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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, October 21, 1914, Image 2

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ALASKA DAiLY EMPIRE
JOHN W. TROY. Editor and Manager.
Published by the EMPIRE PRINTING COMPANY
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
One year, by mall >10.00
81* mooths. by mail ? 5.00
Per month. delivered ? 1.00
Bntered as second-class matter November 7, 1912. at the postoillce nt Ju
neon. Alaska, under the Act of March 3, 1879.
BUNNELL FOR SELF-GOVERNMENT.
___
CHARLES E. BUNNELL believes that the people of Alaska
should accept the invitation of President Wilson to ask for
"a full Territorial form of government." He believes that
the people of this Territory are capable of managing their own
affairs. He believes they are capable of exercising the police
powers of government; of arranging their own taxation matters;
of regulating the game laws, school matters and other affairs
of government. In short he believes they are capable of acting
the part of American citizens.
On this matter, he occupies the American position. If he
is wrong, the whole woof and web of our American government
al fabric is wrong. American experience has been in vain.
But he is not wrong. Self-government is government from
within; government by those who know. No people anywhere
are so well qualified to govern Alaska as those who live in the
Territory. No people are so much entitled to make laws and
manage the government as those who must live under the lawsj
and governmental management.
And yet, further, there is nothing that develops good citi
zens and interest in home and country like exercising the re
sponsibilities of government. The responsibility for good gov-i
ernment in Alaska should rest upon the people of Alaska.
Mr. Bunnell is the candidate before the people of this Ter
ritory who does stand for a full measure of self-government.
Delegate Wickersham is opposed |to further enlargement of home
rule in Alaska.
PRAYING FOR PEACE.
\ '
(New York World.)
T.'O PRAY for peace?yes! But out of this welter of death
and desolation must come something more than a cessation
of hostilities, something more than a paper truce between
the warring nations.
A peace that restored Europe to the condition of an arned
camp, with every peasant and workman -carrying a soldier on
his back?a peace that kept civilization still at the mercy of au
tocracy?a peace that left all the old ulcers eating their way
into the hearts of nations?a peace still "stained with crimes
of many vanquished years" and black with the blood that has
been offered up in sacrifice to the divine right of kings?what
is such a peace worth to mankind?
It is good to pray for peace, but it is better to pray for
justice. It is better to pray for liberty. It is better to pray for
the triumph of right and for the victory of human freedom.
These are the only issues which ever justify war, and when
the final appeal is made to the sword these are the only issues
which ever justify peace.
On the battlefield of Gettysburg Abraham Lincoln made
the noblest speech of the nineteenth century, and the noblest
sentiment of that speech was compresseed into these few words:
?that from these honored dead we take increased de
votion to that cause for which they gave the last full
measure of devotion; that we here highly resolve that
these dead shall not have died in vain; that this Nation
under God shall have a new birth of freedom, and that
government of the people, for the people and by the
p<3ople shall not perish from the earth.
Unless out of this greatest of vall wars shall come a new
birth of freedom, the dead have died doubly in vain. Pray for
peace, but pray for a peace that proudly bears the torch of lib
erty, not for a peace that is shackled by brute force to the char
iot wheels of military despotism.
The Dispatch says The Empire published a "delayed in
transmission" account of the performance of the assessment
work on Delegate Wickersham's Fairbanks mining claims. No,
the dispatch was not delayed. It was received one evening and
printed the next afternoon. It showed that the Delegate had
ordered assessment work performed after it had been disclosed
that he had written the Johnson bill, and after the discovery that
the Johnson bill was dead beyond hope of resurrection.
The Dispatch has "unutterable thoughts" when it recalls the
names of the several times re-elected Mayor of Valdez, Jim
Lathrop, Charlie Hand, James Fish, A. C. Dowling, Al. White
and others of Valdez. The thoughts are probably favorable.
The Dispatch could never think of attempting to injure the
reputations of pioneer Alaskan developers and town builders
by inuendo.
In extending the west wings of the armies in Northern
France the combatants ran out of land, and the Allies have
patched out with the British navy, and thus overspread the
North Sea. -
Everybody is thoroughly pleased that Col. Harvey and Col.
Watterson have made up with the President?but none is so
kittenishly happy about it as the two amiable old Colonels are.
Charles E. Bunnell is a repeater. He not only broke the
Juneau record in drawing out a crowd to a political meeting
Monday night, but last night he broke the Douglas record.
If Wickersham had fulfilled all of his promises he would
have had nothing left to promise the voters. Perhaps there
has been method in his performances.
Juneau has met Charles E. Bunnell, and heard him talk.
The verdict is one of approval.
Alas! how soon do Przemysl's glories fade before the ris
ing star of Schtachutschyn!
OLD-HOME WEEKS IN POLITIC8.
To true Democrats the attractions
if tho White House under its pres
ent occupancy are very good. Most
Democrats come and go as to the
house of a friend, but a few, as a re
sult of misunderstandings. In many
cases regretable, have stood at a dis
tance, doubtful of their reception, and
yet wistful
It does not matter how much Col
George Harvey happoned to mako n
Sunday afternoon call upon tho Presi
dent The point Is that after waiting
nineteen months for reasons best
known to himself, ho appeared at the
White House, and was mode wel
come. Conversations interrupted long
ago were resumed. Old associations
wire renewed. No doubt both of these
distinguished Americans wero glad to
meet again, forgetting past differenc
es and hopeful by reunited efforts to
be of public service. ^
As this reunion chanced to take
place on the day devoted by the Presi
doat to prayers for peace, it had a sig
nificance which wise observers were
not slow to interpret. If Col Harvey 1
cculd appear at a visit to tho Execu- f
tlvo Mansion, why not also that oth- 1
or and more celebrated Colonel?name- '
ly Watterson, of Kentucky?who hap- t
pened to fall outside the breastworks t
in company with Col. Harvey! The '
fact that correspondence has been es- <
tabllshed between Louisville and
Washington proves that differences 1
between honorable men, as between <
honorable nations, may still bo settled 1
by reason, truth and justice. I
If this spirit is to prevail among *
Democrats partly as a result of lead- (
ership which can no longer be ignored 1
by any of them, why should we not 1
expect to. see Champ Clark at the
White House and Roger Sullivan a I
self-respecting caller at the State Do- '
partment. There are old-home weeks j
in politics as well as in the country
towns.?New York World.
A BULLETIN FROM THE HOSPITAL
The patient's temperature has be
come practically normal. He shows ,
i few signs of febrilo excitement.
He has wholly recovered from the
shock of the severe operation to which
he was unwillingly, but unavoidably
on his part, subjected to about Au- ,
gust 1.
He Is taking all the nourishment
he can get and showing an increasing
ly interest in schemes for getting
more.
His mental condition has greatly
improved. He no longer talks about
putting up the shutters of his ware
house or hanging crepe on his door
knob.
He is showing signs of impatience
to get out and go to work again. He
is, in fact, out part of the day and
working hard on some new enter
prises.
Translated into the language of the
hospital bulletin, that is the present
condition of that dlsinguished patient,
American business, as shown by the |
fact that 27,136 more of his freight!
cars were at work on September 15 j
than on September 1. His complete
recovery, with some change in diroc
j tion of activity, especially to the re
! gion in the south, may be confidently
predicted.?Chicago Herald. (Ind.)
i ...
HOPE OF PfcAOfc I IN OOLUHAUO
?+?
It will be entirely pocsiblo for both
sides to find fault with President
Wilson's proposed truce in the Colo
rado mine war. Any compromise, any
effort to find a halfway meotlng ground
offers opportunity for criticism. But
such fault-finding will be utterly aside
the mark and will receive scant pa
tience from the country at 'large.
The point Is that an intolerable con
dition exists and the President's pro
posal offers a fair and reasonable (
basis for ending it. In substance, it ,
seeks to preserve the status quo, en- ,
forcing the laws of the State and pro
, viding for a commission of three to
settle disputed points. The plan is
i the work of the Federal Conciliation
| Commission and will strike the im- J
partial observer as the obvious and
only basis for fair compromise.
The wishes of the country strongly
support the President, and either min
ers or operators will blunder griev- 1
ously If they attempt to defy public
sentiment and the Just demands for
peace.?New York Tribune. (Rep.)
Sept J).
ACCOUNTS INDICATE THAT
THEY "HAD THE GOODS"
There is likely to be some hot poll- '
cal meetings at Valdez tonight. James 1
| the Terrible has his dander up and :
he is going to play the men who have '
assailed him?unless they have the
goods on him.?Cordova Alaskan. (
PRESIDENT WINS ANOTHER
BATTLE FOR ALASKA
?+?
Another fight is over, and Presl- ?
dent Wilson has won the battle for '
Alaska. After years of anxiety we '
now have a coal leasing bill that is .
believed will be workable. It was the '
best that could be secured under the 1
adverse sentiment that has been cre
ated throughout the Eastern and tho !
Southern States.?Cordova Alaskan.
ALASKANS SHOULD SHOW
THEIR APPRECIATION
There are other battles to be fought
for Alaska and it behooves the people '
of the Northland to show our friends 1
in Washington, by every possible way, J
that their efforts In our behalf are 1
appreciated. Telegrams and letters
should go out from every section of '
this vast territory to the men who at
any time lift their voices or cast their
votes in favor of a measure that has ?
for its object the betterment of con- t
ditions in Alaska.?Cordova Alaskan. I
? ? ? t
Everybody reads the Empire. Ad- t
vertlse In It. ^
=====
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'Alaska
Established
1891
Incorporated
1914
=5V II ? ? .1 =
THE
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TERRITORIAL BANK
Resources Over 51,000,000.00^
A service based on ihe facilities and
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B. M. Behrend.
Pee lid eat
J. R. Willi.
Vlce-Pr*?ld?at
i
GuyMcN.agltlon
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' I
VMERICAN FARMERS
ARE GETTING RICH
CHICAGO. Oct. 21.?Farmers of the
Jnited States will receive more money
or their crops this year than ever
>oforo In the history of the country.
*Iot only Is the wheat crop by far
he largest ever raised, but the re
urns that can bo counted on safely
or this crop will exceed the greatest
jxpcctatlous of a few weeks ago.
In virtually every Important wheat
-alsing section of tho country tho pro
lucer can now obtain $1 a bushel for
its wheat. Two months ago wheat
prices were about forty cents lower
;han at present, and in many sec
tions farmers wero not getting more
:han sixty cents a bushel for their
wheat.
Considerable wheat was sold at low
prices, but of the 900,000,000 bushels
raised this year It Is not likely that
more than 200,000,000 bushels have
been sold at this time from the farinB.
A forty-cent advance In the price of
wheat means on 700,000,000 bushels
$280,000,000, and from present indi
cations in regard to the export de
mand a reduction of farm prices for
wheat below the dollar level does not
appear reasonable. In fact, judging
from the way Europe is buying both
wheat and flour, farmers may not be
willing to sell freely at $1.
Oats prices have been enhanced
about 30 per cent. In the heaviest
part of the crop movement. On the
basis of present values for oats com
pared to what they were at tho be
ginning of harvest there has been an
increase In the valuer of the crop of
about $175,000,000. Corn is now the
highest in years.
FAIRBANKS TO GIVE
BUNNELL SUPPORT
FAIRBANKS, Oct 5.?Charles E.
Bunnell departed for Skagwny by riv
er boat last Wednesday and will spend
much of the time between now and
election in campaigning along the
coast
Mr. Bunnell had Intended to go from
Fairbanks to Nome, and to campaign
in the Second Division, but he arriv
ed here after the last boats sailed
down the river, and was thus pre
vented from getting to the Second Di
vision.
Mr. Bunnell went away from Fair
banks with the feeling that ho will
get a good vote here. He had ex
pected to find his chief opposition in
the Fourth Division, the home of his
opponent, but he was welcomed here
in real sourdough stylo, and was giv
en assurance of general Democratic
support here.?Fairbanks Citizen.
MARCONI WIRELESS 'PHONE
OPERATES FOR NINE MILES
LONDON, Oct. 21.?In teste at Home
of the new wireless telephone device
invented by .Marconi, the human voice
was heard distinctly at a distance of
nine miles. For the present, the new
invention will be reserved for war ves
sels.
PRESIDENT FAVORS AID
TO COTTON BY BANKS
?+
WASHINGTON, OcL 21?A num
ber of Southern representatives in
Congress conferred with President
Woodrow Wilson in regard to the cot
ton situation and learned from him
that he would favor legislation look
ing to a warehouse plan and issuance
of receipts on cotton housed.
The President intimated that he
would not favor direct government
aid, but would approve of a plan for
Southern banks to raise a fund to fi
nance the cotton crop and would do
ill that was possible to encourage such
i means of assistance.
SERARD TRIES TO ARRANGE
EXCHANGE OF CITIZENS
NEW YORK, Oct. 21?A London
spocial says American Ambassador
James W. Gerard at Berlin Is en
deavoring to induco the German for
eign office to permit British sub
jects who have passed the fighting age
to leave Germany in exchange for a
similar courtesy granted by England.
SHIP BUILDERS MAY
SELL CONTRACTED CRAFT
LONDON, Oct. 21.?The British gov
ernment has advised Clyde shipbuild
ers that they can go ahead and fin
ish ships ordered In Geimany and
Vustrln, sell them at the best possible
tlgure, and debit the German or the
\ustrlan owners with any loss that
they may suffer.
t/ALDEZ BOY GETS
NAVAL APPOINTMENT
Delegate Wickersham has appoint
id John Meals, of Yaldez, as a cadet
o Annapolis. In the event of the
'ealure of young Meals to pass the
ixamlnation, John Miller Is to take
he examination as the alternate.?
:aldez Prospector.
Fresh cut flowers, just arrived. Ju
neau Drug Co., 107 Front St., phone
250. 10-20-2t
RINK NEWS.
Skating every evening at Jaxon's
rink. (???)
Just arrived?new shipment of coats
at The "Fashion." 10-20-tf
Empire ads reach buyers.
NOTICE OF ELECTION.
To the doctors of tho Town of Jun
eau Division No. One, Territory of
Alaska:
Notice Is hereby given that pursu
ant to an Act of Congress, entitled
"An Act Providing for the Election of
a Delegate to tho Houbo of Represen
tatives from the Territory of Alaska,"
[ and an Act entitled "An Act to create
a Legislative Assembly In tho Terri
tory of Alaskn, to confer legislative
power thereon and for other purpos
es," a General Election for the pur
pose of electing a delegate to the
House of Representatives from the
Territory of Alaska for the full term
of the Sixty-fourth Congress, and for
the election of one senator and four
representatives to tho Alaska Legis
lative Assembly, as provided in the
said acts, will be held on Tuesday,
Nov. 3, 1914, between the hours of 8
o'clock A. M., and 7 o'clock P. M., of
said day.
Tho Common Council of Juneau hav
ing heretofore, by Ordinance, duly
designated the voting precincts of said
town and the polling places In each
thereof, the electors are hereby noti
fied:
..II .1..!.. wAal/l
I IltlL (III UU1JT 1|UUII1ICU YUVVtD 4 VOiU
ing within tho boundaries of voting
j precinct No. One of said town of Jun
i eau which are as follows: all the ter
ritory within the corporate limits of
the said Town of Junenu lying on the
Southerly side of a line along tho mld
| die of Second Street in said Town of
Juneau will vote at the Forrest Build
I ing, located on Lower Front Street, in
: and upon Water Front Property, which
is owned by G. F. Forrest, and unoc
I cupled. the same being the duly desig
nated polling place in and for precinct
No. One, Town of Juneau, Territory of
Alaska.
That all duly qunlifled voters resid
I ing within the boundaries of voting
| precinct No. Two of said Town of Jun
! eau, which are as follows: all tho ter
ritory within the corporato limits of
the said Town of Juneau, lying on the
Northerly side of a lino along the mid
dle of Second Street In said Town of
Juneau, will vote at City Hall building
located on Fourth and Main Streets,
j in and upon Lot 5 of Block 7, which
is owned by the Town of Juneau and
occupied by the Fire Department the
snme being the duly designated poll
ing place in and for precinct No. Two
Town of Juneau, Territory of Alaska.
Dated this 2nd day of October, 1914.
THE COMMON COUNCIL of
tho Town of Juneau. Territory
of Alaska.
By E. W. PETTIT,
(SEAL) Clerk.
First publication, October 20, 1914.
Last publication, October 27, 1914.
j j Sporting C. W.Young Co. Cutlery ||
Goods h A R D W A R F. Etc
i ciMPL*?AB?ocKoTr Mining, Logging and Fiahiny Snpplies alabka
Plumbing -- Tining ? Pipe Fittings j
Estimates and prompt attention given all kinds Job Work
P AINTS-VARfl ISH-WALL* PAPER-BRUSHES
SSfSXEI WAUGH ROCK DRILLS and
EV1NRUDE DETACHABLE MOTORS
MODERN AND UP-TO-DATE
j Furniture Rugs Office Desks Go-Carts Etc.
-????? ??
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jj -THE- ,
I FIRST NATIONAL BANK
OF JUNEAU
UNITED STATES DEPOSITORY
Capital . 160,000
Surplus and Undivided Profits 60,000
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26 FRONT STREET
??
^ FIRST TERRITORIAL BANK
===== OF ALASKA
DOUGLAS - - - -" - JUNEAU
26 FRONT STREET
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M. J. O'CONNOR. President T. F. KENNEDY, Vice-President A. E. GURR. Cashier
H. H. POST. Assisstant Cashier It. H. STEVENS. Assistant Cashier
Groceries and
Men's Goods
Alaska-Gastineau Mining Co.
THANE, * 9 t * ALASKA
H hen ordering BEER
insist on RAINIER PALE
??arjLUMiuLi -an?^^71
OUR NEW STOCK OF
f?
fycKjWl)
Hats, Gloves,
Clothing
HAS ARRIVED
|| Also Large Stock of Mens, Womens and Childrens ||
SHOE5I
These were bought before the sharp advance in price, which I
enables us to maintain our usual low price on footwear. I
Style, Quality
AND PRICE IS RIGHT
Toe Home of
Hart SchafFner
6 <?r Marx
S^S=====SSS=5=I^
? ?
Alaska Treadwell Gold Mining Co.
MERCANTILE DEPARTMENT LATEST STYLES, BEST VALUES
^

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