiddles walled out at the tlmo of
their departure, last June, a choms of
jolly voices wafted over tho bay as
the steamer nearcd Its berth.
The near-juvenile manager, Bertram
l,ang. was the first to descend the
gangplank, followed closely by the kid
dies and in the rear, always watch
ful of her flock, came "Mother" Lang,
Director Bromley and Mattlo Lermer,
Bert's oil-color artist, trailed down tho
plank burdened with luggage, complet
ing the full count of Seattle's popular
operatic organization. |_
Saturday morning Manager Lang |
called the roll for a tour of lower
Sound cities, playing Bellingham Sat
urday and Sunday, and Manager Dun
ham's Rex theatre in Mt. Vernon, Mon
day and Tuesday.
Tonight the company will leave for
Southeastern Alaska towns, playing
Manager Strassburg's New Westholm
theatre In Prince Rupert, B. C., for
seven days, opening next Saturday.
Juneau. Alaska follows with four days
at Manager John Spickett's Orpheum
theatre, opening Oct. 6. Douglas, Al
aska will be negotiated following the
Tuneau engagement and on the re
turn trip heme three days will bo
given In Ketchikan. Alaska, the com
pany arriving back to the States about
October 25.
Time Is now being negotiated
through the Keliie-Burns Theatrical!
Rooking Association for dattes in the)
Northwestern States that will takej
the Boston inns away for a period of
three to four months.?Critic of Se
attle.
THE PRESIDENT AND POLITICS.
There seems no reason to doubt
the sineerelty of President Wilson hi
urging his friends not to take steps
to endorse him for a second term.
If ever a man elected to the office]
gave himself up completely to the job ]
of being president, it is Wilson. He
seems to have accepted his commis
sion on the theory that his employ
ers. the people, were not thinking J
about the next four-year term, but
about the present one when they em
ployed him.
Celtainly he has gone at his work
as if he did not anticipate a second
chance at it.
In many ways Wilson has refuted
the oft-expressed theory that no presi
dent can accomplish anything in four
years. It undoubtedly is true that
none can who devote a considerable
portion of the four years to the task
of obtaining another election.
Friends of President Wilson who
are bringing up the question of re
nomination at this time are acting
unwisely. They are injecting the pres
ident's name into politics at a time
when he is keeping himself strictly
out of politics. It is unlikely that
they will succeed in moving him from
the same path he has laid out for him
self.?Seattle Sun.
VICTIM OF CORDOVA
SHOOTING IS DEAD
CORDOVA, Sept. 29.?With two bul
let wounds in his body. Tony Papas, j
an Italian, was found in a gulch in j
the north end of the town yesterday
afternoon. Papas was conscious when
found, and informed those who dis-j
covered him that the wounds were
inflicted by Angelo Veilsalis on Sat
urday afternoon last, Papes died two
hours after reaching the hospital.
In his ante-inortum statement Papas
said that he and Veilsailis came from
the Bouanza mine at Kennecott where
they had worked for nearly a year.
On Saturday afternoon they went tar
get shooting with a 22-calibre high
power rifle. When it came Velisaris
tuvn to shoot he pointed his weapon
at Papas and demanded the $600 that
Papas had in his pock. Papas re
fused and Velisalis then used the rifle
as a club and struck him on the head.
He fired the two shots at Papas when
tie was lying on the ground.
Ceilsailis is still at large and a
strict watch is being maintained at
jvery port to prevent him from leav
ng the territory.
Try an Empire want adv. I
IRISH SAVIORS OK
BRITISH EMPIRE
NORFOLK, Va., Oct. 6.?James K. j
| McGuire. of New York, who has just j
returned from his native Ireland, says!
there will be little need for homo rulo
after the war as the Irish will be re
garded as the saviors of the Empire.
He added:
"England is putting 200,000 Irish
men on the firing line and every mo
ther's son of them is a voluntary sol
dier."
WANTED.?Girl for general house
work. Call D. E. I'ruit, Phono 2-9-5.
10-6-3t.
THO.M HELLEN.
With Bostonian at the Orpheum Theatre, October 7th.
?
The Oldest
Bank In
Alaska
Established
1891
Incorporated
1914
THE
B. M. Bekrends Bank
TERRITORIAL BANK
Resources Over & 1,000,000.00
A service based on the facilities and
experience gained during over a quar
ter of a century is extended to our
customers. t t fi
B. M. Bchrends
President
J. R. Willis
Vice-President
/
GnyMcNaughton
Ctshlcr
THE BUFFET
! CAIN HOTEL
Offers the following
as long as it lasts:
Golden Wedding Whiskey, bottled in bond qt. $1.00
Old Jug High Grade Rye Whiskey qt. $1.00
Lacy Whiskey (Bourbon) bottle in bond qt. $1.00
Sunny Brook (Bourbon) bottled in bond qt. $1.00
Cyrus Noble Whiskey qt. $1.00
Champagne (any kind) pt. $2.00
Claret, California pt. 25c, qt. 50c
Gin (any kind) per bottle $1.00
Vermouth (French or Italian) per bottle 75c
California Port and Sherry (3 years old) ....per gal. $1.00
California Brandy (the best) per gal. $2.75
The best Bar Whiskey
in the city.
Ferguson & Kirkpatrick
Proprietors
.
?????????????????????????? ?
Sporting I C.W.Young Co. 1 Cutlery |
Goods HARnWARF Etc.
com?l*t?as?ock oTr Mining, Logging and Fishing Supplies ALAtKA
Plumbing ? Tining - Pipe Fitting
Estimates and prompt attention given all kinds Job Work
PAINTS-VARNISH-WALL PAPER?BRUSHES
t"pImou.t WAUGH ROCK DRILLS and
EV1NRUDE DETACHABLE MOTORS
MODERN AND UP-TO-DATE
Furniture Rugs Office Desks Go-Carts Etc.
-THE?
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
OF JUNEAU
UNITED STATES DEPOSITORY
Capital $50,000
Surplus and Undivided Profits 50,000
PUCEYOOR ACCOUNT
With us and in return you will get all that a good hank
can give. Your interests will have our most careful atten
tion. Lasgcand small accounts given the same consideration
26 FRONT STREET
FIRST TERRITORIAL BANK
===== OF ALASKA
DOUGLAS JUNEAU
26 FRONT STREET
You Can Save Money?
more easily by depositing a portion of \;our Wages with us every
Week or month. You soon acquire the habit and you'll lil{e
to see your deposits grow. The easiest way in ihe world
to sace money is the plan just suggested. Just try it for awhile
and see how delighted vou are with it.
M. J. O'CONNOR, I'rcnidcnt T. F. KENN1DY. Vict-PrcKklcnt A. K. GURU. Cashier
H. H. 1'OST, AnBiwMnnt CuBhior R. H. STEVKNS. ArmVstant Cruhier
Groceries and
Men's Goods
Alaska-Gastineau Mining Co.
THANE, o s t t ALASKA
$19.00 FARE TO PORTLAND $12.00
FIRST ? SECOND
PORTLAND STEAMSHIP CO.
Steamers J. B STETSON and QUINAL'LT ? ? Freight and Passengers
Steamer THOS. L. WAND .... Freight and Combustibles
Same Rates Prevail ns out of Puget Sound
===== WEEKLY SERVICE =====
C. S. LINDSAY. Agent. Juneau L. W. KILBURN. Agent
207 si ward bloc, phone 293 Douglas. City dock
?? aiUMAW.
| Dry-goods Department I
I NEW
Fall and Winter
I! STOCK
Pouring in
Your Special Attention is
Called to Our Carefully
. elected
\ I Raincoats
Wraps
ShirtWaists
Neckwear
t Ruchings
Childrens'coat's
New Patterns in Silk and
Woolen Dress Goods ::
Exclusive Line Novelty
Trimmings.
Alaska Treadwell Gold Mining Co.
MERCANTILE DEPARTMENT :: LATEST STYLES, BEST VALUES

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