OCR Interpretation


The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, March 29, 1915, Image 1

Image and text provided by Alaska State Library Historical Collections

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020657/1915-03-29/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

UK 'IRE
VOL. v., NO. 730. JUNEAU, ALASKA,. MONDAY. MARCH 29, 11)15 . . PRICE TEN CENTS.
HOME RULE
EUR FLIES
IN SENATE
After the liveliest debate yet heard
since the Second Legislature con
vened, the Senato committee of the
whole today killed tho Shoup memo
rial asking for a "full form of Terri
torial government" but submitting
Senator Millard's memorial, asking
for the same thing, but couched In
different words. The turn of the tide
was a complete surprise in tho Senate.
It was proposed by Senator Millard
himself, when the Senate seemed
hopelessly deadlocked on the Shoup
bill, with the indications that a vote
on recommending it for passage would
show a division.
Speeches were made by Senators
Hubbard. Millard, Tanner, Sutherland.
Aldrich and Sulzer. The latter presid
ed during the debate and by consent
of tho Senate, was allowed to debate
from tho chair.
The contest arose while the Senate
was in committee of the whole.
S. B. 33. relating to mine Inspection,
was recommended for passage, with
minor amendments, and S. B. 17. re
lating to procuring board and lodg
ing though false representation had
similar recommendation after refer
ence to liquors had been chopped from
it
S. B. 20. designating Juneau as the
place of trial for violators of Terri
torial revenue laws, was recommitted
to tho Judiciary committee. Tho bill:
is likely to fail of passage, as it de
pends largely on tho outcome of the
attorncy-gcnral or "legal counsel" leg
islation.
mil is Ke-Keferred.
Senator Aldrich's bill to give allow
ances to certain aged residents of Al
aska, in cases of emergency, today
was re-referred to the committee on
public health, for further amendment
To Hear Tax Question.
Immediately after the legislature
adjourns tomorrow, the joint ways
and means committee will meet to dls-'
cuss the advisability of levying a di
rect Territorial property tax, to raise
revenue. The sub-committee, consist
ing of Senators Gaustad and Millard
and Representative Shoup. has a
rough draft of the revenue bill which
will be submitted.
Wednesday the Senate and House
roads and highways committees will
meet in joint session after adjourn
ment. to take up the all-important
road questions. There arc several
road bills before both houses, the bills
asking moneys from the "forest re
resrve" fund available.
Chairman Holland, of House com
mittee, was asked today by Mr. Noon
as to what had become of H. B. S.
pertaining to a road from Seward. Mr.
Holland explained that the joint com
mittee had not yet Anally acted on the
road bills. Mr. Noon retorted that he
"didn't want his bill to He in commit
tee and rot," and the House had a
good laugh over it.
"Dry Territory" Bill Killed.
The Snow "dry territory" bill, pro
vidiing that no liquor shall be ship
ped Into or through dry towns In Al
aska, was killed by the House under
the rule of indeflnltc postponement.
The author intimated that a bill to i
prohibit tho manufacture of intoxicat
ing Uquor in Alaska would be his
next step.
xue vote on me dhi was as louows:
To defeat bill: Britt. Combs. Daly,
Day. Driscoll. Getchell, Held, Holland,;
Moran, Noon. Tansey and .Mr. Speak
er.
Supporting bill: Burns, Heckman.
Sboup and Snow.
Mr. Moran said that the State of
Kansas had passed a bill similar to
the Snow measure, but added that it
could not bo enforced, in spite of the
fact that the dry sentiment in that
State was very strong.
Mr. Held declared the bill was un
constitutional; that it interefered
with the Interstate Commerce laws.
Child Actor Bill Up.
The Britt bill to prohibit the em
ployment of children in theatrical per
formances. introduced at tho instiga
tion of the Draper Mothers' club of
Juneau, was recommitted to the edu
cation committee after debate. Mr.j
Britt said the "amateur nights" at lo
cal playhouses had put children on
the wrong tack, especially the school
children, and the remarks of Prof.
Henderson. Juneau school superintend-'
ent. before the committee, were re
peated in the House.
It was pointed out that tho bill as
drawn up would prevent traveling
troupes from appearing In the cities
of Alaska, if Juveniles were .in the
(Continued on Page 6.)
? + + ? ? ?> ?
?i* ?
+ WEATHER TODAY *
? . +j
?> * ?>?{??:? ?> -> ? 4- + <???*? <
?> Maximum?55. ?
+ Minimum?34. <?
* CLEAR. *
SULZER WANTS
SCHOOL or MINES
TOR HJNEAl
Senator Charles A. Sulzer Intro
duced today in tho upper house of the
legislature a memorial asking Con
gress to establish a school of mines
in Juneau, under the provisions of ar
act recently approved by Presldcnl
Wilson, a bill to accept as ilnal the
verdict of three-fourths of the jurors
trying a civil cause, and a bill to es
tablish the competency of co-defond
ants as witnesses.
The mine school memorial is as fol
lows:
"Whereas, the great mineral wealth
of tho Territory of Alaska is now roc
ognized throughout the world, and
"Whereas, the mining developments
within a radius of Ave miles of the
city of Juneau. Alaska, have demon
stratcd beyond question: That Juneau
will be classed with the greatest min
ing cities of the world; that tho most
modern mining methods and practice
involving the most modern mining
and reduction machinery in the world
are now in operation at Juneau; that
within two years Juneau will produce
more gold annually than at present is
being produced in tho entire Terri
tory of Alaska; that tho most eminent
mining engineers in the world could
bo secured to deliver lectures at a
school of mines located at Juneau. Al
aska; and that a school of mines could
be maintained at less expense at Ju
neau than at any other point in the
Territory and at no greater oxpensc
than In most oi tho mining sections
of the United States.
"Therefore, he it resolved, by the
legislature of the territory of Alaska,
that wo earnestly petition the Con
gress of the United States to estab
lish a school of mines at tho city of
Juneau. Alaska. In accordance with
an act or congress at us iasi session
providing for such schools, and.
"Bo it further resolved, that a copy
hereof be sent to the President of the
United States Senate, to the Speaker
of the United States House of Repre
sentatives. to the United States Bu
reau of Mines and to the Delegate to
Congress from Alaska.
A "Three-Fourths Verdict."
The civil jury bill Is as follows:
Section 1. When three-fourths in
number of the Jurymen trying any
civil cause have agreed upon a ver
dict. the foreman shall sign said ver
dict and the same shall be returned
into court. The verdict so returned
shall be taken and considered as the
verdict of the jury.
Sec. 2. All laws or parts of laws in
conflict herewith are hereby repealed.
As to Witnesses.
The bill regarding the competency
of witnesses who may be co-defend
ants. was sugegsted by the Yamagu
chl-Yamashita murder trials held
that Yamaguchi. who had been joint
ly indicted with Yamashita, was com
petent to testify in the lattcr's trial,
after the question had been fought
out by the opposing counsel. The Sul
zer bill provides as follows:
Section 1. The fact that two' or
more persons are jointly indicted
shall not render any one so indicted
incompetent as a witness for or
agalust his co-defendant, whether said
co-defendants are tried Jointly or sev
erally.
Sec. 2. All laws or parts of laws
in conflict herewith are hereby re
pealed.
Dentistry Bills Miea.
Senator Hubbard introduced Sen
ate BIU 36. relating to the practice of
dentistry, and licensing dentists, and
S. B. 37. relating to the same sub
ject. In the House the same measures
were introduced by Mr. Noon as H.
B. 45 and H. B. 46. Mr. Noon said
his constituents had sent the bills to
him and that he would "stand for
them, both." The four bills were re
ferred to the committee on public
health.
Ask Poll Tax Anew.
Representative Shoup introduced H.
B. 44. an act to amend the law for the
incorporation of second class cities,
by giving the city power to levy and
collect a poll tax of $4 per year on all
residents over 21 and under 50 years,
providing a tax of $2 a year on dogs,
and empowering the cities to collect
a municipal tax on real and personal
property not to exceed one per cent,
of the assessed valuation, with "re
ligious and charitable" property, and
the household furniture valued at not
exceeding $200 being exempted.
Other provisions of the amendatory
bill treats with the prohibition of
drunkenness, gambling and other
vices and provides fines. The bill was
referred to the committee on munici
pal affairs.
SEATTLE MAN DECLARES
WAR ON TAXICAB DRIVERS
SEATTLE, March 20. ? Michael
Boyle wrote a letter last night to Po
lice Judge John B. Gordon saying that
he intended to kill the first Seattle
Taxicab Company driver that he met.
This morning he took three shots at
E. L. Hampton, one of the drivers, but
all of them went wild.
Boyle surrendered.
SIM
,| CREW N(
: GIVEN I
' WASHINGTON. March 29. ? The
1
; last hopo that the crow of the U. S.
i' submarine F-4, which lien at the bot
1 torn of tho sea In the outer Honolulu
I harbor, has been abandoned by tho
'! Navy Department.
The chains that had looped tho sub
marlno slipped Saturday afternoon,
and the little craft that was slowly
being raised to tho surface broke
away and again settled on the bottom.
EfTorts made Saturday night and Sun
day to raise tho craft wcro futile.
In behalf of tho Secretary of tho
Navy, Admiral Victor Blue, chief of
navigation, has ordered Rear-Admir
al Mooi 3 to report the exact location;
of the sunken boat and the depth of
water in which she lies that the De
partment might make an estlmato of
tho probability of recovering tho bod-;
ies.
It 1b reported from Honolulu that
every indication points to the con
clusion that the vessel has collapsed
either from water pressure or be
cause of contact with tho bottom.
+??
SEATTLE ELECTRICIAN
KILLED IN ACCIDENT
SEATTLE. March 29. ? Elmer
Barth. electrician, was killed yester
day evening when his automobile skid
ded and struck a telephone pole or.
tho Bothcll road. He was 22 years ,
FIRE DESTROYS BIG ,
SPOKANE OFFICE BLOCK
SPOKANE. March 29?Fire destroy- !
ed the big Mohawk building in this
city this morning.
VICTORIOUS HEIR TO
FORTUNE TO MISS MOTHER ]
NEW YORK. March 2D.?Four-year- .
old "Teddy" Slingsby. the central Dg- |
uro in a British luwsuit involving |
3500.000 and a British-title, is report
ed here to bo a passenger on a steam- i
; ship from Liverpool. He will pass his
mother, Mrs. Charles R. Sllngsby. who
| is bound for Liverpool, in midoccan.
The probate court in London re ? (
ceutly held that "Teddy" is the child i
of Mrs. SJingsby and heir to his fa- <
ther'3 title and estates. Other rela-.i
tives had urged that ho was an adopt- ]
: ed child, and that his parents were en- ]
dcavoriiig to secure property inter- <
ests that way. .
THREE ELECTROCUTED IN
CALIFORNIA ACCIDENT |
LOS ANGELES. March 2D.?Corne
lius Valkoff. his wifo, and Henry Skin
ner, a neighbor, were electrocuted
here yesterday. Valkoft was trying <
to extricate a rabbit that had been <
caught in the wire fence.. A broken j
electric cable had fallen on the fence ]
and electrified the wires which liter
ally burned Valkoff to death. His wife (
; and Skinner were electrocuted while
! trying to rescue him.
K. C. BEATON MAY <
GO TO THE EXAMINER ]
SEATTLE, March 2D.?Kenneth C. i
Beaton, who has been conducting "Ye i
! Towne Gossip'1 corner^ln tho Seattle I
, Post-Intelligencer Is being comman- <
; Jeered by the San Francisco Exam
iner. I
ARGENTINE BATTLESHIP
COLLIDES WITH BARGE
I PHILADELPHIA, March 29. ? The t
new Argentine battleship Morena, :
! which sailed for Hampton Roads <
from Philadelphia, collided Friday I
night with a barge on the Deleware
river off Newcastle. The barge was I
sunk. The battleship ran ashore and
remained aground until 7:30 Saturday
morning when she wa3 floated and
proceeded on her way apparently un- I
damaged. t
TURKEY DENIES ATROCITIES. <
WASHINGTON. March 29.?Ameri
can Ambassador Henry Morgenthau,
cabling to the State Department from a
Constantinople today, says the Turk- <
Ish government denies that there has I <
been any disorder at Urumiah, Persia. <
or that the Turkish troops have com- <
mitted atrocities against Christians in i
either Persia or Asia Minor. i
? ? ? i
ALASKA GOLD.
NEW YORK. March 29. ? Alaska <
Gold closed today at 31%: Utah Cop
per. 56%.
? ? ?
INTERNED LINER ESCAPES j I
LONDON, March 29.?The German 11
liner Macedonia, interned at Las Pal-11
mas, Canary Islands, is reported to i
have escaped nnd put to sea with war i
supplies for German raiders. I
BROWNSVILLE, eTx.. March 29. -
Gen Villa's attack . on Matamorns
proved to be a costly failure. Tho at
tacking forces iwere beaten back af
ter a prolonged fighting, leaving 100
dead and 400 wounded on the field.
Notwithstanding toe disaster, tho
supporters of Villa arc preparing to
ronow tho attack.
U. S. Sends Artillery.
WASHINGTON, March 20.? Three
batteries of field artillery have been
ordered to proceed from San Antonio,
Tex., to Brownsville, Jn that State, op
posito which tho Mexican factions are
U. S. PRESSING
FOR RUSSIA'S TRADE
NEW YORK, March 29. Tho Now
York Herald says tho administration
has. evolved a new policy by which it
will seek to solve the situation pre
sented by tho Allies' isolation of Ger
many, Austria and Turkey. The new
policy will rest upon a commercial
rnpprochraent betweou the United
States and Russia. Tho first steps
toward this end have already been
taken. Sovcrul memoranda are now
In the hands of officials suggesting
methods whereby trade relations, that
wore so suddenly several by tho ab
rogation'of the Russo-Amorican com
mercial treaty may bo repaired. The
Department of Comnierco is in corres
pondence with bankers all over tho
country regarding the means for the
betterment of financial cxchango with
Russia. Within a few days a special
commercial attache. Henry D. Boker,
will be sent to Pctrograd. The plan
is to counterbalance the trade loss
suffered by the isolation of Germany,
Austria, and Turkey by a gain of as
much as possible of the $209,000,000
ivorth of goods which. Russia bought
from Germany in 191$. lr. addition,
:han $100,000,000 u iffe cf war ma
Lerials in the United States, so is is
figured American trade can be prac
lically compensated.
CHICAGO TO HAVE
GRAND OPERA SEASON
???
CHICAGO. March 29.?New graud
ppera company has been formed-In
Chicago to take the place of tho
Chicago Grand Opera. Company, that
went through tho Bankruptcy Court
last week. Harold F. McCormack,
president of the defunct Company, do
:lares enough money has been sub
scribed to guarantee a deficit for two
?'ears. The season will begin in No
rcmbor, 1015. and continue for ten or
twelve weeks.
$300,000 FOR EMPLOYEES.
DETROIT. Mich.. March 29.?The
Studebaker Corporation has jurt
jompleted tho distribution of approxi
mately $300,000 In the profit-sharing
plan among its employees.
HFTER GOOD WILL
OF UNITED STATES
COPENHAGEN, March 29.?A party
pf Americans of German birth and
\mericnns long resident in Germany
lave left Berlin for the United States
with the object of disseminating the
deas about Germany. The chief of
the party was formerly American con
sul at Alx-la-Chappelle.
FRENCH PREPARING FOR
SPRING CAMPAIGNS
LONDON', March 2!).?A Paris spec
a! says that the French In prepara
don for tho Spring offensive have
imassed a storo of 25,000.000 shells,
jnough to carry on a sustained attack
for two or three months.
BRITISH TROOPS-ARE
POURING INTO FRANCE
PARIS, March 29.?British rein
forcements are landing In Franco at
;he rate of 100,000 per week.
i' -v
CHILEANS TO INVESTIGATE
GERMAN DRESDEN CHARGES
VALPARAISO. Chile, March 29.?.
\ commission has been sent by tin.
Dhllcan government to Juan Fornan
lex Island to investigate tho German
jharges that the Dresden was attack
id and sunk In neutral waters, while
it anchor in Cumberland bay on the
torth side of the island. The Ger
nans allege that British shots dam
iged other ships In tho harbor.
3ERMANY STOPS PLANS
FOR 3ELG1AN COLONY
ST. PAUL, Minn., March 29.?The
plana for the establishment of a col
pny of Belgian farmers in Northern
Minnesota received a setback when
t became known that. the German
nilitary authorities havO refused per
nission to Belgium subjects to leave
.
LONDON, March 29.?All Constan
tinople is being shaken by the terrl
: fic cannonading of the Russian Black
sea fleet. The roar of hostile guns is
[the one great central thing In the city
today. Russian shells are now fall
ing within 12 miles of the Sultan's pal
ace, and for the first time in history
the Moslem capital is being bombard
ed from the air.
The Russian attack on the Bospor
us and surrounding country has been
emphasized by a flock of aoroplanes
which discharge their cargoes of dy
namite, and put back for more only
to return to the attack.
Consternation and panic prevail in
the city, and those who can do so are
leaving for Asiatic Turkey.
Business houses are still endeavor
ing' to persuade the Sultan to remove
his government, and to surrender the
city in the event of the destruction of
the Bosporus and Dardanelles defens
es. Thoy desire to save the city from
bombardment.
ALLIES READY TO ATTACK.
The armies and fleet of the Allies
; arc preparing to attack the Dardan
elles In concert, and depend upon the
ferocious Russian attack on the east
to reduco the resistance they will
have to meet.
BATTLE BEGINS AT DAYBREAK.
London, March 29. ? The Russian
fleet renewed the bombardment of the
Turkish forte on the Bosporus at day
break this morning.
BALKAN UNREST
ATHENS, March 29.?Serbia is pre
paring to invndc Albania, and occupy
Qurazzo on tli? Adriatic littoral, It Jo
reported In dispatches from Uskub.
Advices from Salonika nthto Bul
garia-hat; begun to may.-, troops at
tier.
GERMANY CONTROLS
HALF OF FRENCH FACTORIES
COPENHAGEN. March 29.? The
war has placed 50 per cent of the
manufacturing industries of France
temporarily in the hands of the Ger
mans: 43 per cent of the steam power
in Franco Is in tho districts occupied
: by the Germans: tho highest percent
age is in the textile industries, whero
: nearly CO per cent, of tho power is
now in the hands of the Germans: tho
mining industries, including quarries,
follow with 60.5 per cent., and tho iron
and metal industries arc not far be
hind with 54 per cent.
GERMANY IS SHORT OF COPPER
LONDON, March 29.?It is rumored,
that Germany is bo short of copper
J that hundreds of agents have been
sent through Asia Minor and Syria,
to buy- up all copper kettles and pets
they can find, which have boon used
in those countries for conturies, and
are ynry. heavy, as they are beaten
oui bv hand.
Americans Say Not.
| GENEVA, March 29.?\V. D. Boycei
and Horace Kerr, American journal
? isis who have toured Germany and;
Austria, have reach Switzerland.
They state that Germany can fight'
for two years without actual food
shortage and civilians are being train
ed in food regulation and production
for the long struggle Just as the army
i are trained to fight. Plenty of copper ?
' is on hand, but the shortage of natur-j
[al nitrate, so that it Ib being produc
ed chemically, at six times the cost
FORMER YUKONER
KILLED IN WAR
NEW YOItK, March 29.?William'
i U Breeze, former secretary to Am-1
bassador Walter H. Pago in London. J
was killed March 21 in the fighting on
the French front, according to advic
1 bs received here from London today.
Mr. Breeze was an officor in the Koy
. al Horse Guards.
OF Old Family
i Mr. Broezc, who come of an old
family of Now York, had lived in j
England for the last six years. Hcj
became a naturalized British subject
at tho outbreak of the war in order
to take a commission as lieutenant
Id the Royal Horse Guards.
William L. Breoze is known in the;
North. Ho spent several years at ?
Whitehorso and tho Southern Yukon, i
and invested some $200,000 in a big
hydraulic plant on Bullion crook in
the Kluane district. The plant was
j never worked to success. Broeze,
; while an American, spent much of
| ids life in England.
Tho Empire circulation leads. Try
| advertising in it.
?GERMANY MAY
fQRCE AUSTRIA
10 ITALY'S TERMS:
BERNE, Switzerland, March 21t. ?
! Swls newspapers declare that the Ger
i man chancellor Is inlioxiblc In his de
termination that Austria shall cede
j torrltory to Italy In sufficient quanti
j ty to satisfy the demands of that
country In order to secure its contin
: nod neutrality. And they contend
? i hat tho Austrian Emperor is equnlly
! determined that ho will'not surrender
i territory.
| Tn the meantime, both Italy and Au
stria are preparing for war on the
border between the two countries'
with nil tho rapidity, possible.
ROME, March 29?All Apline troops
I born in 1883 were called to the col
I ors yesterday by the Italian govern
upon Strassburg and villages in Al
tillcry engineering corps. Tho call j
requires CO days' service from and af-J
, tor April 16th.
AUSTRIA WILL NEVER
MEET ITALY'S DEMANDS'
ROME, March 29.?"There is not
the slightest chance that Austria will |
code to Italy the Territory it wants!
as a price for its continued neutral- j
ity," said a leading diplomat. "Italy!
wants territory that would make her j
tho unquestioned miBtress of the Ad-j
rlatlc. This includes Trent, Trieste, i
and other lands on tho Adriatic, whoso!
loss would reduce Austria to an in
ferior position, possibly beneath that;
now occupied by some of the Balkan |
nations.
"Acceptance m such -uciuuuus m m ;?
conceivable. Advices of & reliable na-(
ture from Austria declare that the |
general Impression there Is that Ger-|
ninny- would willingly sacrifice Aus- 2
trla to save the German empire. This j i
may be true, but It also may be tak-! ?r
en as a fact that Austria will not sub- J i
mlt to this." t
KAISER SUFFERS OF '
THROAT TROUBLE!;
NEW Y1RK. March 29.? An Am-',
stordam cable to the New York Amdft-; ,
can says the Kaiser Is experiencing |
new trouble with his throat and haslj
to submit to very drastic treatment, j f
This Is why he has not been sect at j j
the front recently. There is said to
bo a sharp difference among special- j <
ists, some favoring an immediate op- k
oration, others opposing this stop. Ex-:
ccpl for its gravity afithis stage of j
his illness the situation is much the
same as that which preceded the r
death of the Kaiser's father in 1888. i
Tho Kaiser has not boon in public t
once since his return to Berlin. t
K.iiacr Danishes Son. <]
LONDON. March 2D~Reporter from i
AlBace that tho Kaiser has banished'
his eldest son to ft remote castle in x
Germany. There have been several (]
disputes between the Kaiser and his ^
son since tho outbreak of the war.
JAPAN AND CHINA
WILL SETTLE TROUBLE; s
?j a
T.0K10, March 29.? A satisfactory!
solution of negotiations between Ja- j f
pan and China is in sight," says a v
statement issued by the Japanese for- v
clgn office. It is understood in offic
ial circles that certain modifications /
by. Japan in its original proposals have
made these acceptable at Peking."
JULY WILL SEE THE
COUNTRIES EXHAUSTED c
- ' ? ' h
IiONUUMi aiarcu >??? ,
before the Royal Statistical Society n
of London, declared some of the bel
ligerents will be exhausted by July. /
and the war then must end. The
estliuato of the total war cost to the
end of July next Is $16,000,000,000.
with the damage to property and ccon- o
omlc losses, direct and indirect, $45,? n
000,000,000. Great Britain's war ex- t
ponses to the end of July are estl- ,
mated at $3,540,000,000, compared with
Premier AsQUith's estimate of $2,500,- f
000,000.
COUDERT DEFENDS
BRITISH POSITION c
NEW YORK. March 20.?Frederick y
R. Coudert, the emlneut New York u
authority on international law defends ?
the British blockade, citing American t
acts as precedent in the Civil and the
Spanish wars. Ho maintains that p,
Groat Britain lias been intent upon
Inflicting as little injury to neutrals
as possibllo and that the United
States can hardly blame or reproach g
her. e
?1* -1- + -1- 4- 4- -!? 4- v 4- 4- 4- 4- 4? 4- 4- 4- q
4- 4- u
4- GEN. VON KLUCK-IS 4- c
4 WOUNDED. 4- a
?> + 1|
? BERLIN, /March 29. ? Gen. ?> ]
4- Von Kluck. commander of the 4- y
4- German right wing, was wound- 4- p
4- ed yesterday while Inspecting 4- j)
? the advanced positions of his *
? army in Northern Franco. 4
j* ? ? ? ? ? * + * ? "? s
FIGHTING
TODAY ON
ALL FRONTS
?4??
LONDON, March 29.?The forces of
the Triple Entntc powers are array
the Triple Entente powers are array
ngainst the troops of the Teutonic al
ies on both the eastern and western
aattle fronts.
Several engagements are waging in
?nany places In Northern France, In
Morthern Poland, In West and Cen
tral Poland, in the Carpathians, Gall
:ia and Bukowlna.
Terrific fighting is also progressing
n the vicinity of the Black sea In Cau
taaus.
In point of numbers, it is believed
hat there are more men engaged In
ictual fighting today than ever before
n the history of the world, because of
he many points of contact.
Probably the hardest fighting is that
n the Carpathians and West and Ccn
ral Poland, where the Russians have
>een able to force the German invad
jrs back toward their own border,
ind where the latter arc making dea
>erate efforts to regain lost territory.
3oth sides have been heavily reln
orced, and the number engaged is
jreatcr than ever before In this see
ion-of the country.
The reports from North France all
;ell of success for the Allies in.those
jlnces where definite results have
>een worked out. In most of the fight
ng for the laat two days, however, the
ictions have not been terminated.
Germans Lose Heavily.
CHAKLONES SUR MAKNE, Franco
starch 29.?Eievcn thousand German
lead Lave been taken from the trnch
.. won by the French during the 20
lays fighting In the Carapagae couu
ry.
The German losses In the lighting
ire estimated by the French military
nithorltlo3 ut 50,000. They say the
jerman wastage has been as two to
me. when compared with the "French
oases, because the Germans have af
er each loss tried to regain the cap
ered trenches, their counter attacks
iave been made again and again with
ibstlnatc courage, hut with terrific
088.
SUBMARINES
ARE STILIil ApTIVS
LONDON. March' 20. -Gorman sub
uurines are active to the south of Ire
anu. It Is believed that they sunk
he British steamship Falabu. as dlii
rest: signals were received from her
luring the Light, and later wireless
llspatohcs said that the crew were
aking to the boats.
The British steamship Dunelln,
vliich was sent out In response to the
listrevs signals, Is being chased to-lay
.y submarines.
Another Ship Sunk.
LONDON. March 29. ? The British
tcamship Aqullla was sunk today by
German submarine.
Eight members of the crew of the
'alaba. which It has been determined
irns sunk by a German submarine,
.?ere drowned. ?
iVtATOR ATTACKS
CALAIS EARLY TODAY
CALAIS. March 29. ? A German
tauhe" dropped many bombs In this
Sty this morning at the breakfast
our The aeroplane apporachod
rnm the English channel, flying frcm
Belgian base.
iVIATOR KILLS THREE
CHILDREN IN FRANCE
PAIUS. .March 20.?The French war
iTIce announced today that a Gorman
viator dropped bombs upon the little
own of Wilier, northwe.t of Thann,
nd killed three children.
:RENCH KILL AND WOUND
COUNTRYMEN IN ALSACE
?*?
BERLIN, March 29.?Eleven Fronch
tvihans were killed and 22 wounded
i hen a French aviator dropped bombs
pon Strassmurg and villages in Al
ace today, according to a report of
he war ofllce.
1ANUFACTURERS MAY
FORM GUNPOWDER TRUST
4 ?i>?
LONDON, March 29.?British. Bel
Ian and French manufacturers of
xplosives have formed a gigantic
rust which will control the European
utput of gunpowder and dynamite
ntil 1950, according to information re
elvcii from .T. T. W! Ncwbold, M. P.,
British labor leader. The trust has
is Inception with the formation in
886 of the Nobel Dynamite Trust.
,-hlch expanded until ft Included in ?
:s members some of the largest Eng
Ish. French and Belgian companies.
J. J. Meherin haa returned from
louthwestern Alaska.

xml | txt