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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, February 16, 1915, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020657/1915-02-16/ed-1/seq-5/

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AS Cost and Less
' 1 ?? . . ????? ? ?? ? ?
ijlThe Grocery stock is nearly all gone but you
^ still have a chance to save big money on j
WORK CLOTHES, BOOTS, SHOES and UN
DERWEAR. :: = ? - :: :: ::
$5.00 Pants . . . $3.10
5.00 Underwear . . 3.00
4.50 Underwear . . 2.25
Buy for future needs NOW; it will pay you BIG
J?
JAMES McKANNA
FERRY WAY, Across from C. W. Yoong's Plumbing Shop
-?? ; ? 1
I BIG REDUCTION
ON
IBALMACANS
"The Huh"?
Willoughby Meat
Market and Grocery
JUST OPENED?Fine line of Fresh ?n?
Silt Meats. Fish of all varieties. Also a
choice line of Green. Fsacv and Staple
? Groceries =====
M. V. JOHNSON, Proprietor
Willoeghbjr Way. End of Plan! Wall j
JOHN MUIR AT THE PEARLY GATE
(By .Marshall Dawson)
Before Now Jerusalem's pearly gate
Stood our John Mulr, called now "the
late."
The warder looked his passport o'er.:
Then sent a cherub on before
To tako John through tho stroets of
gold
Which greet the good sheep of tho
fold.
The gato swung wide. John looked;
ahead,
| Then lingered and bowed low his hoad
As If in pangs of spirit death?
I hoard him sob beneath his breath.
Tho cherub beckoned. John saw not;
"Warder," he murmured, "you forgot.
Your city Is surpassing fair
But Kcan't breathe the city air.
Have you-a mountain hore? Not one?
No Oiyinpus? Well, then, I'm done.
Back to the Sierras lot mo go;
.My spirit shall be in hor alpenglow;
My voice shall speak in the breath of
hor pines;
I'll not bo cramped in your city con
fines. *
DELMONICO
BEST PLACE IN THE CITY FOR GOOD
Oyitert, Crab* and Fisb of all Kinds !
GOOD STEAKS AND CHOPS
0"J* Dinner st Reasonable Prices W |
? ~j
? BasliajJe and Genera. Hauling o
? | coal: coal:: | ?
t A. 0. HOMPHEKIES Tabactw BIJ-. %
"f Tolepboaesi Office 238: 6?> 226 ^
?
C W. WINSTEDT
ARCHITECT
SUPERINTENDENT
0ffle?--2ad Floor. Next to new Post Office
Throngh my Sierras free I'll range.
For no walled Paradiso I'd change
Their unlmprisoncd majesty
From ovcry great Sequoia treo.
From ever}- waterfall that roars.
From ever}- climbing peak that soars.
I'll sing my 3ongs to earth and sky,
And kindle a spark In the passerby."
FINANCE n
(Cincinnati Enquirer.)
A man doesn't bavo to be an export;
accountant to discover that It Is very
much cheaper to have chicken for;
dinner than to take chicken to dinner.
"ADVENTURES OF KATHLYN."
At the OrpLeum, Thursday and Fri
day, the lSth and 19th. Those attend
ing on thos? dates will get a souvenir
picture of Kathlyn Williams. Watch
The Empire for further announce
ments. 2-15-3t.
ALASKA MEAT COMPANY John Reck. Mgr.
Wholesale and Retail Butchers
Manufacturers of al! Kinds of Sausages Oar Hams and Bacon Are |
s Home-Smoked
ISOLD ON 55 YEARS RECORD 1 THE MM WHO" I!;
sraa?;ra~ul is big enough
f to profit by experience gets on 'k
[ the smoothest.
By buying a "cheap" stove
3 or ranS? y?u makc a ?***??
By buying a Charter Oak, you r
Jr^'- '' do not make a mistake, you :
save fuel, trouble and money c
i ' in the end
Profit by the experience of those who have used Charter Oak ?
| Stoves and Ranges.
.For Sale By THE JUNEAU FURNITURE COMPANY
**Tbo Porno Fornlaben" Cor. 3rd and Seward Sta.
Pianos and Piano Players
EDISON DIMOND DISC I COLUMBIA TALKING '
PHONOGRAPHS I MACHINES
VICTOR VICTROLAS
15,030 Recordb for All MacLlnos. Micct Mnslc, Small Musical Insturmcnts
THREE STORES
JUNEAU MUSIC HOUSE
J f>. L. GRAVES, Mg<".
REXALL DRUG STORE FRONT STREET DRUO STORE j
Douglas, Alaska. Douglas, Alaska,
ELMER E- SMITH, Prop
[ SPECIALS 0N GROCERIES 11
IFor a few days we are offering several SPEGMLS
on GROCERIES. It will pay yon to come and I j
see os before boying elsewhere. $ fi 0 t 9 |
H. J. RAYMOND SBS |
American aborglne, brown or bronze
Hklnncd, mac sometlmof- called tho
"redskin", ami to whom the name In
I dlan came to bo applied through a
' typhographlcal error of tho early ex
plorers, has come In for a large meas
ure of deep Btudy at tho hands ofl
anthropologists, ethnologists and oth
er sclontlflc men.
One of tho favorite explanations of
tho presence of this man on the con
tinent we now call homo Is that tho
Indian Is or was a Mongolian and
came from Asia to tho land called
America, instoad of crossing from Si
beria by way of tho Aleutian Islands
and Bering Strait and then Journeying
southward and eastward-Into htB land
of promise.
Thore are those men of sclontlflc
attainments who tenaciously hold to
the opinion that tho man we call an
Indian never bhd any connection with
Asia and la In'no way related to tho
Mongols, tho Tartars, tho Chinese,
or tho Iletutlans. Tho contention of
those learned gentlemen is that tho
Indian was an Egyptian or a Carthas
inlan, or ono of the races or peoples
occupying those parts of tho world.;
and that he crossed to this land In |
thoso remote ages when Atlantis, the!
fabled continent, which tho classic au-.'
thors hinted at lay between tho shores J
of Africa and what is now known as
the Eastern cost of America. He!
camo this "far to tho West before three!
thousand or more miles of deep green
salt sea rolled and boomed and glist
ened between the old world and the
new.
And still there aro other grave mon j
who avow that our Indian came nel-i
ther from Asia nor Africa, but that ho j
came from Europe, and these gentle-,
mon are divided among themselves i
into groups, ono holding the opinion>
that ho was a Gaul, another that hej
was a Welshman, another that ho was:
an frlsmiin. Perhaps ono might find
give assurance that the American in
dlan whs originally a Scotchman;- an
Epgllshmnn, a Gorn'mn or a Swede.
So many opinions aro hold by. wis?
men as to the origin of the Indian'
that It Is porhaps not unreasonable
that there should bo olthor confusion
or lndlfferoiico on this subject In the
lay of the mind.
But tho list of those men holding
views as to tho Indian's origin has not
yet been,exhausted. There Is a com
bination of geologists and ethnologist
who bolloved that tho Indian?tho man
whom few Americans have honorod
and whom tew do honor?was the or
iginal mac. They boliore that he was;
tho first man of tho earth. Among
geologists aro those who boliovc that
this land which wo calltho new world,
and sometimes tho new continent. Is
tho oldest land In the world. They
bollovo that tho first part of this con
tinent to appear above the seas that
enwrapped the world was that part
called the Laurothalan hills, north of
Lnko Suporlor. Tho "old world" of
Europo, Asia and Africa, had not then
boon poked Its mountain tips abovo
tho an-oncompasslng flood. That was
many, many, almost unthinkable ages
ago.
At tho recent meeting In Philadel
phia of tho Geological Society of
America, ono ol the dlstlngulscd men
of tho United States geological survey j
read a paper In which he gave as his?
opinion that the age of tho curth is
about 100.000.00 years. It is believed,
by some men that the first man ap
peared In that early land around Lake
Superior and that the Indian Is de
scended from that man. However,
thero aro so many expert opinions as
to tho origin of the Indian that there
Is probably room for. a few more.
DONDONAED'S GREAT SECRET
mm
Several weeks ago The Emplro con-j
tained an account of Lord Duudon
wald's great secret for the annlhilia
tlon of an enemy. The following ac-j
count from Tho People, a London
newspaper, Is the sequel of tho story: j
"From time to time during the lastj
hundred years or so, everyone has
heard of Lord Dundonald's plan for:
tho total annihilation of an enemy
but the disclosure of the secret has
ocen left to Lord Ellenborough, who,
In his book, "Tho Guilt of Lord Coch
rane In 1813," gives details of the hi j
??ention. In brief, the plan Is death;
by* suffocation from sulphurous flames'
and is sot out as follows as proposed
for use in the Crimean War:
"Memorandum:
" 'Materials required from tho expul
sion of the Russians from Scbastopol:
" 'Experimental trials have shown
that about five parts of coke effectu
ally vaporize one part of sulphur. Mix
tures for land servlco where weight
Is of lraportunco say, however, probab
ly bo suggested by Prof. Faraday; as
to operations on shore, I paid some lit
tle aftentinon.
" 'Four or flvo hundred tons of sul
phur and two thousand tons of coke
would bo sufficient.
' 'Besides these materials It would:
bo necessary to have, say as much bl-,
luminous coal and a couple of thou-!
sand barrels of gas, or other tar. for
tho purposo of making fortifications
to bo attacked or others that flank tho
assailing positions.
"'A quantity of dry firewood, chips,!
shavings, straw, hay, or other such
combustible materials would be re
quired for tho kindling of fires, which
ought to be kept In readiness for tho!
first fnvorablo steady breeze.
" 'Aug. 7, 1855.
" 'DUNDONALD.'
Insurmountable Drawback
"Lord Ellenborough points out, how-.
KUSKOKWIM .S NOT
THE RIVER OF DOUBT
The Kuskokwim will no longer bo
Alaska's "river of doubt." The socro
tary of commerce announces that a
field party of the coast and'goodctic!
survey, after threo years' labor, in tho
short season, has succeeded In chart
lug a practicable navigable channel
from Bering Sea weir into its mouth, j
This is practical work- for tho open- j
ng or Alaska, while tho Alaskans 'are;
waiting for tho government at Wash- j
over, that 'if these enormous amounts
of combustibles had been stored in
our trenches before Sobastapol a hos
tile shell might have ignited them
whllo wo wore waiting for a wind to
blow the smoke in the right direction,
driven from our own trenches.' The
Duudonald plan was first submitted
to the British government in 1811. At
once a committee was appointed to
examine it. The Duke of York, sec
ond son of Georso 111., was the chair
man. and among his colleagues were
Admirals Lord Keith and Lord Ex
mouth and Sir W. Congrove. the in
ventor of the military rocket. Lord i
Dundonald claimed that his dovicoi
afforded 'infallible means of securing i
at one blow our maritime superiority
and of thereafter maintaining it In I
perpetuity,' and 'that no power on the
earth could stand against the attack."
Whllo the committee agreed that his
Lordship hnd not claimed too much,
they would not recommend it for adop
tion because its destructivoacss wub
too great. So nothing was done. No
matter how earnestly Lord Daudon
ald pleaded ho could not movo the
government.
Why It Was Never Tried.
"Again, In 1846, when trouble with
Franco was feared, ho urged the Min
isters to take advantage of it. Anoth
er committee confirmed the opinion of
the Duke of York's that the plan was
certain to bring victory to our arms.
Still, the government would have noth
ing to doxwith it. During tho Crimean
War tho government was twice ap
approached. On the-second occasion
thoy cnuic near to acceptance, for Se
bastopol Btlir appeared to bo impreg
nable. But as tho government dosir
od that engineers' officers should use
it, and Lord Dundouald insisted that
no one should use it but himself, once
more the opportunity passod?and
Lord Dundonwald died in I860."
ington to build that $35,000 000 fall
road through another part of the big
Territory. Tho river, which will now
bo opened for COO miles Inland, Is hoc
ond only in sire to tho tnngniflccnt Yu
kon. It Hob south of that more cele
brated stream, parallels It for some
distance, and the two watersheds Join.
Tho difficulty about getting Into the
Kuskok'wltn Is a characteristic of the
river mouths In Alaska?vast mud
flats. Its mouth is nine rnllc9 wide,
but because of extensive shallows, the
Kuskokwlm has been a monr.ee and n
mystery, as the Yukon formerly was.
Its submerged Hats arc said to extend
a hundred miles out to sea. Now that
tho coast survey has found a way
through aud over them, thousands of
squnro miles of mineral, grazing and
agricultural country will, in due course,
be put In direct communication by riv
or boats with the ocean steamships
that como into the bay.?(Providence
Journal.)
SHINGLE MILL STARTS.
The Wrangcll Shingle Company
started operation last Monday morn
the mill pounding until late in tho
With both mills starting this wcok,
mcr nnd prosperity Is coming our.way.;
--(Wrangell Sentinol.)
%nianiffi Correct (Mfos
c \ v ?=y<i
-H-H-I-H-l"!'H I.i 1[ 1-ri 14*
Gambling j 11
OtberName iill
In buying the necessities of ;;;;
life million^ are lost, to the
thousands lost in actual gam- j';;
Ming. And this is so because
the average person has a prej- !i
udice bom of foolish pride or ;:~
is prone to "take a chance." *\\\
In the matter of clothes, if a ;;;;
man be prejudiced in favor of ;;;;
the custom-tailor he will pg;y
forty dollars for a suit no bet- - *;
ter than the high grade ready- !! ?
to-wear suit at twenty-five, ! i i
If prone to take a chance, he
buys an ill-fitting, shoddj-, ?;"*
"ready-made," simply because Jv
it is a few dollars cheaper than f i i
a suit of. real intrisic worth.
There is a lesson in the econ
omy that satisfies in j.;;
I Irajamtn (ttorrat (Eiothps I
maob iiv alfred benjamin-washington company Nrw VOUK
;;l! For Men and Young Young Men?$25.C0 to $37.50 ?
v '
?jv Distintive in material, absolutely correct in 6ut, and faultless in workman
y ship, they bear the unmistakable ear-marks of the'master-designer and mas
ter-tailor, yet cost, no more than suits obviously inferior in every respect. ;k:
Fabrics that run the entire gamut of good taste, and models sufficiently va
ried for you to select just the one that best expresses your individuality.
I B. M. Behrends Company, Inc. I
? - ? -? .v. V" Lurr." zmn
!?|McKannaTransfer j |
FREIGHT?COAL?BAGGAGE f
light and Hcary llaailni! <>( ?I1 Kindt
Office 127-129 Front St. ,
ALASKA'S TRADE.
The report of the collector of cus
toms for the district of Alnska for the '
j cplondur year 191-1, recently trans-!
mitted to Washington, shows that the
treat northorn country has not been
materially affected by the depression
ilsewhcre. although that depression
did retard some Important develop
ments and reduced the price and pro-!
dilution of copper and some fish pro
ducts. Had it not been for this, tho[
year's transactions would have beoh ?
the largest In the history of Alaska! :
As it is, tho showing Is a great one.;'
During tho year Alaska's imports, the
greater portion from the United States'
were valued at $25.849,944, while Its
oxportB were valued at $44,614,056. The ;
total- value of Alaska's commcrco was
greater than that of the year, 1913,
but slightly short of that of 1912.
Contrary to the Impression which
prevails olscwherc, tho greatest value'
of Alaska's oxports was not In gold.
Tho exports of domestic gold and sil
ver to the United States wag but $14,
722,905, but little over one-third of the
total exports of the territory. Its fish
eries products alone are more valuable
than the output of tho mines of Al
aska.
Considering how little has been done
for the protection of vessels engaged
In Alaska's trade. It Is worthy of more
than passing note that during the .
year 805 vessels entered and 810 clear
ed In the domestic trade of Alaska
and 378 entered and 349 cleared in the
foreign trade, making a total of 1.183 ' I
vossols entered at the custom house. ;
These vessolu during this year car- .
riod Just short of 50,000 pas30tigers
Here is a commorco of $70,464,640 '
in annual valuo, employing nearly 1,- ;
200 vcBseis, carrying 50,000 passengers ?
'or tho protection of which Congress
refuses "to make appropriations at all ?
adequate to the needs, notwlihstand- '
ing tho urgent appeals made by the -
Department of Commorce. ? (Seattle
Post-IntelUgeucer.)
MYTH OF THE BURNED WITCHES ;i
'Paying Its rospoct!. to the "Now ?
England conscience" ns "a ghost that I
will not down,'* iho Herald revives n ;
myth that will not down when It says,
"At such wholesome sport ns witch- |
burning the New England conscience -
Thoro were a scoro or so of indi- -
vlduals hanged In connection with tho !
b'a'cm witchcraft delusion, but none '
v. an burned. Yet the popular trail I .
on when even Qallswb- Hill Itself Is -
foryotton. Trcvolyan -raid in, substance ?
!hat trough a mistake of nlatory may I
years it can never to corrected. Or- I
rcct this particular myth In more thon ?
two centuries, and doubtless It will ;
be bollcved while the sacred ci*
hangs In tho State House at Boston
in no branch of historical rescarc
has there latterly been more palm
taking work than In dispelling the In
accuracies of "popular" '"history?Ii
giving new certificates of character t
N'erojj, muckraking the Fathers of th
itepiiblic and removing tho haloe
fiOin the great. Yet. the more th
record Is sot straight, tho more th
old myths enduro.?(Now York World
GOO GOO!
(Chicago News.)
There's a great difference In thi
last words of fnmous men; but tho!
first words aro all about the Bamc.
IT WOULD SEEM EASY.
? V ?
(Chicago Herald.)
There shouldn't to any troublo cs
tabliship^ a popular government li
Moxico. considering the sort of gov
crnmcnt that seems to be the mos
popular In that country.
QUALIFIED.
(Chicago Herald.)
Tho British .control of the sea Is ai
present a monopoly tcmpored by sub
marines.
L >" ? l*M" I
'? WHEN YOU ARE SICK, SEE A DOC
5 TOR!?and thon take'your prcscrlp
l" lions and have thorn-filled whv'ro Ac
11 curacy Is a Habit.
o I _
The Reliablo Rcxail Sioro.
? | Everybody reads the empire. Ad
vertise in it.
For first class tailoring go to F. Wolland, Third St, second door ?
v from the Post Office. Besides carrying the largest stock of woolens X
? nnd tailorB' trimmings he has the best equipped tailor shop and cm- a
X ploys the best of workmen. As for styles of fashion ho keeps tho
< > most popular and highest in the Sartorial Art Calendar. . >
lr you patronize Wolland you will get what you order and pay ? |
lor what you revolve. Cnil In, if it Is only for a visit; always glad !,
'' to receive visitors. <1
| F. WOLLAND ~~1T~ :: PHONE 66 J
: Enamel | Ware |
I PRICES RIGHT NEW STOCK H
I 1 I __J^
IE LJ I?:
I SEE OUR'WINDOWS J ,
j; Every purchaser is "tickled to death"
with the "IMP" Chimney Cleaners <?
PRICE, 25 CENTS THEY WORK
? > . < ?
i+0?0?0???00?000?00?0???0O00?????<>???g+?O??0?0??+ o
Alaska Supply Company ii

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