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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, March 04, 1915, Image 4

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
Published by the EMPIRE PRINTING COMPANY
JOHN W. TROY, Editor "and Manager.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
Per aoath, deUrerei 1.00
Eawred u ?<cond<iaM matter November 1812. at the poatofflco it Ju
neau. Alaufcm. under the Act of March 3, 1S79.
ELECTIVE OR APPOINTIVE.
The suggestion has been made that the Legislature should
provide for the election of the Territorial Secretary, Treasurer,
Mining Inspector. Attorney-Genera! and other Territorial offic
ers. In suppor. of the suggestion it is urged that it is in the
interest of self-government and progressive policies.
Of course the question of self-government is not involved in
the matter at all. because the officers named are purely minis
terial. They do not in any manner shape Territorial
policies. In the next place, the trend of progressive thought is
in the other direction. New York is to have a constitutional
convention this very year at the behest of the progressive ele
ment of her population for the purpose, among other things, of
making all the State offices except Governor and Lieutenant
Governor and, possibly, Comptroller appointive. Other States
are moving in the same direction, and in nearly all of the. States
the progressive people are clamoring for a shorter ballot and for
the power "0 appoint and remove ministerial officers vested in
the Governor. There has been hardly an instance in ten years
where a new office has been created that the Governor has not
been given the authority to fill it by appointment.
There is a reason for the clamor. Governors are the execu
tive officers of States and Territories just as the President is
the executive officer of the Nation. The responsibility for the
government being on the Governors, experience has shown that
efficiency is promoted where the heads of departments are re
sponsible to him. and subject to removal by him for cause. Elec
tions and legislative sessions are few and far between, while Gov
ernors are always with us.
There is a further particular reason why the Governor should
appoint the mining inspector and other officers whose duties re
quire expert knowledge. The percentage of voters that have ex
pert knowledge in any particular line is very small. The voters!
are ill equipped for the selection of experts. It would be absurd
to wish the responsibility of selecting a mine inspector upon the
fishermen of Southeastern Alaska and the Aleutian traders, or
upon the women and "clerks, counsellors and cooks" of every
where. As well make a State university president an elective
office as the mine inspector.
Under our government, as was the case under the govern
ments of the other Territories in their respective days, the Ter
ritorial Secretary is a Federal office. And, further, the prece
dents in other Territories are in favor of making the treasurer,
auditor, attorney-general, superintendent of public instruction
and other Territorial officers appointvie by the Governor.
UNDERSTANING GERMAN AMERICANS.
German newspapers have suggested, as a means of punish-;
ing the United States for selling munitions of war to Great Bri
tain. the emigration from the United States of the German bom
and German descended American citizens. They say that would
impoverish the American Nation as nothing else could do.
Let as concede that the punishment would be terrific, but
that is not the thought we had in mind. The important point
in the proposal is that suggested by the old recipe for cooking
the hare?"first c&tch your hare." In order to inflict the pro
posed dire punishment upon the United States it would be nec
essary to induce the German-Americans to leave the country.
Just try it
The fact is the German-Americans are good citizens, and
they are good Americans. They have no idea idea of leaving the
United States. Further, they have somehow acquired the no
tion that the United States has done about as much for them
as they have done for the United States.
Further, yet. many of those who have been profiting from
the sale of war munitions to Europe are German born, and oth
ers are sons of Germans. The man who has copped off the big
gest war material contract that has yet-been let in this country
is named Schwab, and as a boy in Pennsylvania his playfellows
called him "Dutchy."
Apparently Europeans will never learn to comprehend the
effect of American residence and American citizenship upon her
expatriated sons. The Germans in this country that are taking
great interest in the harrangues of Bartholdt and Ridder are not
half as numerous as some people seem to think?or at least, their
interest is not nearly as great as the vociferous opes probably
imagine.
Now that the century of Anglo-Saxon peace has been ap
propriately commemorated the time is about at hand when we
will set about the celebration of a half-century of American
peace. There are only a few more days than a month left before
the 50th anniversary of Appamattox will be upon us. And that
recalls that April is prolific month in Civil War anniversaries.
It was on April 9th that Dixieland's beloved Lee surrendered
the remnant of his army of Northern Virginia; Beauregard di
rected the first shot of the war at Fort Sumpter April 12. and
the great Lincoln died April 15.
Japan's plan to preserve the integrity of Chinese territory
by taking the whole country over is as humorous as any of the
quaint conceits in "The Mikado."
England would have us believe that Germany has declared
mor? war zone than she can circu nnavigate with her undersea
navy.
We don't know how far the war is from the end, but we are
very sure that it is getting painfully far from the beginning.
Peru is trying to borrow $1,750,000 with which to feed her
starving poor. Probably this is due to the Underwood tariff!
:?
A GENTLEMAN*
(Cincinnati Enquirer)
The man who never speaks ill of
woman nor religion may not have a
bofled shirt and a pair of kid gloves,
but he I? a gentleman jest the same.
PHYSICIAN, HEAL THYSELF
(Philadelphia Press)
Any expectation that tho Powers
; they have to clean up themselves
! first
MATANUSKA COAL
OPENING IMPORTANT
(Seward Gatoway.)
The coming of tho opening of the
Matanuska coal fields moans, per
nio understand and It makes the sub
here on the spot. To show the posal
it should bo reracmbored first that
Matanuska is nearer to Japan and
Russia than Seattle Is, or the 3rltlsh
Columbia coal fields. That shows
how far from any of those countrlea
are the United States- coal fields
worth noting for the quality of coai,
Japan and Russia combined only
produce about twenty-eight million
tons yearly which, of courBe, shows
that their Importation of coal must be
tromendous. Ru?3la no doubt can get
lots of her coal from western Euro
pean countries but It can be shipped
to eastern Russia so much more
cheaply from this coast that the
chances are good that some day not
so very far distant there will bo a
line of coal ships running from tho
Orient to this place. This may look
funny but It Is no Joke. The Unltod
States Imports more than two million
tons of coal each year and most of
that coal is Imported from British
America. The value of coal per ton
at the mine in the United States
ranges from something over a dollar
to two dollars. That would mean, if
the United States Import In tho future
Its coal from the Matanuska Instead
of British America, that an expendit
ure of three millions a year would bo
made In the Matanuska. and getting
out coal worth that amount means
jsent.i probably more than all the mon
ey spent for wages at present in
The tremendous trado in coal that
| car be done betowen Alaska and tho
Pacific Coast States may be seen by
the fact that California produces less
Oregon produces only 110 thousand
tons. Washington produces nearly
three million tons but it.is of a kind
that cannot be usod In Bteamshlps.
The immensity of the coal trade is Il
lustrated by tho production of some
of tho eastern States llko Pennsylva
nia. Ohio and Illinois. The production
for these three States alone respec
tively is one hundred and twenty mil
lion ton3. twenty-flvo million tons, and
thirty-seven million tons which is
about the same as tho production of
West Virginia. The United States
has a total production of about four
hundred million tons and if tho United
States with a hundred million people
can use that amount of coal what Is
tho amount required by Japan and
other countries across tho Paclfis over
and above the amount they can pro
duce? And Japan has about forty
million people although it has only a!
coal production of about twclvo mil
Let it bo supposed for a moment
that the Matammka fields could equal
the production of ono of teh second
ary States like Kansas with about
eight millions of tons and yet It means
that Kansas spends more than ten
millions at its coal mines.
It Is quite possible that from those
fields coal may be Bont to Japan, Rus
sia, China and other places across the
Pacific. In addition to the Pacific
Coast States there arc States at this
side of the Rockies that produce little .
or no coal and they mal also furnish
a market. Down on the Pacific coasts
of South America are many other
countries whoso coal output is incon
siderable and added to this aro all the
steamboats of the Pacific which can
not secure the same quality of coal In
any other part of the United States
Pacific coast. Wo do not know?that
Is a fact?what a tremendous time
NEW TRIPLE ALLIANCE
?I?
(New York World)
"Who 's responsible for the low
European estimate of the United
States?" screams the Boston Evening
Transcript in the course of an at
tack upon President Wilson and Sec
retary Bryan.
Nobody Is repsnsiblo, because thero
is no low estimation of the United
States.
The United States today is tho moet
important diplomatic pow;er in tho
world. In England It is looking after
the interests of tho Germans and tho
Austrians. In Germany it is looking
after the interests, of tho English, tho
French and tho Russians. In France
it looking after the Interests of the
Germans and the Austrians. In Rus
sia it is looking after tho lnterosth
of the Germa is and the Austrian. In
Turkey It is -looking after the inter
ests or the Eit.i 4. the French and
the Russians. In Jolginm It it: feed
ing the starving niiElwtw and protect
ing their civil'rig1-*.; In tho greater
diplomacy of the- world it is the com
manding Influence, r.ad the m03t Im
this war have '.emanated from Wash
ington.
There are plenty of people !u Europo
who criUclBO our noutranty policy, but
tho only people who habitually insult
tho government of tho United States,
tho President of tho United States and
the Secretary of State are Gor
man-Americans, Anglo-Americans and
Republicans, the now Triple Alliance.
ADVICE TO LEGISLATURE
(Ketchikan Progressive.)
days from tho day when the Alaska
and that Ib to enact laws; and
without any more doubt, wo bellovo
that some of them at least, hnvo suc
ceeded In pursuading themselves that
more laws are needed.
After the organization of both hous
es in working order, they will proceed
to work or play politics, whatever
suits their fancy. Some will want
thla law and that law enacted. Others
will want to show a superior ability
and knowlcdgo ovor tho fast '"bunch"
of lawmakers by "plugging" this law
or that law. And othcre will say no
thing but "saw wood." The tatters are
tho oneB who needed watching; be
cause thoy lack tho courage of tholr
conviction?if thoy ever had such a
thing nnd nro listening that thoy may
catch the public sentiment and flop
over on the soft aide. If wo could
only purauadc tho Solons that what
wo probably need thir most is a fow
years' rest from lawmaking and an
opportunity to ascertain what laws
we have, and whether .we need them
or not, we would be wilting to con
leather medal to decorate every ono
HITS PROM SHARP WITS.
Tho wages of 8in are publicity.?
(Cincinnati Enquirer.)
If you must carry a hammer don't
conceal It In a boquet.?(Cincinnati
Enquirer.)
And you may jlo a man a favor by
tbo ladder of fame when ho Is mere
ly running n treadmill.?(Life.)
Some people Imagine tho Eagle Is
tho American National Bird because
It roosts on tho sUvor dollar.?(Cin
cinnati Enquirer.)
After all, maybe a blind man Isn't
In such tough luck as he thinks ho is.
It is said that tho women are going
to wear pantelottes this Bummer.?
(Cincinnati Enquirer.)
Tho Kaiser's motto Is said to havo
boon changed to read: "Our future
lies under the sea."?(Philadelphia
Record.
To Canada, Just at this time, tho
last Tetter of U. S. looks particularly
like a -(Chicago Herald.)
If, as reported, 1,500 Carranzaitos
fell in a battle, Mcrico is getting in
tbo "major league" class.?(Ch'cago
Herald.)
Cheer up! Lon't kick bccnuso peo
ple do not do more for you. Be grateful j
that they are not doing more to you.
?(Cincinnati Enquirer.)
+ + ? ? -> 4- ?> *> -f ?> ?{? v
As a general thing It is easier to
??~vV
Maybe you also have noticed that
stubborn Is hardly ever "harassed by
debts.
When a boy is trained up in truth
from infancy it takes him a good whjlo
sense of humor, but although she does
not laugh, her husband's excuses do
sound funny to her.
WITH BREEZES
(New York World)
How easily a so-called Democrat,
may become a hero, patriot and states
man in the estimation ot ship-subsidy
Republicans is shown by the applause
thai now greets Senators O'Gormanj
Bankhead, Camden, Clarke, Hardwick
Hitchcock and Vardaman from inter
ested quarters.
son's administration appeals to the
majority of the American people, no
man savo Wilson would have n ghost
of n chanco for the pom in ration. If
it does net., no mau or too Democrat
ic ticket Would have a chance for
election. jl
CHANGE IN "UUMSHOV. BULL"
mlnlstrci nhof dancers who llko to
hear their feet hit the floor.
SUMMONS
No. 1226?A.
In the Oletrlci Court for the Territory
MINNIE J. NEWSUM, Plaintiff,
vs.
ZINA B. NEW SUM. Defendant.
To ZINA Ji. NUMSUM. DEFEND
ANT: GREETING:
IN THE NAME OF THE UNITED
STATES OF AMERICA, You nr? here
by command i d to be and appear in
the District Court for the District of
Alaska, Division No. One at Juner.n
in said Division within thirty days
on you, then cad thcro to answer the
.complaint of plaintiff filed ugainst
you In the above entitled action, and
if you fail to appear and answer, for
want thereof, tbo plaiutifr wjll apply
to the Coiirt for the relief-demanded
in the complaint, to-wit; for. a dlsso
lutlcn of tho bonds of matrimony ex
isting between plaintiff and. defend
Tho order for the service of this
summons by p iblloatlon In dated 'Feb
ruary 24th, ll'in. Tho period for pub
the defendant is required to answer
within thirty days after tho expira
tion of the period of publication.'
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have
hereunto set my hand and affixed the
seal of tho above entitled Court this
24th" day of February, 1915.
First publication. March 1. 1915.
Last publication, April 8, 1915.
SUMMONS,
ho. 1201?A.
In the District' Court For the District
of Alaska, Division Number
One, at Juneau.
CLEMENTINE CABROL, Plaintiff.
ULIEN QILLET CABROL, Defendant.
To Julien Glllot Cabrol, Defendnut,
Grootlng:
In THE NAME OF THE UNITED
STATES OF AMERICA, You are hero
by commanded, by virtue of an order
directing the publication of this sum
mons, dated January 23rd, A. D., 1915.
to bo and appear in the above entitled
Court holdcn r.t Juneau in said Di
vision and District, and answer the
complaint filed against you in the
aboYo entitled action, within thirty
days from tbo date of the service
of this summons and a copy of the
said complaint against you, and If
you fail so to appear and answer, for
want thereof, the plaintiff will take
tion of tho bonds of matrimony, and
will apply to the Court for the relief
demanded in said complaint, a copy
of which la served herewith.
Order for publication of summons
dated January 23rd, 1915; time of pub
lication six weeks; time within which
dofendant is required to answer the
complaint, thirty dayB *ftor comple
tion of publication, or by tho 6th day
of April, 1315.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have
seal of tho above Court this 23rd day
of January, 1915.
J. W. BELL, Clork,
By JOHN T. REED. Deputy.
S. H. MILWEE,
H. L. FAULKNER.
(Seal) Attorneys for Plaintiff.
First publication, Jan. 25, 1915.
Last publication. March 2. 1916.
NOTICE OF FORFEITURE.
Sitka Mining District,
Torritory of Alaska,
January 21,1915.
To I.eland M. Bridgcman
and Win. A. Peers:
Yea are hereby notified that we
hav.y expended ono hundred dollars
<> .<>?
V
I McQoskeys j
<? as
< i
oo-c~ - - -'? : '->???
SCHEDULE
Jimcaa 'ferry 8 Navigation Company
Leaves Juneau for Douglas, Trcadwel!
and Thane
6:00 a.m. 1:00 p. m. 7:00 p.m.
7-00a.m. 3:00 p. m. 8:00p.m.
?fl:00a.m. 6:00 p.m. ll:15p.ro.
li'jOO a.?.
; :latnrt!sy, Night Only?12:00 P. M
?9:00 A. 7.1. Trip Does not no to Thane
Lonvc Douglas for Trendwell & Thane
6:1) a.m. 1:10 p. m. 7:10 p.m.
7:,W turn. 3:10 p. m. S:t0 p. ni:
Leave Trcadwell for Thane
0i.. m. l:lf. p. m. 7:13p.m.
7:^riji.m. 3:15 p. m. 8:15p.m.
3:U i . m. - 4:15 p. m. 9:45 p.m.
ll:;.ta.rh. 0:15 p. in.. 11:30p.m.
Leave Thane for Trcadwell, Douglas,
Ss'Cfit.m. 1:26 p. m. 7:25 p.m.
. 8:35:!. n. 4:25 p.m. 9:55 p. in.
'.1:25 a.m. 6:25 p. ml 12:15 a.m.
Leave Treadwell.for Douglas & Juneau
6:K?fe. m. 1:35 p.m. 7:35 p.m.
":3f A. m. 3:35 p. :s. 8:35 p. m.
;1S:3t-?. m'. 4:35 p.- hi. 10:05 p. m.
9:20 a: m. 5:35 p. m. 12:25 a.m. I
11:3S'a. m.
Leaves Douglas for Juneau
,'?H0a. m. ':40 p. m. 7:40p. m.!
9:?' !?.. m. GM0 p, tt. 12:30 a.m.
J 1,:40 a.m.
In labor and Improvements upon the;
"Big I" lode mining claim, situated
at "hichagoff. on .Chicagoff Island,;
Sitka Mining District, Div. No. 1,,'Tcr-!
ritory of Alaska, and particularly do-'
scribed ns land parallel and joining:
on North side of Young claim No. 2,
and Young claim No. 3; of the Chich-j
agoff Mining Go., as will appear o?<
record in the records of tho Sitka Re
cording District, Territory of Alaska,!
as No. 1564, page 168, Mining Record!
Book f. in order to hold said premises
under the provisions of section 2324,
Revised.Statutes or tho United States,
and the Mining Laws of the Territory
of Alaska, being the amount required
to hold the some for the year ending
December 31. 1914. And if within
ninety days after this lOtice of publi
cation, you fail or refuse to cootrt
butc your portions of such expendi
ture as co-owners, your- Interest in
said claim will become the property
CBICHAGOFF MINING CO. Inc.
ant! JOHN H. PETERSON.
First publication, Jan. 25, 1915.
,
NOTICE OF FORFEITURE.
Sitka Mining District,
Territory of Alaska,
January 21, 1915.
You are. hereby notified thai we,
have expended one hundred dollars ?;
pf the followlrij: named lode mir ing
claims, to-wit: "Over the Hill," 'pa-,
clflc." "Golden Wi.st," and , "Rising
Sun," ail of said claims being situat
ed- -at Ohichngoff, on Chlchagoff Isl
and, Sitka Mining District, Div. No.
1. Territory of Alaska, and each being j
first cf record in tho records of th j
Sitka Recording District, Territory of
Alaska, as follow.-,: "Over tho Hill"
as No. 1279. page 535, Book 2 of Min
ing locations: "Pacific" as No. 13S6,
page 32, Book 3 of Miniog Locations;
"Golden West" as No. 1578, page 175,
Book 3 of Mining Locations, and "Ris
ing Sun" a" No. 1579. page 1"J7, Book
3. of Mining Locations, of said rec
ords. This expenditure was mode in
order to hold.raid prumloes and claims
under tho provisions of Section 2321,1
Rovi-M d Statutes of the United States, j
acr. the Mining Laws of the Territory!
q; Alaska, being the amounts required i
to hold the came for tho year ending:
Becejnbor 31,1914. And if. within nine-!
ty day.: after this notic^V of publica-j
tion, you fail cr refuse Id contribute!
your portion of such expenditures as I
i co-owner, your Interest In tha said
claims will becomo the p.voperty of
the subscriber. %y V."
CHICHACDFF MINING CO., lac.
First publication, Jan. 25, 1315."
t a L. FAULKNER and |
S. H. MILLWHE, i
- '-505 ButJdln - JurAui. Alaakn
il!IHHM<MH Hl?j
| The Alaska Grill :?
, ,
4 ;;
The Beit Appointed
? Place in Town ?
! ?== ::
;?
| Best of Everything Served !!
al Moderate Prices ; ?'
W-t?l till M'! !HIH
I When in Seattle Stop t]
at the Place for
ALASKANS
It'* Firo-Proof, Modern nivl Convenient Eg
RATES SI.00 Per Day aod Up g
HOTEL BARKER |
CornerPlke an I Sixth
? ut ? Boat* ami Trains $
C. 0. Walntfla & Conrad Freodinjr. Prop*, b
'OUGHS g
ITR^V ANCE i
T Tho 1 K
| OSTEOPATHiii
V Room* 5 and 6 Malony Bldg. "*S|
Consultation and Examination
Froo. Phone 282- ] * ?
.j! Graduate American School of j ^ ft
J; Or.tcopnthy, Klrkavllle. Mo. ?- fej
8evcn yoara' active practice. ?? 0
Office"hourt, 9 to 12 m. 1 to 5 K
i,' p. m., or by appointment. t j
JH-W-H-I-I 1 n-t-H M ,;t Hfr I
Remington Typewriter Company
fins established an office in Jaaean at
the corner of Front and Main Streets. ?
Come La and |]et the latest Remington
Idea. : t I
THE SE&T LOAF OF I
BREAD %
.
In Cold At
San Francisco Bakery!
fl. MK3SISR3C?iM)Ot, Prop. %
?> A A# A 4. a?. AA A**A> ? O,
| OLDEST"
I IN ALASKA
Established
Incorporat
performed by U3 for our customers
easfi is always safe.
?
Pr:/ldtn( ;[
j. a. win;*
' Vleo-Frstl^sm !
G.McN?mj!5tea
C*?5ilrr
* for Seattle, Prince Rupert
| Ketchikan, Wrsngell and/
? Petersburg. I
?J City of Seattle April 1, 12
i Saokant* M.-.pcK' S. 1fi. 97
For Skagway and Koines ?
City of Seattle Mar 31 2
Spokan# March 5, 15, 26 ?
OMiflVcU it Skaawmy far X
Dawson and ail Yukon ?
ftivpi i&tflfc 2
CONNKCU AT :?:xt rtx roc i
% SAN TRANUSCO, LOS ANGELES, SAN DIEGO and all California Points %
Z low |
? For full particular* apply ? " \
? H. BRANDT. ?. A. K D.. Sr ktbx. Wai ? -A h. SWING. Afoat Johcau, Alama j
;:.R J GHTS R US RV'E D TO "CHANGE SCHEDULES %
? 'ml) *1
Canadian Pacific Railway Company J
-B. C. COAST SERVICE |
Salting from Juneau for Port Simpson, Prince Rupert, Swanson, Alert ||
Bay, Vancouver, Victoria and Seattle.
PRINCESS MAQUINNA SOUTH?MARCH 11 H
PRINCESS MAY SOUTH?MARCH 25 |
C. P. R. Ticket officec?Orpheum Bldg. and Spickett'o Postoffice Store. R
JOHN T. SPICKETT. Agent. ' I
phe, r THE WHITE PASS' ?peef
BoUiC of, & YUKON ROUTE |e^/e
Lomfort Safety
During the winter season of 191435. our regulav train service
will; be maintained North and South bound between Sknguay and
Whltehor ??. trains leaving both terminals every Tuesday and Friday.
WINTER STAGE SERVICE j; S
Our through mall, passenger and freight service will be operated
between Whitehorse end 'Davson. affording all posslb'le comfort by
moaiiB of a THOROUGHLY EQUIPPED STAGE AND AUTOMOBILE
LINE. For full information apply to
C. W. CASH. Supt. Mail Sorvlco DcpL, Whltehorso, Y.
A. F. ZIPF, Tralllc Manager, G12 Secoud Avenue, Seattle, Wash.
i k? ?:
-:~f??! 'I"I ("'"1 'I"l? t"l ?! ?) -l" l-I-fr-I'
ALASKA |
STEAMSHIP COMPANY I
nfcty. Sorvro.mi) 1 icJ.it* to Seattle. "ac-crrs. VIctcrU ar.d Voccomer. Through +
. toSnn (rnncucu 4.
JEFFERSON, North Feb. 2, 14 and 26 South .. Feb. 3, 5, and 27 I
; MARIPOSA, North.: Feb. 11 and 27 South Feb. 3, 17, Mar. 5 f
ALAMEDA North Feb. 4 and 19 South ........ Feb. .10, 25 T
WILLIS E NOWELL, Juneau Agt. Elmer ?. Smith Douglas Agt j
... -V.
Border Line Transportation Co.
PARES TO SEATTLE-FIRST CLASS $19.00; SECOND CLASS $12.00
S. S. AL-Kl, Southbound
i\!- VSKA SUPPLY CO., Agents John Honaon, Agent, Douglas.
,1, ? Zc'
HUMBOLDT STEAMSHIP CO.
| The Ainska Flyer |, 5. S? HUMBOLDT The Ala i \ t Fljet I I |
Leaves Seattle Saturday, February 27, 9 p. m Northbound
DOCKS AT JUNEAU CITY WHARF ~
PETT1T & HARVEY, Agents,
Cheney Block, Juneau Seattle Office?716 2d Ave.

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