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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, October 29, 1914, Image 1

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THE ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
~VOL. iy. NO. 606. JUNEAU. ALASKA. THURSDAY. OCTOHKli 2a. T.?l I. PRICE TEN CENTS.
BATTIf TIDE IN WEST IS TURNING IN ALLIES' EAVOR
Germany's Army Is Forced Out of Poland
VOTERS FILL THEATRE TO HEAR HELLENTHAL
GERMANS
FORCED OUT
OF POLAND
BERLIN, Oct. 29
The War Office an
nounced officially this
afternoon that the Ger
mans and Austrians
have been forced to
withdraw from Russian
Poland.
RUSSIANS REOCCUP Y
LODZ TODAY
PETROGRAOOct. 29.? The
Russian forces today reoccupied
Lodz, southwest of Warsaw. The
Germans are evacuating Rus
sian Poland.
The Russian forces are con
stantly in contact with the reari
guards of the retreating army.
? , ,
RUSSIANS WIN NOTABLE |
VICTORIES
LONDON, Oct. 29.?The Rus
sians havq again won several
notable victories over the Ger
mans and the Austrians in the
East today. They have over
whelmed the enemy by sheer
force of numbers.
WAR LOSS ESTIMATE
BY GARY TREMENDOUS
BIRMINGHAM. Ala.. Oct. 29.?E. H.
Gary, the great steel magnate, in an
interview given out here today said
that if the European war continued
another 18 months and keeps up the
present rate of destruction that the
loss of life will reach 4,000,000. and
the property loss will be $35,000,000,
000.
A5SASSIN PRINZIP DRAWS
20 YEARS' IMPRISONMENT
SARAJEVO, Oct. 29.?Assassin Prin
zip, confessed slayer of Grand Duke
Franz Ferdinand, of Austria, was yes
terday sentenced to 20 years In pris
on.
Four of the conspirators who plann
ed the crime were sentenced to death.
One was sentenced to life imprison
ment. Five were given from one to
ten years imprisonment.
RUSSIANS BUY WAR
MUNITIONS IN AMERICA
NEW YORK. Oct. 29.?More than
100,000 tons of war munitions, or
probably the largest shipment since
the outbreak of the war, Is leaving
New York this week in three vessels.
ALL STAR BASEBALL
TEAMS AT SEATTLE
SEATTLE. Oct. 29.?The AH Star
baseball teams of the American and
National Leagues, are here today.
"Bill" James. Seattle's star pitcher
in the 1912 season, this year priemler
pitcher of the world. Is among the
visitors as a member of the pitching
staff of the National's all star per
formers.
SEATTLE MEN CHARGED
WITH LOTTERY SCHEME
SEATTLE. Oct. 20.?George E. Stll
llngs and nine others, operating the
"Preferred Mercantile Company" were
yesterday indicted by the Federal
Grand jury, charged with conducting
a nation-wide lottery fraud.
MAN WANTED FOR FORGERY
IS ON WAY NORTH
SEATTLE. Oct. 29.? United States
Deputy Marshal W. T. Downey, with
John A. Larson, who is wanted at Ju
neau for forgery, in his care, left on
the City of Seattle last night for Ju
neau.
THE WEATHER TODAY.
Maximum?16.
Minimum?II.
Cloudy?Rain.
Precipitation?.38.
SAYS U. S.
IS FRIENDLY
TO VILLA
MEXICO CITY. Oct. 29.?Provision
al President Carranza has wired to
President Woodrow Wilson, protest
ing against the alleged activity of
United States Consular Agent Caroth
ers. and what he terms the friendli
ness of the United States to Gen.
Villa.
Carranza alleges that" Villa's true
name is Doroteo Arango.
Debates are Fierce.
During acrimonious debates yester
day at the Aguas Calientes conven
tion guns were drawn by delegates,
and bloodshed was narrowly averted.
+ + <, + + + t + + + + + 4, + + +
? , +
? TREATIES SUBMIT ?
+ OF ACHIEVEMENT +
+ ? ? 1
+ FARMIXGTON. Mo.. Oct 29. +
+ ?In a speech at this place for 4> 1
* Democratic candidates, Secre- *
* tary of the Navy Josephus Dan- + 1
+ iels said that the signing and + '
+ ratification of the Bryan peace + 1
+ treaties by the United Sates, +
+ constituted the crowning act of +
+ achievement by human effort +
+ in this decade. +
? .... *
DETECTIVE BURNS SUES
SEATTLE DAILY TIMES
SEATTLE. Oct. 29? Detective Wil
liam T. Burns yesterday brought suit
against the Seattle Daily -Times and
Col. Alden.J. Blethen for 5250.000.
Burns alleges damages to that extent
on account of alleged libelous articles
that have been printed in the Times. j
+ + + + + + + + + + + + + ? +
+ + :
+ "BUSTER"JOHNSON +
+ KILLED AT SEATTLE +
?> ?+? ? '
+ SEATTLE. Oct. 29.?William + 1
+ Johnson, better known as "Bus- +
+ ter" Johnson, discoverer of Bus- +
+ ter Creek, in the Nome region, *
+ while attempting to board the *
+ schooner Polar Bear, fell to- +
+ day and was killed. +
+ +
* + + + + * + + + + + + + **
CITY OF SEATTLE
IS COMING NORTH
?+?
SEATTLE. Oct. 29.?The City of
Seattle sailed for the North last ev
ening with the following named pas
sengers:
For Juneau:?Mary L. Enstrom, W.
T. Downey. J. Boyle, L. W. Brady and
four steerage.
For Tread well:?Thomas Rear, E.
A. Kleinsmith. Fred Hoffman, P. H.
| Cllngham. H. P. Cllngham, Oliver N.
I Pease, W. A. Meham and Mrs. E.
i Chastan.
For Douglas:?Two steerage.
THLINKET PACKING CO.
TRIAL IS STILL ON
The Thllnket Packing Company's
case, one of the government fisheries
prosecutions, is on trial in the Dis
trict Court and the government is
still submitting testimony.
GUN CLUB TO DISCUSS
NEW CLUB HOUSE PLAN
The Juneau Gun Club will meet
Friday (tomorrow) night at the store
of the C. W. Young company to dis
cuss the plan of building a club house
on the shooting range in North Ju
neau near the lighting plant. A full
attendance is urged.
g g 0
FURNITURE FOR SALE.? Call
Friday between one and four o'clock.
Phone 3073, Reck Apartments. 10-29-lt
WOOLEN MEN SEE LITTLE
SOUTH AMERICA TRADE
1 BOSTON. Mass., Oct. 29.?Winthrop
,: L. Marvin, secretary .of the National
Association of Woolen Manufacturers.
. i says reasons why American manufac
turers show little interest in the pos
sible export trade to South America
are that woolen fabrics are not de
manded in tropical climates, and that
that there is not nearly so great a
curtailment in the British export
trade as is generally supposed.
WILSON
MAY CLOSE
COALMINES
WASHINGTON, Oct 29.?President
Woodrow Wilson is seriously Inves
tigating the law and authorities to
ascertain whether or not he has the
power to close the Colorado mines In
volved in the strike in that State in
case the operators continue to refuse
his plan of settlement of the strike.
The plan has already been accepted
by the miners and received the ap
proval of organized labor throughout
the nation.
LIST OE MEMBERS
Of DEMOCRATIC CLUB
?*?
This afternoon the officers of
the Juneau Democratic Club furnish
The Empire and the Dispatch with a
copy of the roster of the club with
permission to print the same. The
club is not only not ashamed of its
membership but takes considerable
pride in it.
The roster, characterized by the
Wickersham press as the "Juneau
rammany," follows:
Juneau Democratic Club Officers:
Jno. R. Winn, president
D. A. Epsteyn, vice-president.
J. B. Marshall, treasurer.
Thos. S. Cole, secretary.
H. F. Morton, asst. secretary
Board of Managers:
H. C. DeVighne, D. A. Epsteyn, Al
lan Shattuck and J. M. Miller.
Club Members:
Wm. Burns. Sam Harris, John I.
White, Martin Hansen, J. N. Carver,
P. J. Wiley, J. L. Cheek, Dorman New
man, Jas. Mahony, A. H. Ziegler, Geo.
Robblee, Tom Cole, J. W. Woodford.
Albert Wile, S. H. Mllwee, J. H. Cobb,
Jay W. Bell, D. A. Epstcyn, Robert
W. Jennings, John B. Marshall, J. M.
Miller, Z. R. Cheney, Thos. J. McCaul,
Frank Johnston, Thos. H. Ashby, W.
G. Smith, H. J. Turner, M. L. Gil
more, O. Green, H. A. Bishop, Jas. E.
Estes, T. H. Dorgan, W. J. McDonald.
Peter Schramen, E. D Watkins, J. O'
Neill, P. L. Gemmett.
L. G. Hill, Harry C. DeVighne, F.
W. Hebert, Jno. R. Winn, Roy P. Car
mien, Tom Dodson, R. S. Early, A. M.
White, J. F. Malony, Allen Sattuck, J.
A. Snow, Chas. E. Davidson, Angus"
Mackay, Samuel Smith, John T. Reed,
Wm. Steinbeck,- Jas. L. Manning, I.
N. Stevenson, S. J. Hooper, John Gu
dart, Alrfed Lunstrom, Milton Winn,
John J. Reagan. David Martin, Harry
W. Jones,, Peter Correy, M. F. Joyce,
W. R. Martin, Robert Herrick, Jacob
Meyer, Robert Orme, Thos. Brcck, H.
S. Sokoloff, M. J. Grlflln, Francis Cas
sidy, D. W. Walker, E. E. Dunlovy,
J. R. Homer, Earl Naud, Robt. Hick,
J. J. Ellen, Geo. Stephens, J. F. Pugh,
E. O. Bradford, Z. M. Bradford, S.
R. Calvin, W. T. Lucus, Carl H. Erick
son. Max Endclman.
Walter DeLong. Thos. O'Brien, E.
L. Cobb, Dennis Murphy, Jno. P. Lind
say, M. A. Snow, Geo. C. Burford, C.
F. Cheek, Jno. W. Troy, Frank Dov
erspike, William Brltt, Harry F. Cain,
H. F. Morton, J. F. McDonald, Lafe
Spray, W. W. Casey, John A. Hellen
thal, John E. Winn, John C. Hyde,
Dave Housel, E. J. Sliter, Jake Sun
nlville. Egnor T. Casey, Alfred Roche,
J. F. A. Strong, Geo. L. Rice, Simon
Hirsch, Geo. F. Forrest, T. F. Kenne
dy, J. J. Clarke, Jas. Dempsey, Joe
Zace, E. G. Anderson, Myron Johnson,
N. L. Burton, Earle C. Jameson, L. D.
Mulligan, Joe C. Cooscr, I. N. O'Meara,
C. K. Forner, J. F. Henson, A. Hiepa,
T. F. Dryden.
SHIPPING FOODSTUFFS
AND KEEPING COTTON
WASHINGTON, Oct. 29?The re
port of the Department of Commerce
reflecting the effect of the European
war shows that there has been a tre
mendous ' Increase in the sale of food
stuffs to the armies engaged and a
slump in the exportation of cotton
materials for manufacture.
VIRGINIA WANTS MRS.
WASHINGTON'S WILL BACK
RICHMOND, Va., Oct. 29. ? The
State of Virginia will sue J. P. Morgkn
in the Federal courts for the restitu
tion of'the will of Mrs. Martha Wash
ington.
DELEGATE'S I
RECORED
LAID BARE
Before a crowded house, many
standing in the aisles like they did at e
the great meeting addressed by .
by Charles E Bunnell, Democratic nom
inee for Congress, J. A. Hellenthnl a
last night in the Junoau theatre, de- s
clared that Delegate James Wicker- g
sham was opposed to homo rulo for ^
Alaska, now as he always had been;
was responsible for the stagnation and c
lack of development in the Territory, h
on account of land withdrawals; was
opposed to a government owned and *
controled rairoad; had vilely slfin- *
dercd the people of Alaska by slan- +
derlng their legislative body and ren- ?>
dered himself impotent to secure an *
Increased measure of home rulo if *
he so willed; and, followed the public *
record of the Delegnto fro mthe time *
he came to Alaska as a carpet bag *
appointee. If anyone left the hall *
without becoming acquainted .with *
Delegate Wlckcrsham's public record +
it was not Mr. Hellcnthafls fault. *
Henry O. Smith, head of the U. S. ?
fisheries service in Alaska, preceded *
Mr. Hellenthal, and endeared himself +
to all who were present by his few *
happy resmarks. Among other things
he said: "Regardless of tho fuct that V
the Democrats of Alaska have declar
ed that they shall ask for Statehood
when the Territory has 200,000 popu
lation, I say that you aro entitled to E
it now?you are entitled to tho right C
to mako laws to govern yourselves t(
just as othor American people and e
the fullest form or government ih ?.
none too good." Continuing he said o
that ho camo from tho rolling prai
ries, that he loved the barley fields 2
and the cows and the chickens,?"but
this is the life; this is tho lifo,"ho
said, referring to his experiences since
coming to Alaska?"You raised me h
from a nickel man to a two-bitter." si
Alaska Wins When Delegate Is Away. ^
Z. R. Cheney, Democratic National 11
Committeeman for Alaska, presided at A
the meeting and introduced Mr. Hel- ^
lenthal in a few well chosen words. *
Mr. Hellcnthal prefaced his address j
by saying that it was not his purpose %
to review tho work of President Wll- ^
son's administration nor to discuss ,
tho private life or affairs of Delegate
Wickersham. "President Wilson's ad- ^
ministration," ho said, "w?s an open #,
book and reading from that book it )
would be found that it made no dif
ference so far as Alaska is con
corned whether Delegate Wickersham
was in Washington, Juneau or Fair
banks. When tho coal leasing bill
had been killed, tho President had
said Alaska must be oponed up and
the bill was passed.
"The question now is will tho peo
ple say to Mr. Wilson that we like
your Alaska policies by sending a
Democrat to CongresT or will they
slap him in tho face by sending a
mugwaump?"
Wickersham Wrote An Appointive *
Commission Bill. N
Mr. Hellenthal said that Delegate '
Wlckcrslmm came to Alaska fifteen *'
years ago as a carpetbagger, appoint
ed Judge of the district court nnd that j
his record as Judgo was remarkable j
principally for tho severity of tho {
sentences ho imposed on thoso who ^
were convicted. This was, the speak- ?
er said, unimportant except that it is '
an index of the character of tho man. f
Referring to tho first representa
tion of Alaska in Congress the speak
er said that the people of Alaska el- J
ected Frank Waskoy of Notae, and
Tom Calo of Wisconsin as Delegates (
to Congress. Ho charged that while
Cale was Delegate to uongress, juuru
Wickersham formed an alliance (par
tnership) with him. The lottor of
Judge Wickersham to Gov. W. B. Hog
gatt was referred to. in which the for- ,
mer said that thoso who were asking
for self-government were mostly pol- 1
itlcians, saloon men and gamblers.
Later when Wickersham was asked [
to resign from the Judgship, he wrote
the bill introduced by Cale providing
for an appointive council to govern
and make laws for Alaska. The bill
carried the provision that half of tho
number of legislators were to bo ap
pointed and half to be elected by the
people. The first named werb to
draw a salary of $3,000 per year and
the latter to be paid $8 per day while
i in session. "Tho scheme," declared
the speaker, "was to build up a po
? litical machine with James Wicker
( Continued on Page 4.)
GREEK
TROOPS IN
ALBANIA
ROME, Oct. 29.?It is report
d here that Greece has landed
200 soldiers at Santo Quarante,
nd thus taken possession of the
outhern part of Albania, which
ives it the entire control of the (
'orfu channel. The report is
renting a profound impression i
iere. i
? ?Js ?!? ?J?
? .}.
> SEIGE GUN EXPLOSION *
KILLS 250 GERMANS *
> ?<?? v
PARIS, Oct. 29.?The Journal ?r
> today prints a dispatch from * J
Madrid which says that one of + 1
the 42 centimeter German ,
seigc guns on their right wing ?{? (
in France exploded as the re- + (
suit of an excessive powder * '
charge, and that the gunners ? 1
and 250 men were blown to + <
pieces. * ]
. * I
<!? ?> ? ?> ?> ? ? ? -I* -s- ? ?
/AR STOPS ALL CHANCES. <
OF THE GRAND OPERA
BOSTON, Mass., Oct. 29.?Director ;
ben D. Jordan of the Boston Opera 1
o. says there ij Uttle.chance of Bos
>n having a aeasfla.Qf _grapj|..opera -
von next year. He says: '.'Wo can't 1
xpect grand opera until the war is
ver." v
EPPELIN ATTACKS LOOKED |
FOR IN TWO-MONTHS |
?|
NEW YORK, Oct. 29?Henry Wood
ousc of the Aero Club of America ,
iys an onslaught of Zeppelins on
Ingland and the English fleet will
ike place within the next two months.
x
* I
REVOLUTION AGAIN *
BREAKS IN HAYTI * ,
PORT AU PRINCE, Hayti, *
? Oct. 29.?A serious revolution* ?> 1
? ary outbreak has occurred here *
? as a result of the landing of ?
1 Charles Zamor, brother of the ?
? president of the Republic. + '
* !
+ + t * ? ? ?? + ?!??> !
IECKMAN AND BRITT '
ARE DISGUSTED
The Dispatch dares the Em*
piro to print tho nnmes of those
alleged two candidates. The Em
pire dares not.? Juneau DIs
pntcli.
Two candidates of the Non-Partisan
arty who have expressed regret and
ispust to Tho Empire because of
he attacks that were made in the
fon-Partisan manifesto, the campaign
?dvertising and subsequent publica
ions against the Federal officehold
irs and the Juneau Democracy * are
OHN B. HECKMAN and WILLIAM
3. BRITT. Both of thorn said that
he attacks were untruo and unjust*
iable. The statemens of both men
ire to their credit, and it is due them
hat the circumstances of their dis
ipproval should be made public.
Both Mr. Heckman and Mr. Britt
mid the publications were doing them
mjust Injury.
Mr. Heckman made his statement
n the office of Tho Empire.
'ARIS COAL SUPPLY
WON'T LAST LONG
?+?
PARIS, Oct. 29.?The supply of" coal
In Paris will last only to the middle
3f December. The city consumes 1,
900,000 tons a month In winter. The
anly source of supply Is England. The
government is being pressed to stop
All speculation in coal; also sugar.
EXTRA MEN LAW IS
EXPENSIVE TO ROAD
?4?
NEW YORK, Oct. 29. ? President
Rea of.the Pennsylvania Railway, says
the "oxtra crew" law causes a waste
of $1,100,000 annually on .his road
through the employment of unneces
sary men.
Potted plants and fresh cut flowers
at Winter & Pond's. 10-28-tf.
EMDEN
SURPRISES
HER ENEMY
TOKYO, Oct. 29.?The Brit
ish embassy announced today r
that the German cruiser Emden,
flying a Japanese flag and dis- (
guised with a fourth smokestack ?
entered Perang harbor, a Brit
ish possession in the Straits set- (
Uement, and fired torpedoes that f
sank the Russian cruiser Jam
tchug and a French destroyer. *
AUDACIOUS UNDERTAKING f
TOKYO, Oct. 29.?The Ger- *
nan cruiser Emden's entrance I
to the waters of Penang was one i
of the most audicious feats ev
er performed by a naval vessel. (
She came under the guns of the
fort, and after sinking the Rus
sian cruiser Jamtchug and a
French destroyer, she escaped (
through the Strait of Malacci. J
The fate of the Jamtchug's
:rew is not known here.
Merchant craft of the belig- ]
gerant powers are taking refuge
in Colgmbo, Ceylon.
<VM ERICANS ARE SELLING
COMBATANTS COARSE WOOL
??
NEW YORK. Oct. 29.?Buyers, act- P
itig' for Germany, England and Can- v
ida, hnvo purchased coarse wool
freely in New York the last week for
immediate shipment.
'? > ?
\MERICANS MAY MAKE
GOODS IN BRITAIN
?+? t
NEW YORK, Oct. 29.?A London t
:able says that some American man- ?]
ifacturers are planning to build fac
tories in {England for the production ,
>f goods which Germany formerly D
supplied their country. H
? ?? C
3ERMANY STILL TRADES
WITH UNITED STATES (
?*?
NEW YORK, Oct. 29.? That Ger
many Is importing from this country ?
through Scandinavian countries and
Is exporting some goods through Hoi- 1
land to this country is indicated by 11
the movements of Scandinavian and 1
Dutch exchange, in the opinion of for- f
eign exchange exports. {
KAISER WANTED TO F
COMBINE AGAINST U. S.
LONDON, Oct. 29.?Sir Valentino a
Chirol, former foreign editor of the a
London Times, says at beginning of ^
the Spanish-American war the Ger- .
man Kaiser attempted to induce Eng- 1
land to lead the way in a European
demonstration against the United j
Stntes, and that as late as 1901 he j
proposed an Anglo-G&man alliance
which would have had the effect of '
challenging the Monroe Doctrine. 1
I
CANDLE CREEK HAS (
PROSPEROUS SEASON
SEATTLE, Oct. 18.?Charles T.
Lyons, known in Bering Sea and Se
attle shipping circles as the Alaska
Steamship Company's "North Pole"
agent, a title conferred on him be- I
cause he represents the company in J
Kotzebue Sound, reports the Candle ,
Creek district had an exceptionally
prosperous season this year. In con
tradistinction to other years, the
camp had an abundance of water. Yy
ons reports that Kewalik Mining com
pany worked continuously through the
summer and made a rich cleanup.
Lyons, who. arrived from Kotzebuo
Sound, a few days ago, unintentionally
victimized one of the ether officials
j of tiio company yesterday. .An alleg
ed friend presented Lyons with a fine
looking cigar. He put it in one of his
vest pockets with several other ci
gars. Two or three hours later he
was sitting in the company's general
offices when along .carno the official
seeking for something to.sinoke. He
picked the fine looking cigar out of
Lyon's pocket. He was enjoying the
weed when with gusto it exploded.?
Shaw says^nitcd States to lead
Soattlo Times.
ALLIES
WINNING
BIGflGHT
LONDON, Oct. 29
rhe battle tide in Flan
lers has apparently def
nitely turned in favor
>f the Allies, according*
;o an official announce
nent made tonight
rhe Allies have stopped
he German attacks at
ill points, and are fol
owing their successes
>y advances on the en
jmy.
PARIS, Oct. 29?The
Germans are falling
>ack alang the whole
ront of their lines in
Belgium.
BERLIN SILENT
?+?
LONDON, Oct. 29.?Berlin is ?
bsolutely silent tonight on the
irogress of the war either in the
yest or the east.
ALLIES MAKE PROGRESS
PARIS, Oct. 29.?The War of
icc announced this evening that
he-Allies are making substan
ial progress in the regions
iround Ypres and Arras.
The Allies now hold an un
roken line from Nieuport, coast
1 Belgium, to the neighborhood
f Lille.
iERMAN ATTACK PAUSES
?+?
PARIS, Oct. 29.?The clcse of
^esterday was characterized by
l pause in the German attacks
igainst the left wing of the AI
ies' army where the Germans
lave fought furiously in their
tfforts to march on the French
torts of Dunkirk and Calais.
Reliable reports are that heavy
enforcements are on the way
ind that when the German lines
ire strengthened by the addi
ion of 200,000 men, the fight
ng will go on.
These reinforcements, it is
mid, have been drawn from all
he other battle lines, both east
md west, pursuant to the or
ler of Emperor William that
the French ports must be tak
jn at any cost.
MANY BELGIAN TOWNS
DESTROYED.
LONDON, Oct. 29*?'The Bel
gian coast towns of Westkirke,
Slype, Novis and several villag
es have been reduced to ruins by
the bombardment by the British
warships of the extreme right
of the German forces.
GERMANS MAY HAVE
TO EVACUATE ST. MIHIEL
v ?+?
PARIS, Oct. 29. ? It Is believed
here that the Germans will be com
pelled to evacuate St Mlhiel very
shortly, Inasmuch as the French ad
vance is proceeding steadily near that
point, most advanced of German po
sitions on the right. French armies ,
operating from Nancy and Toul con
tinue their efforts to penetrate the
valley of the Moselle, objective as
sumedly being Metz.
Extra choice lot of cut flowers and
growing plants just received by Win
ter & Pond. 10-28-tf.

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