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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, March 17, 1915, Image 4

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ALASKA DAILY EMPIRE
. Published by the EMPIRE PRINTING" COMPANY
JOHN W. TROY, Editor and Manager.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
One year, by mail. In advance $10.00
Six months, by mail, in advance, 5.00
Per mcmb. deli
Entered as second-class matter November ?. 1012. at the postofllco at Ju
nww^faulau undjg, the Act of March 3. 1879.
THE REUNITED ARCTIC BROTHERHOOD
The amalogamation of the two branches of the Arctic Brotherhood this
week Is an event of more than passing importance in Alaska. The Arctic
Brotherhood has played a useful as well as pleasant part In this Territory.
It has been an aggressive and progressive Alaskan order. While it cher
ishes Alaska's traditions, it is more representative of the activities of today
and the plans and hopes for tomorrow than anything else. And it is
an organization that is firmly planted in all sections of Alaska. It extends
from Ketchikan around the coast to Nome, as well as up and down the
Yukon river, recognizing no boundary line or artificial division in the North.
It is too good an organization, and its field too important to permit
it to go to not because of descenslon, and, fortunately, its membership rec
ognized the fact before it was too late.
It is well that the troubles of the order wore bridged over through
a recognition of the fact that its northern character required that it be
kept in the North. Alaska has passed beyond ephemeral dangers. The
country Is a fact, and her people are anchored to her soil. They must
work out their problems here. Their problems aro not the rominisconsos
of those who made a half-made rush into the Klondike and then returned
to the States. They are reat. living matters of the present and future.
They relate to questions of state, community and homo building up here.
The place for a virile, active, northern Arctic Brotherhood is on the ground
amidst our pleasures and griefs, where we are living and shall remain.
Juneau will take a good deal of pride iu the circumstance that the
peace which signifies the end of Arctic Brotherhood troubles and which
will mark tho beginning of a new epoch In the order's career was made at
this place: and the accomplishment of the peace odds enthusiasm to the
hospitality with which the community welcomos the representatives of
the order from other sections of Alaska.
HALF LOAF IS BETTER THAN NO BREAD
While The Empire Is as strongly In favor of more power for the
Alaska Territorial government, and believes Its acquisition to bo the para
mount governmental problem before the people of Alaska, it docs not agreo
with the suggestion that if we cannot get it wo should ask for tho abol
ishment of tho legislature and such measure of home rule as wo have.
The Alaska Legislature is well worth its cost. It Is a case where a half
loaf Is a whole lot better than no bread. Notwithstanding the disaster
which overtook its revenue law and some of its other legislation, the First
Territorial Legislature was well worth while. It blazed a good many trails,
and did some permanent work toward the development of a system of lo
cal government in Alaska. And that the Second Legislature will correct
some of the mistakes of the First, and open up the way for further de
velopment In other directions there is no reason to doubt.
However, the one most important thing that the present Legislature
con do b to impress upon the Congress that Alaska wants above all else
the powers of a "full Territorial form of government."
IRELAND'S CAUSE FOR REJOICING
?
Notwithstanding the war in Europe'where thousands of Irishmen arc
on the firing line, and consequently are a source of anxiety to the folks at
home, the 1915 National holiday of the Emerald Isle is one that should
be celebrated with zest. Since Tast natives and descendants of Ireland ob
served St. Patrick's Day the generations-long contest for home rule has
triumphed, and today the law for an Irish parliament has place in the
statute books of the United Kingdom.
For this happy result those of Irish blood in the United States, liv
ing and dead, have been in a largo measure responsible. TVhile they could
not vote in Great Britain they supplied a great deal of the sinews of war
for the campaign that was waged so long. Therefore, the interest in today's
doings will be as great on this side of the Atlantic as on the other.
There is one point, however, that Irish-Americans should not forget
in their rejoicing, and that is that they are Americans. Admonitions of
this sort will not generally be needed, for we have no more patriotic citi
zens than those in whose veins course Hibernian blood. Yet, here and
there throughout the country are Irish-born citizens who have permitted
their traditional antipathy for England and the English to cause them to
become more active in exhibiting interest in the European war than is
seemly for citizens of a neutral country. St. Patrick's day should not bo
an occasion for embarrassment to a government that stands for so much
that Ireland has struggled for.
IMMIGRATION FIGURES
By way of comforting those who still mourn the defeat of the immi
gration bill it is worth while to call attention to the latest available figures
on immigration. The total for 1914 was a little more than 686,000, which
compares with 1,380,000 for the year before, a drop of more than 50 per
cent But this is not tho most striking fact in the record. In 1913, it
will be noticed, the average for the months was over 100,000, the last
month of that year showing 95,000 arrivals. In 1914 the immigration In
no month exceeded the immigration in tho corresponding month the year
before, and as soon as the war began it dropped to about one-third of
the rate in the proceeding year., then to a quarter, and the year closed
with immigration running about one-fifth of what. it had been the year
before. The arrivals for last December numbered a little less than 21,000
and the steady decline from month to month shows that the effects of
the war may result in a still further reduction. Conditions entirely beyond
the power of Congressional control are restricting immigration to a point
where with anything like a revival of enterprises requiring common labor
the need will be for men rather than for their exclusion.
The Elks' minstrels have provided a pleasant method for the celebra
tion of St. Patrick's Day in Juneau.
In view of what happened to the Eevlyn and the Carlb the sum set
apart for maintaining the war insurance bureau at Washington might not
Inaptly be designated a sinking fund.
In spite of Berlin reports the Russians insist on classing Hlndenburg's
recent victory in Poland among the "Thirteen Decisive Battles of Fiction."
The army officer who declared Uncle Sam must fight the winner of
the present war forgets that there may be no winner, and that, if there
is. he probably will not be able to look a fight in the face.
A London report saye that Germany is full of unemployment. It may
be so, but Germany is certainly keeping the rest of Europe busy enough.
HAVING A HARD TIME
The standpat Republican Seattle Times the other day quoted approv
ingly an editorial from the standpat Republican Los Angeles Times, criti
cising the Underwood tariff law, In which appeared the statement that the
Underwood tariff law had driven the "sheep men out of business."
Now comes the president of the American Woolen company, (the
trust), who. In a signed report to the stockholders of his company, says:
"During that period (of the free-wool Underwood-Sim
mons tariff) the growers of wool in tho United States have
received higher prices than when there was a duty of 11
or 12 cents per pound, and the manufacturers have been
put on a basis of equality with their European competitors
as far as raw material has been concerned."
In other words, according to the president of the American Woolen
Company. Americans have been able to purchase needed foreign grades
of wool as cheaply as the manufacturers of England could gut it, and the
OLDEST
IN ALASKA
Established
Incorporat
ed 1914
Every service a bank may render is
performed by us for our customers
Savings earn interest here and your
cash is always safe.
Q.MeN?uj*{itOB
ever.
Dick out something upon which to hang n political issue, and usually they
recourse to an attomtpt to foor the people as to facts.
TURKEY DUBIOUS
(Washington Post)
Turkey is beginning to question tho
long-accepted statement that "west
ward tho courso of oniplro takes Its
way."
WHAT IT MEANS
(New York World)
A concrete idea of that billion dol
lars' worth of American war exports
can perhaps beet bo had by remem
bering that it will just about pay for !
a year's government,
DIPLOMATIC TEAM WORK
(Washington Star.)
By soizlng tho Dacia, Franco has
shown that the Allies aro equipped'
for diplomatic as well as military team
work.
A CRUEL LAW
(Boston Herald)
In five years the fees of tho sheriff:
of New York have amounted to $402,
329, but a cruel law compels the sher
iff to turn over half of the fees to
the county.
A HIGH PRIVATE
(Ohio Sfato Journal)
Col. Roosevelt's idea of serving
quietly in the ranks is offering to be
chairman whenever anybody starts
some new reform movement.
MUST HAVE EXPECTED PINK
TEA AFFAIR
(Blnghampton Press)
Little Arthur seems a little shy
about breaking into tho Mexican war
;-.one. What kind of a game does ho
think he's billed for at Juarez, throw- j
ing the bull?"
SPEAKS IN AN UNKNOWN
TONGUE
(Boston Transcript)
There's one consolation? Boston
won't understand moro than about
half of what Rt. Irrev. Billy Sunday
I says.
WHAT'S THE MATTER WITH TOM
(Charleston News and Courier)
With all due respectc to tho Vice
President, we hope most fervently that
Mr. Wilson's-health will continue to
be of the very best for some time to
come.
MIGHT HAVE BEEN WORSE
(Louisville Courier-Journal)
If Col. Roosevelt wcro President,
the American people would long since
have been led to war or Mattcawan.
?*? ?|? ?% ?% ?% ?'? ?% *% ?% ?J?
? OPTIGRAMS +
? <? ?> <? t ? ?> ?> + + -J- ?>
(Seattle Times)
Life Is for learning to love. Meas
ure all experience by this rule.
Is there anything more graceful
and loving than that of wishing happy
things for others?
Save us from tho man who dips each
sentence In a diplomatic antiseptic
before using, who makes a fetich of
tact.
Who ever saw a dollar-mark on a
gravestone? Dollars somehow dwin
dle when they reach the cemetery
gate.
Soldiers in tho trenches stand the
strain much better than the folks at
home. It is easier to die in battalions
than to die in bed. Comradeship miti
gates hardship and fear.
Some men lack a nozzlo on the
stream of their thoughts. There is
no chairman in the meoting of their
ideas. They are minus a focus.
Meeting people at some "receptions"
is like being drawn as a stick across
a paling fence; the contacts arc quick,
regular and wooden.
i POINTED PARAGRAPHS
*
(St Louis Republic)
Bright peoplo look upon tho bright
sido of life.
Some men have too much pride to
get down to honest labor.
The self-made man forgets to list
himself when the assessor calls.
A woman bofiovos that it is her
husband's honesty that koopn them
poor.
Many a first-class kitchen mechanic
Is made over Into a tenth-class act
ress.
Sometimes it is a woman's fondness
for change that keeps- her husband's
pockets empty.
If a mother chases hor children out
of the room when anothor woman calls
there is gossip in the air.
The nobbiest line of suitings I have
over purchased for spring and sum
mer wear have just arrived. Come
in and look them over.
3-15-tf. P. WOLLAND. Tailor.
The Empire has most readers
MINING APPLICATION
No. 01763
UNITED STATES LAND OFFICE, J
Juneau, Alaska, March 11, 191G
Notice is hereby given that the Al
aska Gastineau Mining Company, a
corporation organized and existing un
der the laws of the State of Now York
and qualified to do, and doing busl- ,
ncnu as a corporation, at Juneau, Al
aska. by B. L. Thane, its agent and
attornoy in fact, has mado application
for patent to tho Glacier and Silver 1
Quoon Millsites. Survey No. 083, sit- ;
uated in the Harris Mining District,
Juneau Land District, District of Alas- ;
ka. descrlbod as follows, to-wit:
Glacier Mlllslte
Beginning at Corner No. 1. whence 1
U. S. L. M No. 3-A bears North 33?
01' East 5020.94 feet distant; thence ;
South 26? 56' Vest 499.93 feet to Cor
ner No. 2; thence North 63" 04' West
435.09 feot to Corner No. 3; thence
North 27* 02' East 499.94 feet to Cor- ;
ner No. 4; thence South 63* 04' East
434.20 foot to Corner No. 1, tho place
of beginning, containing an area of
4.998 acres. Mag. Var. 32? 00' East.
Sliver Queen Mlllslte
Beginning at Corner No. 1, identical
i with Corner No. 2 of the Glacier mill
site, whence U. S. L. M No. 3-A boars
North 59" 54' East 5432.60 feet dis
tant; thence South 26* 57' West 499.87
foot to Cornor No. 2; thenco North
63" 03' West 434.93 feet to Corner No.
3; thence North 26? 57' East 499.71
feet to Corner No. 4; thonce South
; 63? 04' East 435.09 feet to Cornor No.
1, containing an area of 4.991 acres.
Mag. Var. 32* 00' East
The names of tho adjoining claims
are the Agnes and Bedum lode claims
belonging to the Alaska Treadwell
Gold Mining Company.
The location notices of tho Glacier
Mlllsito and Silver Queon Mlllslte are
recorded in Book 8 of Placers at page
19 of the records of the Rocordor for
the Juneau Recording Procinct, Dis
trict of Alaska.
ThiB notice was poBted on the
ground the 15th day of September,
ALASKA GASTINEAU
MINING COMPANY
By B. L. Thane,,
Its agent and attornoy in fact.
UNITED STATES LAND OFFICE
Juneau, Alaska, March 11, 1915.
It Is hereby ordered that the fore
going notice of application for mining
patent bo published in the Alaska
Daily Empire at Juneau, Alaska, for
the full period of sixty days.
C. B. WALKER,
Register.
First publication March 12, 1915.
Last publication May 12, 1915.
NOTICE OF ELECTION
TO THE ELECTORS of the City of
Juneau, Division No. 1, Territory of
Alaska, Notice In hereby given that
pursuant to Ordinance No. 135, of the
City of Juneau, passed and approved ,
by the Common Council on February
20, 1914, a general election, for the
purpose of electing seven Councllmen
and one school director for the City
of Juneau, as provided In said ordi
nance, will be held on Tuesday, April
Sixth, ninoteen hundred and fifteen,
between the hours of nine o'clock a.
m. and seven o'clock p. m. of said
day: That the voting place for the
above stated election will be In the
Fire Apparatus room in the City Hall
building, located at the corner of
Fourth and Main streets, In the City
of Juneau, and that the entrance to
said room Is on the Fourth street side
of said building; That the qualifica
tions of the electors at said olection
.
Any citizen or the United States,
whether male or female, and any per
son who has filed a declaration of
Intention to become such, is entitled
to exercise the elective franchise In j
the City of Juneau; Provided, such
person shall be of tho full ago of twen
f Alaska for ono year and of the
/receding tho date of election.
Dated at Juneau, Alaska, tills 10th
ay of March, 101C.
NO. 0160G.
INI TED STATES LAND OFFICE,
uneau, Alaska, Fobrunry 26. 1915.
Notice.
Notice it; hereby given that the Al* ??>
aka Gastlneau Mining Company, a <>
orporatlon organized and existing
mder the laws of the Stnto of Now
lualnoss as a corporation at Juneau, ]j
L Grey, and entitled to tho benefits \\
Itatutes of tho United States grant- ' |
ng additional rights to soldiers and
allors who sorved in tho Civil War,
>y and through B. L. Thane, as its ]
ittornoy in fact, has made applies- .
ion for patent for n Soldier's Addl- i
loual Homestead claim, Survey No. J
078, which is situated approximately d
100 feet from the tide water of Gas- p
lnoau Chaimel, noar tho Sheep Creek p
vharf of the said Compauy, and do-' H
icrlbed an follows, to-wlt:
Beginning at Corner No. 1, from i
vhonco U. S. L. M. No. 17 boars S. I
!G? 34' 08" W. 75.12 chains distant; |
honco S. 62" 51' E. 18.93 chains to
lorner No. 2; thenco N. 11* 17' E.
!0.88 chains to Corner No. 3; thenco
N; 4.82 chains to Corner No. 4; thence
iV. 22.17 chains to Corner No. C;
.hence S. 38? 21' W. 9.10 chains to
Jornor No. 6; thence S. 49* 31' E. 11.29 I
shalns to Corner No. 7; thenco S. 38?
16' W. 2.81 chains to Corner No. 1, tho
jlnce of beginning. Containing an
trea of 46.09 acres. Mag Var. North S
10? 15' E. The lattitudc Is 68* 1C' N.. '
md Longltudo 134? 20' W.
Tho names of the adjoining claims
ire the Homestead, Homostcad No. 1,
md the Homstead Extension patented
odo claims Survey No. 900, and the
?iomstoad No. 3, unpatented Jode
odo claim. Survey No. 979. belonging
;o tho Alaska Gastlneau Mining Com
pany. and tho Waw Waw lodo claim,
mpatented, Survoy No. 994-A, belong
,ng to the Alaska Treadwoll Gold
MIning'Company. So far as Is known
;here arc no conflicting claims.
This notice was posted on the
;round on tho 26th day of Fobruary,
1915.
ALASKA GASTINEAU MINING J
COMPANY
By B. L. Thane, its Agent and Attor- ?;
icy In Fact.
It Is hereby ordered that the fore- j
;olng notico bo published for the full ;
yeriod of sixty days In the Empire, a ']
lewBpapcr of general circulation pub- 1
iished at Juneau, Alaska.
C. B. WALKER.
v Register. j
First publication, March C, 1915.
Last publication, -?
NOTICE OF FORFEITURE.
Sitka Mining District,
Torritory of Alaska.
January 21,1910. !
To Leland M. BrJdgcmnn
and Wm. A. Peers:
You arc hereby notlflod that we (
havo expended one hundred dollars .
In labor and improvements upon the
"Big 4" lode mining claim, situated
at Chichagoff, on Chlcagoff Island,
Sitka Mining District, Div. No. 1., Ter
ritory of Alaska, and particularly de
scribed as land parallel and Joining
on North sldo of Young claim No. 2,
and Young claim No. 3, of tho phlch
ngoff Mining Co.. as will appear of
record in tbo records of tho Sitka Re
cording District, Torritory of Alaska,
as No. 1664, page 1C8, Mining Record
BOok 3, in order to hcSA said premises
under the provisions of section 2324,
Revised Statutes of tho United States,
and the Mining Laws of tho Torritory
of Alaska, being tho amount required j
to bold tho same for the year ending
December 31, 1914. And if within
ninoty days after this notico of publi
cation, you fail or refuse to coatri
bute your portions of such expendi
ture as co-ownorB, your interest in
SCHEDULE
Juneau Ferry 8 Navigation Company
Leaves Juneau for Douglas, Treadwell
and Thane
G:00 n. m. 1:00 p. m. 7:00 p.m.
7:00 a.m. 3:00 p. in. 8:00 p.m.
8:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m. 9:30 p.m.
?9:00 a.m. 6:00 p. in, 11:15 p.m.
11:00 a. m.
. Saturday Night Only?12:00 P. M
?9:00 A. M. Trip Does not go to Thano
Leavo Douglas for Treadwell & Thane
6:10a.m. l:10?p. m. 7:10p.m.
7:10 a.m. 3:10 p. in. 8:10 p.m.
8:10a.m. 4:10 p.m. 9:40p.m.
11:10 a.m. 6:10 p. m. 11:25 p.m.
Leave Treadwell for Thane
6:15a.m. 1:15 p.m.' 7:15p.m.
7:15 a.m. 3:15 p. m. 8:15 p.m.
8:15a.m. 4:15 p. m. 9:45p.m.
11:15 a.m. 0:15 p. m. 11:30 p.m.
Leave Thane for Treadwell, Douglas,
and Juneau
6:25a.m. ' 1:25 p. m. 7:25p.m.
7:25a.m., 3:25 p.m. 8:25p.m.
8:25a.m. 4:25 p.m. 9:55p.m.
11:25 a.m.. 6:25 p. m. 12:15 a.m.
Leave Treadwell for Douglas & Juneau
0:35 a. in. 1:35 p. m. 7:35 p.m.
7:35a.m. 3:35 p.m. 8:35p.m.
8:35 a.m. 4:35 p. m. 10:05 p.m.
Leaves Douglas for Juneau
8:40 a.m. 4:40 p. m. 10:10 p.m.
said claim will becomo tho proporty
of the subscribers.
CHICHAGOFF MINING CO, Inc.
and JOHN H. PETERSON.
First publication, Jan. 25. 1915.
NOTICE OF FORFEITURE.
Sitka Mining District,
Torrltory of Alaska.
January 21, 1915.
To John Tupola:
you arc hereby notified that wo
have expended ono hundred dollars
In labor and Improvements on each ;
of the following named lode mining
claims, to-wlt: "Over the Hill," "Pa
cific," "Golden West," and "Rising
Sun," all of said claims being sltuat- ;
ed at Chlchagoff, on Chlchagoff Isl- !
and, Sitka Mining District, DIv. No. ?
1. Territory of Alaska, and each being \
first of record In tbo records of the I
Sitka Recording District, Territory of ?
Alaska, as follows: "Over tho Hill"
as No. 1279, page 535, Book 2 of Min- -
ing locations; "Pacific" as No. 1386, [
page 32, Book 3 of Mining Locations; \
"Golden West" as No. 1578, pago 175, ?
Book 3 of Mining Locations, and "RIs- ;
ing Sun" a: No. 1579, pago 177, Book !
3, of Mining Locations, of said rcc- ?
ords. This expenditure was made in
order to hold said premises and claims
under tho provisions of Section 2324,
Revised Statutes of th$ United States, *>
and the Mining Laws of the Territory
of Alaska, being the amounts required
to hold the same for tho year onding
December 31,1914. And if within nine
ty days after this notice of publica
tion, you fail or refuse to contribute
your portion of such expenditures as
a co-owner, your interest in tho said
claims will becomo tho proporty of ~
the subscriber. ,
CHICHAGOFF MINING CO., Inc. <?
First publication. Jan. 25, 1915. J
? ? V \A,S.Vv- VI ? VAAA/JSAA.4 *
u ?????? i
IPl McKannaTransfer 1
FREIGHT?COAL?BAGGAGE |
j ; Llfifn and Ilcarv Haullni! of all Kliwli j''J
j.] Office 127-129 Front St., phone 65 [ ]
A A
? Baggage and General Hauling < >
11 coal; coalii | ?[
i A. H. nOMPGERIB.^ Valentine Dldtf. t
? TtlepboMi; Office 258: Barn 226 J
;
C W. WINSTEDT
ARCKIT.
SUPERINTENDENT
0Iflce--2nd Floor, Sort to new Po*t Of/lco
; McCloskeysf
~*
< > ,
<?
I ^
An "ad" In The Empire reaches ev
erybody.
THE ADMIRAL LINE Navigation Co |
tn Sun J-rnnci.'ci.. ronncctlnff Willi SS. /
yalt- und SS.. I<?'.'Viinl for. Southern/
California poru.
Southbound ...... March 19
?-?" ? 11 I I I
Pusot Bound-Alatka Houtc, frvm Ta
runut and Scuttle for KctcMk*^ ? "t?
?r?l>uiv. Junoau. Yakuiat. k"VM,
Cordova, V?!d?r, Ellamar, l'ort W?"a.
LuToucho. b' wnid, Cook Inlet. Kodia*^
ADMIRAL WATSON
Wettbound March 18
WLjg v Clmnge 8U11' HUGH p- GALLAGHER, Agt I
Ing dates without notice. phone .'Admiral Line" fl
attle, Prince Rupert ,
Ketchikan, Wrangell and fc
Petersburg. \
City of Seattle April 1, 12 \
Spokane March 6, 10, 27
for Skagv/ay and Haiaes ;;
City of Seattle Mar 31 J!
Spokane March 5, 15, 20 <?
connects lit Skajrwny for < >
Dawson and all Yukon
River points. * [
connects at seattle eoh ?
SAN fRANCISCO, LOS ANGELES, SAN DIEGO and all California Points S
WW SERVICE |
For full portlculaw apply i
Ii. BRANDT. G. A. V. D.. Seattle. Wash. rf. U. EW1NG, Asrent, J"***0; a
RIGHTS RESERVED TO CHANGE SCHEDULES $
Canadian Pacific Railway Company
?B. C. COAST SERVICE
Sailing from Juneau for Seattle, Vancouver, Victoria, etc., via Prince
Rupert, B. C.
PRINCESS MAY SOUTH?MARCH 25
C. P. R. Ticket offices?Orpheum Bldg. and Splckett'o Postofflce Store.
JOHN T. SPICKETT, Agent.
? j
** ?? ?? ?nrm ?
=~~~?? -g I
V>e, r THE WHITE PASS fpe^
Rome oj & yuK0N R0uTE Service
Lomjort Safety
During the winter Benson of 1914-15 our regular train service
will be maintained North nnd South bound between Sltaguay and
Whltohorse, trains leaving both terminals every Tuesday and Friday.
WINTER STAGE SERVICE
Our through mall, passenger and freight sorvlco will bo operated
between Whllehorso and Dawson, affording all possible comfort by
means of a THOROUGHLY EQUIPPED STAGE AND AUTOMOBILE
LINE. For full information apply to
C. W: CASH, Supt. Mall Servlco Dopt, Whltehorso, Y. T.
A. F. ZIPF, Tralllc Manager, 612 Socond Avenue, Seattle, Wash.
t-M-i-i i l l' I -H-I-l-I-H-1 -l-l-1 MM 1 ! I- 1-h !? V-l 1
ALASKA 1
STEAMSHIP COMPANY J
L nfcty. t'crvicp, S|><<d TickctB to Seattle, Toccc a. Victoria and Vancouver, mrouitn ?p
tickets toSan Vranclsco ??
|l MARIPOSA SOUTH r. MARCH 18
?' ALAMEDA, NORTH MARCH 20 SOUTH MARCH 26
NORTHW'N, NORTH....MARCH 27 SOUTH APRIL 2 r
DOLPHIN, NORTH MARCH 22 SOUTH MARCH 23
..
i- WILLIS E NOWELL, Juneau Apt. Elmer E. Smith Douglas Agt
HUMBOLDT STEAMSHIP CO.
| The Alaokn Flyer | S. HUMBOLDT | The Ala ?ka Flye I | j
Sails from Seattle MARCH 21 Leaves Juneau SOUTH, MARCH 26
DOCKS AT JUNEAU CITY WHARF
PETTIT & HARVEY, Agents, Seattle Office?712 2d Ave,
? -
| Border Line Transportation Co.
A ]/; Sails from Seattle, March 15 jj
r'Uti Sails from Juneau, March 19
C. W. YOUNG CO. JOHN HENSON
Agents Juneau Agent Douglas
-I? ? _ |
s H. L. FAULKNER and t
% S. H. MILLWEE, $
LAWYERS %
Notary Public
> ?04-206 Seward HulMlnir Juneau, Alaska < >
? iVi,'M'lrl* t.
When in Seattle Stop
at the Place for
ALASKANS
It'll Firo-Proof, Modern and Convenient pi
RATES $1.00 Per Day and Up u
HOTEL BARKER
CorncrPlko end Sixth ?
Free Auto Bua Meets all Boata and Traliy
C. 0. Walaton & Conriul Frecdlntr.Prope.
ALASKAN SOURDOUGHS
t.t f. f-r?i?r?t r_t?i_t r ; it,,!,!.).
DR. H. VANCE i
Tho
OSTEOPATH;;
Room# 6 and 6 Malony Bldg. +
Consultation and Examination
Free. Phone 282.
Gradusto American School of
Osteopathy, Klrkavlllo, Mo.
3oven year#' active practice.
Office hour#, 9 to 12 m. 1 to 6 Ij
p. m., or by appointment. "
I I I J T H I I II I
????1???1?? .
Remington Typewriter Company
lias established an office in Juneaa at
the comer of Front and Main Streets.
* Como In and (Jet the latest Remington
Idea. > i :
THE BE8T LOAF OF
i bread f
I Is Sold At I
I San Francisco Bakery |
J a. MESSERSCjsCMIDT. Prop, t

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