OCR Interpretation


The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, March 22, 1915, Image 5

Image and text provided by Alaska State Library Historical Collections

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020657/1915-03-22/ed-1/seq-5/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 5

_ ALASKAN TROOPS, fIRST TO
GO THROUGH CANAL, PARADED
Tho Thirtieth U. S. Infantry, slnco
they left Alaska last June, have bee::
receiving their share of publicity i
since they returned to the States. Re-,
cently In New York, they partlclpat-j
ed In the first review of "regulars."'
iu that city since the SpantshAinert-;
can war. They also were the first!
troops to bo taken through the Pan
ama canal since its opening, and on
the first transport to traverse that
waterway.
The New York World, In printing
an account of the review; Interview
ed officers of tho regiment, just be
fore tho review took place. A re
porter for The World wanted to know
what the regiment had been doing
In Alaska and why it was there. He
asked the latter question first. The
officer to whom it was addressed an
swered:
"Do you remember the old story of
the German Princess who came across
a plant trying to force Its way be
tween a crevasse In one of the pal
ace walls, of how, at her behest, a
sentry was stationed there to see
no one trod upon It, of how the Prin
cess forgot about the flower, and of i
how, some centuries later, cme one
had asked a sentry why he pas pa
trolling along that particular walk
and the sentry could not tell him.
"Well. many, many years ago. when
the great rush was on in Alaska, it
brought many turbulent and lawless
characters, and to restrain this ele
ment the Government sent troops in
to the Territory. The need of them
passed long ago. but the custom re
mains."
Life a Dreary Monotone.
The World continued: "In the reg
iment were seventy-five veterans of
the war with Spain, men who have
served in the Philippines, in Cuba on
the Isthmus. Jfone of them is in love.
with Alaska. They describe the
deadly montotone of a life where no 1
news from the outside world ever
comes except by mail, and this at in
tervals of two or three months some- :
times.
"The physical health of the men
was excellent, but many had suc
cumbed to nostalgia; menalcholia had
afflicted others, and isolation and the
monotony had induced several cases
of insanity.
"The command was distributed in 5
five posts?Forts Gibbon. Davis. St.11
Michael Liscura and Seward. In three
drills and practice marches were im-J
f'
| possible, because of the soft, spoilt
I tundra. Only one fort, that of Soi
[ ard. had regular barracks. The ot
extended from October to June, at
the thermometer sometimes reglsto
ed as low as 60 degrees below zero.
"Col. Frank B. McCoy commande
the regiment."
WORTHEN SAWMILL
STARTS TOMORROW
The Worthen saw mill will start u
full blast tomorrow morning. Tb
Carlta got in yesterday froi
Schenk & McDonald's camp on Por
age Bay, Kupreanof Island, with 26C
000 feet of logs, some of them 7% fee
in diameter.
"Two bad wind storms were ei
countered, and for a time it looked a
though $1,600 worth of logs would g
glimmering." remarked H. S. Wortl
en who was aboard the Carita. W
danced the Merry WIddow waltz t
the tune of the wind."
A side wind had them cTose to th
rocks, but they held on to their toi
and landed it safely in Juneau harboi
It required 70 hours to make the roun
trip.
Mr. Worthen reports Schenk & M<
Donald at Portage Bay as doing wel
and that they expect to take out 4
000,000 feet of logs this season.
The Carita will depart for Peters
burg Wednesday to bring in anothe
boom of logs for the mill, which ha
a sawing capacity of about 25,000 fee
per day and will emply 40 men.
NINETY SCHOOL CHILDREN
LOCATED AT KNH
John Glfpntrlck arrived yesterda:
from Kenai. He says there arc abou
ninety children there and net a sigi
of a school. He believes other con
dltions over there should be lookcc
Into by the government. The trai
sadly lacks snow.?(Seward Gate
way.)
MAMMOTH SIGN BEING
ERECTED OVER HOTEL
A huge electric sign, calculated tc
be seen miles down the channel by
incoming boats, is being erected on
:he roof of the New Cain J3oteI by
Marshall & Newman and VanLehn
it Raymond. The letters are already
made, and are seven feet high and
tour ane one-half feet wide. The sign
vill be completed by the middle ol
;h!s week.
NTERIOR PEOPLE IN
JUNEAU LAST SATURDAY
?+?
Paul Hopkins, assayer of the Amer
can Bank of Alaska, of Fairbanks,
Hopped off for a few hours while the
Vlameda was in port Saturday.
Mrs. Blanche Martin, formerly pro
>rietor of the Golden Gate Hotel, of
Fairbanks, passed through on the Ala
neda with her two children, bot^nd
or the Westward.
Jack Ctayworth, an operator in the
? Circle country on the Yukou was
homo-bound passenger on the Alanu
da Saturday.
Mr. R. Marsden. of the firm of Maw
don & Riley, operators In the Idltaro*
will go over tho trail from Seward.
Mr. and Mrs. Tom Gibson were ca
lers In Juneau Saturday, and wilf g
cy ovor tho Valdo/. trail from Chltlna.
h- lin. the man who built the Tanam
,*s railroad, passed Northward on ,thi
id Alameda, accompanied by Mrs. Jot
t- lin.
Harry Woodworth. pioneer real ea
d tate man of Fairbanks, accotnpanlet
by Mrs. Woodworth, was a rcturnlni
passenger on the 'Alameda.
Frank Splra. a sourdongh of oh
. Cleary Creek, was ono of the man;
/ Interiorltes aboard the Alameda las
Saturday.
W. Doblor, owner of the Tanani
e river boat Dan, has sold tho steri
M wheeler and tho scow Bill to Dav<
t. Petroe.
, A party of twelve, going In ovor tin
,'t trail to Mastodon creek to work th<
Clarence Berry dredge this summei
v were aboard the Alameda Saturday
s night.
0 Manuel Gularte, a pioneer business
j. man of the Idltarod, passed North 01
e the Alameda Saturday.
BULLET WHISTLES
v PAST JUNEAUITE
d Bert B. Brewster had an experience
in Vnldez that he win not soon for
:?: get. Whilo dining in tho Vnldez res
1, taurant on the evening of March 6
a bullet came through tho celling
jof the dining room, and flattcneed
i- on the stove which was within a few
r foot of Mr. Brewster's tablo. The bul
s let didn't scare him, he says, but it
t was thought that perhaps a gatllng
gun was at work and there should
be more messengers coming.
An investigation showed that a man
t and his wife who occupied tho upper
room had been quarreling and a pis
ir jtol which had came into tho affair be
t came discharged, accidentally of
! | course.
1} ?'***??+ + + ** + **'4* ?***
I' 4 ? 4
. * MARINE NOTES 4
1 ^ *
? ????? ?> J ? ? t + ? ?
The Al-Ki arrived at 3:30 this morn
. ing. She will sail south at 10 o'clock
tonight
> The Dolphin is expected late this
j evening from the South.
t| The Spokane leaves Seattle tonight.
The City of Seattle sails from Seat
tle on the 27th.
The Alameda is duo from the West
ward Saturday.
The Mariposa sails from Seattle on
the 30th.
l Tho Jefferson is due to sail from
Seattle on the 27th.
The Georgia is due today at noon
from Skagway; will depart for Sitka
at midnight tomorrow.
The Princess May is due from Van
couver tomorrow.
The Northwestern sails from Seat
tle Wednesday night.
The Admiral Evans said from Seat
tle Friday at 10 a. in.
The Humboldt is duo from the
smith Wednesday afternoon.
O. E. S. MEETING.
Regular meeting of Juneau Chapter,
Xo. 7. O. E. S.. at Odd Fellows' Hall.
. Tuesday, March 23, at 8 p. m.
ALETA DANIELS, Secy. It
FRYE'S DESTRUCTION
WAS OUTRAGE
A fact which has become painfully
apparent more than once during the
war is that neutrals must tread a
thorny path in preserving their neu
trality. In the fervor of a natural
zeal to cripple their opponents, the
belligerents are not always scrupu
J lously observant of neutral rights.
! While neither of the contending^ al
liances has been guiltless, it seems as
if the sinking of the American bark
William P. Frye by the German con
verted cruiser Prinz Eietel Friedrich
was a crowning act of international
lawlessness.
Apparently there is no dispute as i
to tho actuality of the sinking. But!
the defence has not been heard. When
it has been, there is the possibility
that tho occurrence will take on a
somewhat different aspect. However,
the act of the German commander
is especially to be regretted since it
makes it so much more difficult for
the United States to avoid being
swept Into the European malestrom..
It was the mocking of fate that the
destruction of an American ship on
} the high seas by a German vessel
I should have antedated President Wil
son's now famous message to Berlin.
That epistle was indited with the
ublqultlous undersea fighter In mind.
With the Kaiser's fleet on the high
seas reduced to a scant threo or four
adventurous units, it was hardly to
r. be thought that the Wilson dictum
For a German ship commander to
A right' effrontery, to take refuge in
o'an American harbor after dynamiting
jnn American ship la so preposterous
I--as to border on the ludicrous. Of
o course, the niatte'r Is not one for ad
i. mander. it must be threshed out
a with the Imporiul Germaa govcrn
0 ment, after calm and dispassionate In
.? qnlry. Lately the tone of communi
cations received at Washington from
i. the Berlin foreign office has been re
] froshlngly conciliatory. If this innnl
5 Testation of a studied policy, then it
ought to be a simple matter for the
1 Unltod States to obtain whatever in
,? demnlflcation and redress the circum
t stances of the Eltel case demand.
As for the contention that Gormnn>
t should pay for the wrongdoing of he.
i naval commandors by forfeiture of
3 tho offending ship, obviously tills is
arbitrary and injudicious, and u moth
3 od of procedure which would undoubt
3 cdly lend to graver complications,
r Confiscation may bo part of the policy
of militaristic states: it has never re
ceived official recognition in Wash
- tngton. el3e Germany would fear for
i the safoty of the pick of her mer
chant marine, now languishing in the
Apiorlcan harbors, and just augu
mcnted by the Prinz Eltcl Fricdrlch.
For tho Eitel, by scurrying into a nou
| traf harbor, has practically sealed the
bottlo on herself.?(Boston Nowb
, Bureau.)
. ^ .j. ?
COMMENT ON LATE
CONGRESS.
?Springfield (Mass.) Republican: 1
The long despised Democratic party, ;
following blindly, it may be, its nc- ?
cepted leader, has at least proved that j
, It can govorn, that it can place on ?
the statute book large measures of j
I constructive legislation?among them ?
tho most Important banking and mon- !
etary act in fifty years?that it is ca- ?
pablo of cohesion in rank and file !
and coherence in party policy, in *
short, that a substantial half of the I
American people can be intrusted *
with the government of the United ?
States in troublous times and not j
reduce the nation to ruin. In a de- ?
mocracy it is well, occasionally, to j
have such a fact demonstrated. The *j
history" of the Sixty-third Congress j
might have been written, to its ad- *!
vantage, bofore its laBt session began, Ij
since a llttto to its credit was ac-Jj
complished in the closing three1 -j
months. Tho groat record was thejj
work of the two earlier sessions. ^
?Cleveland Plain Dealer: Back of
practicaly every Important act of the,
last Congress stood President Wilson, a
counseling, urging, interpreting. Up-j ^
on ouly one issue did he meet defeat "
?that of the Ship Purchase Bill? (
and our own opinion is that ho has j
been strengthened, rather than weak- r
ened, by that reverse.
The record has been excellent!1
! Few, even among partisans, would
j propose to destroy the Federal Re
! serve Bank. The tariff act has been;v
a great step forward. Most of the;r
legislation of these two years is im- j11
muno from party attack.
e
?St. 1-ouls Republic: The future
of democracy, after all, is conditioiled
primarily on the moral qualities of a ''
pcoplo. In seoking the reason why j11
tho present Congress has written
more constructive legislation than any
other in half a century wo have not
far to look. It Is to be found not '
in any new-fangled theories, but in li
the possession of the plain-old-fash- )'
ioned virtues of honesty and regard '?
for the public good. The nation
says "Well done!"
?Chicago Herald: Congress can at :i
least congratulate itself that It has
done the business that lmd to be fc
anna I
?Birmingham Age-Herald: The lj
constructive legislation has already r<
been of incalculable benefit to the
business world, and Its admlrablo
funtcions will be all the more appro- t!
elated as time goes on. w
G
?Houston Post: We can thank the 111
outgoing Congress for what it has c'
done. tl
: n
?Philadelphia Record: Taken in si
its entirety and compared with the &
labors of the Republican Congresses
that preceded it, the work of this
Democratic body must be considered
remarkable and bound to have :i
great influonce upon the welfare of ,](
the country. It has been progressive, (ll
and it is safo to say that no party m
will ever venture to undo it. tl]
?Baltimore Sun: Here is a record ^
that the Democratic party can cheeis
fully go to the polls with in 1-916, j.j
and it can go perhaps all the more OJ
cheerfully because of tho President's ?
ono big defeat. The Ship Purchase ...
Bill might or might not have turned ^
out well had It been enacted Into law. w'
v *> + v v d* v ? 4* v *> *> v v v v v
* WAR SIDELIGHTS
?;? .j f 4> -> ?> v ?j- >> ->
Field Marshal Von Hlndenburg is
quoted in the Now York Times: "But
for America, my armies would possi
?without tho American railroading so
slble for me this wonderful weapon,
able with comparatively small num- P(
bcrs to stop and beat back the Rus
alon millions again and again?steam Fl
engine versus steam roller. Were it
one of our best friends, if not an ally.'' st
(.44^44-H-M'i; I -I-1 ?!? I IM I-H-H
I I'M M-MM H-I-H-H-H
The German government has issued
. book entitled. "The Food Supply
if tho German Peoprc and the British
Starvation Flans." It presonts a com
irehenslve plan to prevent waste and
ncrease home production and was
iropared by economists and house
rives. It suggests that people eat less
seat and more dairy products.
?>???
Gen. Zupelll, tho Italian minister of
car, says that by March 31, 7,000
cserve officers will have been sum
moned to the colors, "All classes In
ho Nation," he said, "are asking to
nter tho army."
Emperor William has given $12.
00 to the German Red Cross for tho
enefit of German soldiers and civil
ms held prisoners in France.
PAIUS.? More than 40 soperate
oinbardments have been directed
gainst the French town of Armen
erles by the German artillery which
es about six miles away. The town;
1 desorted except tor tho French and!
ritish soldiers and a handful of the1
>wn peoplo. The streets are full of
obrls and torn by shell" fire. The
ousc8 that were not wrecked By
rojectiles have been burned. The
sw people who remain In Amcntierfcs j
eep in the, cellars for no one knows j
hen the Germans will turn their'
Ig guns against the riddled town to
mow tho bombardment.
NEW HAVEN, Eng.?Members of!
te crew of the steam trawler Grizncs j
hlch was sunk in the channel by a!
erruan submarine. said that the cont
ender of the Kaiser's boat gave tlio
row 20 minutes in which to leave
loir vessels. At the expiration of
mt time the trawler was sunk by
tnfire, the submarine thus avoiding
ie use of a torpedo.
ONE ON LEGISLATURE
A recent arrival from Juneau brings
>wn the following: A Juneau resi
mt took his little son to nttend a
eeting of the Torrltorinr I.egisln-!
ire now in session there. The lit
e youngster was greatly interested,
)d of course asked questions about;
?prything. The Chaplain- of thei
ousc stepped forward durinpk the;
>ening of the session and delivered
?s prayer. Whon he. sat down the
(ungster asked his dad who the man
as who had Just been talking, and
as told that it was tho Chaplain of
"Oh, ho prays for the Legislature,
tesn't he?" asked tho lad.
"No," replied the father, "he gets
>, takes a look at the Legislature,
id then prays for the Territory."?;
Cotchikan Miner.)
Theory and Practice
"I have always believed in saving
tnething for a rainy day."
"How much have you saved?"
)8t)
XING UP YOUR GARDEN??
Now is the time to order your blue
ass and white clover seed at Gold-t
-hW-K-HfrK-H-I-I-M'-l-l' I-t-l I ttttt
DANCE NOTICE.
Commencing Mnrch 20 tlie regular
Saturday night dancos In Miss Gu
; lick's studio win be continued under
| new management. 3-16-6L
MINING APPLICATION
No. 01762.
UNITED STATES LAND OFFICE.
Juneau, Alaska, March 10, 1915.
Notice
Notice Is hereby given that the Al
aska Gastlnonu Mining Company, a
1 corporation organized and oxlstlng un
der the laws of the State of New York
and qualified to do, and doing busi
ness as a corporation, at Juneau, Al
aska, has made application for patent
for the York, Alma and Avon lode
; mining claims, Survoy No. 954. sit
uated at the Eastern end of Silver
; Bow Basin, about three mile3 East
! of tho Town of Juneau. Alnska, In the
| Harris Mining District, Juneau Pre
cinct, at approximately Latitude 58?
19' North, and Longitude 134" 21'
West, and particularly described as
follows, to-wit:
York Lode
Beginning at Corner No. 1. whence
U. S. L. M. No. 2 bears S. 88' 36' W. j
2090.58 feet distant: thence N. 24? 30'j
E. 553.63 feet to corner No. 2; thence
S. 55* 10' E. 1061.51 feet to corner;
No. 3; thence S. 24* 30' W. 565.921
feet to corner No. 4; thence N. 54?
33' W. 10G3.57 feet to corner No. 1,
tho place of beginning. Containing;
an area or 13.419 acres. Mag. Var.j
at corner No. 1. 31? 45' E.
Alma Lode
Beginning at corner No. 1 on line
3-5 of the York Lode of thin survoy,
whence U. S. L. M. No. 2 bears N.
84* 67' 5G" W. 3102.13 feet; thence
N. 24? 30' E. GOO feet to corner No.
2; thence S. 59" 3D' 15. 1500 feet to
corner No. 3; thence S. 21? 30' \V.
600 feet to corner No. 4; thence N.
50* 39' W. 1499.49 feet to corner No.
1. the place of beginning. Containing
an area of 20.550 acres. Magnetic Va
riation at Corner No.. 1. 31" 40' East
Avon Lode
Beginning at Corner No. 1, identical
with Comer No. 2. of the Alma Lode
of this survey, whence U. S. L. M.
No. 2. bears S. 85? 18' 57" W. 3350.08
feet distant: thence N. 24? 30' E. GOO
feet to Comer No. 2; theneo S. 59"
39' E. 1499.92 feet to Corner No. 3; j
thence S. 24? 30' W. 600 feet to Cor
ner 4; thence N. 59? 39' W. 1500 feet
to Corner No. 1, the place of begin
niug. Containing an area of 20.553
acres. Mag. Var. at Comer No. 1, 31?
47' E.
The names of the adjoining claims
aro the AJnx Millsito, patented, Sur
vey No. 241, nnd the Pcrscveranco
Placer mining claim, patented. Survey
No. 605, both belonging to the Aiaskn
Gastlnesu Mining Company.
The York lode mining claim con
flict! with tho Martin patented lode
raining claim, Survey No. 754 which
belongs to the claimnnt, and such con
flict Is hereby excluded; the said con
flict is described nS follows:
Beginning at Corner No. 4 of the
York lodo, thence N. 39? 30' W. 1016.05
feot to Corner No. 4 of tho Martin
rode (Survey No. 754): thence S. 50?
30' W. 273.20 feot to V point-on line
1-4 of the York lode; thence along
line 1-4 of the York lode S. 54? 33' E.
1052.14 feet to Corner No. 4 of tho
York lodo. tho place of beginning. Con
taining an area of 3.186 acres.
Tho, Alma lode mining claim of this'
survey conflicts with the Snowflake
iode mining claim, survey No. 931, hut
said conflict is not excluded from this
application, and is described as fol
lows:
Beginning at Corner No. 4 of the
Alma lode, thence along line 4-1 of
the Alma lode N. 59' 39' W. 568.37
feet to a point on line 1-2 of the Snow
ffako lode, thence along lino 1-2 of
tho Snowflako lode N. 42* 03' E. 177.46
feet to Corner No. 2 of the Snowflako
lode, thence along lino 2-3 of the Snow
flake lode S. 54* 10' E. 522.08 foot to
a point on line 3-4 of tho Alma lode,
thence along lino 3-4 of tho Alma lode
S. 24? 30' W. 124.63 feet to the place
of beginning. Containing an area of
1.866 ncres.
The Alma lode mining claim of this
survey also conflicts with the Robert
lode mining claim, Survoy No. 977, but
said conflict Is not excluded from thlu
application, and is described as fol
lows:
Beginning nt a point on line 3-4 of
the Alma lodo distant S. 24" 30' W.
127.97 feet from Corner No. 3 of tho
Alma lode; thence along line 3-4 of
the Alma lodo S. 24* 30' W. 345.26
feet to a point on line 14 of the Rob
ert lode; thence afong line 4-1 of the
Robert lode N. 54* 02' 17" AV. 108.63
feet to Corner No. 1 of the Robert
lode: thence along line 1-2 of tho Rob
ert lode N. 42* 48' E. 301.80 feet to ?
the place of beginning. Containing
an area of 0.420 acres.
The location notices of the York,
Alma and Avon lodo claims, were re
corded respectively ' on August 3rd.
1912 and October 25th, 1905 In books
20 of Lodes at page 313, and 18 of
Lode3 at plages 162 and 161 respec
tively, of the records of the Recorder
for the Juneau Recording Precinct,
Alaska.
This notice was posted on the
ground on tho 24th day of February,
1915.
ALASKA GASTINEAU
MINING COMPANY
By B. L. Thane.,
Its agent and attorney In fact.
UNITED STATES LAND OFFICE
Juneau, Alaska, March 10, 1915.
It is hereby ordered that the fore
going notice of application for mining
patent be published In tho Alaska
Dally Emplro for tho full porlod of
sixty days.
C. B. WALKER,
Register.
First publication Starch 12, 1915.
Last publication May 12, 2915,
* *
UP-TO-DATE HAIRDRESSING j ?
SERVICE FOR LADIES. t
} The W.E.B., located la the new I
j postoffice block, will be open Wed
i' nesdays from 10 a. m. to 5 p. m.
beginning this week. March 3. for
ladles and children only. This ar- j1 i
: rangement i3 to insure privacy as ;
! a hairdre3sing parlor. Hairdressing
j manicuring and massaging strict
Ily up-to-date in all particulars. The ; i
work will be done by Mrs. Leaf- I
| green and myself, personally. ;
W. E. BATHE. : f
ALASKA MEAT COMPANY John Reck. Mgr.
Wholesale and Retail Butchers
Manufacturers of all Kinds of Sausages Oor Hams and Bacon Arc
Home-Smoked
ISOLD ON 55 YEARS RECORD
STTIES, SIZES WD PRICES TO SUIT ALL
?&. OAK
Plsafemi
Wis. Zni il&u?,
THE HAN WHO I
IS BIG ENOUGH
to profit by experience gets on ij
the smoothest.
By buying a "cheap" stove 1
or range you make a mistake. ?j
By buying a Charter Oak, you [j
do not make a mistake, you i-j
save fuel, trouble and money
in the end
Profit by the experience of those who have used Charter Oak ii
| Stoves and Ranges. jj
For Sale by THE JUNEAU FURNITURE COMPANY
" Tbe Home Fornlihcn" Cor. 3rd and Seward Sl?.
I PIANOS
ASP PIANO PLAYERS j
Edison Diamond Disc Phonographs, ?
I COLUMBIA TALKING MACHINES. VICTOR YJCTROLAS ?
4 > IS,000 Records for All Machines. Sheet Music, Small Musical Instruments .?>
| JUNEAU MUSIC HOUSE ij
j; Elmer E. Smith, Prop. THREE STORES. J. P. L. Gravi s, Mjr. o
{ 1 Retail Drug Store, Donglaa. Front Street Drog Store, Doaglas ?
florsheim
SKoes
ONION SETS
Arc scarce; we
have them.
Order Now.
Groceries
for -
Gents' Furnishing Goods
Clothing, Hats and Shoes
Trunks, Suit Cases, Hand Bags
?GO TO? ?
H.J. RAYMOND 8 CO.
Stetson
Hats
SEED
POTATOES
We have a few
on hand now.
Order Early.
Rain Goats
?
Hanan Shoes
Stetson Hats
I Boys' Clothes is j
:
E
i:f A
il R"
SOUVENIR
CUFF BUTTONS
PENCIC POCKET x
2
PAIRS OF .
KNICKERS \
UNENE UNED/
KNICKERS
PATENT SUCKLE ?
. CLUB BUTTON
_ LEATHER
WATCH TOO
-.SILK
HANOKERCHIEF
> -3-P1ECE BELT
. \ IVORY BUTTONS'
L\^
-pants hanger
six!dclt loops
\ "cloth faced
' pockets
"The Nitffynjl IJo>? Suit"
. ?//
The I
National
' Two
Pant |:j"
Suit
; *'t ?
! IT SERVES A DOUBLE PURPOSE ?
. ? ? ' ? ? 9 ?*?
::: For wear and tear?an extra pair
This handsome all wool boys' suit with TWO PAIR OF ????
::: full lined knickers in many styles at? I;;
$8.50 and UPWARDS . |
The Home of Benjamin Clothes
| B. IVLBehrends Company Inc. |
1?rrn?r.".-:"i"i rn .*T-rri"i''il I ?; i-|~ ...
?H-H-X-H-M IHH4M MM M-I-l-I
"BOX CANDY"
?of the better kind?LIGGETTS,
GUTH and FENWAY?
Elegant Assortment
/'?
The Rcllublo Uexall Store,
?rioii??liiw?IIIBI i ???

xml | txt