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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, March 05, 1915, Image 1

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CZAR'S ARMY AGAIN CAPTURE CZERNOWITZ
PRESIDENT WILSON
PAYS TRIBUTE TO
LATE CONGRESS
WASHINGTON, March 5.?Presi
dent Woodrow Wilson paid a glowing
tribute to the Sixty-third Congress in
a statement given to the public yes
terday as the two houses were about
to adjourn. Immediately after signing
the last of the bills passed, he dictat
ed tho following statement before leav
ing his office In the capitol for the
White House:
"A great Congress has closed Its
cessions.
"It's work will prove the purpose
and quality of Its statesmanship, more
and more, the longer it Is tested.
"Business will now have time for
calm and thoughtful adjustment be
fore It, disturbed only by the Europ
ean war.
"The circumstances created by the
war put the Nation to a special test;
a test of its true character, of its
self-control.
"The constant thought of every pa
triotic man should now be for his
country, its peace and order. With
Just and tempered judgment In the
face of perplexing difficulties, its dig
nity and strength alike will appear,
not only In the revival of its business,
despite abnormal conditions, but also:
In its power to think to a purpose, to
act Y/Ith patience and with disinter
estsnted fairness, without excitement:
but in a spirit of friendliness and en
lightment, which will firmly establish
its influence throughout the world."
MEASURES THAT DIED
WITH ADJOURNMENT
WASHINGTON. March 5.? Among
the Important measures that had bees
considered and passed by the House
of Representatives and which died in
the Senate were the ship-purchase bill
the Philippines biU, the conservation
measure, the rural credit/bllL
There was great confusion and
scramble in the final passage of bills
and resolutions.
CONGRESS APPROPRIATES
$1,120,000,000 AT SESSION!
WASHINGTON. March 5.?The to
tal appropriations of the short session
of the 63rd Congress which came to
a close yesterday wert $1,120,000,000.
It is claimed however, by the Sjcre
tary of the Treasury, that the expen
ditures of the government for the year
win be less than that amount, as some
of the appropriations are for expen
ditures that will come from tho reve
nues of future years, and that others
arc to meet contingencies that will
require less money that tho amount
provided.
ADJOURNMENT AFTER NOON .
WASHINGTON, March 5.? Both
bouses of Congress adjourned yester
day shortly after noon. President
Woodrow Wilson began signing the
accumulation of bills and resolutions
at 10 o'clock.
By concurrent resolution the current
appropriations for Indians and the pos
tal bills were extended over the next
fiscal year.
GLOWING TRIBUTE TO MEMBERS
Among the last acts of Congress
were glowing tributes paid in the
House of Representatives to Speaker
Champ Clark. Democratic Leader Os
car W. Underwood and Republican
Leader James R. Mann.
In the Senate tributes were pild to
retiring members, which Included
many of the distinguished members of
that body?among them veteran Sen
ator George C. Perkins, of California;
Senator Elihu Root, of New York: Sen
ator Theodore E. Burton, of Ohio;
Senator Issac Stephenson, of Wiscon
sin; and other Senators.
SKAGWAY IS TO BE
A PORT OF CALL
SEATTLE, March 3.? The Alaska
Steamship Co. fleet to tbe-rwestward.
will call at Skagway roguiaciy, begin
ning on the arrival of the-Xorthwest
ern there, which is scheduled to leave
here on March 24th.
THE WEATHER TODAY.
Maximum?42.
Minimum?35.
Rainfall?.20 inch.
Cloudy.
400-EOOT
STEAMSHIP
FOR ALASKA
SEATTLE. March 5.?The Alaska
Steamship Company Is negotiating for
the purchase of the steel passenger
and freight steamship Sierra, now op
erating between New York and San:
Francisco. It is presumed that she
will be used on teh Alaska routo.
The Sierra is of 5.980 gross and 3,
745 tons net register; 400 feet long
and 50.2* feet beam. She was built
at Philadelphia in 1900.
ANOTHER QUAKE
SHAKES ITALY
FLORENCE, Italy, March 5. ? An
earthquake in Tuscany and other sec
tions of Central Italy early t|is morn
ing caused a panic. The people, be
lieving that a repitltion of the cartli
quke of a few weeks ago is about to
occur, have congregated in open
places away from buildings.
?
*
? 170 PERISH IN WEST *
? VIRGINIA EXPLOSION ?
v ? 4?
? HINTON, W. Vs., March 5. 4>
? ?Searching for tho recovery +
? of bodies In the New Rivers col- ?
? llerles company's mine at Thur- ?
?> mond where an explosion oc- ?
? currcd Wednesday reveals that +>
?5* 170 persons perished. Ten +1
? were recovered alive yesterday. *
?>
4,4' ? + 4* 4> 4"5> ?i,v ?>?'??+*> i* +
ARGENTINE GETS
BIG WARSHIP
PHILADELPHIA. March 5. The
Argentine battleship Moreno has been
turned over to Argentina by the New i
York Shipbuilding Company, at whose
yards in Camden It was built. There
had been delay in the delivery of the
Moreno because of differences over
payment for extra work.
The Moreno will depart for its home
port as soon as sho gets her supplies.
Part of the Argentine crew went on
board today.
Moreno's Builders Claim More Than
? Million Dollars
WASHINGTON, March 5.?The dis
pute which delayed the delivery of the!
Moreno Involved extra work done on:
tho vessel totaling, according to the
builders, more than $1,000,000. and was
adjusted at a conference at which
Assistant Secretary of the Navy Fran
klin D. Roosevelt was present unoffic
ially. It is understood the amount to
b? paid will be determined by arbitra
tion.
COMMITTEE TO SETTLE
BRITISH LABOR DISPUTES
I
LON'DON", March 5.?To prevent In- J
tcrruptlons of work in the trades that;
supply war materials, the government
has appointed a committee to consid
er unsettled disputes. Tho commit
tee consists of Sir George Askwith of
the Board of Trade. Sir Francis Hop
! good of the Admiralty, and Sir George
Gihb of tho War Office.
PASSENGERS COMING ON
THE ADMIRAL EVANS
SEATTLE, March 5.?The Admiral
Evans sailed this morning with the
following passengers:
For Juneau?E. A. MacKamllton,
Louis Schumacher, Mrs. G. E. Aldon,
Karl Palm, S. J. Bradford, J. F. Warn
er, E. J. Daily, E. Lewis, Mrs. Jo
auna Holmc3, Mrs. Pauline Parker,
Mrs. H. Klauff. B. B. Plckler. Mary
Smith, Beatrice Clark, Fred Forester,
W. R. Conlon. C. Larson, O. W. Lar
son, Charles Larson, Frank Seivert,
and eleven steerage.
For Douglas?L. B. Wright and wife.
lANOTHER
TY-GfN.
| BILL
Representative William E. Brltt of
Juneau was the author of a bill intro
duced In tho House this afternoon to
provide an attorney general for Alas
ka. The measure differs from the
Aldrtch bill but is similar to the Mil
lard bill, in many provisions. It pro
vided the appointment of tho Attor
ney General, by the Governor, until
the next general olection, when the
people shall name tho official. The
salary is flxed at $7,500, a3 in Sena
tor Aldrich's bill. Tho bill also , re
quires tho candidate to have been a
bona fldo resident of Alaska for at
least five years, and ho must be over
thirty-flve years of age.
Representative Brltt also Introduced
a resolution authorizing tho Speaker
of the House to communicate with
the Secretary of tho Treasury with
the view of ascertaining "what, if any
thing. can be done by the legislature
to expedite matters in connoctlon
with tho construction of tho Federal
building, so that work, if possible, con
bo commenced thereon, during the
present season and the building com
pleted In time to house the next Ter
ritorial legislature."
Mr. Shoup introduced a resolution
extending the courtesy of the visitor's
gallery to the familes of the Gover
nor. the Secretary of tho Territory,
the District Judge, the Territorial^
Treasurer, and other Territorial offi-i
cial3, and the press.
Tho Burns resolution asking tor a
joint revenue committee from both
houses, was passed by the House, and
will go to the Senate tomorrow.
Senator Frank A. Afdrich's Attor
ney General bill provides $7,500 shall
be that otllclal's salary per year. He
shall be tho legal advisor of tho leg
islature and of tho various officers,
and shall bo elected by popular vote
at the general election in November,
according to tho provisions of tho
measure. The first official shall be
elected by the legislature.
CHILDREN URGED TO
GIVE UP PART OF FOOD
LONDON, March 5.?The Chronicle
says that an appeal addressed to the
children of the German Empire has
appeared in the press throughout the
country. Tho gist of it is to impress
on them the need of voluntarily giving '
up a substantial portion of tholr daily
bread in order that the food supplies
of tho' country may continue suffic
ient Jor adults who have 'to work at
home and soldiers who have to fight
abroad.
- ? ? ? ?
RUSSIAN ADMIRAL IS
HELD 'N ARCTIC ICE
PETROGRAD, March 5.? Admiral
Viltlsky, formerly chief of the Rus
sian Hydrographic Bureau, who has
been sent by the government to thor
oughly explore the Arctic route to the
Far East, and who recently discover
ed new territory which has been nam- I
ed Nicholas II.. Land, has again been
heard of by wireless.
Ho loft Vladivostok in two ships in
July to attemtpt an Arctic passage 1
from cast to west. He learned of tho ?}
outbreak of the war from a wireless 1
source somewhere in Bering Strait.
Sinco then headquarters at Petrogirad |
have sent very many wireless mes
sages but this H? the first time one i
has reached hojo. . I
COMPLETES 1.000-MILE TRIP
ON SLED DRAWN BY- DOGS '
CHICAGO, March 5.?Jack Hughes :
has completed a 1000-mile trip to Chi- i
cago by dog team from Fort Chlppe
wyan, on the Mackenzlo river, by sled
In les3 than four monthB. Snow gave 1
out at Madison, Wisconsin, and tho :
last stages of- tho journey wore made :
by train. The journey was made on 1
a bet. * 1
SENATOR FALL URGES
MEXICAN INTERVENTION
LOUISVILLE. Ky? March 5.?Sen
ator Fall, of Mexico, urges in
tervention In Mexico, by the United
States; Brazil.'Argentina anu Chile. <
- ? ? + - i
ALASKA GOLD
NEW YORK, March ? 5.?Alaska Gold <
closed yesterday at 29%; Utah Cop
per, 51%.
Today Alaska Gold closed at 29%; :
Utah Copper. 52%. !
THE INSANE
Reproaentatlvo Dun Driscoll today
introduced a resolution which may
send a committee of the House and
Senate to Portland to Investigate the
treatment of Alaska insane tp Morn
lngsldo Asylum. The resolution was
referred to the committee on the ju
diciary and federal relations, and it
was Indicated that it would be passed.
Tho resolution would give the com
mittee power to employ an unbiased
physician to mako the trip with them,
and a stenographer. Under a bill"
which Mr. Driscoll also Introduced, an
appropriation, the amount having
been left blank. Is asked of the House,
to pay air expenses of the undertak
ing. Tho lost government contract
with the Mornlngside Asylum was
dated March 19, 1914, and la for a
five-year period from January 16.
1915.
The House decided today to meet
at 2:00 p. m. dally until further or
ders.
Rules Is Special Order.
The committee on rules will submit
its report at a special order of the
day, tomorrow at 2:30. Tho Governor
transmitted to^the House the first bi
ennnal report of the uniform laws
commission and it was referred to the
judiciary committee, and tho reports
of tho mine Inspector, banking board ;
rcport was referred to the Committee
on mines and mining and labor and
immigration.
Mr. Britt's resolution with reference,
to expediting work on tho federal i
buildlntr was nassed.
Fight Sunday Closing.
Representative Coombs of Nome in !
troduced H. B. 6, a bltl to repeal the
Sunday closing law. It was- referred j
to the -committee.
Before the House adjourned the' re
port of the last federal grand jury, j
which met here, was read, it was,
transmitted by U. S. Attorney J. J.
Reagan.
In the Senate.
At a half-hour session of the Terri
torial Senate today the report of the
Board of Alaska Commissioners for
the Promotion of Uniform Laws for
the United States was submitted by
the Governor, and was referred to the
committeo on the Judiciary. A bill
has been Introduced in the uppor j
chamber of the Legislature by Sena
tor Aldrlch, to do away with this com- j
mission.
Under suspension of the rules the
House joint resolutions relative to the
appointment of joint mileage and
printing cbmmitteos were passed and
President Sutherland announced itho
Senate's members of the committees
would bo later announced.
The Senate adjourned to meet at
12:30 o'clock tomorrow afternoon.
BELGIANS' DISTRESS
ON THE DECREASE
NEW YORK. March 5.?Ex-Con
pressman Charles P. Scott, of Kansas,
raombor of the Belgian Relief. Com
mjttee of his State; who made a six
weeks' automobile tour to look over
the distribution of food, says the des
titution Is now at the minimum, be
causo of the constant stream of the
American roflef supplies now pouring
Into that country.
"In Belgium two 3aylngs are heard"
said the ex-Congressman: "We sow
that the Germans may reap,' and 'Wo
thank God lor the United States.'
"Tho work of the American Roller
Commission Is beginning to tell, and
thoir distribution of food and supplies
has saved millions from completely
starving. If contributions continue to
be as heavy as they wero there will
be enough to keep the people alive
until the situation prmlts them to re
ly upon their own resources.
"Fifty thousand Belgians are en
gaged In distributing the food and
clothing."--'
WASHINGTON STATE
BUILDING DEDICATED
SAN FRANCISCO, March 4.?Tho
Washington State building. at the
Panama Pacific Exposition, was dedi
cated yesterday afternoon.
ATTENDANCE PASSES
THE 1.000,000 MARK
SAN FRANCISCO, March 5. ? The
ittondance at^he San Francisco fair
ias passed 3,000,000.
BUKOWINA
LONDON, March 5.?Tho Bucharest
correspondent of the London Evening
News has telegraphed his paper this
evening saying that the Russian of
fensive movement In Bukowlna Is car
rying everything before It, and that
the Auotrlans have been compelled to
evacuate Czcrnowltz, the capital of
Bukowllna, captured by them recently.
GERMANS CLAIM GAIN
IN WESTERN AREA
BERLIN, March 5. ? The Gorman
war office announced this evening that ,
in fighting on tho west front last ,
night the German troops wero sue- \
cessful, and that 1000 French troops :
wore lert dead on the nold. Tho 1
French attacked tho Gorman lines i
and wore repulsed.
Tho Germans are continuing tholr; ]
attacks in North Poland^ The fight-1'
ing is furious, but the results aro still '
indefinite.
Reports frofti Vienna are that the
Russians have been repulsed on the i
Rials river.
The Gormnns' and Austrians con
template an offensive movement in
Galicia.
GREAT ARMY OF RUSSIANS
MASSING IN CARPATHIANS; I
VENICE; March 5.?The Hungarian!]
newspapers contain accounts of the ] i
struggle in the Carpathians, where a 11
battle of gigantic proportions has been 1
In progress for fifty days.along the t
whole lino of mountains somo 300 <
miles In length. I
Vicious attacks were mado to gain '
heights or sheltered positions. Theso
attacks are repelled with reckless t
abandon. Sometimes a position will 1
ho gained and lost again three times <
within twenty-four hours. There is
one height on the front which has 1
been stormed 100 times, and even at 1
this time neither side can claim to (
hold It. No sooner Is it won and the <
victors Installed on It, than the van- ^
QuishetS forced gathor now troops and
storm it again. i(
Meanwhile the Russians are gath-i
oring Immense additional forces in:
the center of the Carpathians.
BATTLE WAGES IN NORTH <
PETROGRAD, March 5.?The Ger- t
mans in North Poland aro concontrat- f
ing their efforts to break through the c
Russian fortified ilnes near the Prus- ?
sian frontier.
Tho battle, on the outcome of which c
is of high Importance, was proceeding *
last night with great violence. ?
? ?
KAISER STILL IN J
SUBMARINE FIGHT ?
LONDON, March 5.?A Copenhagen
dihpatch to the Daily Mail says:
Emperor William, with his brother.
Admiral Prince Henry of Prussia, and
Admiral von Tlrpitz, the Minister of j
the Navy, aro in charge of the Navy i
arrangements for blockading England, r
It Is reported that tho Germans havo j
built 120 big mine-laying submarines
during the last six months, each with i
a carrying capacity of one hundred
SECRET UNDERSTANDING t
. FOR UNITED STATES J
AMSTERDAM. March 5.?It is be- V
lioved here that Germany has given c
iho United States secret assurances r
that no A.omrlcan merchant ship shall
be harmed by a German submarine. It 1
Is believed that Germany's notea to
the world with reference to the war
zone wouhl hayo been in more-kindly
terms if they had been directed to 1
tho United States alone, but that they v
were made harsh purposely for the *
purpose of blufilng tho smalier coun- t
trios as Holland, Norway and Denmark 1
out of attempting to trade with Great f
Britain, while assurances of friend- 1
ship and promises of protection were ^
Tho Telegraph says the conrco of
tho United States in standing for prin
cipal in behalfof all noutrala is worthy 0
sldor It in connection with the un
doubted facu that the ships of that s
country are not in danger and that n
she knows it.
BRITISH i
DEFYING
NEUTRALS
LONDON, March 5.?In a speech In
the Commons, yesterday afternoon.
Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs
Sir Edward Grey said that unless neu
fes8 neutral nations are prepared to
assist In throwing Germany out of
Belgium no suggestions In the mat
ter of preventing devastation arc
wanted by the British government.
AMERICAN SHIPS
ACCIDENTALLY SUNK
[
WASHINGTON, March 5.?Tlic offi-|
:Iar roport of Capt. Ghcrardi of his
investigation of the sinking of the
American cotton steamere-Carlb and
Evelyn In the North sea was received
:oday directly from Berlin. Tho re
port finds that both vessels \Vere sunl:
jy coming in contact with mines, and
:hat reports received through unoffi
rial channels, and based on rumor,
Srom both Berlin and London were er
roneous. The report says:
"Both boats, were sunk by mines;
:hero was no false directions given
py British boats. They simply rau
>n mined fields."
It has been reported from Berlin
:hat the vcssols were sunk because
Srltish naval officers had purposely
llrcctcd them falsely; and from L011
lon It had boen reported that they
vero sunk by German submarines.
COLLIER SINKS ONE
GERMAN SUBMARINE
LONDON, March 5. ? The British
:ollior Thordis< proceeding from
3Iyth to Plymouth, roports that she
lighted tho periscope of a German ,
lubmarinc, rammed and sunk the
:raft after dodging tho torpedo that
ihe launched.
The collier reports that the torpe
lo was launched fro ma short range,
vbllo tho submarine was coming
straight at its enemy. Tho collier '
iwung sharply to starboard and then
tort, catching the submarine ainld
ihlps.
r^VO SUBMARINES
HAVE BEEN SUNK
LONDON, MARCH 5?Two German
lubmarines have been sunk In Brit- ;
sh watcre ? according to an official an
louncement that was made this morn
ng.
rHE FRENCH SINK
GERMAN SUBMARINE
PARIS, March 5.?The Preach mini
iter of marino today announced that
ho Gorman submarine U-S \vaa sunk
?esterday by a French torpedo boat.
The crow of tho submarine was res- ;
:ued by the destroying craft, ana
nade prisoners of war.
PHE GERMANS SINK ?
TWO BRITISH CRAFT
BREMEN, March 5.?The master of ,
ho American steamship Gulf Light,
rhich arrived here this morning from
lalveston with a cargo of cotton, re
?orts having witnessed the destruc- 1
ion by torpedoes of two British :
roightors in the English channel. I
loth of the vessels were completely <
lestroyed, according to report. !
COLLIER'S CLAIM CONFIRMED. t
LONDON, March'5?Tho admiralty t
illciaiy announced this evening tiiat t
,n examination of tho Tbordls con
;rmr, tho claim of her moSter that <
ho rammed and probably sunk a Ger
man submarine.
I
The Empire circulation leads. Try 1
dvoriitlng iu it. (
RUSSIA WILL HIT
APPROACHES TO
CONSTANTINOPLE
London, March 5. ? The Russian
Black sea fleet Is steaming toward
the Bosphorus according to a dis
patch received today. The fleet is ad
vancing to participate in the attack
on the Bosphorus defenses, in the ex
pectation that the British and French
fleets will pass out Into the Sea of
Marmora soon.
RUSSIANS WILL ATTACK
CONSTANTINOPLE APR0ACHE8
London, March 5,?Information re
ceived here this evening Is that the
Russian Black sea fleet Is within 100
miles of Constantinople and nearlng
that city at a fleet speed of about 11
knots. It should be within reach of
the approaches to the Bosphorus by
morning.
Advices from Bucharest say that
the purpose It for the Ri&slan fleet to
attack the approaches to Constatlno
pie while the British and French fleets
are reducing the fortifications of the
Dardanelles and the Sea of Marmora.
TURKISH FLEET DISAPPEARS.
LONDON, March 5.?A Turkish '
fleet to which has been assigned the
tack of giving battle to the Atllea'
fleet which has been engaged in forc
ing the Dardanelles has fled, accord
ing to dispatches received from Ath
ens yesterday evening.
These ships were expected to meet
the enemy in the Dardanelles. Instead
they slipped under cover of a heavy
fog from the Niagara roads Into the
Sea of Marmora.
The British Admiralty is greatly
puzzled over the mysterious disap
pearance of the Turkish vessels.
ONLY TWO FORTS REMAIN
ATHENS, March 5.?According to
advices received here yesterday after
noon there were only two Dardanelles
forts remaining. Ten warships were
engaged In a continuous bombardment
of these which were returning the fire
with weakening effectiveness.
BLAME CONON
DOYLE FOR BLOCKADE
LONDON, March C.?"Neutral Ob
server's" statement in the London
Times yesterday that, according to
well-informed Germans, the Idea of the
submarine blockade of England was
borrowed by their government from
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's story, "Dan
cer," published last Spring, has grlov
ed tlio author.
Th< story set up the mythical coun
try of Norland which reduced England
to starvation by Just such a system
of submarine attacks as Is now pro
posed.
"I need hardly to say that It Is very
painful to mo to think that anything
I have written should bo turned
against my own country," said Sir Ar
thur "The object of the story was
to warn the public of a possible dan
ger which I saw overhanging this
country and to show how to avoid that
rl.inner.
"My reason was that aftor studying
the subject I concluded that the sub
marine ot tho present war was not
capable of the resufts which I deplet
ed, but it still Is my opinion that if
this war had been delayed five years
and if tho submarine, during that per
iod, had gone on improving as rapidly
as it has done in the past, England
would have been placed in a most ser
ious position exactly as outlined in
my story."
<\UTO BANDITS CIRCULATE
PRO-GERMAN LITERATURE
PARIS, March G.?Members of the
3annot band of auto bandits bavo been
lccused of circulating pamphlets tell
ing the people that they are being
leceivcd, and making a plea in be
talf of Germany. It is suspected that
hoy are being pnid for tho work by
igents of tho German government,
;omo society that Is secretly aidhvf
he Germans. / .
3ERMANY LIMITS /
THE SALE Or BREAD
BERLIN, March . 5. ? T-Vc sale of
lour Fridays, Saturdays/nd Sundays
iaa been forbidden In.^nis and othor
,'Ities. /

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