OCR Interpretation


The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, October 13, 1914, Image 1

Image and text provided by Alaska State Library Historical Collections

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020657/1914-10-13/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
VOL. IV., NO. 590. ~ ' JUNEAU, ALASKA, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1914. ^ " " PRICE TEN CENTS.
BELGIUM TRANSFERS CAPITAL TO HAVRE IN FRANCE
* 1 / ? ?
Wickersham's Record on Juneau Capitol
GERMANS MAY CAPTURE WARSAW ANY TIME
DELEGATE
ON JUNEAU
CAPITOL
Delegate James Wickers ham at
tempted to make political capital for
himself while at Juneau by talking
about how hard he had been laboring
to secure an additional appropriation
for the public building for Juneau. He,
also claimed that he bad previously
met with opposition in his efforts in
that direction from Gov. Walter E.
Clark.
Investigation discloses that, as in
many other things. Delegate Wicker
sham's record in this matter does not
live up to his claims from the stump.
LET THE RECORD SPEAK.
The appropriation for the pub
buildings at Juneau?an office build
ing and the Governor's residence?
were made in 1910. It included $200,
000 as the maximum cost of the office
building.
Gov. Clark's Report of 1911.
In 1911. Gov. Clark reported that
the appropriation was not sufficient
for the purposes intended. His re
port to the Secretary of the Interior
that year, under the heading. "Public
Buildings," said:
Nearly all the Government of
fices are now poorly accommodat
ed, all but one of them being heat
ed by stoves and no protection of
records from the constant men
ace of fire being afforded. Be
sides. most of the offices are un
. comfortable in winter and on the
whole are not a credit to the gov
ernmenL It is hoped that the pre
paration of plans and specifica
tions for the new office building
will be hastened and the work of
construction begun in the spring
of 1912. The appropriation of
1200.000 is inadequate for the pur
pose of paying for the site and of
erecting a building to Include
space for the large collection be
longing to the Alaska Historical
Library and Museum. It is ear
nestly recommended that an addi
tional appropriation of from $73.
000 to $100,000 be made, in order
that the building may be enlarg
ed for the purpose indicated, as
well as to provide more ample
space /or- the other Government
offices.
Gov. Clark's 1912 Report.
No results coming from this sugges
tion of Gov. Clark, he took the mat
(Continued on Page 2.)
GOLD OUTPUT
SHOWS DECLINE
?+??
WASHINGTON. Oct. 13?The gold
production ot the United States for
the year 1913 Is valued at $89,000,
000 by the Director of the Mint, as
against a production of $93,500,000 in
1912.
_ Again California ranked first among
all the American political divisions.
Colorado was second and Alaska third.
Alaska produced 735,364 ounces of;
pure gold, a decrease from 331.9S1 i
ounces in 1912.
++++++++*++++++++
?f +
+ EARTHQUAKE LOSS +
+ MORE THAN 3,000 +|
* +
+ WASHINGTON. Oct. 13. ?A *
+ cablegram from American Am- 4*'
+ bassador Henry Morganthau, at +
+ Constantinople, says that more + !
+ than 3.000 lives were lost as +
+ the result of the earthquake +
* In the province of Konia, Tur- +|
+ key, October 5th. +
? ?
+ ? + + + + + + + + + + ? + +1
ILLINOIS OFFICIAL x
COMMITS SUICIDE
SPRINGFIELD. 111.. Oct. 13.?Harry
Woods. secretary of State of the State |
of Illinois, committed suicide yester
day.
He had been Ids ins heavily through
stock speculations.
Fresh flowers and plants. Juneau
Drug Co.. 107 Front St.. Phone 250.?
?(10-12-21)?
THE WEATHER TODAY.
Maximum?54.
Minimum?45.
Rainfall?.73 Inch.
Cloudy; rain.
MORGAN
TRIES TO
SELLROAD
WASHINGTON, Oct 13.?J. Pier
pont Morgan today proposed to Sec
retary of the Interor Franklin K.
Lane that the government either buy
or lease the Copper River and North
western railroad.
Morgan represented that the build
ing of a government railroad into tho
heart of Alaska would make it imprac
ticable for the Copperf River and
Northwestern railroad to extend its
lines into the interior of Alaska, and
therefore greatly impair the Invest
ments of himself and associates in the
proposition.
No statement has been given out by
Secretary of the Interior Lane, but it
is believed that he did not commit
himself, beyond promising to give the
matter serious consideration.
COAL BILL IS
ALMOST SURE
?t??
WASHINGTON, Oct. 13.?The con
ferees on the Alaska coal lands leas
ing bill have practically reached an
agreement on the Alaska coal lands
leasing bill, and a report is being pre
pared by Senator Henry L. Myers, of
Montana, and Representative Scott
Ferris, of Oklahoma, representing the
Senate and House respectively. The ?
report will be in conformity with the '
agreement of the Conferees, the other 1
members of which are Senators W. H.
Thompson, of Kansas and Reed Smoot,
of Utah, and Representatlce Edward
T. Taylor, of Colorado, and I. L. Len- !
i uui, ui ?> lawusiu.
Changes in Bill.
The report of the conferees will
make some changes, both the mem
bers from the Senate end the House
have made concessions.
The report will proviu*. for striking
out of the bill certain provisions bear
ing on disputes between the govern
ment and lessees, and substitutes a
section which provides that appro
priate remedies for the breach of any
of the terms of the leases shall be
agreed to by the contracting parties
and stipulated in the lease.
The amended bill will contain* a pro
vision that any municipality may
lease coal lands from the government,
and operate a coal mine and distribute
its product.
The Interior Department is author
ized to lease lands that have been tied
up for eight years, and that no Fed
eral rights shall be forfeited to these
claims until the claims are fully ad
judicated. It also provides that the
status of coal claimants to alnds shall
not be affected by the bill.
Authority is given the-President to
maek withdrawals of coal lands for
military purposes.
Lane Took Hand in Bill.
Secretary of the Interior Franklin
K. Lane, who returned from New Eng
land. where he had been making
speeches for Democratic candidates
for the Senate and House, yesterday,
galvaaized a dying bill into sturdy
health. The President has made it
known that he expects the immediate
passage of the bill, and Secretary of
the Interior Lane personally interview
ed Senators and Representatives.
The report will be ready for the Sen
ate and House before the end of the
present week, and it is believed it will
be adopted without serious quibble,
and sent to the President for his sig
nature. ?
It is believed that the bill Is now
certain to pass.
PROMINENT SEATTLE
INSURANCE MAN DIES
SEATTLE, Oct. 13.?Henry L. Siz
er, a prominent pioneer insurance
man of this city, died here last night
Deceased was general agent at Se
attle for the Penn Mutual Life Insur
ance company for many years. He was
a prominent club member.
ADMIRAL WATSON SAILS
WITH JUNEAU PASSENGERS
SEATTLE. Oct. 13. ? The Admiral'
Watson sailed for Alaska last night
with the following named passengers:
For Juneau?Frank M. Scott, S. T.
H. Cann. Benjamin Lundgren, L.
Blackwell. C. W. Fell, Mrs. *M. A. Scott,
Mrs. R. J. Button and J. Edward
Berg.
For Douglas?J. F. Buzzo.
BOSTON
WINS BIG
SERIES
+ 4' + + + + + + + + + t +
+ +
+ R H E *
+ Boston 3 6 0 +
+ Phila 17 0 +
+ +
+ +
+ +
+ Complete Record of +
+' Four Games +
+ R H E +
+ Boston .... 16 33 6 +
+ Phlla 6 21 2 +
+ +
+ + + + + + + + + + + + -F
BOSTON. Oct. 13.?Beforo 35,000
enthusiastic Boston fans, the Boston
Braves, National League pennant win
ners, today won the fourth straight
game from the Philadelphia Athletics,
American League pennant winners,
and the world's baseball championship
for 1914.
For the first time since the Chicago
Cubs defeated the Detroit Tigers four
straight games in the 1907 world's
Beries and the second time since the
organization of the American League,
the minimum number of games for a
world's series was played.
While the game today was interest
ing, it did not possess the sensational
features of the games of Saturday and
yesterday. Boston took the lead in
the fourth inning, and maintained it
throughout the game.
Rudolph and Gowdy constituted the
battery for Boston and Shawkey and
Schang began the gamo for Philadel
phia. Pennock relieved Shawkey in
the sixth inning.
Rudolph pitched a masterful game,
and was especially strong in the
pinches.
ruuaueipniu couiu uui caicii uie
elusive slow ball when hits would have
sent runs over the plate.
The Braves outgamed and outplayed
their opponents today in every depart
ment of the sport.
Boston cinched the game in the fifth
inning when two men were out with
Rudolph's single, Horan's double and
Evers' solid blow to deep center.
After the last man was out, the Ath
letics rushed over to tho Braves'
bench on masse and congratulated
their rivals and vanquishers.
The spectators went fairly mad with
joy, and paraded the field, singing
and cheering.
Except for the pitchers there was no
change in the line-up from yesterday.
Boston made three runs, six hits
and no errors.
Philadelphia made ou? run, seven
hits and no errer.
The batting order follows:
Boston?Moran, rf; Evers, 2b; Con
nolly, cf; CatherB, If; Schmidt, lb;
Deal, 3b;; Maranvllle, ss; Gowdy, c;
Rudolph, p.
Philadelphia?Murphy, rf; Oldring,
If; Gollins, 2b; Baker, 3b; Mclnnis,
lb; Walsh, cf; Barry, ss; Schang, c;
Shawkey, p; Pei-nock, p.
Summary:
Two base hits, Moran, Walsh,
Shawkey; double play, Gowdy to Ev
ers; Struckout?by Rudolph, seven;
Pennoca, three; pitching summary?
three runs, four hits off Shawkey in
five innings; no runs, two hits off
Pfcnnock in three innings; umpires?
plate,. Byron; bases, Hildebrand; left
field, Klem; right field, Dineen.
? Score by Innings:
123466789
Boston 000120 00 0?3
Philadelphia 000-01000 0?1
NATIONAL LEAGUE WINS
YESTERDAY'S GAMES
NEW YORK, Oct. 13. ? The New
York National Baseball League team
won from the New York Americans in
yesterday's games, the score being:
Nationals, 6; > Americans, 1.
White Sox Win Game.
CHICAGO, Oct. 13.?Tho Wihte Sox
American League, won from the Cubs,
National League, today: Score:
Amerians, 3; Nationals, 1.
Howard Birch, brother to Stephen
Birch, and a well known mining man
of Dan Creek in the Copper River sec
tion, Jb a pessenger aboard the Mari
posa enroute to the States.
Every boat is bringing "gifts that
gladden" to Britt's Pharmacy. ???
WARSAW
MAY PALI
ANYTIME
WARSAW MAY FALL.
Washington. Oct. 13. ? The
State Depatrmnet has received
cablegrams from the American
consul at Warsaw which says
the Germans are pressing the
Russians hard in Russian Po
land.
The dispatches say that War
saw, the capital of Russian Po
land, is threatened by the Ger
mans, and that it may fall at any
moment.
The American consul asks for
instructions as to what he shall
do in the way of handling for
eigners in case of the capitula
tion of the city.
GERMANS PRESS RUSSIANS.
Washington, Oct. 1 .?Scraps
of information received from va
rious comers i f Europe indicate
that the great Russian army
along the frontier, extending
from-the Baltic ocean, through
East Prussia, Russian Poland
and Galicia, to the Carpathian
mountains is being pnished se
verely by the attacking Germans
-at d Austrians. The points of se*
v rest attacks are in Russian
foland and Galicia.
COAL CONSPIRATORS
CONVICTION AFFIRMED
SAN FKANCISUO, Uct. 13.?
The Circuit Court of Appeals to
day affirmed the conviction of
Charles E. Houston and J. W.
Bullock for conspiracy to de
fraud the government in con
nection with the coal supply Tor
Fort Jeff Davis at Nome.
POPE QUITSWORK
FOR PEACE NOW
NEW YORK. Oct. 13? Robert Mac
kenzie, telegraphing from Rome to the
New York World, says: "I am inform
ed by a competent source that the de
lay in the issue of the Pope's first en
cyclical was wrongly attributed to the
Pope's continued efforts toward peace,
since it is now fully realized that any
offer of mediation is out of the ques
tion, and the Pontiff's appeal for peace,
after its first failuro, is not likely to be
repeated.
"His Holiness recently received an
autograph letter from the Emperor of
Austria, who admits the Impossibility
of concluding peace separately from
Germany, as the two empires are fight
ing to defend their existence. The
Pope is not discouraged by the Emper
or's letter, and continuos to use his
spiritual lrfluence toward peace, but
refrains from taking any diplomatic
action.
"Any present action, it is recognized,
would be premature and doomed to
failure."
OLD TIME JUNEAUITE
RETURNS TO STAY
T. C. Austin, who was in 1899 one
of the publishers of the Record-Miner
In Juneau, returned to Juneau on the
last trip to of the City of Seattle, com
and expects to remain here" for a
time. Of late years Mr. AuBtin has
devoted his time to the work of a civ
il engineer w^lch is his calling. Mr.
Austin is much pleased and surprised
over tho changes made in Juneau, r
B. A. Mitchell, connected with the
engineering department of tho Jack
ling mining concerns and stationed at
Salt Lake, who has been attached to
the engineering offices at Thane for a
few weeks left for the South on the
Mariposa.
"A real comfort, a good hot water
bottle," from $1.50 to $3.00 at Juneau
Drug Co., 107 Front St., opposite the
Alaskan Hotel, phone 250 10-12-2t
RUSSIA
LOSES BIG
CRUISER
Petrograd, Oct. 13.?The Rus
sian armored cruiser Pallnda
was torpedoed by a German sub
marine and sank in the Baltic
sea. The Russian warship lost
all of her crew.
SUBMARINES SCORE SUC
CESS.
?4*?
Copenhagen, Oct. 13.?It is
officially stated by the Germans
that their submarine fleet has
scored another success. This
time it was in an attack against
the Russian fleet, and at least
one of the Czar's great armored
cruisers has been destroyed.
JAPS PERMIT ENEMY
TO BURY DEAD
? ?4?
Tokyo, Oct. 13. ? During an
armistice yesterday on the bat
tle front at Tsintau, 22 German
defenders of the fortress' were
buried between the lines.
The fortress fires 1500 shells
daily at the attacking Japanese
troops.
ONE OF TAKOMA'S
CREW AMONG LOST
WASHINGTON. Oct. 13?The others
lost from the Manning boar crow, In
addition to Assistant Surgeon L. W.
Jenkins, were:
Coxwain Demarco, Seaman Delgard,
Seaman Lundaberg, and Seaman Keo
Iy.
Ltrke Louks, a sick man from the
Unalga pass lighthouse, whom they
were endeavoring to take aboard the
Manning, was also drowned.
Coxwain Demarco was a member of
the crew of the Tahoma.
TAHOMA SURVIVORS ARE
LANDED AT UNALASKA
?+?
SEATTLE. Oct. 6.?All of the sur
vivors of the wrecked United States
revenue cutter Tahoma, have been
lauded at Unalaska by tho steamship
Cordova and tho geodetic survey
steamer Pntterson and will be brought
to Seattle. Offlclnls of the Alnska
Steamship company were advised yes
terday by Capt. Thomas Moore, mast
er of the Cordova, that ho reached
Unalaska on Sunday and that the
Patterson had put in at the same
port on Saturday. Capt. Moore said
that all of the officers and members
of the crew of the Tahoma had been
saved and that he was proceeding
for Latouche to load copper ore for
Seattle.
The United States revenue cutters
Bcar^nd Manning will bring the sur
vivors to thir, port.?Seattle Post In
telligencer.
ENGLAND WILL HAVE
TO RAISE MORE CASH
LONDON, Oct. 13.?A London cable
says It Is expected that the govern
ment will shortly make a further is^
sue of $7i;,000,000 Treasury bills. In
the last 11 days of September the gov
ernment supplies cost in excess of
*75,000,000, the bulk of which went
for war expenses, while In the pre
ceding v eek *43,595,000 was absorbed
in the same way. The government
balance on hand Sept. 30 did not ex
ceed *20,000,000.
JAPANESE WANT TO
BE ENGLISHMEN
VANCOUVER, Oct. 13.?Two hun
dred and fifty Japanese have applied
for naturalization * papers yesterday.
They all want to enlist in a Japaneso
corps under the British flag.
Judge Grant Is refusing all appli
cations for naturalization by Germans
and Austrians unTil the end of the
war.
L. K. Kennedy, well! known mining
engineer and brother to E.- P. Kennedy
former asclatant superintendent of
Trea'dwoll and T. P. Kennedy, presi
dent of the First National bank of Ju
neau, took passage on the Mariposa
enroute to San Francisco.
AFRICAN
REBELLION
IS NOW ON
CAPETOWN, Oct. 13. ? The com
mand of Col. Maritz has rebelled In
the Northwest Capo Provinces, and
martial law has been proclaimed
throughout the Union.
?The rebellion has been brewing
since the resignation of Gen. Beyers,
commander-in-chief of the Union forc
es.
The government sent Col. Britz to
relieve Col. Maritz. When he arrived
he found Col. Maritz commanding
Geriran troops as well as his own.
He also had German guns in his pos
session.
The government will send a force
against Col. Maritz immediately.
4?4-,>4,4,4,4,4,4,4,4,4,4,4,4,4'
4* / *
? AUSTRIA ADMITS +
? LOSS OF 211,000 *
?I* 4
? AMSTERDAM, Oct. 13? ?
? Published lists of the Austrian 4
? killed and alleged missing place 4*
4* number since the war began 4
? nt 211,000. +
? This estimate Is much less 4*
?> than the Russian estimate! of 4
? the Austrian losses. *
4* +
? * * + 4- 4- 4* 4- 4* ?> 4> 4* 4* 4* 4? 4* 4
4,.4* 4'4?4?4?4?4?4'4'4,4?4?4?4?4, 4*
4- +
?> SERVIAN PRINCES ?
? ARE WOUNDED 4
?j, 4
4- BERLIN, Oct. 13. ? Crown 4
? Prince of Servia was wound- 4?
4> cd, nnd his brother, Prince 4>
?> George, mortally ~hurt while 4
> engaged in lighting in the army 4
? of Servia against Austria. 4
? 4*
4* 4* 4- ?> 4- *
4- ? * 4* 4- * ? ? 4- ?> 4- 4
* +
4- NOT A WORD FROM *
? BATTLE OF AISNE +
4* ?
? LONDON, Oct. 13. ? Not a +
? word has been vouchsafed the +
+ public either through the mlll\ 4*
4- tary information bureau or the 4*
4- newspapers concerning the pro- 4?
4* gress of the Battle of the Ais- 4
? ne today. 4*
4- 4"
4 4>44>4 4>4>44>^f 4>f 4>4
? # ? 0
EUROPEANS WON'T PAY
ENOUGH FOR BLANKETS
? ?
BOSTON', Oct. 13.?French and Ger
man agents are said to have bid for
several million blankets in Boston, but
the bids were rejected.
GERMAN EXPORTS ARE
NEARLY CUT IN TWO
?4*?
WASHINGTON, Oct. 13.?Exports
for the third quarter of 1914 from the
district of American consul in Berlin
amount to $3,535,879, against $6,039,601
for the corresponding period of 1913.
GERMANS SINK VESSEL
OWNED BY AMERICANS
?4"?
NEW YORK, OcL 13.?The oil tank
er ElsTnoro, an American-owned ves
sel under British registry has been
sunk by a German cruisor off Chile.
PASSENGER TRAVEL FROM
EUROPE SHOWS DECLINE
BOSTON, Oct. 13.?There were 12,
308 few%r passengers to Boston from
European ports for September than
in September, 1913, and 29 fewer ves
sels.
FRANCE AFTER AMERICAN
AUTOMOBILE FRAMES
PHILADELPHIA, Oct. 13.?A Shar
on, Pa., factory received an order said
to bo from the French government
for 2500 auto frames, to be delivered
In the shortest possible time.
NEW HAVEN RAILROAD
TO CUT EXPENSES
BOSTON, OcL 13.?By curtailment
of 2.000 miles per day of non-paying
trains, the Now Haven railroad ex
pects to save $730,000 a year.
Empire ads "teach most readers.
BELGIUM'S
CAPITAL IS
IN FRANCE
BORDEAUX, Oct. 13
?It has been decided
to transfer the Belgian
government from Os
tend to France.
The Belgian Cabinet
ministers, accompanied
by other officials, left
Ostend this morning
for Havre, where the
French government has
prepared offices for
them.
King Albert remains
at Ostend in command
of the Belgian army.
GERMANS OCCUPY GHENT.
?+?
Ostend, Oct. 13. ? The Ger
mans have occupied Ghent
without resistance from the Bel
gians.. ... * .1
Refugees, arriving from
Ghent, which the Germans oc
cupied yesterday, say that two
bombs were dropped into the city
by aeroplanes before its occupa
tion.
BRITISH REINFORCE
OSTEND DEFENSE
. .Washington, Oct. 13. ? It is
reported here that the British
are sending reinforcements to
join the Belgian defense of Os
tend. It is believed that an at
tempt will be made to prevent
the Germans from occupying the
Continental coast of the English
channel.
RUSSIA ABANDONS SIEGE
OF PRZEMYSL.
?<??
Rome, Oct. 13. ? Dispatches
from Petrograd confirm the re
port from Vienna yesterday that
Pr/emysl has been abandoned.
The dispatches say that the. or
der to abandon the siege was is
sued for strategical reasons, and
for the purpose of permitting
the Russian army to put itself .
in a different position to meet
the Austro-Gcrman army in Ga- /
licia.
Petrograd dispatches say that
the Germany army has been
greatly stren ?thened in Galicia,
and that reinforcements are
coming to Cracow constantly.
JAMES BRYCE SAYS
ENCLAND IS UNITED
s BOSTON, Ma3s., Oct. 13.?Lord
James Bryce, fqimer British ambassa
dor to the United States, in a letter to
ex-President Charles W. Eliot, of Har
vard, says regarding thfe European
wnr:
"Neither commercial rivalry nor
any fancied jealousy of Germany's
greatness has led us into this, and
to the German people, our people
bear no ill-will whatever. But the
action of the German government
in violating the neutrality of Bel
glum, when Franco has assured
us that she would respect It,
evoked in this country, an almost
unanimous sentiment that the faith '
of treaties and the safety of the
small states must be protected.
There has been no war for more
than a century?perhaps two cen
turies?into which the nation has '?
entered with so general a belief
that its action is justified.
Rubber goods of dependable quality
at Britt's Pharmacy.

xml | txt