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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, January 27, 1915, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020657/1915-01-27/ed-1/seq-5/

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?I'M I HI 1 I 1 I II i I I I n II HMMfH 1 1 !? t 1 1 i I I i i I ! I I 1 1 H-l-H
i 11 M-k. i :? :? \ EH-H-I-H-H-I-H-I-H H't ?
| Quitting Businessll
:::: Save Yourself Money ::;;
? .T
Selling My Entire Stock
At Cost
Groceries and Men's Goods
Rubber Boots and Shoes
:::: ========^^
j| JAMES McKANNA}
::? LOWER FRANKLIN ST. PHONE 5-5
?M"i' i; i H-I-H-T t ?' i; 1111 ? ?
1111111:111111111:: 11 M : i
B
< English Underwear
!at MULLEN S HEBERT
?"The Hub" |
Willoaghby Meat
Jarket and Grocery
JUST OPENED?Fine line of Freah ?,!
Salt?Meats. Full of *U satieties. Also a
choice line of Green. Fancy and Staple
- Groceries ?
M. V. JOHNSON, Proprietor
Wlltoojhhy Way, End of Plank Walk
1 Juneau Athletic Club I
"?i ?'.???)A-'iiirl Next to Alaskan Hotel ?3*323 K
(| J. FISHCHER, Physical Director |j
D.ELMONICO
BEST PLACE Dt THE CITY- FOR GOOD
Oyster*, Crab* and Fish of all Kinds
GOOD STEAKS AND CHOPS
?IK* Dinner at Rcaaonabio Price* w
* + + * + ?4*** * ?> * * *5*
*? ?
+ ARCTIC BROTHERHOOD *
? ??? +
? Junneau Camp, Xo. 31. meets *
?P every Tuesday night at eight ?>
+ o'clock, at Moose Hall. ?>
? *
+ ? ? ? + ? ? ? ? ?? ? ? ?> ?> ?>
PUBLIC DANCE
every Saturday night at the
Moose HalL Gentlemen $1.00.
Ladies free. Everybody is wol
come.
pmmm ?? . ? ? ...... ?. i ??
SOLO ON 55 YEARS RECORD
| STYLES. SIZES AID PRICES TO SUIT ALL
JSSBS
im mm who
is big enough
to profit by experience gets on
the smoothest.
By buying a "cheap" stove
or range you make a mistake. [
By buying a Charter Oak, you n
do not make a mistake, you M
save fuel, trouble and money |
ia the end. |
irronc Dy tne experience or tnosc wno nave usca snorter uok h c
Stoves and Ranges. | 11
For Sale by THE JUNEAU FURNITURE COMPANY *
"Tto .Borne Forniibert" Cor. 3rd and Scnard St*.
a??????1??*?*?? ???????mmmm??????????u??mmm
Pianos and Piano Players t
EDISON DIMOND DISC | COLUMBIA TALKING \
PHONOGRAPHS I MACHINES [
VICTOR VICTROLAS
15,000 Records for All Machines. Sheet Music, Small Musical Insturments t
THREE STORES -1
JUNEAU MUSIC HOUSE ?
J P. L. GRAVES, Mgr. t(
REXALL DRUG STORE FRONT STREET DRUG STORE
Douglas, Alaska. Douglas, Alaska.
ELMER E. SMITH, Prop r.
h
| Fresh Washington Creamery i['
|-^BUTTER^=|
| 35 Cents Per Pound ill
I H. J. RAYMOND SSB |!
I M'M i M M'i i M 'I I H-w-fft-PTt-t-r
ff ALASKAN TELLS OF
RUSSIA'S COLD CLIME
J Seward Gateway.?The" climate at
i the place the Russians, Germans and
Austrians are now fighting is colder
by far than the-climate of many parts
: of Alaska, according to E. A. Thede,
the Seward wharfinger, who was born
in St. Petersburg?beg pardon, Petro
: grad?and who has been all over Po
i I land, East Prussia, and the neighbor*
? ing regions. He was mate In a steam
ar running botween Cronstadt and
i } Stettin in the Baltic Sea, where, ho
I ? says, the ports are closed in v inter,
all same Xome. According to Mr.
Thede the temperature in Polar.il and
East Prussia often goes to thirty be
low zero. Indeed, he says that a sum
mer in those regions is similar to the
! winter in Seward! Sleighs aro the
only vehicles used for several months
! during the winter. The Carpathian;
| mountains arc covered with snow dur-:
I ing the winter just like the mountains
; in Alaska. Another interesting fact
; mentioned by Mr. Thede is that in sev
j eral parts of the Russian empire, the
{people do not even know that war is
going on. In tho East and South tho
j, railroads do not reach, and, therefore,
no means can be had of using the (
population in those regions as sol
diers .
INVITE PRESIDENT HERE.
I Cordova and other cities of Alaska 1
> should join with Juneau in extending '
an invitation to President Wilson to '
visit Alaska before he returns home J
from his trip to the Pacific coast.
While he might be compeled to con
fine his sight-seeing trip to the const, '
the trip would undoubtedly prove a !
revelation to him, broadening his c
views regarding the needs of the Ter- '
ritory and enabling him more readily 1
to solve tho new problems which will 1
present themselves in connection with r
, construction of the government rail- 1
ways and opening of tho coal mines.: I
It would also give him first-hand in- - 1
formation about the great needs of ad- '
ditional lights, buoys and. additional:
surveys for protection of shipping and !
those who travel on these waters.? 1
(Cordova Alaskan.) {
* * ? ?
Dr. Mahone will be at Dr. Midford's )
office In Douglas daily from 11:30 to
1:30 during Dr. Midford's absence. !
J i-27-tf.j;
ALASKA RAILROAD
GOSSIP m CAPITAL
flgfLr ?
WASHINGTON*.? Now that gossip
Northwestern railroad and tho Alas
ka Northora railroad, tho owners of
thoso properties aro receiving visits
and lottors from numerous persons In
mission basis, in putting through the
It Is quite apparent that J. P. Mor
gan, of the Alaska Syndicate, has not '
listened to the siren song of any or
these gentlemen. Wherein ho is wise.
Those who know Secretary Lane, wno
would have to do with the negotia
tions. know very well that if tho gov
ernment does decide to do any rail
rond buying, the negotiations nro to
bo conducted direct with tho princi
ples and not through any agonts. It
will be noted that Mr. Morgan hna
ma'de three trips to Washington In
person on tho matter. Tho Alaska
Northern people for many rensoriB,
are keeping aloof, but It Is under
stood that they aro willing and even
anxious to sell.
"Who owns tho Alaska Northorn?":
is tho question put to a member of1
the Alaska engineering commission i
recently.
"All right," was the reply. "Who
owns the Alaska Northern? What's
the answer? I never have boon able
to find out"
in any dealing with that road the
government would hnvo to untangle
considerable legal difficulties, for tho
ownership la somewhat clouded. The
property Itself is now In tho hands of
trustees named to protect tho bond
holders. Tho bonds, aggregating some
four or fivo million dollars, wero
among tho assets of tho Sovereign
Bank of Canada, and with tho other
assets of that Institution, wero taken
over by a group of twelve Canadian
banks and have been placed by them
In a holding company. This holding
company is made up largely of the
representatives of tho twelve bank3.
It would appear then, that the banks
are the ones with whom to deal, and
they aro reported to be gottlng decid
edly Interested In the situation, hop
ing to realize on tho bonds.
It is learned here that while the
Alaska engineering commission has
made no valuation of tho Copper Riv
er & Northwestern, as previously
stated in tho Post-Intelligencer, it yet
has socurcd an estimate us to tho cost
sf putting tho Copper River and North
western and tho Alaska Northorn
trackage In first-class condition. These
figures are said to be between $400,-j
)00 and f 500,000 for the Copper River j
i Northwestern and $250,000 for the'
\3nska Northern.
The high figure on the Alaska
Northern?considering Its mileage?
s duo to the fact that the road has
>een Idle so long. Nevertheless tho i
>plnlon prevails here that the Admin- i
stratfon will ask or this congress :
he full sum necessary to purchase
>oth roads outright A great deal of <
irelimtnary work would have to be
lone before any deal could be corn
rioted, and an appropriation nt the
ong session beginning next December,
vould come In ample time.
The authority to purchase existing i
Ines of railroad in Alaska is given to !
he president in the following portion i
>f the act:
"To purchase, condemn, or other- :
vise acquire upon such terms as he i
nay deem proper any other line or <
ines of railroad In Alaska that may
>e necessary to complete the construe- i
ion of the lino or lines of railroad
lesignated or located by him: provid- i
:d that the price to bo paid In case
>f purchase shall in no case exceed j
ho actual physical value of the rail- '
oad." 1
Members of the houso committee on i
Ltval affairs have become greatly in- i
crested. in Alaska by reason of the <
flowing report Secretary Daniels made
>f the Maryland tests of tho Matan- |
i8ka coal. Tho whole naval coal prob
em has been very much boforo tho
:ommlttcc, and much attention has
>oen paid to tho high cost of trans- 1
lortlng Atlantic coast coal to tho Pa- ?
ific for use by the fleet tlioro. Whilo (
he Panama canal has operated to re- ]
luce that cost materially, the com- 1
nittee still feels that the coal bill <
or the Pacific is high, and is anxious
o secure tho early opening of Alas- j
;an coal fields for naval purposes. j
Tho assumption among several of <
he members of this committee is j
hat the government will striko for }
he Matanuska coal fields in its first <
allroading operations, and tho Idea t
f these members is that It is to bo
eachcd from the Susitna, presumably ^
hrough tho Seward gateway and tho c
ilaska Northern. But tho members c
dmlt that they havo nothing tnglblo r
pon which to base their assumptions. ,
-(Ashmun Brown n Seattle Post-In- ^
slllgonccr.)
i
A. Shyrnan returned yesterday from r
buslatss trip to Southwestern Alas- c
? u
FRIEND OF MINERS
"Mothor Jones" will moot John I).
tf.on, to present the cause ofthe strik
distrlct, according to yesterdays proas
.dispatciios to The Emptro.
It was Mother Jones who led throe
thousand of her "boys," us she calls
t:ict In West Virginia, on their now
historical siege of the Wesl Virginia
State House, ut Charleston, when
Qov. W. E, Glasscock had threat
ened to proclaim qjcrtlnl law at Coal
River. It was Mother JonoB who
building, her defiance to the Governor
of West Virginia and to constituted au
thority. However, us much as lias
boon published of Mothor Jonos. she
is no advocate of riot and bloodshed.
Tlto'mon whom sho lod to cow Gover
nor Glasscock, would havo battered
down the State House if sho had but
gvon the command. Mothor Jonos
did not get hor audience with the
Governor and hor action in hending
the demonstration only hastened the
writ of martial law. which reached the
height of Its merciless possibilities
when a special Chesapeake &, Ohio
railroad train ran at full speed up the
Coal River valley, "shooting up" threo
towns.
It was the riot that followed this
rttack tan: proclpltated tho famous
drumhead court martials, and the sub
sequent Senatorial Inquiry, of which
Senator James E. Marline was the
chairman
Responsibility for the shooting up of
Coal River villages was novor deter
mined, although Congress spent over
$200,000 in carrying on the Investiga
tion. Tho men who manned the train
were Baldwin-Fols detectives from
Blucflclds, W. Va., according to com
mon rumor, however.
Today Mother Jones is as chipper
as a "chicken" as if she woro 23 in
stead of S3. She frequently comes In
to the Kanawha coal district to see
hor "boys," and tho minors through
out tho State swear by hor.
EAST CONTINUES TO
DISCOVER ALASKA
?+?
It is worth while to repeat some of
the things the National Geographical
Society has to sny about this neglect
ed Empire: Its mines, fisheries and
furs alono have added to our wealth
the grand sum of ?500,000,000; Individ-,
ual fortunes have been made in that:
country larger than the price paid to
Russia for the whole territory; its wa
ters aro teeming rich with skins and
fish; how rich its lands are in gold
and copper, coal and iron, silver and
zinc no one knows, but the prpspect
or has gone far enough to tell us that
no dther section of our land today
makes so rich a mineral land: in agri
culture the government itself hns dora
castrated that Alaska will produco In
abundance all that can be raised In
the Scandinavian countries, the hardy
cereals and vegetables, tho meats and
berries, off which 9,000,000 peoplo live
in Norway, Sweden and Finland: the
town of Sitka has coolor summers and
warmer winters than Washington; it
has been estimated that thcro aro 500.i
000,000 acres of land that will make
homes for a poople as sturdy as those
of New England.
Lastly,' the Geographical society has
made the Important statement that Al
aska can be made self-sustaining agri
culturally." Those are the things that
ought to interest many Americans of
a migratory or venturesome turn of
mind. Tlio government is preparing
to build a railroad in Alaska, which
is tho first actually momentous step
towards that country's development.
The people of the United States will
hear a great deal more about this big
territorial possession in future than
they have heard In the past.?(Louis
rillc Courier-Journal.)
3AUGHTER EXPOSES
MOTHER'S MARKSMANSHIP
As is well known here, Mrs. Peter
Vachon and her little daughter, Con
stance, are down river at the fox farm
)perated by the brothers, helping him
ook after it this wlncr. while John
I'achon and family are on the Out
side.
The foxes require much meat and
?abbits aro bought at ten cents a head
rom whomever has them to soil. Con
sequently Mrs. Vachon, being fond of
mnting, gets out frequently with a
;un and kills rabbits for the foxes.
She is also operating a string of snares
his winter with considerable success.
Cppt. McCann tells a good story of
icr and little Constance. Ho has been
:arrylng the mall down river and the
ithcr day met Mrs. Vachon, her maid
rnd Constance up the tra^ The two
vomen were looking after Tae snares
tut Constance had hold of a dead rab
?lt and she climbed into the mall sled
or a ride to the house. The captain
emarked to her that the rabbit seem
d to bo bleeding a wholo lot, whore*
ipon Constanco took away his iTrcath
vlth the following withering retort:
"It ought to. Mamma shot it eight
r ten timos."?(Fairbanks News-Min
"HIS AMERICAN GIRL
MAY BE "VICEREINE"
LONDON, Jan. 8.?Following in the
ootstcps of the beautiful Lady Cur* ,
on. onco head of the Euglioh "court"
a India, and her American girl may
session. This is the Countess of
Grannrd, formerly Miss Beatrice Mills
of New York, whoso husband, the Earl
of (iranard, is seeking tho Lord Lieu
tonacy of Ireland. Lady Grannrd, her
friends say. would prove tho ideal
"vicereine" not only because of her
ability and tact, but because of the
great Mills wealth, which would en
able her to entertain elaborately.
MADRID.?A most interesting evi
dence of the cleverness of enterpris
ing spirit of the American woman is
;ho International Institute for Girls,
an American school with branches in
both Madrid and Barcelona, and whore
American women are teaching Span
ish girls according to the best meth
ods. The field is large, for tho lat
est government census showed that
o\ r. fifty per cent, of Spanish women
can neither read nor write. Both of
tho schools are flourishing boyond ex
pectatblns.
PARIS.?The war has given rise to
much apprehension in the labor sec
tion~of the National Council of French
women, regarding a possiblo lowering
of tho wages of women workers, that
would destroy the efforts of many
years. Mme. Achillo Duchesne, presi
done of the. council, is leading an "ef
fort in opposition to the exploitation
of workers at this time and urging re-t
lief workors not to lntcrfcro In the du- ;
ties of paid labor.
PHILADELPHIA?Exclusive society
circles are Btirred over tho announce
ment that Miss Lucy Dahlgrcn, heir
ess. dobutanto of barely two soasons,;
and connected with tho famous Drex-}
el family, is to take the veil and be
come a missionary among tho negroes
and Indians. Ilor cousin, Miss Kath
arine Drexcl, took the veil in 1899, and
has since contributed over a million
dollars to religious work. Miss Dahl- I
gren is 22 years old, and hor debut In
Now York In 1912 was brilliant.
I
Mrs. Joseph Fels, widow of the fa-;
mous Singlo Tax propogandist, is bo-1!
ginning active preparation for cam-'
paigning on the platform to continue J
tho work of her husband In behalf of; I
tho single tax idea. Sho is determined !
to dovotc her time' and fortuno to the i
movement. Sho cpolco in Chicago and; I
Clncluuall rccontly, and has made an j
extended tour In the^South and the' i
West.
CINCINNATI?The Duchess of Man
chester. formerly Miss Helena Zlm
morman, of this city has arrived in
Cincinnati from England to attend tho
funeral of her father, Eugene Zim
*? ^ rnrnt"iur'i/K'^mum'msmBam
merman, railroad magnate and a mul
ti-millionaire. The Duchess is the
solo heir to the fortune, estimated at
above five millions. Through the
death of the financier, his British son
in-law, of whom he always vigorous
ly disapproved, will become a very
rich man.
His graco was lately reported as try
ing to make money?and failing-2-In
a moving plcturo enterprise.
ST. LOUIS.?Tho marriage of tho
Rt. Rev. Frederick F. Johnson, co-ad
jutor bishop of the Protestant Epis
copal church of Missouri and destin
ed to become tho head of the church
in his state, to Miss Elizabeth Boers,
of Newtown, Conn., will take place this
month. Miss Beers Is a cousin of the
bishop's first wife, who died in 1001.
The "million dollars debut" is the
term by which society knows the fete
recently given by Mr. and Mrs. Au
gust Busch for their second daughter.
Miss Clara Busch at Sunset Inn. The
affair wns the most'brilliant and cost- j
ly of Its kind ever given in tho West.
BOSTON.?Camillo Clifford, once aj
scrubwoman in New York, and later
through her bdauty one of the stars
of musical comedy, falls heir to mil
lions through the death of her hus
band, Capt. Henry Lyndhurqt Bruce,
of tho Royal Scot Guards, recently
killed in buttle in France. The cap
tain's wife was at first ostracized, but
later welcomed in England.
Miss Helen Leghorn, a popular so
ciety girl, -is soon to wed Senor Don
Alfonzo Washington Pezot, son of the
Peruvian minister to tho United States
and a rising dramatist.
Miss Mary A. Barr, a working and
business woman, has been chosen a
member of tlio State Board of Charity.
She holds tho federal government con
tract for teaming here, and employes
50 men and trucks.
WASHINGTON.?According to tho
Bureau of Kducation, women arc mcro
and more being sought as truant offi
cers, College graduates and social
workers arc frequently engaged In the
work.vthc old type of "kod cop" of
rough and ready kind being rapidly
dispensed with.
VE HAVE IT?Butler, M&Uro Drug
?nwrinwmii iiii 11 imi n
Start _ the day right with a |
Breakfast of
?: ARTICLES MENTIONED IN THIS SPACE
jp ARE FAR BELOW COST
MEN'S SHOES?Black and Tan, lace
:;;: and button. From the best makers,
\:z: $5.00, $6.00 and $7.00 shoes, bro
i1::: ken sizes and lots?
jl- SS.B50&159&
MEN'S 35c and 50c Cashmere Hose,
IF. good weight, fancy and plain?
i glpilpr*
:;F ODD LOT of Rain Coats, sizes 34 to
37?
Fv YOUR CHOICE of c AA
? These Coats for
;;;;
j::| FOUR-IN-HAND Silk Ties that sell
I! ? ? regularly at 50c apiece?
"ii YOUR CHOICE of these
Very Fine Ties, Each ^d'C
;;F MEN'S Soft Hats, all styles and col
li ors, broken lines, $3.00 and $3.50
IY hats?
HAVE A LOOK. An $| AA
? e; Excclcnt Bargain at i51?Uy
YOUR choice of any of these odd
coats and vests, sizes from 34 to 37
YOUR CHOICE O flA
COAT AND VEST
LADIES' SHOES?A few button,
mostly lace with welts and turned
soles; shoes worth three times the
price asked. Broken lots and sizes,
while they last?
YOUR CflOICE of ?r| en
These Fine Shoes. Pair at
A FINE, large lot of shirts, cuff at
tached and detached fancy patterns
tind plain; mighty good values?
$1.50 and $2.00 values?
YOUR CHOICE at ff i A A
a Great Saving, Each J31o\lvr
THAT for qualities and quantities in
volved and for extraordinary low
ness of prices has never been sur
passed in the history of this store.
All bargains in overcoats and rain
coats at?
SSil per cent Off
?
? ? :;:!; m m i i i i i i i i m ?i-m-h-i-h
*
During the holidays we always stock
heavily on good stationery. Our sales
wero larger, but we have decided to
close out tho odds and ends at 25%
reduction. They are on sale now und
will bo for one wook.
Writing paper Is always needed but
in opportunity to-buy at theso prices
seldom comes.
You always get a little more than
what you pay for at?
The Reliable Rexall Store.
BAGGAGE AND GENERAL HAULING
A. H. HUMPHERIES Tplpnhnnp<;- 0FFICE 238
VALENTINE BUILDING leiepnOlTO. barn as
AT,ASK"A MT^AT rOMPANY John Reck, Mgr. ;
Wholesale and Retail Butchers
Manufacturers of all Krada of Sausages Our Hams and Bacon Are
Home-Smoked
If AL ASK AN HOTEL I f
I WINTER -RATES J 1
THE ALASKAN HOTEL will quote winter rates for permanent room- I i~
ers, warm, well lighted rooms, with or without private bath, from Oct 1 1 |
to April 1, at reasonable rates. - p p ,r; ? See Mftnagement for Prices [J j
? TTT?'grrr? .MB !??-?"Tr-wr~~{^g:g/

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