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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, January 23, 1915, Image 1

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VOL. V., NO. 678. . : InjNEAU, ALASKA, SATURDAY, JANUARY 23, 1915. PRICE TEN CENTS.
SENATOR
BRUNER
KDEAD
Senator Elwood Bruner, of Nome,
died at Byron Hot Springs, Calif., on 1
January 15 and the body was ere mat- !
ed at San Francisco last Tuesday, ac- I
cording to advices received In Juneau i
this morning. i
The Empire's Seattle correspondent I
Interviewed Former Senator Conrad |
Freeding, at Seattle, and learned that <
Senator Bruner had passed away from i
an attack of heart failure, white sit
ting in a chair. Particulars were re- i
celved by W. A. Gilmore of Nome from
J. Allison Bruner, who is In San Le- J
andro, Calif.
Elwood Bruner. senior Territorial
Senator from Nome, was In his sixty
Cm year. Ho was born in Zanesville. 1
Ohio, on September 27, 1854. Senator
Bruner came West when a young man
and located in Sacramento. Calif., ,
wl-cre for a number of years ho prac
ticed law.
Mr. Bruner served several terms In
the California legislature from the Sac
ramento valley district. In 1903 he
camo to Nome and with his brothers.;'
Alvin G. Bruner and J. Allison Bruner.
the law firm of Bruner, Bruner and
Bruner was formed. Alvin G. Bruner :
died in California several yeare ago I
and J. Allison Bruner and Elwood Bru-j
ner continued tho partnership with j''
Family survives rum.
Senator Bruner Is survived by his:
widow and several children, all of
whom are in California except one
daughter, who resides in Washington.:
and two brothers. J. Allison Bruner"
of Nome, and Evan S. Bruner. who was
enrolling clerk in the last Territorial
Senate. The latter resided at Juneau
for some time after the adjournment
of the legislature, but is now in the
Valdez country.
"The Old Roman," as Senator Bru
ner was affectionately called by his
friends, was just what his nickname
implied. Dignified, highly polished
and courteous. Senator Bruner was
a forceful and eloquent speaker and
one of the ablest attorneys in the Ter
ritory
Elected During Absence.
Senator Bruner was elected to the
upper chamber of the legislature on
November 5. 1912, the voters of the
Second division giving him a popular
majority while Senator Bruner was
away la Seattle. He arrived in Ju
neau late In February, 1913, and took
his seat in the Senate on March 3,
1913. serving throughout the session.
Senator Bruner was an advocate of
a strong taxation and revenue bill dur
ing the legislative session, was op
posed to code revision, and took an ac
tive part in the debates on the im
portant matters that came before the
legislature at Its initial session. In
politics he was a Taft Republican. He
was a holdover Senator for the sec
ond legislative session, having won
the toss-up with Senator Conrad Freed-)
Ing.
Belonged to Elks' Lodge.'
While the legislature was in session
two years ago Senator Bruner became
.t member of Juneau Lodge No. 429. B.
F. 0. Elks, with Senator Millard, and
Representatives Kennedy and Burns.
The speech made by Mr. Bruner on
the night cf his initiation will long be
remembered as ono of the best ever
heard In the lodgeroom, members who
were present say.
GOVERNOR AUTHORIZED TO
CALL SPECIAL ELECTION
Under tho Alaska organic act the
Governor la authorized to Ibsuo a writ
for a special election whenever there
shall occur a vacancy in the Territor
ial legislature, "giving due and prop
er notice."
Gov. J. F. A. Strong has tho ques
tion of a special election In the Sec
ond division under advisement today.
Whether tho "duo and proper notice"
should be construed to mean similar
notice- to that provided for the general
election, or whether the terms are
stated generally In order to: give tho
Governor discretionary authority in
order to meet a situation such as that
which Senator Bruner's death has
brought about, has not been deter
mined.
THE WEATHER TODAY.
Maximum?33.
Minimum?13.
Clear.
JUNEAUITE
BURROWED
FROMSNOW
Five hours before Ivor Holmqulst;
was carried to his death by a snow-;
slide In Granlto Basin Wednesday at-;
:ernooii, J. B. Giovanettl, brother of:
i Calhoun Road grocer, was caught
under u torrent of snow and burled
inder a covering two fceet deep, at a
plont a half milo from whore Holm
julst died. Glovanettl's rifle, a Win
Chester of .32 calibre, was found by A. J
McLean, a teamster, and through an
article published in The Empire yes
terday. the gun was restored to its <
jwner and details of what might have
been another tragedy of the snows
.vere obtained. !
Giovanettl and Morris Giovanettl,
tils brother, were hunting ptarmigan
Wednesday morning In Granite Basin.!
The men were about fifty font apart
when Morris shouted a warning to his
brother. Tho latter turned in his
tracks when a wall of snow boro him
Blown. "I was bowled over and over
like a ball." said Giovanettl to an Em
pire reporter this morning, "and 1
grabbed at rocks and roots in an at-!
tempt to stop myself. Finally. after it
seemed to mo that I had traveled
about a mile, I. stopped, and. after a
few minutes of twisting I succeeded
In getting out. I was covered with
otherwise 1 believe I would have been
unable to get out."
While Morris Giovanettl was franti
cally searching for his brother the
latter broke from his tomb and the
men searched an hour for the lost gun.
Giovanettl has scratches all over him!
as evidence of tho punishment he took
while hurled over tho ground beneath
the slide. Holmquist was caught at
3:30 in the afternoon. Giovanettl wasl
struck at 10:30 in tho morning.
REDF1EL0 HAS TILT
WITH JAMES J. HILL
ST. LOUIS. Jan. 23.?James J. Hill
and Secretary of Commerco William
C. Red field discussed tho administra
tion ships purchase bill at this place
yesterday before the National Foreign
Trade Convention.
Hill read a paper in which he assert-1
ed that a government-owned shipping I
line would "almost cortainly drag tho
United States sooner or later into op
en conflict with foreign Nations."
Secretary of Commerce Redficld ?e-j
plied, saying that Hill's paper was has-:
ed on surmise and not facts. Tho Sec
retary said that it has been advertised
over tho world that wo would meet
trouble if we bought German ships,
yet the government had been ap
proached to purchase British. French
and Russian vessels. He closed with
the assertion that tho "extortion of
the shipping interests Is closing Amer
ican factories." and the "violation of
written contracts by shipping com
panies makes the robbera of the mid
dle ages look like public benefactors."
AMERICAN SHIPPERS TO
MAKE TEST SHIPMENT
NEW YORK. Jan. 23.?The Ameri
can-owned steamship Wilhelmina, fly
ing tho American flag and loaded with
foodstuffs consigned by an American
commission firm to an American citi
zen in Gormany, sailed yesterday eve
ning for Bremen, Germany, on the
first voyage of the kind. The purpose
is to make a test of whether or not
such shipments shall he considered le
gitimate. The United States will be
asked to protect the shipment from
seizure by the British navy.
HEAVY SNOWFALL WILL
INSURE BIG WHEAT CROP
?*?
CHICAGO, Jan. 23.?A heavy snow
fa'l throughout the winter wheat grow
ing States is believed to have increas
ed ?hc chances for another great jie'd,
next year.
HOUSE PASSES MILITARY
APPROPRIATION MEASURE;
WASHINGTON, Jan. 23?The House |
of Representatives passed tho army:
appropriation bill carrying $100,000,
000 last night
DUTCH LOAN OVERSUBSCRIBED
??>?
THE HAGUE, Jan. 23..? The an
nouncement is made that the govern
men war loan of $110,000,000'hr.s bevn
oversubscribed.
AC
ROAD BILL
FAIRBANKS, Jan, 23. ? Tho Fair- j
banks city council has gone on roc-1
ord In opposition to tho Wickershnmj
wagon road bill, and particularly that
portion of it which proposes that af
ter July 1. 1916, tho liconsc or occupa
tion tax shall bo transferred from the
present manner of distribution and
turned over to the Territorial legisla
f v ?*? ?% 4* ?*? ?> *J? ?3?
? REPORT TO BE READY ?
BY FEBRUARY 1ST
?> FAIRBANKS. Jan, 23!?A ca- ?!
I- blegram received hero from <?[
?> Thomas Riggs, Jr., says tho re
? on the Alaska, government rail- *
? road will be ready Fobruary *
-t- 1st. Tho telegram says, that de- ?
? Unite action will follow fast 4
after the report is proparcd. +
<?' +|:
? ? ?> -> -t- v <? -> -!? -,- v <i* <jk l
~ ? * *
MILD WEATHER CONTINUES
IN FAIRBANKS DISTRICT
FAIRBANKS. Jan. 23.?MiUi won
ana vattey. There has been practi
cally no realy cold weather thus far
this season.
JUDGE BUNNELL AT
FAIRBANKS MO.NDAY
FAIRBANKS. Jan. 27.?Judge Chas.
E. Bunnell will arrive at Fnirbanks
.Monday night, and assume the dutlos
of his office at once. Thcro are many{
applicants for patronngo at his dis-J
posal.
Marshal Erwln Coming.
SEATTLE, Jan. 25.?United States j
Marshal L. T. Erwln, of Fairbanks, i
will be a Fairbanks-bound passenger
on the Mariposa which sails for the
North Sunday night.
PUGET SOUND TO
HAVE ANOTHER CANAL
.. ?-.
SEATTLE, Jan. 17.?Work has be
gun on the canal between Port Town
send bay and Oak bay, for which Con
gress appropriated $62,500. The 4.
400-foot strip will join the two bodies
of water, and the announcement was.
made that June 1 the first Paget sound
steamship will pass through the canal.
When tho canal is ready, Sound
boats not only will bo ablo to roach
Seattle from Victoria and Port Town
send bay in less time, but will avoid
passing Marrowstone point, a dangor
ous headland, where tides run with
great velocity.
Tho cana! cut will be 105 foet at tho
surface and 75 fcot at the haso.
GOV. LISTER'S INVITATION
TO PRESIDENT WILSON
OLYMPIA. Jan. 15.?Governor Lister
sent a special telegram to President
Wood row Wilson today inviting him
on behalf of the people of the State of
Washington to visit that Stato on his
contemplated trip to the Pacific Coast.
The telegram reads:
"On behalf of the people of tho
State of Washington 1 desire to
extend to you a most cordial in
vrtation to visit the State of
Washington on your forthcoming
trip to the Pacific Coast. I sin
cerely hope you may be able to
so arrange your itinerary.
(Signed) "ERNEST LISTER.
"
WASHINGTON ARTISTS GIVE
$1,200 TO BELGIAN RELIEF
WASHINGTON. Jan. 23.?Washing
ton artists contributed pictures which
were sold for tho benefit of Bolgiun
babies. The monoy was divided, $1.
000 for boxes containing combination
. vey Wi Wiioy and $200 for malted
NEW YORK CITY TO
FEED SCHOOL CHILDREN
1 <y
proper nourishment.
MEASURE
WASHINGTON, Jan. 23.~At a cau
cus of the Democratic members of the >
United States Senate to day tho admin
istratlon purchase bill was finally cn- !
dorscd by unanimous vote.
A resolution was adopted with the
affirmative vote of all the Democratic
Senators, making tho bill a party mea- <
PATRONAGE FIGHT ENDS.
WASHINGTON, Jan. 23.?The en- -
thuslasm Inspired among the Demo- i
crats In Washington over the "call to
arms" to do party battle for the ad
ministration In the chips purchace bill,
which resulted from the Cabinet meet- ' I
Ing last night, has resulted In aban
donment of the patronage fight by i
certain Democratic Senators. Evi
dences that the fight has been either I
In official action when In the Senate 1
every Democratic vote was cast In fa- 1
vor of the Indefinite postponement of
tional powers in making recess-appoint
ments. The Indefinite postponement
defeats further progress of the In
quiry.
?
BY PRESIDENT WILSON
will bo complete harmony between thc|
Democratic Senators and the Demo
cratic majority in tho House of Rep- j
resontatlvcs In pressing the adminis-j
tration ships purchasing bill for pas
sage Is conceded to be the result of j
a Cabinot mooting last night and con-;
fcronces botweon Congressional lead- J
ers and members of the administration
today. The Democrats will prosont a1
solid front against the flllibhsterlngi
Republicans, and if .necessary, the
President and mombcrs of his Cabinot.
will make several speeches in which:
they will appeal to tho public senti
ment of the Nation to force Republi
can Senators from desisting In tholr
light.
The Democrats take the position
that tho Republican opposition to the
shipping bill is in the Interest of sub
sidies, nnd that the talk of Interna
tional complications that might follow
Is not offered in good faith.
GOV. WHITMAN DISCHARGES
400 STATE EMPLOYEES
?
ALBANY, N. Y., Jan. 23.?Governor
Charles S. Whitman, of New York has
discharged 400 employees of the State
Englnecriu g and Surveying Depart
ment on the ground that no need of
their services existed.
;
NEW YORK MAKES $2,000,000
ON ACCOUNT OF EXCHANGE
turing obligations to the European
holders this month American bankers
and tho municipality of New York
cleared $2,076,587 on-account of tho
increased value of American exchange
in Europe, so great is tho demand
ances that are running heavily in fa
for the the United States;
CAPT. DODGE'S WIFE
APPEALS TO SENATORS
SAN FRANCISCO,?Capt. Frederick
sea November 14, on the revenue cut
Dcnce, and shortly after applied for
sick leave. This was granted by the
Works that conditions at the Marine
Injure him. She asked tor an lnvostl
"unparalleled."
treatment, but fail reliance may be
NEW YORK
CONCORD, N. H., Jan. 23.?After
one of the moct sensational legal bat
tles In the history of the country and
3 series of adventures that have held
the Interest of a Nation covering a per
iod of a year and a half since his es
cape from the Matteawan asylum for
the criminal Insane and spectacular
Plight Into Canada, Harry K. Thaw was
today turned over to the authorities
cf the State of New York, fortrlat
cn an Indictment charging him with
conspiracy to escape from the opera
tion of the law.
Thaw fought to the last ditch to es-.
cape being deported to New York,
where he feels that public sentiment
Is against him. In his flght for lib
erty the Thaw millions have carted
to his aid the services of many of the
brilliant attorneys of the country, In
truding thoso of former Attorney-Gen
era I and former Secretary of State P.
Tho brunt of the legal battle against
Thaw has been borne by former Dis
trict Attorney William Travcre Je
rome, who conducted the prosecutions
against him for the murder of Stan
ford White.
? ? ?
* ? * <- *? * ?> + ->
V ?
* HARRY THAW TO BE *
*? IN TOMBS TONIGHT *j
.?
XI:\Y YORK, Jan. 23.?Harry ?
* K. Thaw will bo brought to +j
?> -Now York tonight from Now ?
* HampBhlrc and lodged in the ;
Tombs. Thus will terminate *
?> in success New York's long <fr
* fight to secure control of tho 4
slayer of Stanford White. 4
>*? y ?*? *** M ?%
GOLD COMING FROM
CANADA TO NEW YORK
NEW YORK, Jan. 23.?Gold la now
moving from Canada to Now York, not
withstanding tho large Canadian mun
icipal and other loons that have been
placed thfe month in this city. Ameri
can shipment!, of manufactured goods
to Canada for military and other pur
poses has created a halanco of trade
that is so great that tho millions that
have been loaned Canada, Including
the Montreal, Vancouver and Domin
ion public securities, do not offset
KAISER'E NEPHEW
BECOMES INSANEi
Franz Josef of Hohenzollorn, ncphow
of tho Kaiser, lias gone mad as a ro
fight between H. M. A. S. Sydnoy and
the Eraden. according to a private let
ter receiver hero fro mLicut. Pitt, of
tho British navy.
by two six-Inch shells.
straight jacket on the troopship Or-|
WHEAT MUST GO
HIGHER AND HIGHER
NEW YORK, Jan. 23.?An exporter
of wheat says that sales abroad con
tinue to average 1,000,000 bushols a
day; and ho looko for ??.60 or $1.70
before tho end of tho season. There
is some danger that bread may be ad
vanced from 5 to 6 cents per loaf.
COTTON CROP MAY
BE LARGE NEXT YEAR
WASHINGTON, Jan. 23.? Roports
brought back to Washington by sklll
.*1 observers who have been visiting
the cotton-growing region of tho south
:;:iy there Is as yet little indication of
a limitation o.' acreage for the com
PRESIDENT SELECTED NAME
FOR HIS LITTLE GRANDSON
WASHINGTON, Jan. 23. ?It was
President Woodrow Wilson who sug
d that his grandson be named
Francis Sayre without any middle
name, and the suggestion was accept
ed by tho parents who wcro disposed
to- name him for his mother's distin
GERMANS'
EAST PLAN
LONDON. Jan. 23.?Petrograd die-!
patches report that a complete change
In the eastern campaign, such as would I
mark a new period In the war Is ex- i
pcctcd by the officers of the Russian ,
General Staff.
Thoy say that German and Austrian
military chiefs have abandoned aggres- ,
slve moves against Warsaw, and arc j
concentrating their troops In Hun- I
gary to repel the Russian Invasion In 1
Bukowina, Eastern Gallcla and North
ern Hungary.
It Is in this section rather than on ;
Warsaw that heavy fighting in the i
next few weeks Is looked for In Pe
trograd. i
HOSTILE FORCES ONLY SIX
MILES APART. I
Bucharest, Jan. 23.?Austrian and i
Russian forces are within six miles {
of each other In the vicinity of Dorna
Vatra near the Roumanian frontier In <
the Carpathian mountains, and the be
ginning of a battle Is expected at any
minute. I
The Russians are seeking to carry;
out an enveloping movement In the,
Blstrltz valley on the Transylvanlan,
side of the mountains'for the purpose;
of capturing the Hungarian army that
has been sent forward to check the In-'
vasion. ;
TURKS CLAIM VICTORY.
Constantinople, Jan. 23.?An official j
communication given out today, re-j
gardlng righting In Caucasia, follows;
"The Russian main forces which
failed In an attempt to encircle our
left wing have retreated before our
counter attack. ,
"Our troops are now pursuing the
enemy."
GERMANY MUST HAVE
A NORTH SEA PORT
COPENHAGEN, Jan. 23. ? Albert
Ballin, managing director of the Ham
burg-American lino, who Is in Copen
hagen, says it must be admitted that
Hotligoland 13 not a desirable base of
operations for tho German fleet, and
that Great Britain has brought to a
standstill Germany's overseas trade.
Ho says there can be no lasting peace
until Germany has a naval station on
the North Sea that will give her the
same advantages in Europe as Great
Britain now enjoys.
CHINA AND JAPAN FACE
CRISIS OVER KJAUCHOU
??>-?
TOKIO, Jan. .23.?China and Japan
-are now declared to be on the verge
of a diplomatic crisis. Tho Poking
government baa abolished the war zone
in the Shantung peninsular and this
action Is regarded by Japan as nn un
friendly act
Klaochau is on tho Shantung penin
sula, and tho Japanese government
sees In China'a Sudden and unoxpected
move an attempt to force tho aban
donment by Japan of the town fee
ontly takon from the Germans.
MISTAKEN FOR SUBMARINE
WHALE IS RIDDLED
ROTTERDAM, Jan. 23.?A dead
whalo, which drifted ashore on the
northern part of tho Dutch coast was
found to have been riddled with thrco
lnch shells. It had obviously been
mistaken for a submarine.
ENGLAND AND THE VATICIAN
ROME, Jan. 23.?The belief is ex
pressed here that England will con
tinue to maintain a diplomatic envoy
at the Vatlclan after the war. Sir
llenry Howard, who recently arrived
to represent tho British government,
Is well satisfied with the success of
hlc mission. His presence here will
give a closer relationship between the
Vatican and tho-British government.
DEPUTY SHERIFFS ARRESTED
FOR MURDER IN STRIKE
ROOSEVELT, Jan. 23. ? Deputy
sheriffs to tho number of 32 were ar
j rested last night charged with mur
der In connection with the rioting at
the agricultural chemical works hero.
Two of tho strikers have died and two
moro cannot live.
BIG BATTLE
PENDING IN
BELGIUM
LONDON, Jan. 23. ? Germans are
massing troops in the vicinity of La
basse in preparation for another bat
tle between Ypres and Courirai. The
Allies are strengthening their posi
tions all along Northern France and
Flanders.
These preparations lead to the in
cvitablc conclusion that another des
perate struggle for mastery will soon
begin between the great armies In
tho West.
ALLIES MAKE GAINS.
Paris, Jan. 23?The War Office this
afternoon gave out the following state
ment:
"In the region of Lombaertzyde we
gained 1,000 yards.
"In Sectors, Ypres, Arras, Albert,
Roye and Soissons regions there havo
been heavy artillery exchanges In the
course of which we at several points
gained advantage.
"Berryaubac was violently bombard
ed by Germans.
"To the northwest of Bease our ene
my delivered an attack which .we re
pulsed.
"In Argonnc we administered a com
plete check to the Germans at Fon
taine Madame.
"In Alsace infantry fighting in the
region of Hartmann and Wielerkopt
continues. We are in close touch with
the enemy, and there hae been no In
terruption to fighting."
GERMAN AIRMEN LOSE ONE MA
CHINE.
London, Jan. 23.?Germans raided
Dunkirk with aircraft this morning- **"
One account says that ten aeroplanes
took part in the attack.
British aeroplanes assumed the de
fensive, and succeeded in bringing
down one of the visitors.
Eighty bombs were thrown and the
victims number 20. of whom six were
killed.
ONE ZEPPELIN LOST.
London, Jan. 23.?Fishermen arriv
ing at NoordwIJk today saw an airship
founder in the North Sea Friday night.
The description of the airship given
Indicates that the lost craft was a
Zeppelin of the German air fleet
BRITISH AIRMEN AT WORK.
Amsterdam, Jan. 23. ? British air
men dropped bombs this morning on
Important docks of Bruges, Belgium.
Although the aircraft were attacked by
German long range guns they escaped
uninjured.
DARDANELLES FORTS
ARE CRUMBLING
?t?
ATHENS, Jan. 23^-The fort
Tchnnak-Kalossi. guarding the South
side of the entrance to tho Dardan
elles, hau been abolished by the con
tinued bombardment by the Allies'
wan hips and has boon evacuated by
tho Turkish garrison, according to
word from Salonika, brought there by
merchant ships. Forts Ellis and Sod
dil were expected to fall when tho
ships left tho war zone.
Tschnak-Kalessl Is known as "the
castle of Asia." Tho fort there, Kale
Sultanle, was of old construction, but
now guns of tho largest types had boon
mounted within the last two years.
RUSSIA IS PRESSING
THROUGH CARPATHIANS
*t* ?
LONDON, Jan. 23.?In their cam
paign against tho Austrians, the Rus
sians arc advancing In force through
Bukowina and have reached Dorna, on
tho Dorna river, half way between
Kimpolung, thoy have taken thousands
of prisoners nnd vast quantities of
munitions.
At Klov alono 16,000 captured Aus
trians have arrived, including 250 of
ficers, 40 being colonels, A Klov dis
patch says tho Austrians are believed
to have lost 70,000 men in their unscuc
ccssful attempt to relieve the pressure
in tho western part of Gallcla, by open
ing an offensive campaign in Buko
ALABAMA OVERTURNS
PROHIBITION VETO
MONTGOMERY. Ala., Jan. 23.?Tho
Alabama legislature has passed the
prohibition bill over the Governor's
veto. Tho new law goes into effect
1 July 1, 1915.

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