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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, March 11, 1915, Image 1

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VOL. V., XoTns. ' ~ JUNEAU, ALASKA, THURSDAY, MARCH 11, 1915. - ' PRICE TEN CENTS.
p ' - - ?- - ?- ? ? - - - ? ?----- ^ ^ ~ ~ ~~ ' " ~ "
MAY BUY
ONLY ONE
RAILROAD
WASHINGTON, March 11.?Presi
dent Woodrow Wilson has Intimated,
according to' statements made this
morning, that it It shall be decided
to exercise the authority given the
President to purchase one or more ex
isting railroads in Alaska, that only
one will be purchased. However, Sec
retary of the Interior Franklin K.
Lane said, that negotiations are now
under way for the purchase of both
lines. The whole matter is now in<
the hands of the President, who is glv- j
ing it his personal attention.
Offers S350.000 for Alaska Northern.
The best offer that has been made!
by the Federal government for the
Alaska Northern railroad is $350,000.
It is understood that this sum has
been refused.
The completed report was submit
ted to the President yesterday after
noon. late, by Secretary of the Inter
ior Lane. A conference between the
President and Secretary of the Inter-j
ior followed. The Secretary informed
the President that negotiations are In
progress for the purchase of both
railroads. He says the President,
however, left the impression that hei
would sanction the purchase of only j
one. if any.
The Secretary of the Interior said,
the question of which railroad would I
bo purchased is very much In doubt.
The President had called for further
figures on the cost of construction and
operation. This request has resulted;
in a great deal of speculation as to
just what Is meant, as the report is
known to contain figures on all the]
routes discussed. The engineering
commission is now busy getting tip
the new figures wanted.
First Question.
The principal question to be decld-;
ed at once by the President is at to:
on which side Prince William Sound
to build the railroad. This decision.,
Secretary of the Interior Lane, hangs:
largely upon which part of the coal
fields it may be thought best to de
velop at this time, and upon the cost
and maintenance of the two routes.
President Asks As to Authority.
The engineering commission Is now
working on figures showing the costs,
and estimates which will be laid be
fore the President and Secretary of
the Interior soon. Then the proposi
tion will be put up to the Attorney
General for an opinion on the ques
tion as to the existing authority of
the President to obligate the govern
ment for an expenditure in excess of
the available funds. This question
would arise if the President should
desire to purchase all of the existing
railroads, or if ho desired to contract
In advance for extended construction.
M'ADOO IN HOSPITAL FOR
OPERATION FOR APPENDICITIS
WASHINGTON. March 11.?Secre
tary* of the Treasury William G. Mc
Adoo is in a hospital here where he
will be operated on for appendicitis.
UNITED STATES DISTRICT,
JUDGE RUDKIN DIVORCED
NORTH YAKIMA. Wash.. March 11.
?United States District Court Judge
Frank H. Rudkin. formerly chief-Jus
tice of the Washington State supreme
court, was granted a divorce today in
the superior court on the ground of
desertion.
Mrs. Rudkin was formerly the wife
of S. O. Morford. an Alaska lawyer.
STONE SAYS BLOCKADE
HURTS AMERICAN TRADE
ST. LOUIS, Mo.. March 11.?Sena
tor W. J. Stone of Missouri, chairman
of the foreign relations' committee, of
the Senate, says the blockade serious
ly would injure American commerce.
He stated his belief that American
shipping can and will be indemnified
for all losses thus sustained, but said
he was not yet prepared to take up
the question of redress.
4- -h 4
* : +
? WEATHER TODAY *
? +
.> 4. 4. 4. 4. 4- -j. 4? 4? *> 4- *> 4- ?> 4- 4*
4- Maximum?i2. *>
+ Minimum?36. 4?
+ Rainfall?X0 inch. *
! BILL fOR BOUNTY
! ON WOLVES RUNS
| AMUCKINHOUSE]
WANTED ?An expert
on wolves, who will serve
without compensation, as
an adviser to the Legis
lature. Apply immediatc
T>'' #l
Wolves, their habits, hankerings,
haunts, holHshness. horrors and hos
1 tility, are coming in for a great deal
of comment in the Territorial legis
lature. since the introduction of the
bill providing a bounty for their
scalps. The amount which Senator
Sulzer fixed as suitable reward for
the slaughter of one wolf?fifteen dot
lars?was reduced to $10, by the com
mittee. but when the measure came
up today in the Senate for second
reading, the bll was re-committed to
the finance committee, and is was in
timated that it would be considerably
revised before further report. Mean
while tho worf experts are in demand,
and the above advertisement may be
officially authorized before tho meas
ure comes to a vote.
After Board Beaters
Senator Caustad introduced Senate
Bill 7. an act making It a misdemean
or, on conviction of which tho punish
ment shall bo by fine not exceeding
$200, or by imprisonment not to ex
ceed six months, to procure board or
lodging from hotels. Inns, boarding
houses or lodging houses by false re
presentations.
The finance committee fayorablj : ex
ported the-bill to compensate Dr. P,
Wllberforce, and recommended that,
the bill be effective as soon as passed. j
LEGISLATORS SWIM
ON TREADWELL VISIT
When Senators J. M. Tanner and
B. F. Millard and Representatives
Charles M. Day and Earnest B. Col
lins dived Into the Trcadwell Nator
ium 'last evening?in unison there
was a mighty splash, but the tank
rose to its task with a display of re
serve power, and came through the
ordeal uninjured.
Senators. Representatives, members
of the Press, the ladles, and eraployeos i
of the Legislature, were guests of the
Treadwell Club last evening on aj
swimming excursion. Superintend
ent P. R. Bradley made tho visitors;
feel right at homo from the moment
they landed from the ferry "Alma" at:
7:30, until 10 o'clock, when they re
turned to Juneau. During that time
the excursionists swam, saw the larg
est hoist In the world at work, visited
the club, and then the boarding house,
where hot coffee and sandwiches were
served. On behalf of the party. Sen
ator C. A. Sulzer thanked Mr. Bradley
for his courtesy, and the latter ex
pressed the hope that the Legislators
would come again, as often as the*
liked. _
About thirty made tho trip. Every
body had a good time.
CANNERYMEN COME j
ON THE SPOKANE
SEATTLE, March 11.?J. T. Barron,
prestdent of the Tblinget Packing com
pany, and 30 men. and P. T. Harris,
president of the Hawk Inlet canner>,
and 25 men are sailing on the Spokane
! tonight for Funter bay and Hawk in
let. respectively. There are also 2a!
men sailing for the Vermont Marble
company's new plant at Red Bay.
Tho Spokane will have the following
named passengers:
For Juneau?Mrs. R. G. Datson, Al
bert Peacock. J. H. Long and wife.
Paul Harta, Otto Lalne, Gust Makl,
Andrew Johnposkle.
For Douglas?Mrs. G. Geisser.
INCOME TAX RECEIPTS
TO SHOW DECREASE
NEW YORK. March 11.?It is gen
erallv admitted that there will be a
falling off on about 20 per cent, in
receipts from Income tax in New
York this year, as the European war
has seriously curtailed net income of
many corporation and persons.
JOHN G. LEWIS MAY RUN
FOR GOVERNORSHIP
OLYMPIA. Wash., March 11 ? Re
publican clubs all over the State arc
endorsing the Candida* y for Governor
at the next State primary election, of
John G. Lewis..of Aberdeen, former
State Treasurer.
Si
ON
A memorial to Congress, asking per-1
missiou to vote on prohibition at the
next Territorial election, November
1, 1916, was introduced in the House
this afternoon- by. Representative C.
K. Snow, of Ruby. On the question
of reference, a lively tilt ensued and
by a vote of 8 to 6 the opinion of the
chair, that the memorial go to the
committee on education, public health
and morals, was sustained. Chairman
Heid. of the judiciary committee, de
clared the memorial should not bo re
ferred to his committee. Chairman
Brltt likewise contended thnt the ed
ucation committee should not be glv
cn the memorial. The author of the
memorial replied with a marked dc
gree of spirit, that ho would spend
the whole session, if necessary, to a
discussion of the memorial, In com
mittee.
Wilberforcc Bill Passed.
The Dr. Wilberforce compensation J
bill, appropriating $400. passed the
House. Mr. Noon dissenting. On the
emergency clause Mr. Held and Mr.
Noon voted No. The bill now goes to
tho Senate.
New Bills Introduced.
New bills were introduced as fol
lows: .,
II B 22, ways and mcatis commit*
tee. to appropriate $300 for conting
ent expenses of vital statistics ret, ?
lrSH B 23. bv Mr. Brltt, amending the
lav. relating'to the practice of medi
cine and surgery, and repealing allj
laws in conflict. Referred to educa
tion and public health committee.
H B 24. bv Mr. Hold, amending
law's of Alaska" to require execution of
olographic wins. Referred to the ju-,
d VL B. 25, by Mr. Hcckman, giving
municipal magistrates in Alaska civil j
jurisdiction whon, the amount dm s
not exceed $500. To Judiciary com-;
mlttee. , . .. t
The House mot at two o clock. At |
tor praver by the Chaplain, the Rev.
r, E Renison. the Journal was read
? nd approved. The House adjourned
at three o'clock, to reconvene tomor-.
row at two o'clock.
SEVERAL CASES OF
EMPLOYMENT AFFECTED
??$??
The House Bill No- 20. Introduced
vesterday by Representative &now of
Ruby, not only applies the S-hour wor -
lng day to all classes of mining, it re
quires'that in hotels, laundries, res
taurants, bakeries, mechanical or mer
cantile establishments, the 8-hour day
shall obtain.
The bill is as follows:
Sec. 1. Employment in all open cut
mines or workings, open pit workings
dredge workings, hydraulic working.,
or mine workings of any other? char-,
acter: in telephone or telegraph ex
changes. or offices, laundries, hotels,
restaurants, or bakeries, beyond a rea
sonable length of time,
clared to be injuHous to health, and
dangerous to tho public safety. ?
cmc 2. That no person employee
: in open cut mining or workings, open
nit workings, dredge workings, hydrau
lic workings, or mine workings of any
other character, shall be required or
; permitted by the employer to work
more than eight (8) hours during any
one day of twenty-four hours.
Sec 3 That no person employed
I in a laundry shall be required or per
I mitted by the employer ttrwork more
:?? forty-eight ?oo" <?> h?ure *
I one week. , .
<tcc 4 That no female employed n
la telephone or telegraph exchange or
; office, in a .hotel, restaurant, or bak
?erv. shall be required or permitted b>
tho employer to work more than eight
hours in any ono day of twehty-fo..
h?Sec 5 That every employer of any
female, in any manufacturing, mech
anical, or mercantile establishment,
laundry, hotel, restaurant, bakery or
other ' establishment, shall provide
suitable seats for all such female em
not engaged in the active duties of
their employment.
deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and
upon conviction thereof, shall to*. pun
ished by a fine .of "
and Imprisonment.
* I
Tho committoo on education, in tho
House o? Ropresontntivos, at a meet
ing after the session yesterday, agreed
to favor the bills of Senator Hubbard
and Representative Britt, to appro
moneys to be placed in an emergency
school fund, In order that outlying dis
tricts might not suffer for the lack of
schools.
committee, believes that when the. ap
propriation is made, the legislature
can then take steps to provide schools
for the soctions which now have no
place to sond their children, for
training.
Action Is expected to be taken next
week on tho bills.
MEXICANS
TOUR SPANIARDS
in Mexico City; that the fcnuses of
Spaniards on the outskirts of tb'o city
have boon burned and looted, and that
Spanish citizens bad been maltreated
CARRANZA ASKS
FOREIGNERS TO LEAVE
ranza. replying to tho note of protest'
from Secretary of State William J.;
Bryan regarding conditions in Mexico
City, addressed President Woodrowj
Wilson, personally, expressing the
hope that Americans and all foreigners
would get out of Mexico until tran
quility shall have boon restored.
Promises Protection.
WASHINGTON, March 11. - Gen.
Carranza's reply to the American note,
which was received today, promises
protection to all foreigners in Mex
ico, both as to life and property.
Carranra Restricts Trade
GALVESTON, Tex., March 11.?
Gen. Carranza has prohibited the ex
portation of sisal fibre from Progres
eo, Yucatan, used in the manufacture
of twine. An embargo has ben Im
posed on account of differences be
tween the two factions of Carranzls
LEGISLATURE TURNS
GOV. LISTER DOWN
OLYMPIA, Wash., March 11.- The
tho veto of Gov. Ernest Lister, the bins
requiring initative petitions to be
signed only at places of registration.
erciso of the initiative moro difficult.
Thoy were opposed by Democrats and
Progressives.
Legislature to Adjourn.
OLYMPIA, WaBh. 11.?The Wash
ington legislature will adjourn tonight,
the session coming to an end by 11m
j itation of law.
GOLD COMING TO
U. S. REGULARLY
NEW YORK, March 11.?In addition
l to foreign lonns that have boon made
this year and the repurchase of Amor
j ican securities, it has been found ne
cessary to Import gold in order to
keep European exchange to the point
that foreign trade is possible.
Tho total gold engaged for import
since January 1st now amoijnts to
$15,550,000. Of this. $9,300,000 comes
from Canada, $4,200,000 from the Par
Blast. $1,000,000 from South America
and $1,050,000 from London direct.
IMMENSE GAINS IN
MONEY FOR AMERICANS
NEW YORK. March 11.?The Na
tional City Bank, N. Y., estimates that
with a trade balance of $400,000,000 in
be expected for 1915 find that $100,
CANADA'S KILLED
TORONTO. Can., March 1L?A to
first contingent had been killed up to
March 1st.
I
PETROGRAD, March 11. ? A re
grouping of the Gorman force# in
Northern Poland and. the commence
ment of a new attempt to pierce the
Russian line# through Przanycz has
been noted by the Russian general
stat.'.
This movement is being made v/lth
considerably greater strength tfian
was the recent operation in the di
rection of Przanycz which terminated
not only in local defeat for the Ger-j
mans but In the general retirement of!
all the German forces In the direction
of their own frontier.
The Russian forces In Northern Po
land, and in Galicla continued to meet
with successes. In the Carpathians
German and Austrian attacks were re-i
pulsed.
HOLLAND MAY GET IN WAR.
LONDON. Starch 11.?Rates of in-;
suranct- against Holland's participation J
in the war have taken a sudden jump.j
Duo to semi-official reports hero that;
the Dutch government is planning for;
war with Germany and that the Ger-j
are making preparations for j
an aggrosr.lvo offensive against Hol->
land as soon as it joins the Allies.
passing through Aix la Chappeile arc
carrying soldiers to reinforce the fore-:
cs now guarding the frontier between
Belgium and Holland, and that the'
Germans arc building bridges over thej
Scheldt at Antwerp and Hobokenj
across which heavy artillery can be;
transported for action against the
Dutch.
Announcement was mado that no
persons can leave England for Hol
land without first securing a permit
at tho home orrice. To get such a per-;
mlt air applicants must give satisfac
tory proof of their purpose and fur-!
nlsh reference^
Officers Rejoin Regiments
THE HAGUE, March 11?A1 Dutch
officors on furlough have been ordered
to rejoin their regiments, This action
was taken after a conference between
the foreign minister and Queen Wil
holmina.
GERMANS FIGURE ON
TEN YEARS OF WAR:
COPENHAGEN, March 11 ? That
German officialdom is preparing for a
ten years' war against Great Britain
is said to bo proved. It Is stated that
Germany has abandoned any iiopc of
peaco with Great Britain, irrespective
of what the other nations might do.
It is believed that the war may bo
one on the water and bo a war on
commerce, If ?o, Germany will contin
ue tho conflict with her submarines
until Frauce and Russia shair have
been disposed of, and then she will.
build a navy larger than England's.
GERMANS FEAR
DANGER OF HUNGER
WASHINGTON, March 11?Gorman
Officials secretly admit grave appre
hension over the developments in the
German warfare against the English
ally?hunger.
Prussia Aids Sufferers.
BERLIN, March 11.?The Prussian;
Diet has unanimously accepted u. bill
appropriating $25,000,000 as a subsidy
to be used in alleviating tho suffer
ings of persons affected by tho war.
Restrict Use of Bread
LONDON. March 11.?The London
Chronicle reports that Germnny has
appealed to all German children to
eat one slice of bread Instead of the
customary two for supper.
German "Hunger" 1c Bluff
LONDON, March 11.?Tho London
Morning Post says the war-bread reg
ulations in Germany are not due to
scarcity, but the pretext to induce
charitable Americans to feed the Bel
?
people in tho portion of France now
occupied by Germany. Already as a
result n Franco-German conference
has been hold in Berne. The German
government is expected to Increase
food, restrictions and Ibsuo meat and
' potatoes.
[BRITISH BEATING
I GERMANS BACK
IN f LANDERS
PARIS, March 11.?The War Office
announced this evening that British
! troop3 have today captured more than
a mile and one-half of German
troncheB.
The British nttacks extended for a
long distance along the German front ,
in Flanders, and In each attack suc-j
cesscB were gained.
Tho losses were heavy.
Improved weather conditions ls;i
causing greater activity along the,,
front in Belgium and France, and it j (
is believed that heavy blows and
counter attacks may be expected. j
11
British Capture City (
"LONDON, March 11.?Under cover .
of a heavy fire from French artillery
British troops captured Neuve Chap
pelle, north of Labasso yesterday, tak- ?
lng 1,000 prisoners. ,
A Gorman attack in tlie Campagne ^
district was repulsed with heavy Iosb- 1
es. (
British Lose Collier.
B13RLIN, March 11. ? A dispatch
from Rotterdam says that the British
collier Beethoven, hound from New
castle to Gibraltar, was sunk yester
day by coming in contact with a
mine. Two of her crow were drown-:
BRITAIN REFUSES PRIVILEGE
TO SCANDINAVIANS;
PARIS, March 11.?The Paris Temps,
says it learns from a foreign office:
source that the proposal of the Scan- (
dlnavian States that they be permit-:
ted to use warships as convoys foi j
merchant vessels sailing for English
ports haB been refused by the British j,
government. ; \
BRITISH LOSE 33 j,
SHIPS IN FEBRUARY j (
LONDON, March 11.?British mor
chant vessels lost in February num- ]
bered 33, of an aggregate net tonnage (
or 34.859. with 97 lives, of which nine
steamers, aggregating 12,389 tons,
were sunk by German submarines,
with a loss of six lives, and one of
2605 tons was sunk by a Gorman mine. i
BOMBARDMENT OF
DARDANELLES CONTINUES (
LONDON, March 11. ? The bom
bardment of the Dardanelles forts
has been continued, though most of
the firing is being done by the 1' rench (
warships. i
Fog has prevented the ? aviators ^
from discovering the extent of the
damage executed. (
RUSSIA'S USE OF
DARDANELLES GUARANTEED
LONDON, March 11.?The Paris j
Temps asserts says a dispatch recei'.- ;
cd horc, that an agreement has been
reached between France, Great Britain ,
and Russia regarding the future stat
us of the Dardanelles, which will give ,
Russia free passage of the Straits.
TURKS REINFORCING 1
DARDANELLES ARMY
ATHENS, March 11.? Information 31
from Mltylenc and Tenedos is that
more than 100.000 Turks have been (
posted along the coast of GaMpoH
peninsula, near tho sea of Marmora,
about 130 mites from Constantinople.
SULTAN IS URGED
TO CONCLUDE PEACE
ATHENS, March 11.?According to
reports from Constantinople, Prince .
Sabah-Ed-Din has telegraphed the Sul
tan. urging him to conclude peace with ,
the Allies quickly, in order to prevent ,
a catastrophe to Turkey.
GERMANS SAY JAPS
HELPED BRITISH FLEET,
BERLIN, (via Amsterdam), March
1 tl --According to information received
'here the dofeat of tho German squad- ,
ron near the Falkland islands was ac
compllshed by the combined efforts ,
of a Japanese and British squadron ;
This is a new version, as credit had
then been claimed by the British Ad- ,
mlralty for the nhips of Vice-Admiral
Sturdee. . .j
The Hanover Kourler has received,<
from its correspondent at,Peking a.
Japanese report of the battle. Panted;
In a newspapor there to this of fee
and giving tho main credit to thej;
Japanoso.
U. S. MAY
DEMAND
DAMAGES
WASHINGTON, March 11. ? That
the United States will make a de
mand for the Immediate and full pay
ment of damages by Germany to the
Arthur Sewall and company, the own
irs of the William P. Frye, and to the
owners of her cargo for the loss of
ship and freight Is understood here.
The final disposition of the Prlnz
Eltel Friedrich has not been deter
mined upon. It is believed that the
Ccrmans will ask -to dismantle her
ind interne her until after the war.
Washington, March Dealing
with the William P. Frye case, the ad
ministration will Insist that during
:he negotiations that Its position is
the same as that outlined In Its re
lent note to Germany, which said:
"If commanders of German war
ships destroy American vessels
it would be difficult to view the
act in any other light than an In
defensible violation of the neutral
ity which would be very hard to
reconcile. If such a deplorable
situation arises the United States
will be constrained to hold the
imperial government to a strict
accountability."
SITUATION CRITICAL.
It is admitted here that the situ
ation growing out of the Frye case
might become severely critical unless
Sermany makes quick reparation.
U. S. Investigating.
WASHINGTON, March IX.?At the
^Vhite House this morning the follow
ng statement wns Issued:
"The President, when asked what
ictlon will be taken with regard to
:he sinking of the William P. Frye,
replied: 'The most searchbts Inquiry
ivill bo made, and whatever-action that
may ho taken will" bo based upon the
Indings of that inquiry/"
American Crew Released.
NEWPORT NEWS, Va.. March 11.
?The crew of the William P. Frye
ivas released today and brought
ishorc.
The Prlnz Eitel Friedrich went into
Irydock todny for repairs.
Eltel Friedrich Sank Another
American.
WASHINGTON, March 11.?It was
disclosed today that tho British
steamship Charcas, which was sunk
by the Prinz Eltel Friedrich. was an
American-owned ship and on her way
to New York to take an American reg
ister when she was destroyed.
British Chased German to Port.
WASHINGTON, March 11. ? At
least three British warships were in
pursit of tho Prlnz Eltel Friedrich
ivhcn she reached American waters.
To the olll ers of one of tho sunken
British ships, who were aboard tho
Eltel Freidrlch, the commander of the
latter said that. Judging from tho
ixchangc of wireless communications
between the British ships, one of them
was within ten miles, another within
50 or 40 miles and a third within 50
miles when his ship reached the
American three-mile limit, off the \ ir
ginin capos.
GERMAN WAR ZONE
ORDER VIOLATES TREATY
WASHINGTON, March 11. ? It is
held here that the German war zone
proclamation is an absoluto violation
of Germany's treaty obligations to
the United States, shown by the study
Df a treaty of 1828 between tho Unit
sd States and Prussia, which officials
hnve had under consideration In con
section with the preparation of pro
tests to the German government. Al
though this treaty was drawn between
tho United States and Prussia,, tho
German government two years ago
presented a formal memorandum to
the United States asserting that tho
treaty was to bo considered in force
today and as covering the entire Ger
man Empire. Under the terms of the
treaty American vessels should enjoy
jn entiro freedom of the seas in trad
ing with British ports.
CALIFORNIA SHIPS 80,000
BOXES OF ORANGES DAILY
SAN FRANCISCO, March 11 l-Cali
fornia fruit growers are now shipping
80,000 boxes of oranges dally.

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