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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, January 08, 1915, Image 2

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
Published bylhe EMPIRE PRINTING COMPANY
JOH~y~W. TROY EdTtor and Manager.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
One year, by mail -SIO.OO
Entered as second-class matter November ?, 1912. at the postotflco at Ju
ANDREW JACKSON.
Many important things came from the Battle of New Or
leans, which was fought 100 years ago today, but the most im
portant of all was that it gave to the American people Andrew
Jackson. While all things are possible, it is not probable that
Jackson would ever have been President of the United States
had it not been for the fame that came to him as the conqueror
of Packenham's army. Yet, Jackson is the one military hero to
become President of the United States who is not oftenest
thought of a soldier. Even the fame of Washington, ifrst Presi
dent and wise statesman, rests more securely in the minds of
men as the Revolutionary commander-in-chief and "Father /bf
His Country." Taylor is still the hero of Buena Vista, and Grant
the victor of the Civil War. Jackson's place in history is as the
great democratic president who conquered the money-trust of
his day and restored the country to the masses.
Jackson's remarkable career ranks with that of Lincoln not
withstanding that, though the greatness of each was of the first
magnitude, they were widely differing characters. Jackson was
the posthumous son of a poor widow. He was practically with
out schooling. He was raised in the hills of North "and South
Carolina. Though but a boy, he was a valient soldier for the
American colonies during the Revolution. After the war was
over and victory won, there followed years of wild, harum scarum,
whiskey drinking, cock-fighting? and man-fighting?life. Yet
through it all, in addition to a hatred for snobbery and aristo
cracy, there was in the boy and young man an abiding sympathy
for the "under dog." a love of fair-plav, honest dealing and
truth. Next to a coward or a bully he dispised a liar. It is said
that most of his fights were in defense of weaker associates and
in trimming bullies.
Out of these conditions, that were possible in no other place
than on the frontier of America in his time, there grew a lawyer,
a general, a statesman and a chivalrous gentleman of coflrtly
manner. Where Jackson got his education as a lawyer is a mys
tery, for the days that he was supposed to be reading law were
devoted largely to the life we have been describing, and likewise
the nigths. Yet /ackson was a successful prosecuting attorney
who cleaned up Central Tennessee and sent gangs of bad men to
the penitentiary?making a record that would put a Heney to
shame?before he was a soldier, whipping the Indian tribes that
harrassed his State and defeating the flower of Wellington's war
experienced army. He was a Chief Justice of his State Supreme
court before he was a United States Senator and President.
Jackson was a masterful man. He dominated all that he came
in contact with. His State was his private property, politically
speaking, and willingly so, from the days when he was yet young,
and later he conquered the Nation, politically speaking, in like
manner. No man, Jefferson alone probably expected, ever con
trolled the United States so absolutely as this poor, unlettered
son of a lowly widow of the Carolina wilderness. Never was an
American so greatly feared or more sincerely loved.
Jackson marked a new epoch in American affairs. In him the
common people found themselves. Prior to his time every Presi
dent had been from the aristocracy. All were university men,
but Washington, and he was, with possibly one exception, the
wealthiest American of his day. and for generations his ancestprs
read clearly their title to place among the gentry of England.
Jacksor. was the first man to be called to leadership from the
masses who have, for the most part, controlled the destinies of
the Nation since his day.
Not only did Jackson revivify the principles of Jefferson, who
was his patron saint, but he gave substance to the purpose and
prophecies of the Sage of Monticello, who had dreamed of a
greater United States, which should extend from ocean to ocean
and from lakes to gulf, giving home to oppressed men of all na
tions. His famous toast, "the Federal Union, it must and shall
be preserved," sounded the death-knell to secession and separa
tion, and he insipred the annexation of Texas, which brought
California with it, and made certain America's position on the
Pacific coast.
Of all Americans, it would be exceedingly hazardous to say
that any was greater than was he the centenary of whose leap to
fame is celebrated in so many parts of the United States today.
-?
PANAMA CANAL AND NORTHWEST TRADE
In enumerating for the Seattle Post-Intelligencer the things
upon which he bases a prediction that 1915 will be a prosperous
year, Robert R. Fox, a Seattle wholesaler, who is closely in touch
with the lumber trade, and erstwhile President of.the Young
Men's Republican Club at Seattle, includes:
"* 11 * * the demand from the Atlantic coast of the United
States for our lumber and shingles, caused by the low freight j
rates through the Panama canal."
Other business men of Seattle likewise attribute in part the
"good time coming" to the Panama canal
In this connection it has been notea that beer is being ship
ped from Milwaukee to Seattle and paper from St. Paul tot Seat
tle through the Panama canal at rates that defeat railroad com
petition.
Yet it is only a short time since it was being alleged that
the canal would be a detriment rather than an aid to Pacific coast
/business if the President and Congress insisted upon passing the
canal free tolls repeal bill.
"The proof of the ridding is in-the eating," and returns
from the feasts show majorities for Uncle Woodrow.
The present Congress has broken many records in addition
to being the hardest working Congress that the country has had
since the Civil War. It has made a new one already in the short
appropriation bills?the postofiice bill?before the end of the
old year. The bill carried an appropriation of $321,000,000. It
has been many years since a Congress passed one of the big ap- i
propriation bills until after the holidays.
partroeht recently, but before going
to the office of Mr. Bryan, left his
out of the window, his back to the
door. The ambassador hesitated.
tendant
"Tho Minister of Santo Dominga,"
"Oh," said the ambassador, "I car.
Domingo-'?(New York Horald.)
?
THE BEST OF NEWS.
i Tim report of the navy department
> upon the test of Matanuska coal, as
j first made public iu tho News-Miner
last evening, is the best of nowi; to
In coal, and Alaska will in future
furnish the Amorlcan fleet on the Pa
cific coast with all its coal, while
Alaska can become the coal depot for
I tho Western world.
It Is to the credit of tho present ad
ministration that tho coal land of
Alaska were declared opon under a
J luoolng system before the coal tests
had bean reported upon. Thero Is
i now no doubt that Alaska coal is A-l,
: and there is now no obstruction to
coal development hero under the leas
ing system. One of our resources Is
now certain of development.?(Fair
| banks News-Minor.)
WINDHAM BAY NOTES
WINDHAM, Jan. 6 ?D. W. Yates is
| busily engaged doing development
work on tho Durrcr group of quartz
claims.
Capt. Orr gave a stag party at his
home hero Now Year's Eve. F. W.
Ketchmark had charge of tho refresh
ments.
i The new residence of P. Honson is
noaring completion and wil be ready
for occupancy soon.
If tho soft weather continues the
Hegg will be ablo to deliver Windham
mail at tho float on the next trip.
GHENT'S CONTRIBUTIONS
(From the Boston World)
Nor is Ghent by any means a hun
I red years away; when tho war, broko
out she was sending us sotui of our
' thricftios azaleas.
COMPETENT JUDGES.
(From the World, New York.)
Japanse observors in France now
say that tho French aro better fight
ers than tho Germans. And in the
i matter of fighting the Japanese aro
? * ?
REASON ENOUGH SURE.
(From the Washington Post.)
Perhaps one reason why Villa and
Carranza are not willing to leave for
their country's good is that Huerta
has already left with his country's
; goods.
MEETS HIS DESERTS.
(From the Sun New York.)
The holder of a public office who
spends his days with his feet on his
desk only meets his desserts when
his head drops into the wasto basket.
HIS fllAME IS LEGION.
(From tho Sun, New York )
Santa Claus may be a myth, but ho
has a multitude of energetic, and In
dustrious representatives in physical
existence.
NOTICE"
- have been appointed administra
tor of the estate of Matt Beseloff, de
ceased. All persons having claims
against the same are required to pre
sent them within six months from
this 18th day of Deoembo>, 1914, veri
fied as by law required, at my office,
in Juneau. Alaska.
V. A. PAINE,
Publications, Doc. 18, and 25, Jan. 1,
and S.
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF REAL
ESTATE BY TRUSTEE.
WHEREAS, On August 26, 1914,
Henry Causies, a single man, and Ar
themise Bilodeau and Edward Bllo
dcau. her husband, owners of the
real estate hereinafter described, did
make, execute and deliver to tho un
dersigned, a certain Trustee's deed,
which .'aid deed was thereafter, on
the 28th day of August. 3914, dulv
recorded in .Book 25 of Deeds at page
44, of the records of the Juneau Re
cording District, District of Alaska,
at Juneau; and,
WHEREAS, by virtue of said deed
the undersigned, as Trustee, was du
ly empowered and authorized to sell
at public sale tho roal eBtate herein
after described to tho highost and
best bidder for cash, after giving thir
ty (30) days notice of said sale.
NOW. THEREFORE. Notice is here
by given that under and pursuant to.
the terms and conditions of tho Trus
tee's deed stove mentioned, I. Ike
Sowerby, as/Trustee under said deed, ? I
will, on the 4th day of Fobruary, 1915, J
at the front door of building number
212, located on tho tract of land here- i I
inafter described, on the Fcrrv Way, H
?In the town of Jnneau, Alaska* at the
hour of 2 o'clock in the afternoon of :
said day. sell at public auction to the i
highest and best bidder for cash, the
col of land, together with ail im
provements thoreon , consisting of ]
foundations and -two two-story frame i
buildings, doscribed as follows, to
Commencing at a point on the "P.
c. S. S. Co" approach to wharf, whonce ?
? he Northwest Corner of said Frank
lin Street and said Pacific Coast Com- s
pany'H approach to wharf bears north -
51 degrees 04 minuter. East 127 feet t
distant; thence South 51 degrees 04 i
minutes West 102.4 feet along said 1
approach to wharf to tho N. E. Cor
ner of the Draw Brldgo; thonco N.
20 degrees 30 minutes West 52.5 foot
to point at N. W. Corner; thonco N.
51 degrees 04 minutes East S6 feet to
a point on tho Northeast Corner;
thenco South 38 degrees 50 minutes
East fifty (50) feet to placo of begin
ning. Containing 11-100 dcrcs, moTo
or less. Variation 30 degrees East!
of North.
This property is located on tho Fer
ry Way oxtending from Franklin
Streot to the People's Wharf, and has
a frontaga of 102.1 feet along said
Forry Way, and extonds back to tho
building known as "Jaxon'c Rink."
Tho entire tract is piled and capped
and covered with platforms and build
ings. The titlo to this property is
cloar and frco from all incumbrances.
Tho purchaser will bo givon immod
into possessslon.
Dated at Juneau, Alaska, this 2nd
day of January, 1916.
IKE SOWERBY.
Trustee.
First publication, Jan. 2, 1915.
hast publication. Feb. 3, 1915.
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
UNITED STATES PATENT.
Survey No. 1004--Serlal 01734.
UNITED STATES LAND OFFICE,
Juneau, ..laaka, Dec. 3, 1914.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
in pursuance of the Act of Congress
approved May 10, 1872. Joseph Woyor
horst, whose post office address la
Douglas, Alaska, has made application
for a patent of those certain lode
mining claims situated on tho oastcrly
sido of Douglas Island and about ono
mile northwest of tho town of Doug
las, Alaska, In tho. Juneau Land Dis
trict, Juneau Recording'Prccinct, Ter-;
ritory of Alaska, and known and call
ed the "Mars" "Venus" "Jupiter" "Sat
urn" "Uranus" "Mercury" and "Kos
mos" as Included in Survey No. 1004
and describod ty tho official plat and
by tho field notes cn t'.lz In the office
of the register of tho Juneau Land
District at Juneau, Alaska, to which i
referonco is hereby made, as follows ?!
to-wlt:
Beginning at Cor: No. 1 of the Mara
lodo claim, whence U. S. M. Mi No 5
bears S. 56" 41' <9" E. 2809.13 feet;
thenco S. 45* 00' W. 1417.55 foot to
Cor. No. 2; thoncc N. 44? 20' W. COO
feet to Cor. No. 3; thonco N. 45* 00'
L. 1417.;>5 feet to Cor. No. 4; thence!
S. 44* 20' E. COO feet to the place of
beginning.
Said Mars lode containing in the ag
gregate 19.524 acres.
Beginning at Cor. No. 1 of the
Venus lode claim, whence U. S. M. M
No. 5 boars S. 62* 25' 15" E. 1297 94*
feet: thenco S. 45* 00' W. 594.77 feet
to Cor. No. 2; thence N. 57? 31' 30"
W. 1499.4G foot to Cor. No. 3,-ithonco
N. 45? 00' E. 567.19 feet to Cor. No.
4; thenco S. 50? 29' 30" E. 222.36 feet!
to Cor. No. 5; thonco S. 40? 17' E.I
159.99 foet to Cor. No. 6; thenco S. I
70" 24' E. 87.20 foot to Cor. No. 7;
thenco S. 59* 40' E. 271.42 feet tc Cor
No. 8; thenco S. 73* 14' E. 63.39 feet ?
to Cor. No. 9; thenco S. 62* 10' E.
363.26 foot to Cor. No. 10; thence S.
77* 43' E. 42.50 feot to Cor. No. 11*
thence S. 62* 34' E. 174.50 feet to
Cor. No. 12; thenco S. 55* 39' 30"
E. 138.96 feot to Cor. No. 1, and the
placo of beginning.
I , Said Venus iodo containing in the i J
aggregate 18.406 acres.
Beginning nt Cor. No. 1 of tho Jupi
ter lode claim, whence U. S. M. M.
No. o bears S. 76* 38' 51" E. 1496.01
feet distant; thenco S. 45* 00' w.
599.85 foet to Cor. No. 2; thenco N*
57? 31* 30" W. 1499.46 _ect to Cor.
No. 3; thence N. 45? 00' E. 599.85
feot to Cor. No. 4; thence S. 57? 31'
30" E. 1499.46 feet to Cor. No. 1, the
place of beginning.
Said Jupiter lodo containing in tho
aggregate 20.157 acres.
Beginning at Cor. No. 1 of tho Sat
urn lode, whence U. S. M. M. No. 5
bears N. 88-22' 11" E. 1874.24 feet
distant; thenco S. 45? 00' W. 599.40
feet to Cor. No. 2; thenco N. 57* 31'
SO" W. 1499.44 feot to Cor. No. 3
thence N. 45? 00' E. 599.40 feet to
Cor No. 4: tfcenco S. 57? 31' 30" E ?'
1499.46 feet to Cor. No. 1, the place!
of beginning.
Saturn lodo containing in the ag
gregate 20.142 acres.
Beginning at Cor. No. 1. of tho
Uranus Lode, whenco U. S M M
No. 5 bears N. 28* 57' 5S" E. 736.35
foot: thence S. 45? 00' W. 599.85 foet
to Cor. No. 2; thence N. 47? 06' 30"
W. 1491.46 feet to Cor. No. 3; thenco
N. 45? 00' E. 699.85 feet to Cor. No.
4; thence S. 47? 06' 30" E. 1491.46 feot
to Cor. No. 1, the place of beginning.
Uranus lodo containing In the ag
gregate 20.525 acres.
Beginning at Cor. No. 1 of the Mer
cury lode whence U. S. M. M. No 5
bears N. 36* 09' 32" E. 1323.29 foot;
thenca S. 45* 00' W. 599.40 feet to
Cor No. 2; thenco N. 47* 06' 30" W
1491.46 foot to Cor. No. 3; thenco N.
46? 00 E. 599.40 feet to Cor. No 4
Uiencm S. 47? 06' 30" E. 1491.46 foot to
u0r; ^?- A tho placo of beginning.
Mercury lode containing in tho ag
gregate 20.509 acres.
Beginning at Cor. No. 1 of tho Kos
mos lode, whence U. S. M. M. No. 5
bears N. 35* 6' 49" E. 1204.69 feet;
thonco S. 51? 55' E. 72S.47 feet to Cor.
No. 2; thence S. 45? 00' W. C04.39
root to Cor. No. 3; thenco N. 51? 55'
;?ot to Coi;. No. 4; thenco.
\. 4.) 00 E. G04.39 feot to Cor. No. 1,
placo of beginning.
Kosmos lode containing in tho ag
jregatc .10. 034 acres.
That tho total area contained In said
survey No. 1004 Is 129.297 acres.
That said survey is in conflict with
:ho iollowlng named lode claims, to
Wt; Now Kowco. U. S. Survey No.
>"9;jRoso. U. S. Survoy No. 172- Bol- I
sont, U. S. Survoy No. 175 and Lucy ?
J. 8. Survoy No. 59; that said con- ?
fllcto In tho aggrogato containing
3.0GS acres which la horoby excluded
from this survoy,- No; 1004, leaving a
net total area for Bald survey of
32G.239 acres, said conflicts nbovo
montloned bolng more accurately de
scribed In tho official plat nnd field
r.otcs of said survey N. 1004 to which
rofeionco 1b horoby mndo.
That thoro aro no adjoining unpat
ented mining claims to said survoy
No. 1004 and tho only claims, patent
ed or unpatented in conflict aro those
JOSEPH WEYERHORST
UNITED STATES LAND OFFICE,
IT IS HEREBY ORDERED, that tho
foregoing notico be published for the
statutory period In tho Alaoka Dally
Empire, a daily nowspapor of gonernl
circulation printed at Juneau, Alas
ka.
C. B. WALKER,
Roglator.
First publication, Dec. 4. 1014.
Last publication, -?
SOLDIERS' ADDITIONAL HOME
STEAD APPLICATION
No. 01651 ?
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR;
UNITED STATES LAND OFFICE.
Juneau, Alaska, Novembor 28, 1914.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, R. F. Lewis, of 3424
Webster Street, Oakland. Cal., by his
agent, T . F. Kennedy, of Junonu. Alas
ka, has made application In this of
fice as assignee of Ehvln Rasoy un
der'the provision of Sees. 2306 and
2307, to moko soldier's additional
additional homestead entry of tho fol
lowing described tract of land lying
about one mllo Northeast of tho town
site of Juneau and In Lat. 58" 18' N. and
Long. 134* 24' W., towlt:
Sur. 1084.
Beginning at Cor. No. 1, Identical
with Cor. 1, Sur. No. 289, whonco U,
S. L. M. No. 3 bears S. 71' 45' W.
72.11 chu? thenco S. 12" 24' E. 5.13 1-2
chu., to Cor. No. 2, Identical with Cor.
No. 2, Sur. 289, thence E. 1.4 S chs.,
to Cor. No. 3, thonco N. 3* 02' W. 1.46
chs. to Cor. No. 4, Identical with Cor.
No. 2, Sur. 162, thonco N. 58? 08' E.
3.49 chs. to Cor. No. 5, Identical with
Cor. No. 2, Sur. 161, thenco N. 68?
29' E. 3.16 chs. to Cor. No. 6. Identical
with Cor. No. 2, Sur. 160, thoncc N.
1.30 chs. to Cor. No. 7, thonco E. 1.51
chs. to Cor. No. S, thoncc N. 19? 15'
E. LOT chs. to Cor. No. 9, Idontlcal
with Cor. No. 2, Sur. 159, thence N.
58? 02' E. 3.48 chs. to Cor. No. 10,
identical with Cor. No. 2, Sur. 168,
thence S. 75? 54' E. 3.19 chs., to Cor.
No. 11, Identical with Cor. No. 2, Sur.
167, thence N. 67? 04' E. 3.21 chs. to
Cor. No. 12, identical with Cor. No. 2,
Sur. 166, thence N. 2.27 chs. to Cor.
No. 13, thenco W. 20.33 chs. to Cor.
No. 14, thenco S. 6.63 chs. to Cor. No.
1, tho place of beginning, containing
an area of 9.61 acres. Mag. Var. 32*
307 E.j as additional to homestead ap
. r i. ? r,-M|?-,T?I?I
plication of Bald Rasoy for tho E%
N. W. % a.' % S. W. % Sec. 4, T. 105,
N. R. 33 W. which he entered, No.
6774, at Worthlngton, Minn.
Any and all persons claiming ad
versely any portion of tho said lands
are required to fllo with tho Register
and Receiver of tho U. S. Land Of-'
flco at Juneau, Alacka, tliolr adverse
claim thereto, under oath, during tho
i period of publication, or within thirty |
days thereafter, or they will be barred
! by the provision of the statuto.
R. P. LEWIS,
By T. P. KENNEDY,
Attornoy-InFact
UNITED STATES LAND OFFICE,
Juneau, Alaska, Nov. 28, 1914.
It is hereby ordered that the fore
going notice be published for tho stat
utory period of sixty days in the Al
aska Dally Empiro, a newspaper of
general circulation published In the
vicinity of tho land applied for.
C. B. WALKER, '
Registor.
First publication, Doc. 1. 1914.
Last publication Feb. 3, 1915. (
j
1 ; ESTABLISHED 1891 ; 1
BRING YOUR SAVINGS' BOOKS IN
Mo-Bone Corsets
Mrs. L. Rutledge, agent, will
be pleased to fit the ladles in
their home. For appointment,
phone 1402, or call 340 Franklin
B. D. STEWART
MINING ENGINEER
U. 3. MINERAL SURVEYOR
P. 0. Box 138 - ? - Jur.oau
Good Home Board & Individual Meals
RATES BY THE WEEK OR MONTH
t NEW^AIN DINING ROOM ;
THIRD AND MAIN STS. MRS. W. L. HUQEL.
I
I- ? ;
m FIRST TERRITORIAL BANK
Douglas Qp ^ g yr ^ 28 Front 1t Juneau
INTEREST PAID ON SAVINGS AO
ACCOUNTS, AND ON TIME DEPOSITS fl Q
;; i n 11 i ill il n a ll IM111II111
:: FOR THE NEXT 30 DAYS WE WILL GIVE
10% Discount ][
ON ALL CASH PURCHASES ON ANY
ARTICLE IN THE HOUSE.
f| G. W. YOUNG "COMPANY | j
mumi muni i minimi mini iiiiiuimniir *
I (THE FIRST NATIONAL BANR]
OF JUNEAU
United States Deposits $100,000.00
Capital, Surplus and undivided Profits over 100,000.00
Jnited States Depository
aa?nan?i??aa
Why buy ready made clothing when
you can get n ?
KAHN Tailor-Made SUIT
with an extra pair of troueors
FREE
Until January 50th. Suits and Ovor
coatc, $20 to $45.
Hugo Heidhorn, Agt 222 Soward 8
Reduced Prices on my owa make
of Suits until March 1st.
C W. WINSTEDT
ARCHITECT
SUPERINTENDENT
Office, Room 7, Garsldo Block
Juneau, Alaska.
Bowling?Billiards
at the BRUNSWICK
=== -""pa
GIFTS AND HOLIDAY GOODS
ON DISPLAY UNTIL AFTER
(Servian Christmas, Jan. 7th, 1915 ||
VISIT TOY DEPARTMENT ON SECOND FLOOR
* ' ' ? ..t .T..T. T ,T T, f.,T..T..I.T...M..M-I"I"I"I"1"I"1'M,T
i -l-i-l-i-i"!"! ?! 1' t"i"l 'ft I TT rl"l
I ^
Excellence
?
ter y,
I can t sec
how 1 ever
did without it"
I*
'fiat s wfiat they say about tfiese electrical Utensils [i
?i-ri i ?: r h-i-i-hi i i i i m m i i i i i i m i-i- f j
' |
A few sets Eurs left in our Dry Goods Dept.
25?0 Off to Close Out
-
. i ..I i
ALASKA TREADWELL GOLD MINING COMFY
Mercantile Department TREADWELL, ALASKA

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