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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, March 09, 1915, Image 4

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
Published by the EMPIRE PRINTING COMPANY
JOHN W. TROY, Editor and Manager.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
One year, bjr mail, la advance : ~ $10.00
Six months, by mall. In advnnco, 5.00
Per month, delivered 1.00
? ? . .. , . ? 1. I.I
Entered as second-class matter November 7, 1912. at the postotnce at Ju
neau, Alaska, under the Act of March 3.1879.
MORE POWER TO SEWARD
Seward is nothing if not practical. Her city council has set
about making an organized effort to secure work for her citizens
on the railroad during the coming summer.
The move is a worthy one, and it ought to succeed. The
money paid out in wages to actual residents of the country
through which the railroad is to be constructed will not quit
working for Alaskan development with the completion of the
work performed. It will work again in creating still further
improvements.
Furthermore, money paid out to actual residents is wisely
spent by the government. In addition to running no risk in se
curing value for the money in the first instance, it is contribut
ing to the development of a country that must be depended up
on to provide tonnage for the railroad when it shall have been
completed.
By all means, let us wish more power to the Seward city
council.
CHICAGO INDICATIONS ARE DEMOCRATIC
From a party standpoint the primary election in Chicago the
other daJ" must be gratifying to Democrats. More thar. 63 per
cent, of all the men and 62 per cent, of all the women voting cast
their ballots in the Democratic primaries, leaving less than 37
per cent, of all the men and less than 3S per cent, of the wo
men to vote in the Republican, Progressive, Prohibition and So
cialist primaries. The women voted in great numbers?154,000,
all told. Of these 94,000 voted Democratic ballots and 59,000
voted ballots of the other four parties.
Chicago papers say that the figures from the primary elec
tion indicate a tremendous Democratic majority at the general
election that will be held next month. This is regarded as a cer
tain result for the reason that there were spirited contests
in the Republican primaries as well as in the Democratic
it is conceded that the figures show Democratic gains over
previous years.
OUR FOREIGN LOANS
While the immediate response to the foreign loans that are
being made by American financial institutions will not be so
great as would come from a like amount of money invested at
home, the proceeds of the loans are furnishing a constantly in
creasing market for American products, and the results will be
felt for many years to come. And, it might be added, the loans
are not impairing the ability of American banks to care for
domestic demands for money. It is estimated that the Ameri
can money placed in foreign loans and in foreign countries for
the expansion of American trade since the first of last Decem
ber now amounts to more than $350,000,000?and most of this
money has remained at home. Some day this and the yet vaster
sums that will be added to it must be returned to the United
States, and in the meanwhile it will bring into the country at
regular intervals large interest payments. Thanks to the new
currency law, American banks are able to carry these foreign
credits and loans without crippling home finances. It is just
that much business added to what we can develop in other man
ner.
ABOUT OPTIMISM AND PLACE OF RESIDENCE
We hope the day is not far distant when the ma
jority of the people of the United States will be as
optimistic as if they lived in Florida.?(Florida
Times Union.)
To be optimistic is next to being as blissfully con
tented as if you lived in California?but maybe that is
too much to expect.?(San Francisco Star.)
We shall hope that all the people will be as busy as those
who live in Alaska, and then they will not have to worry about
mental attitudes.
If Delegate Wickersham should introduce a bill early in the
next session of Congress to amend the Organic Act in such a
way as to give Alaska a "full Territorial form of government,"
as a friend of the Judge recently said that he would, those who
have attacked the Democrats of Alaska as "machine politicians"
will have a chance to retract. They will discover by the support
that will be given the measure that the Democrats of Alaska are
democrats, and that they support democracy whenever they
have an opportunity to do so.
If we are going to have non-partisanship, let's have the
real article. It has proved so successful wherever it has been
tried that there is no danger of the communities' returning to
party governments. It is a growing and extending system rather
than a diminishing and dying one. But make it real. Do away
with partisan "Non-Partisans" parties also.
About the time everybody had made up his mind that he
would have to move to Seward comes the New York Sun and
starts a boom for Valdez. Well, Valdez people, too, have done
their share of watchful waiting. In addition, they have sawed
a lot of wood while waiting.
It has been stated as a fact that a small and select number
of the unemployed in Chicago are not in sympathy with the
movement to rovide them with work.
A dispatch states that China will give $25,000 for the mur
der of an American. She should send her victims to New York,
where they kill them for less money.
As the war progresses the belligerants are coming more
and more to treat neutral nations as rank and impertinent out
siders.
"WITH NEITHER PRIDE NOR
PASSION."
(Chicago Herald.)
Former Prosldent Taft In a Wash
ington birthday address at Morris
town. N. J., gave counsel meet for the
tlmos to every American.
Calling attention to the various In
novations of the European's belllgor
cnts upon formerly accoptcd rules of
international law with respect to neu
tral commerce and to tho fact that
the "serious Invasion of our rights"
thus threatened brings us "faco to
face with a crisis," Mr. Taft contin
ued:
When their violation results in
the destruction of tho lives of
American citizens, or of American,
property, a gravo Issue will arise.
The responsibility of tho Presi
dent and Congress In maintaining
our national rights and our na
tional honor on tho one hand, with
duo regard to the awful conse
quences to our 90,000,000 people
of engaging In this horrible war
on the other, will be very great.
It Involves a judgment so mo
mentous that we should earnosly
pray that tho necessity for It may
be averted. If, however, tho oc
casion arises, wo can be confi
dent that those in authority will
be actuated by tho highest pat
riotic motives and by tho deepest
concern for our national welfare.
We must not allow our prido or
momentary passion to influence
our Judgment. We must exerclso
the deliberation that the fatal con
sequences necessarily Impose. We
must allow no jingo spirit to pre
vail Wo must abldo tho Judgment
of those to whom we have intrust
ed the authority, and WHEN
THE PRESIDENT SHALL ACT
WE MUST STAND BY HIM TO
THE END.
That is wise counsel, tho only coun
sel for every loyal American. He is
no American who may refuso so to
govern his thoughts, words and ac
tions. Any day something may occur
that may thrust upon us tho choice
between submitting?tor the time?
to some outrage and war in defense of
our national rights and honor. Lot
neither prido nor passion rule thon.
The way of safety and tho way of
hoaor is to abide by the docision of
the patient and patriotic President
to whom we havo intrusted authority
and upon whom falls this fateful re
sponsibility. When that decision is
made wo may bo absolutely suro it is
right and must stand by It to the end.
A PRACTICAL, NOT A LEGAL
QUESTION
(Chicago Herald.)
Tho British ubo of the American
flag on merchant ships to escape pur
suit or capture raises a practical ques
tion rather than an issue of Interna
tional law.
The official statement of the Brit
ish foreign office sets forth tho legal
aspects. It Is quite true that tho use
of a neutral flag to escape destruction
Is not forbidden by any rulo of In
ternational law or any international
government.
It is also possibly true that In na
val wars under circumstances hereto
fore familiar such a use of a neutral
flag by a merchant vessel would not
be like-y to prejudice interests of tho
nation whose flag was thus employed.
But wo are confronted with a naval
war of an unfamliar sort. Wo are
confronted with the declaration of a
belligerent that it intends to resort
to methods against an enemy that will
expose neutral nations to extra haz
zards. In short, with a situation In
which tho employment of our flag on
Great Britain's merchant vossols will
materially prejudice our interests.
Under such circumstances Great
Britain should assuredly discontinue
the uso of our flag as a matter of
international comity. Out of a prop
er regard for a neutral: nation she
should declino to avail herself of tho
methods which aro calculated to in
jure If unnecessary.
The communication from Washing
ton on this subject should be conceiv
ed In this sense. It is too late an
attempt to establish a new rulo of
International law. But is la a good
time to call attontlon to the applica
tion of the general principles of in
ternatlon comity.
SCHOOL LANDS FOR ALASKA
(Fairbanks News-Miner)
The effort to obtain BChool lands
for Alaska is commendable?if It can
bo dono,?and to "us Americans" no
thing is impossible.
The issuo Is not tho merit of tho
measure?but tho simple question of
bolng able to convince Congress that
tho Territory should be treated in tho
Bamo manner that all othor Territor
ies were treated by the government.
On tho face of things, it would ap
pear that no serious opposition would
be developed to tho Wlckorsham
scheme. It is moroly an application
to tho Northern wonderland of tho
same policies adopted at other periods
of tho nation's history.
<? ?+
GRINS AND GROANS
In these days of closed seas and
war zones, overy little movement has
a peril of Its own in the case of tho
morchant ships.?(Chicago Herald.)
Some follows are trying to lay up
treasure in Heaven by doglng taxes
on Earth.?(Cincinnati Enquirer.)
A medical authority pronounces tho
tight skirit sonsible and hoalthful.
That sottles it. We jBee the finish
of the tight skirt.?(Cincinnati En
quirer.)
Whon two womqp happen to hate
the Bamo person they are always bo
som friends.?(Cincinnati Enquirer.)
It isn't every man who can kcop
his end up when he can see his fin
ish.?(Fairbanks News-Miner.)
Many a fellow becomes his own
worst enemy simply because he has
too many friends. ? (San Francisco
Star.)
The devil doesn't care how ofton
a man goes to church on Sunday, If
he can ubo him tho rest of tho week.
?(New York Times.)
PRAISE FOR CURRENCY LAW
(San Francisco Star.)
One thing to remembev (that the
foes of the Democratic party would
bo glad to have forgotten): the world
praiso of this Administration's finan
cial enactments. Canada especially
in hor nowspapors, commends, and ad
vises llko laws In her Dominion. Says
the Montreal Commercial: "This leg
islation has put tho United States In
position to handle the present* situa
tion without strain or wory."
THERE'S A REASON
(Fairbanks Nows-MIner)
Of course there is plenty or room
at tho top. Everybody wants to got
in on the ground floor.
FORSIGHT
(Louisville Courler-Jaurnal)
Some of the nations which wore re
luctant about participating In tho
Panama canal exposition doubtless
foresaw that they would havo their
hands full about this time.
NEW ORDER OF THINGS
Chicago Herald.)
The Woman's Council of St. Louis
is preparing to erect an ofico build
ing exclusively for women. We sup
pose tho customary sign will be per
haps amended to read: "Book agents,
peddlers and men not permitted in
this building."
SOME HOPE LEFT.
(Los Angeles Express.)
However, it is hoped that the bel
ligerent nations will permit the ships
of neutral countries to lie In their
homo ports uumenaced.
NEEDED LEGISLATION
(Loulsvlllo Courier-Journal)
Legislation that would deprivo pro
fessional lawbreakers of weapons and
permit the lnocont bystander to arm
himself would bo desirable If it could
As OHvor W. Holmos might have
will bo the de'll to pay!"
UNITED STATES LAND OFFICE.
Juneau, Alaska, Fobruary 26, 1915.
Notice lu hereby given that the Al
aska Gnstlnoau Mining Company, n
corporation organized and existing
undor tho laws of the State of Now
York, and qualified to do and doing
business as a corporation at Junonu,
Alaska, uh assignee of John M. Ran
kin who was tho assignee of RlBWorth
yA. Grey, and entitled to tho benefits
of sections 230G and 2307, Rovlsed
Statutes of tho United States grant
ing additional rights to soldiers and
sailors who sorved In tho Civil War,
by nnd through B. L. Thane, aB Its
attorney In fact, has made applica
tion for patent for a Soldier's Addi
tional Homestead claim, Survey No.
1078, which Is situated approximately
300 feet from tho tldo wator of Gas
tincau Channel, near tho Sheep Crook
whftrf of tho said Company, and do-'
scrlbod as follows, to-wit:
Beginning nt Corner No. 1, from
whence U. S. L. M. No. 17 bears S.
25* 34' 08" W. 75.12 chains distant;
tbcnco S. 62* 51' E. 18.93 chains to
Corner No. 2; thence N. 11" 17' E.
20.88 chataB to Corner No. 3; thence
N. 4.82 chains to Corner No. 4; thence
\V. 22.17 chains to Corner No. 5;
thence S. 38? 21' W. 9.10 chains to
Corner No. 6; thonco S. 49* 31' E. 11.29
chains to Corner No. 7; tlicuco S. 38?
06' W. 2.81 chains to Corner No. 1, tho
place of beginning. Containing an
area of 46.09 acres. Mag Var. North
30* 15' E. Tho lattltudo Is 58* 16' N.,
and Longitude 134* 20' W.
The names of the adjoining claims
are tho Homestead, Homestead No. 1,
and the Homstead Extension patented
lodo claims Survey No. 900, and tho
Homstond No. 3, unpatented lodo
lodo claim, Survey No. 979. belonging
to the Alaska Gnstlnoau Mining Com
pany, and the Waw Wnw lodo claim,
unpatented, Survey No. 994-A, belong
ing to tho Alaska Troadwoll Gold
Mining Company. So far as is known
thorc are no conflicting claims.
This notice was posted on the
ground on the 26th day of February,
1915.
ALASKA GASTINEAU MINING
COMPANY
By B. L. Thane, its Agent and Attor
ney in F\ict.
It is horcby ordered that the fore
going notico be published for tho full
period of sixty days In the Empire, a
nowspapor of general circulation pub
lished at Juneau, Alaska.
C. B. WALKER,
Register.
First publication, March 6, 1915.
Last publication. ?
NOTICE OF FORFEITURE.
Sitka Mining District,
Territory of Alaska,
January 21,1916.
To Leland M., Bridgoman
and Win. A. Peers:
You are horeby notified that we
have expended ono hundred dollars
in labor and improvements upon tbo
"Big 4" lode mining claim, situated
at Chicbagoff, on Chicagoff Island,
Sitka Mining District, Dlv. No. 1., Ter
ritory of AlaBka, and particularly de
scribed as land parallel and Joining
on North sldo of Young claim No. 2.
and Young claim No. 3, of the Chich
agoff Mining Co., as will appear of
record In tho records of the Sitka Re
cording District, Territory of Alaska,
as No. 1564, page 168. Mining Record
Book 3, In order to hold said premises
under the provisions of section 2324,
Revised Statutes of the United States,
and tho Mining Laws of tho Territory
of Alaska, bolng tho amount required
to hold tho samo for tho year ending
December 31, 1914. And if within
ninety days aftor thl3 notice of publi
cation, you fall or refuse to contri
buto your portions of such expendi
ture as co-owners, your Interest In
said claim will becomo tho property
of tho subscribers.
CHICHAQOFP MINING CO, Inc.
and JOHN H. PETERSON.
First publication, Jan. 25, 1915.
NOTICE OF FORFEITURE,
Sitka Mining District,
Territory of Alaska,
January 21, 1915.
To John Tupcla:
You arc hereby notified that we
have expended ono hundred dollars
in labor and improvements on each
of the following named lode mining
claims, to-wit: "Over tho Hill," "Pa
cific," "Goldon West," and "Rising
Sun," all of said claims being situat
ed at Chlchagoff, on Chichagoff Isl
and, Sitka Mining District, Div. No.
1, Territory of Alaska, and each being
first of record in tho records of the
Sitka Recording District, Territory of
Alaska, as follows: "Over tho Hill"
as No. 1279, pago 535, Book 2 of Mln
lag locations; "Pacific" as No. 1386,
pago 32, Book 3 of Mining Locations;
"Goldon West" cb No. 1678, page 175,
Book 3 of Mining Locations, and "Ris
ing Sun" as No. 1579, pago 177, Book
3, of Mining Locations, of said rec
ords. This expenditure was made in
order to hold said premises and claims
tinder the provisions of Section 2324,
Revised Statutes of the United States,
nnd the Mining Laws of tho Territory
of Alaska, being the amounts required
to hold tho sarno for the year onding
December 31,1014. And if within nine
ty days after this notice of publica
tion, you fail or refuse to contribute
your portion of such expenditures as
a co-owner, your Intorest In tho said
claims will bccomo the property of
the subscriber.
CHICHAGOFF MINING CO., Inc.
First publication, Jan. 25, 1915.
OLDEST
IN ALASKA
Established
1891
Incorporat
ed 1914
Every service a bank may render ia
performed by us
cheerfully, promptly and on the very
best of terms.
Savings earn interest here and your
cash is always safe.
President
J. R. Willi.
Vkc-PrcilJcnt
I
GJHcNaagiitbii
GtsJiler
I J'lMcKannaTransferI
| FREIGHT?COAL?BAGGAGE t|
I llglit aad Hc*ty Hading of aQ Kinds B
| Office 127-129 Front St, phone BS '? i
? o
? Baggage and General Eaallng g
| CO ALT CO ALU | ? ?
? A. H. eCHPOBRIBS V.lcntine Bldtf. t
? Telepf>osej: Office 258) Bern 226 J ?
.' i
C. W. WINSTEDT
ARCHITECT
SUPERINTENDENT
Off loo?2jh1 Floor, S?t to acir Port Office
< MHHiinimutimm>p
ll TKe Alaska Grill i?
Tke Best Appointed
Place in Town
;: Best of Everything Served 1!
at Moderate Prices
Alio ii iniinatmin
' > ?
< > <.
I McCIoskeysj
? ? -
An "ad" In The Empire roaches ev
?????'?? nm?BBMWI
SCHEDULE
Juneau Ferry 8 Navigation Company
Leaves Juneau for Douglas. Treadwell
and Thane
6:00a.in. 1:00 p.m. 7:00p.m.
7:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m. 8:00 p.m.
8:00a.m. 4:00 p.m. 9:30p.m.
?9:00 a.m. 6:00 p. m. 11:15 p.m.
11:00 a.m. ^ w
. Saturday Night Only?12:00 P. M
?9:00 A. M. Trip Does not go to Thane
Loave Douglas for Treadwcll & Thane
6:10 a.m. 1:10 p. ra. 7:10 p.m.
N 7:10a. m. 3:10 p.m. 8:10p.m.
8:10 a.m. 4:10 p. m. 9:40 p.m.
11:10 a.m. 6:10 p. m. 11:25 p.m.
Leave Treadwell for Thane
6:15a.m. 1:15 p. m. 7:15p.m.
7:15 a.m. 3:15 p. m. 8:15p.m.
8:15 a.m. 4:15 p. m. 9:45 p.m.
11:15a.m. 6:15 p.m. 11:30p.m.
Leave Thane for Treadwell, Douglas,
and Juneau
6:25 a.m. 1:25 p. m. 7:25p.m.
7:25a.m. 3:25 p. m. 8:25p.m.
8:25a.m. 4:25 p.m. 9:55 p.m.
11:25 a.m. 6:25 p.m. 12:15 a.m.
Leave Treadwell for Douglas & Juneau
6:35a. m. 1:35 p. m. 7:35 p.m.
7:35a.m. 3:35 p.m. "8:35p.m.
8:35 a.m. 4:35 p. ra. 10i05p. m.
9:20a.m. 6:35 p. m. 12:25a.ra.
11:35 a. m.
Leaves Douglao for Junoau
6:40 a.m. 1:40 p.m. 7:40 p.m.
7:40 a.m. 3:40 p. m. 8:40 p.m.
8:40a.m. 4:40 p. m. 10:10p.m.
9:25a.m. 6:40 p.m. 12-:80a.m.
11:40 a.m.
THE ADMIRAL LINE i Navigation Co j
Yslo and 83. Hui-vurJ for Southern 12.
California port*.
ADMIRAL EVANS
Southbound M.irch 19
Pugot Sound-Alaska Routo, from Ta
cormi and Seattle for Ketchikan, Pet
ersburg, Juneau, Yalutnt. Katnlla.
vordovu. V alder. Ellumar. Port Wells,
l-aToUCl,e. Seward. Cook Inlut. Kodlak.
ADMIRAL WATSON
Westbound March 18
Right to reserve to change sail- HUGH P. GALLAGHER, Agt
lng diuea without notice. Phone "Admiral Lino"
rvj-?.? wwwv
*
| For Seattle, Prince Rupert ,
Ketchikan, Wrangell and ft
;; Petersburg. !
? City of Seattle April 1, 12 ^
' [ Spokane March 6. 16, 27
0
For Skagway and Kames j;
t City of Seattle Mar 31 I!
(Spokane March 5, 15, 26
i connMtn atSWajfway for , ,
Dawson and all Yukon
River points. < >
, . nc?Nf f LB SAN WE60 and all California Points !;
san ???*!
; ? LOW KATES- I'^wtnndUnt'B^. fuU particular. nppW JwBA0, Ala?CA J ;
Canadian Pacific Railway Company I
B. C. COAST SERVICE 1
Sailing from Juneau for Port Simpson, Prlnco Rupert, Swanson, Alort {?
Bay, Vancouver, Victoria and Seattle.
S PRINCESS MAQUINNA SOUTH?MARCH 11
PRINCESS MAY SOUTH?MARCH 26 |
C. P. R. Ticket offices?Orpheum Bldg. and Splckett'o Postoffice 8tore.
\'\ __ JOHN T. BPICKETT, Agent |
*** ??i^???mmmmmmmmm^^mmmm???A
? :v'!e. r THE WHITE PASS I |peef?
Rouie o & yukoN ROUTE "TT
Lomjort Safety
During the winter season of 1,914-15 our regular train service
will be maintained North and South bound between Skaguay and
Whltchorso, trains leaving both terminals every Tuosday and Friday.
WINTER STAGE SERVICE
Our through mall, passenger and freight servico will be operated
between Whitehorse and Dawson, affording all possible comfort by
moans of a THOROUGHLY EQUIPPED STAGE AND AUTOMOBILE
LINE. For full Information apply to
C. W. CASH, Supt. Mall Service Dept. Whitehorse, Y. T.
A. F. ZIPF, Traffic Manager, 612 Second Avenue, Seattle, Wash.
*=.... H in<
Wx
ALASKA |
STEAMSHIP COMPANY
r.fcty. Service, Speed Tickets to Seattle. Tacerr.n. Victoria and Vancouver. Through ? ?
. tickets to San Francisco
! JEFFERSON, North Feb. 2, 14 and 26 South Feb. 3, 5, and 27 il
MARIPOSA, North Feb. 11 and 27 South Feb. 3, 17, Mar. 5
; ALAMEDA North Feb. 4 and 19 South Feb. 10, 25 "
WILLIS E NO WELL, Juneau Agt. Elmer E. Smith Doufllao AqL
HUMBOLDT STEAMSHIP CO.
| | The Almkn Flyer | ^ HUMBOLDT The Ala ska Flyer J
Leaves Seattle Saturday, February 27, $ p. m Northbound
DOCKS AT JUNEAU CITY WHARF
PETTIT & HARVEY, Agents,
Cheney Block, Juneau Seattle Office?716 2d Ave.
I Border Line Transportation Co.
jl |/? Sails from Seattle, March 15
AI-lVI Sails from Juneau, March 19
C. W. YOUNG CO. JOHN HENSON
Agents Juneau * Agent Douglas
i H. L. FAULKNER and |
% S. H. MILLWEE, $
LAWYERS ' |
Notary Public X
% 2M-206 Scwtinl Bufldbs Juneau. Alaaka J
? . .AI
I When in Seattle Stop
at tho Placo for
ALASKANS
It's Flro-Proof, Modern and Convenient P]
RATES $1.00 Per Day tnd Up |j
HOTEL BARKER
CornerPlfce and Sixth
Free Auto Bun Meets nil Boats nnd Trnma
C. O. Wnlaton & Conrad Frecdlnjr. Props.
ALASKAN SOURDOUGHS
-'TOaafcMapmi ?!iimbbbw???
?tl 1 H III! I -H-H ll!llllllll['
:: D R. H. y A N C E I
f Tho
I OSTEOPATH;;
;* Room* 5 and 6 Malony Bldg.
?r Consultation and Examination .f
Fro*. Phono 242. '*
Graduato American School o' "*
j Osteopathy, Klrksvlllo, Mo.
Seven years' active practice.
Office hours, 9 to 12 m. 1 to B I!
;; p. m.f or by appointment *j
-f-1-I .M-H-H-H-I-I-I- M-I ;l-l' l-l1 !? I
Remington Typewriter Company
has established an office la Juncaa at
the corner of Front and Mala Streets.
Gome In and get tho latest Remington
Idea. : i :
* THE BE8T LOAF OF
BREAD |
;; io sold A?
11 San Francisco Bakery!
; | Q. MKSSERSCrfMEDT, Prop. \ \

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