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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, February 18, 1915, Image 1

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VOL. V., NO. 698. JUXEAU, ALASKA, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 1915. , , ... PRICE TEN CENTS.
NEW SHIPS
MAY TRADE
IN ALASKA
WASHINGTON, Feb. 18?The ships
purchased under the administration
ship-purchase bill, if it should become
a law, will be permitted to engage In
the Alaska traffic. Such was brought
out in the course of the debate in
the House. While the bill was being
discudsed there Representative Al
bert Johnson, of Washington, asked
the question as to whether or not,
under the amendment adopted In the
Democartic caucus, vessels of foreign
bottoms, bought under the terms of
the bill, could trade directly from the
Atlantic with Alaska. The answer
was in the affirmative.
Representative Raymond B. Stev
ens, of New Hampshire, who subse
quently bolted the caucus got the cau
cus to write in Alaska.
President Says Ship Bill Safe.
WASHINGTON. Feb. IS.?Presidentj
Wood row Wilson said today that there j
will be no need for an extra session':
of Congress, but that the ship-pur
chase bill and other necessary legisla
tion will be adopted.
ASK THAT CAPITOL
CONSTRUCTION START
Business men of Juneau are discus
sing the Idea of taking organized ac
tion to hasten the beginning of con
struction work on tbo Juneau capitol:
building as soon as the civil sundry
appropriation bill shall have passed !
the Senate. Tho bill provides for a
continuation of the work, and appro-,
priates $75,000 additional money for;
that purpose.
Of the or'ginal appropriation for a ?
Juneau public building $177,500 re-i
malncd after the site and the work
of investigating the foundation wero
paid for. This sum is still available,
and the addition of the $75,000 carried
In the sundry civil bill will increase
the total available sum to $252,500.
This is $375 000 less than Secretary
of the Treasury William G. McAdoo
has estimated that will be required
for the building, but it is enough to
pay for all the work than can be per
formed before another Congress con
venes. which can make additional
funds available.
The delay upon the beginning of the i
building has been due to the fact;
that since the original appropriation!
was made it was decided that more
money would be required. The last!
Territorial Legislature memorialized I
Congress to appropriate ?500,000 addl-:
tionaL Gov. J. F. A. Strong and Gov.;
Walter E. Clark had asked for more ;
money. On the I7th of last March
Secretary of the Treasury McAdoo in
a letter to Delegate James Wlckor
sham called his attention to the mem
orial of the Alaska Legislature, and
stated that his Department bad decid
ed that 5450.000 additional money?
making 5627.500 all told?would bo
sufficient to erect a building large
enough to accommodate the business
of the Federal government and thc:
Territorial government at Juneau,
and suggesting that he introduce a
bill making the appropriation. Dele
gate Wickersham promptly compiled
with the request. Introducing the bill |
March 24th last. The appropriations!
committee, in carrying out its pro-;
gram of economy, appropriated only
575.000 for the purpose of "continu
ing" the construction of tho building,
realllng that tho neat Congress could
appropriate tho additional money
needed when required.
George F. Forrest, discussing the
need to get the Department busy
with the construction work, has sug
gested that the Juneau municipal gov-;
eminent, the Commercial Club, and
such other instruments and influences
as are available, should be set in:
motion to get the actual construction
work started as soon as possible so
that thQ building will be available be
fore tho third session of the Alaska
Legislature shall convene in 1917.
Others have agreed with Mr. For
est's suggestion.
The government has a slghtry,
conveniently located and ^ specially!
available building slto between Main;
and Seward and Fourth and Fifth;
streets for the building. J
THE WEATHER TODAY.
Maximum?34.
Minimum?23.
Precipitation?J3 inch.
Cloudy?Snow.
CANNERIES CAN
MINE EUEL AT
GREAT SAVING
Fort}* salmon canneries operating In
Southeastern Alaska can save several
thousands of dollars on thoir coal bills
this summer If they oxamlno caroful
ly the provisions of the now Alaska
coal land leasing act and act accord
ingly.
In an Interview accorded The Em
pire yesterday, Andrew Christenson,
chief of the field division of the gen-'
cral land office pointed out that de
posits of good lignite coal are plenti
ful In Southeastern Alaska, that the
government gives any person or cor-:
ponttion permission to mlno all the1
cost! they want within a 10-acrc tract.!
and that not once cent is charged by
the government.
"Wo will go oven further." Mr. Chrls
tensen said. "Our geological depart
ment shows the applicant where the
coal is. and the government does not
even charge a filing fee." Mr. Chris
tenson added, as an after thought, that
pen, Ink and paper also will be fur
nished, if desired.
It win be remembered that for many;
years the clamor from Alaska has;
been: "If you won't let us mlno tho
coal In the reserved areas, let us have
coal for our own use." And so tho ur
resorved tracts have been opencl, with
almost no restrictions at all to tamper
or discourage the applicant.
Chief Christenson called attention to
the deposits of coal on Admiralty Isl
and. a few miles from Juneau. Any.
one of the deposits indicated on the
maps of tho geologic?., survey could I
produce enough bituminous fuel to op
erate a group of canneries :V. rough ?
season. At the present time the can
neries pay about 59 a ton, delivered
to their plants, for the Canadian arti
cle. Mr. Christenson estimated that
the canneries could mine and haul thej
coal which the government Is willing
to give them, for about 52 a ton.
EUROPEAN WAR ISSUE
IN AMERICAN ELECTION!
PATERSOX. X. J.. Feb. 18.?At the
coming election of commissioners in;
Passaic. X. J., the Issue between pro
Germans and those who take the op-'
posite views of tho war situation will
be joincu. The German-Americans
will put candidates in the field.
TO GERMANY RESTORED,
WASHINGTON. Feb. 18?The 5-cent
postal rate applies oaco more to Ger
man mall due to the war. according
to an announcement by Postmaster
General A. S. Burleson.
LEG1SLAI0RS ARE
COMING TO JUNEAU
-4?
A week from Monday tho second ses
sion of the Alaska Legislature will
assemble here for a sixty-day session.
Tho legislature will be housed on the
Third floor of the Goldstein Block.
The legislators will begin to arrive
tonight on the Mariposa, and it is
expected that overy member will bel
on hand by the tho time the session
opens. The special election will be
held at Nome a week from Saturday,,
to fill the vacancy In the Senate,
caused by the death of El\u)od Brun
er.
Senator J. M. Tanner will arrive
from Skngway next week. Senator
Charles A. Sulzer is on his way back
North from an Eastern trip, and Sen
ator Frank Aldrich Is hero. Senatos
B. F. M.liard and 0. P. Hubbard
from tho Third division and Senator,
O. P. Gaustad of Fairbanks are ex-'
pected to arrive on an early boat from!
the Westward, possibly tonight. Sen-!
ator Dan Sutherland will come North;
from Seattle.
A. G. Shoup, member of the
House, is expected to arrivo from Sit-;
ka Saturday morning on the S. S.
Georgia, and will make an active cam-j
palgn for the Speakership. It is under
stood.
Assemblymen J. P. Daly. Nato
Coombs. W. W. Gotchcll and Martin
MoraD, of tho Socond division, are In
tho States. Representative Dan Dris
coll of Fairbanks is in Portland. Rep
resentative C. K. Snow of Ruby is>
expected here soon, 03 aro E. B. Col-;
11ns and W. T. Burns, also of tho!
Fourth division. Tho members of the
Third division delegation. T. B. Tan-|
sy, John Noon, Thomas Holland and!
Charles A. Day, are reported to be
on the way. It is reported that Rep.
J. R. Heckman. of the First division,
is leaving San Francisco this week. ;
SEATTL0TES
WASHINGTON, Feb. IS. ? Falcon;
.JosTIr: and Clyde L. Morris, formorly j
of Alaska but now residents of Seat-|
tie. aro hero seeking to seoure con
struction contracts on tho government
railroad In Alaska.
Falcon JosOn built the Tanana rail
road, and C. L. Morris Is president of
the C. L. Morris Construction com
pany which built most of tho rail
road mileage in tho Seward peninsula
country.
In behalf of them it is being urged
that tho government will got botter
results if the construction work is;
done by contract.
4-4- -f'4* 4- -I- 4- 4- 4- 4- 4- 4- ? 4?i
4- CABLE REPAIR SHIP v
? 3URNSIDE IS COMING 4-j
?
4- SEATTLE. Feb. 18.?Tho ca- 4
?> bleship Burnsidc will sail for
? Alaska today to repair the Unit- 4
? od States cable near Sitka. ?>
-t- The steamer Spokane will 4
4- sail for Alaska tonight. *
v
4- -> 4 ?> 4- 4- 4- 4- 4- 4- 4- 4- +*?> 4- 4- +
G. A. R. COMMANDER
IS AT SEATTLE,;
for the purpose fit addressing the:
Union Civil War veterans of the Do i
partment of Washington and Alaska.
MEXICAN RAILWAY TO
CLOSE AMERICAN OFFICES
NEW YORK, Fob. 18.?National rail
ways of .Mexico officials learn from
Mexico City that at tho end of this
present month traffic and soliciting
agencies of tho road in Now York,;
Chicago and San Francisco aro to be.
closed. Branches at Sati Antonio. New
Orleanu and St. Louis aro already shut,
up. The company will ceaso to have
any agenciot. of this character In the
United States.
SENATE WILL INVESTIGATE
SEVERAL SENATE CONTESTS
nr \ etrrxf/^nnrvxT 10 ^hnMVAo i
>> ;ionn^u i i oo. AW. V/M
Involving corruption In the election of
Senators Jacob H. Galllnger, of Now
Hampshire: Frank B. BrandegOO, of
Connecticut; Boles Penrose, of Penn
sylvania, nnd L. Y. Sherman, UIi|
nois, and Senators-Elect Warren G
Hardlng, of Ohio: J. C. W. Beckham,]
of Kentucky, and Oscar \V. Under
wood, of Alabama, have resulted In;
the appointment of a Senalo commit-;
tee to Investigate the charges.
DANCE l'O CROWN
"MASONIC WEEK";
Tonionow night will mark the con
clusion of the Masonic ceremonial :
which has been in progress undor the
direction of ErneBt B. Hussey, of Se
attle, all week. Nearly forty candi
dates have been going through the de
grees up to the thirty-second. A ban
quet tomorrow night will bo given, in
honor of the class.
Saturday night tho Shrlners' baTl
will bo given in the rink and tho indl-:
cations are that It will be one of tho!
most brilliant parties ever given In Al
aska.
Tho committees are as follows:
Glad Hand?Gov. J. F. A. Strong,!
Royal Arch Gunnison, B. M. Bohrcnds.j
John Rustgard, Z. R. Cheney, Jai
Chrl8toc. J. W. Martin, James Hogan,:
H. T. Tripp. J. c. McBride, Isa Gold-}
jr., Wi H. Case. E. Webster, John T.
Reed. J. W. Beir, Lloyd V. Winter,
Paul Blocdhorn. Chas Goldstein, C. S. 1
Llndsey. Joo Woodford.
Hall and Decorations?Fred Smith,;
We Frye, D. M. Dothwell, V. N.-Du-J
puy, Walter DeLong, Aleck Pruoslng.j
M. E. Baker, W. W. Casey, Merle'
Thomas and V. J. Kub'n. j
Refreshments?L. S. Ferris. H. C.
Daniels, Ben Learning, Wm. Foils and
Howard Ewliig.
Music?R. H. Stevens, D. J. Kinzic,
Archlo Lewis.
Invitation?H. H. Post, R. J. Wulzcn,
V. A. Palno, C. G. McKlnnon. F. B.
Hyder.
Dance?J. L. Muaeth, Sumner Smith
Reporting a WtTo with n terrific,
storm on tin Taku Saturday morning,'
tho little launch Flora, thought to have j
passed through tho worst experience j
tho storios they tell of the storm, and
Charles Gsrside. who heMcd the
party, says tho launch was tossed
was only after tho little craft'3 nose!
had boon kept pointed Into tho tgeth
ery member of. the party was soaked i
by an Indian carapor. The picking up
the wanderers: ' *
"JTh-.: delay Of, the hunter!; in return
that for two days they have been
they feared had been lost.
U. S. STEEL INCREASES
CAPACITY 25 PER CENT.
NEW YORK. Feb. 18.?The Now
York American financial column says:
"The number of mon employed by the
United States Steel Corporation has
been increased-25 per cent, since De
cember. The volume of business has
increased a similar percentage during
tho same period.
Erie Increases Orders
NEW YORK, Feb. 18.?The Erie
railroad has ordered 28,000 tons of
rails or 8000 tons more than was pre
viously expected.
E.lg Foreign Steel Orders.
NEW YORK, Feb. IS?The United
States Steel Products Company has
taken orderB for 7,500 tons of rails for
Russia nnd 10,000 tons for Chile.
- O
LEGISLATURE MAY ELECT
NON-MEMBER AS SPEAKER
SPRINGFIELD, 111.. Feb. 18 -Fail
ure or the House to elect a speaker Is
causing speculation over the possibil
ity of electing someone from outside
urovlnlon cither In the -Constitution or
statuteo that a speaker shall be a
member of the House. Some of the
lawyers of tho House are of the opin
ion that the election of on outsider
would bo logal.
tative Holaday has started a:boom for
former Lieutenant Governor John C.
Oglcsby for speaker,' Other members{
tainlng Secretary of State Lewis G
Stevenson as the permanent speaker.
Tho Houso of Representatives has
temporary organisation. In the mean
tlmo Secretary of State Stevenson has
GERMANY CONTINUES
TO SIEZE GRAIN
COPENHAGEN, Feb. IS.?Tho Gcr-1
man War Grain Company, an organi
zation to acquire all available grain]
FRANCE TO CAPTURE
GREAT POTASH DEPOSITS
PARIS. Fob. 18.?More than ?1Z,
1s retaken. This acquisition alono wlll'l
iargely compensate France for Its im-j
mense war expenditures, The depos
its are known as tbo Nonncnbruche
mines. Thoy are situated on a :<trat
HAMBURG, Feb. 18.?It is uitier
stood here that Emperor William Is
on his way to Heligoland from where
he will personally direct the German!
submarine blockade of British and;
French waters and ports.
Causes Scarcely a Ripple.
suspension of tho service of 3omo of
the Dutch .and Scandinavian lines
across the North Sea to British and
French ports, thoro has nothing oc
curred to indicate that the German
submarine blockade of tho v;ar zone
has been inaugurated. It has causod
ecarcoly a visible ripple.
Tho British admiralty is patrolling
tho waters of tho English channel and
the North and Irish seas with torpe
do boat destroyers, torpedo boats, sub
marines and smafl cruisers, seeking
German submarines fot; the purpose of
Other plans to froo the coast of
Bubmariuct are not disclosed by the
RAINSTORM MARKS FIRST
OAY OF GERMAN BLOCKADE
LONDON. Fob. 18.?A driving rain
storm Is sweeping tho coast and har
bors of Great Britain during tho first 1
day of the Gorman blockade.
..The British people have great con
fidence in their navy, and regnrd it.
as ablV> to carc for the German block
Advlcos received by tbc British ad
miralty are that 100 German submnr
lnou arc ready for blockading pur
?
ROME PAPERS SAY
BLOCKADE IS BLUFF!
ROME, Fob. 18. ? No.wspapers of
this city declare that the entire Ger
man war zone blockade is a gigantic
blue.
LITTLE CHANGE EITHER
IN EAST OR WEST,
LONDON, Fob. 18.?Tho Interest in
London Is chiefly centered In the
starvation war that Is being inaugu
rated by the British and Gorman na
vies.
Advices from Petrograd and othor
news centers Indicate that there has
been little change In the sltuat'.on in
either the aistern or western theatres
GERMANS WOULD LET .
AMERICANS HANDLE FOOD
WASHINGTON. Feb. 18.? Count
Bornstroff, Gorman ambassador, has
suggested that the cargo of foodstuffs
aboard the VVflhelmina, destined for
the use of German civilians, bo hand
led by American consular officials so
as to guarantee that none of the car
go will be put; to military uses.
FLEET TO MOBILIZE.
SAN DIEGO. Cal., Feb. 12-Prepara-;
tlons for the I'aciflc fleet of the United J
States to welcome tho Atlantic fleetj
when tho great International armndaj
comes through the Panama Canal In f
March,, arc going rapidly forward. The;
west coast fleet, made up of the flag-!
ship San Diego, tinder Rear Admiral j
Thomas B. Howard, the crulsors Colo
rado and South Dakota, nlno torpedo
boat destroyers and four submarines,
will mobilize at this port to greet the
war vessels from the Atlantic sea
board. At present the destroyers and
tho submarines are already stationed
here, while, the cruisers arc on pa
trol duty on the Mexican coaBt.
.. Composing tho sreat fleet which will
como through the Panama Canal, will
ho tho famous battleship Oregon, tin :
cruiser Olympia, which won fame at
Manila, twenty-one superdroadnnughts
and battleships and a flotilla of do
stroyera from the American Atlantic
fleet, two armored cruisers from Ar
gentina, two battleships from Brazil
and four cruisers from other South
The Armada v/ill steam up the west
coast to thlsiport, whore tho flrst atop
will he mad-!. Including auxiliaries,
there will ij-s more than sixty war
March when the ships from the Atlan
tic arrive. This will ho the greatest
floot of iwar vessels ever assembled in
.
TODAY LAST Of
PEACE CENTURY
ANNIVERSARIES
-Today la the centennial anniversary)
of tho proclaiming by President;
James Madison and Socrotary of State
James .Monroe (inter President and
proclaimer of the Monroe Doctrine)!
of the treaty of pence between the1
United States and Great Brituln. It
completes tho centcniary dates in con
nection with- the close of the War of
1812. The other centennial date.-, com-1
meinorntcd the signing the treaty of
peace at Ghent, December 2VlS14;j
tho last lighting of importance, at New]
Orleans, January 8, 1815, and the rat-]
ideation of the peace treaty by thc(
United States Senate February 17,i
All of these dates hnvo been ob-;
served in a more or Toss marked man-'
ner wherever American citizens hndi
British subjects have been able to
foregather.
Dawson Sends Greetings Through The i
Empire.
Yesterday evening The Empire re-;
colvcd tho following telegram off
greetings from the Dawson News:
"Dawson Y. T. Fob. 17, 1915,
"Tho Empire,
VJuneau, Alaska.
"Greeting: from Northland's great-,
est placer-camp to greatest quartz'
camp oVer cOnteniary peace America
and Britain. May pence and prosper-!
ity never Cease.
"(signed) DAWSON NEWS."
Dawson News to Gov. Strong.
At the name time Gov. J. F. A.'
Strong received the following telegram:
from the Dawson. News:
"GOV. STRONG: Greetings- and;
congratulations on the anniversary of a1
hundreds years peace between Amcr-J
ica und Great Britain. May it bo per-;
mnneht and the northern no ghborsj
contlnuo to prosper undor the two:
tings.
"DAWSON NEWS."
Tho Empire Acknowledges.
The Empire sent tho following ack
nowledgment of the Dawson News'
greetings this morning:
"Juneau, Alaska, Feb. 18, 1915,
"Dawson Nows,
"Dawson. Yukon Territory:
"It is'fltlinfr that the two leading
communities of the region where the
relationship Is closest between tho cit
izens of tho two most intimately as
eccluted branches of tho people con
corned should exclmngo felicitations
on the completion of a century of Ang
lo Saxon poacc.
"On this centennial anniversary day
of the proclaiming of the Ghent peace
treaty by Pros dent Madison and Sec
rotary of State Monroe, The Empire
acknowledges your greetings written
on the anniversary of the ratification
of that treaty by tho American Senate.
"Let Alaska-Yukon Influence bo ex
erted constantly townrd the end that
tho flve-thousawI-mile-American-Cnna
dlan boundary shall remain unfortified
as a monument to enlightened Anglo
Saxon civilization, and the good sense1
of die American branches of that race. '
"(signed) THE EMPIRE."
BELGIANS CONTINUE TO
LOOK FOR VICTORY;
BRUSSELS, (via London.)?Feb. IS: ]
"The Belgians," said General Von Bis-1
alng, the new governor general of
Belgium, "aro politically undisciplined j
children. They believe their libera ]
tlon from Germany may come at any
tnomont, and they are strengthened
in this belief by the French newspa
pers, as well t.s by some neutral news
papers which continually are smug
gled In.
"When, as frequently happens, a fa
vorable wind brings the sound of can
non to the city, tho Belgians believe
tho long-looked for day has conic. On
several occasions the very dnto for the
return Of King Albert has been set
and no number of disappointments
seem to crush the hopes of the poople.
AMERICAN SHIPPING
CONTINUES TO GROW
WASHINGTON, Feb. 18.? Foreign
vessels to tho number of 123, aggre
gating 455,021 tons, have been admit
ted to American registry under recent
legislation.
SENATE INCREASES RIVERS
AND HARBORS APPROPRIATION
WASHINGTON. Feb. 18.?The Unit
ed States Senate committee on riv
ers and harbors increased die appro
priation;, carried in the bill by 34,000,
000 over tho amount specified It' the
bill as it passed tho house.
GERMANY
TO BANISH
5,000,000
COPENHAGEN, Feb. 18.?Owing to
the necessity of conserving the food
stuffs of Germany, It has been decided
to restrict Its consumption. To make
this more effective, Germany will or- J
der that 5,000,000 of people, who pos
sees Independent Incomes and are in
eligible for military service, leave the
country Immediately for neutral coun
tries.
The exodus of German for the Scan
dinavlan countries, Holland, Switzer
land and the United States will begin
immediately.
kaiseramTking
standing pat
?+?
WASHINGTON, Feb. lS.Tho Brit
ish reply to the American note denies
that the naval acts of Great Britain
will hurt American trade.
The reply says that Great Britain
will not allow food to bo shipped to
Germany on acocunt of the German
organization which makes all food
stuffs subject to government control .
and available for military purposes.
No Embargo on Arms.
President Woodrow Wilson told a
committee that called upon him to
da} that to place an embargo on tho
(shipment of arms would bo a most
un-neutnil act.
GERMAN NOTE FRIENDLY
BUT THAT IS ALL
BERLIN, Feb. 18?The German note
to the United States Is coiched In tho
most friendly terms. It says that Ger
many Is clearly within her rights in
ly tabllshlng a submarine blockade
of British ports bccauao England has
refused to raise the food blockade.
<? ?> <? ?:* -s- + ?:? * +
* AUSTRIANS THREATEN +
?}? ITALIAN BORDER +
*
?J GENEVA, Feb. 18.?Austrl- +
ans are concentrating a large *
4* forco of .troops on tho Italian +
?> border. *
?> v v ?!? v ?!* v *!* 4* ?!* ?) ^
PEACE TALK AMONG
BANKERS OF WORLD
?"S*?
WASHINGTON, Feb. 18.?There is
known to bo a moro or less organized
movement among International finan
ciers towards peace, it is said, which
has for Its purpose, the ending of the
European conflict about May 1st. The
proposal is being discussed among
the bankers of the belligerent powers
as well as by American bankers.
Berlin Note of Despair
AMSTERDAM, Feb. 18.?The Ber
liner Tngoblatt in its leading article
Tuesday said: "Contrary to official
predictions it Is uncertain as to wheth
er Germany's hopes will be fulfilled
and she will be victorious. We know
tho Allies' strength at present, but
not their strength in the future."
German Press Wants Peace.
LONDON, Feb. 18.?A Copenhagen
correspondent of the Telegraph Ex
change Company, of London writes
that lengthy discussions of peace
terms aro appearing in tho German
press, tho attitude of which indicates
a desire to end tho war.
Kaiaer Not Ambitious.
BERLIN, Feb. 18--Thc official press
bureau rave out tho following: "Tho
emperor, in conversation with tho Ger
man author Ganghofor, said recently
that the allegations that ho intended
to lay the foundations of a Gorman
world-wide emplro were ridiculous nou
sense."
SPAIN LOOKS FOR PEACE
BUT NOT SO SOON
-MADRID, Feb. 18.?Senor Reverter,
who Is In closo touch with tho Span
ish foreign office, declared his belief
in n speech In the Senate that a treaty
of peace terminating the European
War will bo signed during the present
year.
Tho Empire circulation leads. Try
advertising In It.

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