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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, December 31, 1914, Image 2

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Published by the EMPIRK PKINTING COMPANY
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
Oac year, by mall $10.00
Sintered as second-class matter November 7, 1912, at the postotllce at Ju
The appointment of D. W. Higgins to be British vice-consul
at Port Angeles was an appropriate recognition of one of the
most famous of the pioneers in Western journalism. The death
of Harvey W. Scott, for many years the great editor of the Port
land Oregonian, left Mr. Higgins the most notable surviving
pioneer Pacific Coast editor. Born on the east coast of Canada,
he came West when a boy. and was a newspaper writer in San
Francisco at the rime of the rule of the Vigilantes in that city
during the '505. He was one of the founders and the first editor
of the San Francisco Call, and in his time was connected with
most of the leading Pacific Coast dailies of "the days of old, the
days of gold, the days of '49." Among the publications which
he served as editor was the Seattle Intelligencer which after
ward became the Post-Intelligencer. More than two score years
- ago he became editor and publisher of the VictQria Colonist, and
conducted the destinies of that publication for over a quarter of
a century. He served for 14 years in the British Columbia legis
lature and for a decade was Speaker of the House. Many years
ago he retired fro inactive journalism, though for a time a few
years ago he served as editor of the Vancouver World. He is;
the author of books and many articles on the history and anec
dotes of the Northwest.
In addition to being a journalist and writer of a very high
order Mr. Higgins is a "gentleman of the old school," a man
of the highest character and kindliest nature. He has passed
man's alloted three score and ten years, but is still hale and
hearty. Hundreds of friends will wish that the veteran editor
and author might survive to enjoy his position in the British:
diplomatic service for many years after peace shall have been
restored to his distracted country.
THE NEW ADJUSTMENT OF BUSINESS.
While the exports of the United States are gaining at a
rate never experienced before in the history of the country the
change in the character of the goods that are shipped abroad
has been such that it will take a little time for the business of
the country to adjust itself to the new conditions. The great
increase in our exports is in goods that formerly were scarcely
exported at all, while goods that were formerly sold in foreign
markets lie on shelves and in warehouses, unless they can find
American purchasers.
For instance, before the war American manufacturers ship
... ped high grade shoes to the stores for particular people in Lon
don. Paris and Berlin. Now they are shipping cheaper and heavier
shoes for the soldiers that are fighting in the French and Belgian
trenches. The shoes that were ready for export at the outbreak
of the war and the materials that were in the warehouses to
make more such shoes are a deadweight on the hands of the
A similar condition prevails in other lines. We have ceased
to ship the cheap runabout and touring automobiles and are
exporting heavy auto-trucks. Typewriters, sewing machines, agri
cultural implements, tools and machinery, for mechanics and fac
tories which constituted a large part of our exports in the past
are now begging a market at home, while the men who make rifles
and cartridges are busy as bees. The people of the South find a
ready market abroad for their cattle, hogs, horses, mules, corn
and wheat at advanced prices, but their cotton is a drug on the
markets. Foreign buyers are hot after the wheat and other ,
foodstuffs that are produced in the West, but there is no foreign <
market for lumber and shingles.
It will take time for adjustment before those who produced
the unsaleable articles, those who furnished* them money and;1
material and '.hose whose business depended upon their prosperity!,
are able to profit from the change. The inflowof gold for our;:
exports, that are amounting to more than $3,300,000 a day in j
excess of our imports, is strengthening the American financial;:
structure and increasing its capacity to arrange the adjustment;:
that must come, but it will take time for the new prosperity^
that is coming to reach all the strata of the commercial and pro- j
ducing masses.
After pointing out how "Nature is helping to bring back j i
times," the Tribune says: "The Administration did not act as!'
Providence's advance agent in these recoveries, nor could upset
ting legislation retard them." It is only when there is a Republi
can administration in Washington that Nature performs its poli
tical duties properly, and the rain falls and sun shines and bounti
ful crops ripen in obedience to partisan legislation. ;
The manner in which the British government and press has
received the protest to British interference with American ship
ping is reassuring. Everywhere there is a determinatino to
treat the matter in such a way as will lead to satisfaction for all;
concerned.
Many of the students in an Oregon manual training school r
asked that the holiday vacation be dispensed with so far as they t
were concerned, and this leads the Portland Oregonian to remark
that "those are the foremen and superintendents of the years
to come."
d
f
Japan will be missed in the parade of warships in the Canal a
celebration. As the sea is clear of Germans, she has nothing to *
fear, and must have in view something great pretty soon. )j
'
One o: the incidents of the American fight for South Ameri- ^
can trade is the presence of 200 young men and women .in the! 0
night schools of Portland learning the Spanish language. f<
| ti
Los Angeles will not participate officially in opening the San c
Diego fair because a San Diego editor had a few jesting remarks
cannot get the first 1915 baby. New Year's day is always nearly ^
20 hours old before it reaches .his Territory. : t
WASHINGTON'S ADVICE
TO THE NATION.
A century and a half has palmed
slnco the Father of his Country, in Us
ever famous Farewell Addreas, Issued
that solemn warning on tho dangor of
entanglements with foreign powers.
.Much water has run under Concord
bridge slnco that tlmo, says tho Chris
tian Sclenco Monitor, but It has not
washed out one of his arguments. Tho
declaration, "Our detached and distant
situation Invites us to pursue a dif
ferent course" from tho nations of
Europe, has been amply justified, and
If tho rulers of tho mighty republic
of today remain as wlBe as those of
the little republic of the eighteenth
century, tho day will come when the
voice of the United States may bo rais
ed not to proclaim war. but to com
mand peace.
It has boon said of a British etatos
:nan that if ho had boen ready to
take tho same risks Tor peace that he
wag ready to take for war, ho might
have won the gratltudo of nations.
! Tho oplgrnm suffers from this weak
ness, that It could be applied with
equal justlco to Count Berchtold or
! to Dr. von Bothmann-Hollweg, to M.
i Dolensse or M. SasanofT, as to Sir
Edward Gray. It merely means that
European politics have not yet out
grown tho feudal Instincts on which
they wero once, and sometimes still
are, nourished. Bernard Shnw may
l demand tho Incorporation of an in
ternational police for taking Into cus
tody the first nation which Issues a
mobilization ordor. Ho Is not likely
: at present to moot, oven In tho social
istic press, with any warmer support
than a mild banter. If. however, tho
day ever should come when tho Shav
ian dream should develop Into prac
tical politics, It is to be suspected
that the chief constable may bo found
in President Woodrow Wilson, or ono
of his successors.
It would bo difficult to imagine a
rnoro liberal exponont of the Wash
lngtonlan doctrine of non-Intorferenco
in European politics thnn President
Wilson. In tho present supremely
difficult moment, whon the European
belligerents aro making use of tho
White' House as a moans of giving
to the world their respective versions
of current events, ho has succeeded
in maintaining an attitude of perfect
courtesy to all and of supreme though
by uo means colorless Impartiality.
Tho tomptatlon to express his own
opinion on the events of the war must
have, at times, been peculiarly strong
but the president has never for a
moment succumbed to it. He has no
doubt realized tho fact that the good
offices offered to the Japanese and
Russians by Colonel Roosevelt, in 1905
may. at any momont, bo offered to tho
belligerents in tho prosont war. Whon
that moment comes. If tho offer Is ac
cepted. It will bo because all the com
batants feel that President Wilson has
fulfilled the demand of the first presi
dent of tho United States, in that he
has proved that ho has noither parti
ality for ono nation nor dislike for
another.?(Fairbanks Times.)
RUDE DANCING
Ted Robinson. In the Clovcland
Plain Dealer has formulated a set of
rules for dancers which it may be
well to observe. He says:
Rulo 1. Always place your feet
where your partner's feet aro not
Rule 2. If you get a partner with
whom you cannot dance, do not apolo
gize. Start an argument.
Rule 3. If you bump into anothor |
couplo growl about those cyclone j
dancers, who Beom to think they own .
the ball.
Rulo 4. If when you fall your part- |
nor sits on your car, do not become <
embarrassed, but make a facetious re- 1
mark, such as. "Do you llko to rldo 1
on the Erie?" or "All oft?this 1b as far
is 1 can go."
Rule 3. If you should miss the floor (
with your feet and uso your partner's -
Instep, stop dancing and, look at her i
seriously, and fcsk iher whore she i
learned to dance. This will not only t
lvert suspicion from yourself, but '
lead her to believe that you woro the I
;uy who taught Mrs. Castle how to "
walk.
Rulo 6. Never watch your foot, for c
:hat is useless. Watch the floor, which
s likely to fly up and hit you my t
:ime. 1
, , , c
whitehorse man advanced j
The latest copy of the official Mill- (
ary Gazctto received hero from Lon- l
Ion mentions Selwood Tanner as hav- c
ng been made a second lieutenant
emporarily. This doubtless means ?
hat a permanent appointment will .
ollow Tauner Is in the British cav- ,
dry. He waB in the Kluano district j
vhen apprised of the war but came to t
Vhltehorso at once, getting away for ^
Sngland tho latter part of Septom- ?
ler. He was very popular here and *
ds friends are pleased that ho has 1
aeritcd 3uch speedy official recognl- n
ion;?(Whitehorse Star.)
michael brown dies b
Word comes from the South of tho C
oath in Victoria recently of Michael 1
!. Brown, old-time Klondiker. For f
long time ho was in charge of the q
lolbourno hotel, and was exceeding
>? popular in this city. Mr. Brown J
icd at tho age of 76 years. Ho left
>awson seven or eight years ago, and n
esided in Victoria until the time of b
is death. Ho is survived by hiB von- ^
rable wife. Mr. Brown was in Cali- ?
jrnia in the early 50's and wont from ^
lero to the old Cariboo camp. ^
u
anada to pray for
SUCCESS OF BRITISH g
Next Sunday will be observed as a
xy of prayer by tho people of Canada
>r tho success of the British Em
Ire and her Allies in tho European r,'<
ar. Whitehorse and other Yukon ir,
erritory towns will observe tho day. u
KAISER'S DAYS ALL BUSY
Tho Kaiser is now hurrying to the
westorn battle zone. It kcopB tho
KaiBor on tho Jump visiting nil tho
spots of stress.?(Portland Oregon
LONQ WAY TO BERLIN
Paris reports that tho British have
mado 500-yard gains. Think of it!
In about soventy-fivo years thoy will
get to Borlin at that rate.?(Portland
Oregonlan.)
NOTHING LIKE HOPE
Tho shortest day of winter has
"done wont." Lot us hope tho cold
est day has dono likowiso.?(Whitc
horso Star.)
Cut Glass and China at cosL
12-21-tf. W. H. CASE.
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
UNITED STATES PATENT.
Survey No. 1004?Serial 01734.
UNITED STATES LAND OFFICE.
Juneau, .Jaska. Dec. 3. 191-1.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
In pursuance of tho Act of Congress
approved May 10, 1S72, Joseph Woyor
horst, whoso post office address is
Douglas, Alaska, has made application
for a patent of those certain lode
mining claims situated on tho eastorly
sldo of Douglas Island and about one
tnilo northwest of tho town of Doug
las, Alaska, in tho Juneau Land Dis
trict, Juneau Rocording Precinct, Ter
ritory of AlaBkn, and known and call
ed tho "Mars" "Venus" "Jupitor" "Sat
urn" "Uranus" "Morcury" and "Kos
mos" as included in Survey No. 1004.
and described by the official plat and
by the field notes on filo In tho office
of tho register of tho Junoau Land
Dlotrict at Juneau, Alaska, to which
reference is hereby made, as follows;
to-wit:
Beginning at Cor. No. 1 of the Mars
lode claim, whonco U. S. M. M. No. 5j
bears S. 56* 41' 49" E. 2S09.13 feet;'
thenco S. 45" 00' W. 1417.55 feet to
Cor. No. 2; thence N. 44? 20' W. COO
foot to Cor. No. 3; thonce N. 45* 00'
E. 1417.55 feet to Cor. No. 4; thence
S. 44' 20' E. 600 feet to tho place of
beginning.
Said Mars lode containing in tho ag
gregate 19.524, acres.
Beginning at Cor. No. 1 of the
Venue lode claim, whence U. S. M. M.
No. 5 bears S. 52* 25' 45" K* 1297.94
foet; thenco S. 45* 00' W. 594.77 foot
to Cor. No. 2; thence N. 57? 31' 30"
W. 1499.46 feet to Cor. No. 3; thence
N. 45? 00' E. 5C7.19 feet to Cor. No.
4; thence S. 50* 29' 30" 13. 222.30 feet
to Cor. No. 5; thcnco S. 40? 17' E.
159.99 feet to Cor. No. 6; thenco S. j
70? 24' E. 87.20 feet to Cor. No. 7;
thence S. 59? 40' E. 271.42 feet to Cor.
No. 8; thenco S. 73? 14' E. 03.39 feet
to Cor. No. 9; thonco S. 62? 10' E.
163.26 feet to Cor. No. 10; thence S.
17* 43' E. 42.50 feet to Cor. No. 11;
thenco S. 62? 34' E. 174.G0 feet to
3or. No. 12; thence S. 55? 39' 30" j
S3. 138.96 feet to Cor. No. 1, and the
?laco of boginnlng.
Said Venus lodo containing in the
iggregato 18.406 acres.
Beginning at Cor. No. 1 of tho Jupi
ter lodo claim, whonco U. S. M. Ml
No. o bears S. 75' 38' 51" E. 1496.01
teet distant; thenco S. 45? 00' W.
>99.85 feet to Cor. No. 2; thence N.
>7? 31' 30" W. 1499.46 feet to Cor.
No. 3; thence N. 45? CO' E. 599.S5
oet to Cor. No. 4; thcnco S. 57? 31'
(0" E. 1499.46 feet to Cor. No. 1, tho
>lace of boginnlng.
Said Jupltor lode containing in the
iggregato 20.157 acres.
Beginning at Cor. No. 1 of the Sat
ire lode, whence U. S. M. M. No. 5,
>oars N. 88' 22' 11" E. 1874.24 feet
listant; thence S. 45? 00' W. 599.40
eot to Cor. No. 2; thence N. 57? 31'
!0" W. 1499.46 feet to Cor. No. 3;
honco N. 45* 09' E. 599.40 foot to
3or No. 4; thonco S. 57? 31' 30" E.
499.46 feet to Cor. No. 1, tho placo
if beginning.
?Datura iouu cuuuuiuug iu iuu u&*
iregate 20.142 acres.
Beginning at Cor. No. 1, of the
JranuB Lode, whence U. S. M. M.
4o. 5 bears N. 28? 57' 58" E. 736.35
eet; thence S. 45? 00' "W. 599.85 feet
o Cor. No. 2; thence N. 47? 06' 30"
V. 1491.4G feet to Cor. No. 3; thonco
L 45? 00' E. 599.85 feet to Cor. No.
; thonce S. 47? 06' 30" E. 1491.46 feet
o Cor. No. 1, tho place of beginning.
Uranus lodo containing in tho ag
TCgate 20.525 acres.
Beginning at Cor. No. 1 of tho Mer
ury lode whonco U. S. M. M. No. 5
ears N. 36? 09' 32" E. 1323.29 feet;
hence S. 45? 00' W. 599.40 feet to
lor No. 2; thonce N. 47? 06' 30" W.
491.46 feet to-Cor. No. 3; thence N.
5? 00' E. 599.40 feet to Cor. No. 4;
henco S. 47? 06' 30" E. 1491.46 feet to
lor. No. 1, the place of beginning.
Mercury lode containing in the ag
rcgato 20.509 acres.
Boglnning at Cor. No. 1 of the Kos
los lode, whence U. S. M. M. No. 5
ears N. 35? 6' 49" E. .1204.69 feot;
iience S. 51? 55' E. 728.47 feot to Cor.
to. 2; thence S. 45? 00' W. 604.39
jet to Cor. No. 3; thonco N. 51? 55'
7.' 728,47 feet to Coc. No. 4; thence
I. 45? 00' E. 604.39 feet to Cor. No. 1,
le place of beginning.
Kosmos lode containing in the ag
regate 10. 03.4 acres.
That tho total area contained in said
jrvey No. 1004 is 128.297 acres.
That said survey Is In conflict with
ie following named lode claims, to
It; New Kowee, U. S. Survoy No.
59: Rose, U. S. Survey No. 172; Bel
nnt, U. S. Survoy No. 175 and Lucy.
. S. Survey No. 69; that ?said con- ?.
filets in the aggregate containing
3.05S acres which is hereby excluded
from tills survey. No. 1004, leaving a
net totdl area for said Burvoy of
)2?,239 acres, said conflicts abovo
mentioned bolng moro accurately de
scribed iu tho official plat anu field
notes of said survey N. 1004 to which
rofeienco is hoieby made.
That there are no adjoining unpat
ented mining claims to said survey
No. 1004 and the only claims, patent
ed or unpatented In, conflict aro those
mentioned abovo:
JOSEPH WEYERHORST
UNITED STATES LAND OFFICE,
Juneau, Alaska.
IT IS HEREBY ORDERED, that the
foregoing notice bo published for tho
statutory period In tho Alaska Dally
Empire, a daily newspapor of general
circulation printed at Juneau, Alas
ka. ?
C. B. WALKER.
Resistor, fj
First publication, Dec. 4. 1914.
Last publication, I
SOLDIERS' ADDITIONAL HOME
STEAD APPLICATION
No. 01651
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR;
UNITED STATES LAND OFFICE.
Juneau, Alaska. November 28, 1014.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
tho undersigned, K. F. Lewis, of 3424
Webster Street, Oakland, Cnl., by his
agent, T. F. Kennedy, of Juneau, Alas
ka, has made application In this of
fice as assignee of KIwlu Rnsoy un
der the provision of Sees. 2306 and
2307. to niako soldlo-'e additional
additional homestead entry of tho fol
lowing described tract of land lying
about one m.'lo Northeast of tho town
site of Juneau and In Lat. 58? IS' N. and
Long. 134? 24' W? towlt;
Sur. 1084.
Beginning at Cor. No. 1, identical
with Cor. 1, Sur. No. 2S9, whence TJ. r
S. L. M. No. 3 bears S. 71? 45' W. ?
72.11 chs., thenco S. 12? 24' E. 5.13 1-2 ?
chs., to Cor. No. 2, Identical with Cor. G
No. 2. Sur. 289, thenco E. 1.4S chs.,
to Cor. No. 3, thence N. 3? 02' \V. 1.46 '
chs. to Cor. No. 4, identical with Cor. :l
No. 2. Sur. 162, thenco N. 58? OS' E. :l
3.49 chs. to Cor. No. 5, identical with f
('or. No. 2. Sur. 161, thenco N. 68? c
29' E. 3.16 chs. to Cor. No. 6, identical 7
with Cor. No. 2, Sur. 160, thence N. d
1.30 chs. to Cor. No. 7, thenco E. 1.51 b
chs. to Cor. No. 8, thenco N. 49" 15'
Ii. l.iri; chs. to Cor. No. 9, identical
with Cor. No. 2, Sur. 159, fhonco N.
5S? 02' E. 3.48 chs. to Cor. No. 10, t
identical with Cor. No. 2, Sur. 158, T
thenco S. 75? 54' E. 3.19 chs., to Cor.
No. 11, identical with Cor. No. 2, Sur.
157, thence N. 67? 04' E. 3.21 chs. to jj
Cor. No. 12, identical with Cor. No. 2,
Sur. 156, thenco N. 2.27 cha. to Cor.
No. 13, thenco W. 20.33 chs. to Cor. $
No. 14, thenco S. 6.53 chs. to Cor. No.
1, the place of beginning, containing
an area of 9.61 acres. Mag. Var. 32'
30' E., as additional to homestead ap
dication of said Rnsey for the E',4
C. W. 34 E. % S. W. % Sec. 4, T. 105J
ff. R. S3 W. which ho ontored, No.
774. at Worthington, Minn.
Any and all persons claiming ad-i
orccly any porJon of tho said lands
re required to file with the Register j
nd Receiver of the U. S. Land Of
Ice at Juneau, Alaska, tholr adverse
!aim thereto, under oath, during the
lerlod of publication, or within thirty i
ays thereafter, or they will bo barred
y tho provision of the ntatuto.
R. F. LEWIS.
By T. F. KENNEDY,
Attorney-lnFact.
JNITED STATES LAND OFFICE,
uneau, Alaska, Nov. 28, 1914.
It is hereby ordered that tho fore
olng notice bo published for the stat
tory period of sixty days in the At
ska Daily Empire, a newspaper of
eneral circulation published in the
icinity of tho lnnd applied for.
C. B. WALKER.
Register.
First publication, Dec. 2, 1914.
Last publication Fob. 3, 1915.
C SANK IN ALASKA
I ESTABLISHED 11191 I
INCORPORAT
WE ARE N(
I
J
ilu-Bone Corsets
Mrs. L. Rutlcdge, agent, will
be pleased to fit the ladles In
their home. For appointment,
phone 1402, or call 340 Franklin
r">- ? ? . .... ?--m-rer?n
? i.. O J? ("> L_> J(jw?|rr .".nd Optician
? FIRST TERRITORIAL BANK.
Douglas OF ALASKA 26 Front ,1t Juneau
INTEREST PAID ON SAVINGS AO
ACCOUNTS, AND ON TIME DEPOSITS 4 Q
M ti Ht III I ll I i l l 13 ri i?in ?it? n a 111 ill 11II ? ?.....
FOR THE NEXT 30 DAYS WE WILL GIVE ij
I 10% .Discount jj
ON ALL CASH PURCHASES ON ANY
ARTICLE IN THE HOUSE. ;;
I|C. W. YOUNG COMPANY| i:
f?u m ?i m i n i m n mh iiniiiiiininiiiininiw'
"
H
I THE Em NATIONAL BAM1|
OF JONEAU ?
United Slates Deposits $100,000.00
Capital, Surplus and undivided Profits over 100,000.00
United States Depository I
B. D. STEWART
MINING ENGINEER
U. 8. MINERAL SURVEYOR
P. 0. Box <58 - ? ? Juneau
Why buy roady made clothing when
you can get a
KAHN Tailor-Made SUIT
with an extra pair of trousers
FREE
Until January 30th. S-lts and Over
coats, ?20 to ?45.
Hugo Heldhorn, Agt 222 Soward St
Reduced Prices on my own make
of Suits until March 1st
C. W. WINSTEDT
ARCHITECT
SUPERINTENDENT
Office, Room 7, Garsldc Block
Juneau, Alaska.
ftduajuRaeHmnvMi m* ?jKu.mmu^iuni
I Bowling?Billiards I
at the BRUNSWICK
z ^
GIFTS AND HOLIDAY GOODS j
ON DISPLAY UNTIL AFTER
Servian Christmas, Jan. 7th, 19!5||
VISIT TOY DEPARTMENT ON SECOND FLOOR 1
II 1 i I I I I ? I I I I I IT I1 M 1 'M"I H1H1I |
Excellence
Reliability
"I can't see
how I ever
did without it" j
That's what they say about these Electrical Otensils !
A few sets Furs (eft in our Dry Goods Dept.
25?o Off to Close Out |
ALASKA TREADWELL GOLD MINING GOMP'Y I "
Mercantile Department TREADWELL, ALASKA \

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