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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, February 25, 1915, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020657/1915-02-25/ed-1/seq-5/

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r~"" =*r
At Cost and Less I
?" 1
rhe Grocery stock is nearly all gone but you
still have a chance to save big money on
WORK CLOTHES, BOOTS. SHOES and UN.
DERWEAR. :: :: :: :: :: ::
$5.00 Pants . . . $3.10
5.00 Underwear . . 3.00
4.50 Underwear . . 2.25 -
Buy for future needs NOW; it will pay you BIG
y II. sj
JAMES McKANNA
FERK1 WAY, Across from C. W. Young's Plumbing Shop
? i
j j
Il??I
BIG REDUCTION |
ON
BALMACANS
?"The Hub"? 1
Willoughby Meat
Market and Grocery
JUST OPENED---Fine line of FriIi and
Salt Meats. Fish of all varieties. Also a
choice line of Green. Fancy and Staple
' ' Groceries = I
M. v. JOHNSON, Proprietor
WlHeotftby Way. End of Plank Walk
'
DELMONICO i
BEST PLACE IN THE CITY FOR COOD
Oysters, Crabs and Fish of all Kinds
COOD STEAKS AND CHOPS
W Dinner at Reasonable Prices w
* Baggage and General Hanling ?
| coal: coal:: 11
? A. H. OC.MPBBRIES Valentine BUtf. $! :
J Ttl?pfi??ett Offlc. 236; Barn 226 ? '
C W. WINSTEDT
ARCHITECT
SUPERINTENDENT
0fflce--2a<l Floor, S?t to now Post Office
? ' i
RUSSIA'S VAST HORDES
Gog and Magog seem to March In the
Russian Armies Alone.
Far better than either at Petrogr&d
or Moscow one gets an Impression of
Russia's enormous military strength
In Warsaw, says the New York Her
aid. Every day her soldiers stream
through tho city, types of a dozen na
tions. Through. the city thoy pour,
crowding tho Vienna station and tho
Praga; through tho streets thoy aro
marching. Little Russians, Poles, Li
thuanians, Letts, Ests, Georgians, Cau
casus Tartars, Circaslans, Turkomans,
Finna-Tartar races from the Vologa
and Cossacks, who count as a nation
as well as a cavalry branch.
They give the impression of mil
lions, for to tho untrained eye a single
army corps looks like a million. Some
times there is a lull, and then one
Imagines that tho millions have come
to an end. Then more come. Burlats
and Tchuvaches. And one reads that
khan and khive himself wants to serve
with his bodyguard. With Russia it
[8 as with Britain and her Indian princ
us.
How many men Russia has in the
Held one is not permitted to say. but
jne thing Is certain, Russia under no
:ircurastanco lacks trained men. Tho
trouble is to get a battlefield big
jnough for the hosts which can be
Drought west. Poland, which is only
ISO miles from north to south, and
inclosed by hostile territory, is not
mch a battlefield. If the Grand Duke
Nicholas abandoned Warsaw and ro
ared on the Bug and Brest-Litovsk,;
lis chances to use present and poten-;
ia.1 resources in a vast enveloping
novement might be better than they
ire now.
Blood Is Clannish.
(Louisvillo Courier-Journal.)
The blood of the clan Is thicker than
he blood of the common people that
a shed like water. Cousin George, of J
Sngland, has forbidden the London
>ress to caricature Cousin Wilhelm, of
Sermany.
ALASKA MEAT COMPANY John Reck. .Mgr.
Wholesale and Retail Butchers
Manufacturers of all Kinds of Sausages Our Hams and Bacon Are
Home-Smoked
SOLD ON 65 YEARS RECORD WHO ^
STILES, SIZES A8D PRICES TO SUIT AIL gjg ENOUGH
to profit by experience gets on I
OAK %?-> the* smoothest,
oBy buying a "cheap'' stove
or ran2e y?u ciake a mistake, \
By buying a Charter Oak, you
do not make a mistake, you 1
HJ_ save fuel, trouble and money
in the end
Profit by the experience of those who have used Charter Oak |
Stoves and Ranges. [
For Sale by THE JUNEAU FURNITURE COMPANY
"The Home Furaliiierj" Cor. 3rd end Seward Stt.
Pianos and Piano Players
EDISON DIMOND DISC | COLUMBIA TALKING
PHONOGRAPHS * I MACHINES
VICTOR VICTROLAS
15,000 Records for All Machines. Sheet Music, Small Musical lusturmcnts
THREE STORES
JUNEAU MUSIC HOUSE
J. P. L. GRAVES, Mgr.
REXALL DRUG STORE FRONT STREET DRUG STORE
Douglas, Alaska. Douglas, Alaska.
ELMER E. SMITH, Prop
j SPECIALS on GROCERIES I
I For a few days we are offering several SPECIALS % I
| on GROCERIES. It will pay yon to come and
t see as before baying elsewhere. 0 0 0 0 fi ?
iQIaimond IIS 1;
; ?
EDUCATION AND
CAMIP IRE GIRL!
(Continued from I'age Two.)
ways been the center of heme; In
cause "camp flro" suggests outo;
doors, and we want the romantic oui
of-door olement In it; because, th
camp represents human solidarity, th
coming together of the group.
There are three orders: The Wo ?
Gatherers, the Fire Makers and th
Torch Bearers: When s. girl first join
Bho becomes a wood gatherer. Sh
stands for these desires: "It is m;
desire to become a Camp Flro Gfrl
which is to seek bsauty, to glvo cei
vice. to pursue knowledge, to ho trust
worthy, to hold on to health, to glor
Ify my work and to bo happy. Thi:
law of the Camp Flro 1 will strivo t<
follow."
To attain the next stage a girl rnus
loam to do and actually perform man:
jseful things.
In addition she must prosont tweu
ty elective honors. Tbero aro sevoi
groups of these elective honors
rlealth Craft, Homo Craft, Natun
ncss and Patriotism. At least one hon
; or must bo won In each group, am
with the exception of Home Graft, noi
j more than five honors may bo pre
sentcd from any ono group. To bo
como a Torch Bearer, the girl tausi
present fifteen more of thoso elective
honors, bosldos fulfilling cortaln oth
cr requirements.
The activities In these seven groups
represent gift the phases of woman's
work that wc know about. Thoy arc
to make for status iu that work. Af
ter a certain kind c>f wovk has been
dignified, it is done In a very differ
ent sort of way from what it wns bo
fore. Also, wo have tried to restore
the psychic function of motherhood by
exalting all the domestic feelings. The
work In the business section is de
signed for the girl who Is earning hor
own living. Credits arc given for def
inite accomplishment In hor particu
lar Hue of work.
The general aim of the Camp Piro
Girls is to help girls got ready for the
new world In which woman is finding
herself and to enable tbom to over
come the grinding tendency of mod
em machine work; to show that com
mon life contains the materials for
romanco and adventure?-that making
a soup or Inventing a new way of
(laming may be an adventure; to show
by special names and symbols, tho
significance of tho modest attainments
of life; to put woman's work Into
mensurenble bundles; to develop In
girls tho power of keeping step. Wc
have made the organization to sim
ple that it can be carried on by or
dinary people. It Is adapted to all
peoples.
woman's worn nas ion me uome?
tho religious institutions have gone,
tho educational institutions have'gone,
the weaving and tho making of tho
things of beauty have gone, yet the
things which these nlood for should
occupy ail her power:; the bulk of her
days most of the years of hor life.
There must be a broader field of use
fulness for her. Tho fundamental dif
ference between tho world relation of
women and the worfd relation of men
i3 that woman's instinct feelings have
been confined to tho homo whilo the
man's have worked thcmsolves out in
tho wider life of the community: as
tho gang instinct, for example, works
Itself out in tho relation of the man
to tho party or to tho army. Here is
woman's opportunity, not to copy tho
institutions of men. but to apply her
own instinct feelings to community
life. Many of the fundamental activ
ities of the community aro not primar
ily the business of men?those that
relate to good housekeeping, for in
stance, to tho cleaning up and partic
ularly to the beautifying of our cities.
And so the conditions under which j
girls work in New York City aro the
business of women of New York City,
although the men must help them out.
Woman's work is still woman's work.
Tho only difference is that wf for
merly it was essentially Indiw .uaUst.c
;t can no wbe dono socio'"./ with oth
3r women.
Love has been predominately a
tome affair. By applying it to tho
immunity, we are going to get a
incr typo of community life. It is
:oming all over the world, but !t must
)e organized and brought about by
vomon and it will take time. The re
idjustment of one-half of human kind
o the world is a tremendous step.
Confidence In Bryan.
(Petersburg Report.)
William J. Bryan advocates tho re
all for all public officials. Wo don't
teliave in the recall, but will admit
hat if anyone could change* our
lews in this particular, it would bo
his samo W. J. B.
An "ad" in Tho Empire rcachos ev
irvbody.
?- ? ' ? --vf-~ ? ?
(The fallowing article, written
?" for the Chicago Herald by Frank
L. Chance, the "peerless leader
of baseball," lo one of the bent
'* articles evor written on thin sub
c Jcct. It Is sound advice to the
youngsters just breaking Into ath
letic*. Cleanliness In body and
5 mind ore essential to any ath
lete's succeed, say. Chance. Be
? healthy, you dor.'t have to be a
| giant, aro other of his warnings.)
Good physical condition moans pood
health. Good health It; founded on
clt-sn living, and the average boy who
i follows certain rules of living can ac
3 quire good health, oven If ho haa tho
nilefortuno to bo naturally frail physl
_ cally. As I aald in my talk to you
' boys and growing young men lost
wcok, good physical condition Is one
of the most Important things In the
' make-up of a future big leagno star.
It does not matter whether you do
5 sire to be a pitcher, outfielder. Infield
er or catcher, good health Is the prlmo
requisite. Of course, not all ball play
ers are strong physically. Some of
: the greatest players that the game has
over known have boon far trom robust.
* I can mention threo or four players
? who went to make up the old Cub ma
chlno who were anything but muscu
lar, but who wore, and aro right to
this day, great ball players.
Evers Thing As a Rail.
1 Take for Instance, Johnny Bvors.
When Evors first carno to the Cubs
he was as thin us the proverbial rail.
' Ho looked anything but the great ball
player he was destined to bocome. Ir
fact, his appearaucc was go "much
against him that It handicappoe.hlm
at the start of his career, and 1 know
of one manger who declared that ho
was too smali to over amount to much
in tho big league. But Evors had an
abundance of something that many
ball players lack. He had a big lot
rtf nnrvo. nnd mnnv a brilliant gamo
he put up when he was far from be
ing what wc call "In form."
Evors, naturally, had to tp.ko pretty
good caro of himself. He know it, too,
and was pretty careful not to abuse
himself In that way. Thoro was just
one thing ho would" Insist on doing
which I knew was very harmful for ?
him. Ho would stuff himself with
candy at all hours of the day or night
when it happened to bo within his ]
reach. Ho was, and is yet, inordin
ately fond of chocolate. He would de
vour a pound of It before breakfast
If ho could get It, am", many is the '
time that I hnd to forbid him indulg
A Sport Sermon
ing his appetite for sweets, especially j
just before an important series withi
New York or some other team which I
was closo on our heels .for pennar.t
honors. A fan In Boston gave Johnny
a box of candy every day we played
there, and 1 finally had to forbid it.
as Evors would cat tho candy on the
bench during the game.
Schulte. Hoffman, and Virgil Gar
vin, the p.'tchcr, who is now dead, are
three jprcat players who could not be
called in any stretch of the imagina-j
tlon "strong men." Yet look at the
way Schulto whaled tho ball the year
ho was awarded the Chalmers trophy.
It was almost a dally occurence for
him to "bounce thorn off" tho sign- '
board out in tho right field, bleachers.
"Combing one" is the quaint way that
Schulte referred to it when ho would
"straighten out" a curve or "put tho '
wood" to a fast ono handed him by the '
opposing pitcher.
Cleanliness is t-irsi nuic.
Ono of the first rules that the fu- '
ture ball player should lay down for '
himself is 1n regard to personal clean
liness. Nearly all ball players are scru- 1
pulously clean. Thcv have to bo. Af- 1
: ter every gamo the whole team breaks '
for tho clubhouso and for half an 1
hour thero Is the sound of shouting
and splashing as the players soap :
themselves and 3tand under the show- 1
or baths. If a man keeps hiB body 1
clean ho will naturally follow this up !
by keeping his linen and undercloth- :
ing In tho same immaculato condition. (
. Boys, develop the habit of tho'daily 1
bath, It will send you to schoor or f
to work feeling twlco as fit as tho r
man who bathos irregularly. Keeping 1
your body clean and the pores of the r
skin open and healthy is half tho bat
tlo for good "condition" and a strong '
vigorous body. v
I intend, as tho tirao goes along, to -
givo you kids and future ball players r
some real pointers in regard to play- s
ing the National sport. 1 intend to e
tako each position, beginning with tho 1
catcher, and toll you what goes to T
make up a great pitcher or cutcher, "
as tho case may be, and what you shall v
do to form habits that will help you
to correctly play any position on tho
diamond. However, before those les- '?
sons aro begun, it la necessary that
I should 3pcak a foreword in regard '*
to your daily habits.
Cut Out tne umarcii.cs.
And rcmcmbor this boys, and don't '
let It escape from your minds for a
single instant. What one boy or man
can io doesn't rucan that you also -
can <lo.lt. What.I moan is this: Be
cause ono man smokes cigarettes, do ' 1
not think you can do it and still keep J,
"In trim." Smoking is bad for the
wind. Plonty of lung power is an aw- k
ful good thing for any one, whethor ~
he bo a ball' player or not. Ball players
who have good lungs, or "hollows," .j
as wo call them on the ball field, can ,,
streak It around the bases, stretching
ordinary two-baggers into three-baso
3
If you want to bo a Ty Cobb don't w
smolco. But if you do smoko, at least
use tobacco In moderation.
Hero is'one of tlie most Important 0,
rules for a ball player,.no matter what
ti %annn(Correct(floihcs i
S? III w i \ I
. .J.?? ?
I lllini'l l'l;
mm H-H-H ;;
The New
Spring |
? ? ? ?
IN
Up-to-the-Minute
STYLES |
j,? <
Has arrived and is
Ready for Your In
spection and Selec- f:':
tion. i;;:
3F COORSE THEY'RE THE g
1 Smiamiu fflnrrrrl (Slnthre 1
made by ALFRED BENJAMIN-WASHINGTON COMPANY new york
For Men and Young Ycung Men?$25.00 to $37.50
f-l jt VERY garment is a prize of intrinsic value. From the weaving of the
f | 4^- cloth to the sewing on of the buttons. Benjamin Correct Clothes are in
I .'I delibly stamped with character and distinction, and the finished product bears
;; the signatures of many master-workmen. Fabrics out-of-the-ordinary are
:: skillfully tailored int ostyles that are absolutely authentic ? both sufficiently
varied to meet all tastes in quest of really good taste.
;;;; Add faithful service and moderate prices, and you haye as good a clothes story ; ;? ?
I:; as any can tell.
I: We are ?o!e Agents for the Justly Famous Manan Shoes JJ
| B. M. Behrends Company, Inc. i |
t ? ? ?H-l-K-I-l-H"!"!1 ^ ?KH-H-HK-K~H-H-H-H| 11 ?!??! -M I-H-H-S-H-H-H-H-l-I' K-H-i-I-M-H-K-HH-H-I"! I H-H- +
? * ? ' t
I i l l t I'l'l'M"
I Pi McKannaTransfer I
l'| FREIGHT?COAL?BAGGAGE ||
U 11 jlit and lleaiy Hanllng of (II Klndj B
j| Olflce 127-129 Front SL. phono 55 q
tnlnd. is one of tho worRt signs of the
docalogue. The average baseball fan
doesn't know It, but many a great ball
player has fairly "oaten himself out
of the big leaguo."
Let me give you an example: I am
not going to mention names, becauso
no man likes to publicly branded as a
glutton) A few years ago a promis
ing bail player broko into the "b.'g
show" who. to hear him tell it, was
"some eater". And ho was, too. He
ivas as nice a natural ball player as
[ ever looked at. He was not on the
Sub pny royy, but on a team in the
West, and I envied the manager of
hat team his possession until I dis
;overcd what a glutton the follow was.
Ho simply could not, or would not,
:ontrol his appetite. Ho hogged all!
:hc rich stuff on tho bills of faro at
;he different hotels tho team stopped
it. Repeated warnings did no good.
Ho waB a great player for about
[wo Beasons. Just about the time
vhen ho should havo boon reaping a
?ich financial reward for his skill iu
landllng a baseball, he became fat,
? ?" 11; i J i - ?, as
md of that season ho was sent back
o tho "bushes" where he finished his
taroer playing ball for about $200 a
iionth, when ho could have beer, puli
ng down $5,000 a year or more in the
najors.
Eat good food and plenty of it,
tut don't oat until you feel as if you
vere stuffed and could not hold an
tther mouthful. In tho playing season
ay players and myself contented our
elvcs with a glass of milk and a
andwlch, or something else equally
Ight. for our lunch. In thnt way we
;ere able to go into tho game feeling
Ike playing and not feeling as if we
,-ero waterlogged.
* ? ? <? 4? ?!? ? O ?/ + <? *
> . *
WAR SIDELIGHTS. *
*
? + + + '!? + + + ^ + ?? <? ?!? v
In a roported conversation between
linn of Bavaria and an American vis
.or, king declared that Germany sl
ays expected to be attacked. He
aid: "Wo felt Tor a long- time that
lis war 'would come some day, but
?o always desired only peace. For
3 years I myself have worked for
eaco every hour, but we woro always
unrounded. by Jealous neighbors,
os, wo knew that a war would como
ist winter. Great debates began in
10 French Chamber about the change
'om two years' to three years' ser
tco that could not be mlsunder
:6od. Then we learned that Russia
an keeping under arms 900,000 men
hose period of service had expired." ;
cpoctation that neutral countries
?bund the British Isles and along the -
rbneb coast has hcon amply fulfilled. !
Thus far tho United States, Holland,
Italy, Greece, Norway and Denmark
have made representations, all in!
friendly terms.
"Tho most absurd rumors arc circu
lated In tho foreign press about the
Immense German losses in the fight-1
i ing east of Bollmow at the beginning;
of February. The German losses In
these attacks were small In propor
tion to the success whleh they at-,
talned," savi a German statement.
London special says that the first!
bach of 100 Incapacitated German j
wounded prisoners has started home,
and an equal number of British wound
ed soldlors r.rc leaving Germany.
Thirtieth overseas battalion of 1200
Canadian troops, which has been in
training near Vlctor.'a, B. C., left on
Its way to England by special trains
over Canadian Pacific.
.
! The Rockefeller Foundation report
| shows that 1,400,000 people in Bol-j
i gium are wholly destitute. More than 1
52.000,000 por month for relief Is im-i
nerative.
I|
The Austrian government has or
dered a census of church bells whichj
may be used If coppor needs become!
acuter.
Tho Lokal Anziogcr says Germany i
is propared to strew the British coast: 1
with mines. j l
j <
All physicians in Austria under thojf
ago of 50 iiro called to tho colors. ]
?? h
Nar.u-.; Is Names. j t
(Chiciuintl Enquirer.) 11
Will Ware travels for a Portsmouth ; !
(Ohio) shoe company. | f
TOMORROW ONLY?
With every one of Britt'e 35c tooth
brushes we are giving a 25c can of
tooth powder FREE?
Tho Rcllablo Rcxall Store.
Loyalty at a Discount.
(Cleveland Plain Dealer.)
Bourtzseff, tlio Ru8s:an revolution*
at, lias been entenccd to Siberia. Off
land one is Inclined to congratulate
llm. Even a moderately cozy doml*
:ilo In Siberia seems proferablo to
Ightlng on tho snow-swept plains of
Poland, among the frozen bogs of
'russia, or In tho bitter blizzards of
he Carpathians or tho Caucasus. For
he first time !n history tho man "agin
ho government" In Russia scorns to
are bettor than tho loyalist
Enamel Ware I
j [prices RIGHT | pnew STOCK |f
i ? ? 1 t
f1 SEE OUR WINDOWS 11
i Every purchaser is "tickled to death" ^
with the "IMP" Chimney Cleaners II
PRICE, 25 CENTS THEY WORK ;;
[ Alaska Supply Company |

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