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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, October 24, 1914, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020657/1914-10-24/ed-1/seq-3/

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Why Do Men Insure?
and Why Are Insured Men Most Almost
Citizens of Worth in Their
Community
A drop of water falls into a stagnant pool and remains,
growing filthier and more ill-smelling each day, and polluting,
with its fellow drops, the surrounding atmosphere.
ANOTHER drop of water, no purer and no larger, falls into
a mountain revulet, where it sings its way, augumented by thou
sands of other drops, to the river, and then on to the ocean, in
creasing in force and power with every mile it covers. It turns
mill wheels, furnishes power for electric light plants, irrigates
waste land, and is always producing results.
IN JUST SUCH A WAY two men's lives may differ. The !
one a spendthrift and ne'er-do-well, thinking only of self and his
pleasures.
Mixing with other men of his kind he finally, like the first
drop, falls into the "slough of despond." His usefulness is gone
and soon he is missed when Father Time gathers him in.
His life was a failure, and his death even more so.
The other man gets his innings. He grasps his opportunities, j
No task is too great, and no work can be called drudgery, for he j
has a goal and is producing.
"" 11 ? * ? L 1..1 _ ?*IL 4.:-:? ~'
wnue nammering nis way over oostacies wun nevei-iuuijs
zeal he does not forget to think of the future, and always puts
aside a part of his income in good, legal reserve life insurance.
When his final calling comes, he goes to the great beyond
as a conqueror in the fight. He has done his duty, and while!
doing it, has painstakingly protected himself and his family.
Which of these men would you prefer to be?
"Every man in the world worthy the name, loves something
?his wife, his children, his mother, his sister, his reputation
before other men. If he has not that sentiment in his soul, he
is a poor stick. When he buys life insurance he is elevating and
satisfying that one high, human sentiment by providing for that
which he loves.
Insurance is the one thing in the world that, at the least ,
cost, and with the most certainty, supplies that demand and de
sire of noble sentiment.
The Northern Life not only protects your family when death
comes, but pays to you the face of your policy if you lose hands,
feet, or eyes and pays you a monthly endemnity up to $200.00
per month if sick or disabled by accident.
Get the 3-in-l policy now; $275,000 written in Southeastern,
Alaska. Remember, delays are dangerous.
Address, giving occupation, day, month and year of your'
birth,
A. E. RANSOM. Div. Supt. for Alaska..
Alaskan Hotel.
AN -OLD LINE" COMPANY WITH -NEW LINE" IDEAS
insurance ca
. I ^ I* S200.000.00 Depoalted with State Ttccaurer
k|0p% ^3>n1p&
I \i 11 Premiama Paid for Yoa on Your Life luut^a;.' If
I Permancntlv Disabled
Home Office, Wblte Building, Seattle, U. S. A.
A. E. RANSOM, Dir. Supt. for Alaska. Alaskan Hotel, Juneau
LOOK
(The Bread of Quality
FOR SALE BY ALL
FIRST-CLASS GROCERS
Rolls, Cakes and Pastry FresK
Bvery Day at Noon
PD A PP'C NU-STYLK
liKAr r o bakery
330 FRANKLIN ST. PHONE 308
?
: Juneau Transfer Co. i
? PHONE 48
X WE ALWAY8 HAVE
i* COAL
Moving Carefullr Don? ?
STORAGE I
Baggage to and from All Boata X
37 FRONT 8T. X
Peerless Bakery
Bakers of Fine Pastry of all
kinds. Only the best of mater
ial used. Try the Peerless brand.
Its quality insures its continuous
use. + + * + + + +
PEERLESS BAKERY
(Formerly Lempke's)
THEO. HEYDER, Propr.
125 Front St Phone 222
4 > Ju*t Arrived?A full line of fall and <
:: jjg. Suits $20.00 :
< ? Work. Material. Style. Guaranteed <
< ? SATISFACTORY 4
i ' H. HEIDORN, Merchant Tailor J
o 222 Seward Street, JUNEAU 4
?????>>??????????????????<
' I M 111111:11 I I
.t Scandinavian Hand Laundry |
~ First class band laundry done J
? at 323 Seventh Street. Table !
V Unen a specialty. Experienced |
t and guarantee satisfaction.
V11111111111111111111111 it
+ i 111 m 11; 11111111 n 111 ii ?
if D R. H. V A N C E i
! t The
' j OSTEOPATH::
T Rooms 5 and 6 Malony Bldg.
t Consultation and Examination
I Free. Phone 262. "
X Graduate American School ot "
i Osteopathy, Kirksvilie, Mo. jj
t Seven years'active practice.
X Ohice hours, 9 to 12 m. 1 to 6 !
I p. m., or by appointment. '*
Ii ; i i iiiiiiniiiT
!' t
L. G TMiiufl Merl F. Thomas ?
Alaska Furniture 8 Undertaking t
Co., Inc. a
Funeral Directors & Fmbalmers t
Doujjrlas Alaska ?
^ THE BE8T LOAF OF
BREAD
= ?
? la 8old At >
IX
I San Francisco Bakery >
? G. MESSEKSCtiMIDT. Prop. $
j i
G. K. GILBERT
PLUMBING and
SHEET METAL WORKS
121 Front 8L Phone SM
Remington Typewriter Company
ha* established an office in Jincau at
the corner of Front and Mail Street!.
Come in and get the latest Remington
Idea. lit
?
HOTEL ARCTIC
Mr*. Birdio Fowler. Prop.
FURNISHED ROOMS
Permanent or Transient
' Clean, Quiet and Homelike
89 FRONT ST. PHONE 229
? .
PETTIT & HARVEY
Rentals and General Collections
REAL ESTATE BROKERS
Auditing and Accounting
Agents Northern Life Insurance Co.
, Cheney Bldg. Phone 297
The Alaska Political Situation in a Nutshell
T ? i" A
President Woodrow
Wilson
"
?and his administration
saved Alaska from stagna
tion and decay.
Charles E. Bunnell
????J
?Democratic Nominee for
Delegate to Congress, repre
sents the Wilson policies in
Alaska. Show your appre
ciation for the Administra
tion's efforts in your behalf
and encourage it to greater
efforts by supporting and
voting for him.
???????? ?? ????1 ?
PRESIDENT WOODROW WILSON, who saved Alaska
Election: Nov. 3, 1914
CHARLES E. BUNNELL, who supports the Wilson policies
i
LA FOLLETTE ON | <
PRESIDENT WILSON j
?
Incidentally, tho country rejoices i
that Wilson is President, not Roose- j
velt, whose recently expressed atti
tude towards disarmament confirms
this judgment. The accumulating and I
increasing horrors of tho European |
war are creating a great tidal wave
of public opinion which sweeps aside
all specious reasoning aud admits of
but one simple, common-sense, hu-!
mane conclusion?a demand for peace !
and disarmament among civilized na
tions.
The author of this just and proper
sentiment is Robert M. La Follette.
not so long ago a hero of Roosevelt's
showered with praise by that dispen
ser of blame and of rewards. Mr. La
Follette is nothing If not a keen ob-!
server of political currents and pop
ular opinion, and in his Weekly, he
declares that President Wilson "today
holds a supreme place in the confi
dence of the people of the Unitedj
States." which is summed up in the
simple phrase, "He Is keeping us out
of war." Tho praise Senator La Fol
lette bestows upon him and Mr. Bry
an is unreserved. Those who, like
Mr. Roosevelt, mocked at Mr. Wilson's
Mexico policy now offer up prayers
of thanksgiving that we were sparod
a war with Mexico. As for the peace
treaties, negotiated with Mr. Bryan,
which Mr. Roosevelt scorns, tho Wis
consin Senator declares that they con
stitute a "great service to the human
race." From our observation of press
and public, we believe that Senator
La Follette is correct in his estimate
of what the public Is thinking. We
cannot out feel that Mr. Roosevelt's
rehashing of his mistaken militaristic
theories just at this time is as grave
a political mistake as any of the mauy
that he has recently made and that
have caused his friends to wonder
what has becomo of his once great
political skill and intuitive knowledge
of public opinion.?New York Even
ing Poet.
TERRIFIC WAR-RATE
IS WORLD WIDE
Tho estimate of Paul Leroy-Beau
lieu. the French political economist,
that half tho population of the world
is affected by the war is not Immod
erate. Indeed, if reference is had to
the indirect consequences of the war,
it is within the bounds of truth to |
say that it affects practically every
living human being.
India might be supposed to bo far
enough away from the firing-line not
to feel the onset of armies In West
ern Europe. Yet is it very directly
affected by the dispatch of native
'??Anne tr\ tha fr/inf n rwl hv thA U'lth.
draw&l of an element of the popula
tion and a material part of the na
tional wealth from Industry, and this
over and above the Interference of
commerce. China and Japan are af
fected, all the colonial dependencies
of the warring powers are affected.
The Persian carpet-bagger, the Arab
trader, the savages in the rubber for
ests and the copra-gatherers in the
South Sea islands, all suffer more or
less from a conflict the evil conse
quences of which extend to practical
ly all the industries of the civilized
and uncivilized man the world over.
No part of the world's population,
in these days of close international re
lations and commercial intercourse,
lives wholly to Itself, and any break
down of one part of the complex ma
chinery inevitably interferes with the
working of the other parts. Europe's
colossal waste of wealth will bring
disastrous results not only to the na
tions immediately involved, and not
alone to others in close trade relations
with the belligerents, but to hum
ble toilers in the remotest regions of
the globe. It will bo a staggering bill
to pay and one which will levy an
enforced tribute to some kind on all
the human family.?New York World.
CAMP FIRE GIRLS
TO HELP LIBRARY
Miss Kdith Komptliornc and Miss
Francis Gulick are planning to give a
library benefit entertainment with the
Camp Fire Girls next Friday evening.
This will include motion songs, and
the public will be given an opportun
ity for the first time of seeing fire
made without matches by a Camp Fire
girl. Full particulars will bo an
nounced later.
COL. SWANITZ APPROVES
ALASKA COAL BILL
?*1'?
SEATTLE, Oct. 17.?Col. A. C.
Swunitz, of Alameda, Cal., the chief
engineer of the Alaska Northern rail
road, is a recent arrival at the Rain
ier-Grand, from his homo in the South,
where he has spent most of the sum
mer. Col, Swanitz is rathor elated
over the passage of tho Alaska coal
bill. "It Is an excellent bill," he said.
"It meets all of the requirements
and will undoubtedly result in good
work as soon as a railway is com
pleted into the Matanuska coal fields.
I know of one coucern on the Pacific
coast which wishes to take out 100,
000 tons of coke a year, and they are
perfectly satisfied with the law. It is
an effort to bring about better condi
tions 'in Alaska, and demonstrates
that Secretary of the Interior Lane
is the right man in the right place."?
Seattle Post Intelligencer.
Horse and Rig For Sale ?
For Sale.?Driving pony, buggy and
harness. Must bo sold by Monday.
Apply* P. E. Jackson. See him on the
street. 10-24-1L
Empire ads reach buyers.
CHENA SLOUGH j
THROWING ICE
?<??
FAIRBANKS, Sept. 30.?For the
first time this season the C lien a slough
and the river bolow here are show
ing signs of the rapidly approaching
freezeup. Quito a lot of ice was in
sight along the slough through the
city this morning and extended part
way across it at the big riffle by the
Nordale hotel. The ice is still thin, and
has not as yet hindered navigation,
to any extent, but the small boats are
getting shy of making long trips. From
the time the river begins to "thow
Ice" until the freezeup is complete
there is quite a long period, depend
ing upon weather conditions. With
such as there Is today it will be a
matter of two or three weeks prob
ably.?Fairbanks News Miner.
FITTING MEMORIAL FOR
MRS. WILSON PROPOSED
?
WASHINGTON, Oct. 24.?Plans for
a memorial to Mrs. Woodrow Wilson,
to take the form of a model block
of sanitary tenament houses In the
slum district of Washington, are be
ing made by Mrs. Archibald Hopkins,
of this city.
Mrs. Hopkins plan is to raiso a fund
by an appeal to the women of the
country. She will present the subject
at a meeting in Pitsburgh this week
of the leaders of Women's organiza
tions. The plan provides also for a
request to Congress to appropriate
money to build wide, paved streets
through the slums.
Pree clock contest now on at Britt's
Pharmacy. 10-22-3t
Empire want ads get results.
il for Adult and Children il
i; Rain Hats ? Rain Gapes ? Rain Goats ::
i: UMBRELLAS?BIG STOCK
| MRS. BERRY'S STORE RAN KLIN ||J
???????????????????????????????????????????????????
What do you Buy ;|
i! When you Buy a
j Typewriter?
33 You pay for neat, well-written correspond- |
;3 ence, for perfect carbon copies, for the quality and ; 3
;: quantity of work your typist can turn out?in ;;
;3 short, for the years of service you get. 33
? < ?
33 If your inventory were made on this basis, %
33 you would find in the L. C. Smith & Bros, type- t
31 writer a much bigger asset than the price you paid 3 3
33 for it and a much bigger asset than in any other 33
33 writing machine ever made. 33
^ Ball Bearing; Long Wearing 33
It isn't the machine?it's what the machine o
11 will do for you. ? >
< ? < ?
Can we prove this statement? Absolutely.
11 Ask for our proof. ;;
o <?
? < ?
;; L.C.SmitK$Bros.TypewrterCo. ;;
o Home Office and Factory ,>
:; SYRACUSE, NEW YORK ;:
E. S. HEWITT, 115 SEWARD ST. JUNEAU U
??ii^????
STOVES I
We Have Sold 52 "Great Westerns" This Fall, making over
500 IN USE IN JUNEAU
WHY? Because They Beat Everything for Appearance, Safety, Efficiency, Quality and
LOW COST
SEE A "G.-W." AND YOU'LL BUY NO OTHER
ALASKA SUPPLY COMPANY
EXCLUSIVE AGENTS
iHWUWMWIIHMFrWBMBB?????I???1^^??MM?1|

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