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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, April 09, 1915, Image 1

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THE IRE
VOL. v.. NO. 740. .11'\ KA ALASKA. KIM DAY, APRILS. lim. PRICE TEN CENTS.
RUSSIA COMMANDS CARPATHIAN SITUATION
DELEGATE
. MISQUOTED
PLATFORM
?t?
Wednesday night at his Kink meet
ing Delegate James Wickersham pre
tended to quote from what he repre
sented to be the Democratic 1912 plat
form. He pretended to read there
from a declaration in favor of State
hood for Alaska. With that as a basis
from which to start, he declared that
the Democratic party of Alaska is re
actionary because its Skagway con
vention declared for "full Territorial
form of government." and Democrats
la the Legislature and The Empire
have supported a memorial asking
Congress for "full Territorial form of
government."
There was no available copy of the
platform in Juneau. Friends of Dele
gate Wickersham had been searching
for a copy of the platform because,
it was said, someone had told him
that it had declared for Statehood.
The Empire, knowing of the Dele
gate's habits when "quoting" in pub
lic and knowing of his intention to try
to make a point on the alleged infor
mation. also made a search of the
town for a copy of the platform. The
Empire was unsuccessful, but the
Delegate "quoted" as stated.
Yesterday morning The Empire, still
mindful of the Delegate's habits, sent
a telegram to the Yaldez Prospector,
published at the town where the 1912
convention was held, asking thut it
telegraph The Empire the plank in the
platform on Statehood for Ataska.
DEMOCRATS DECLARED FOR TER
RITOR1AL GOVERNMENT IN 1912
The Empire received this reply:
VALDEZ, April S.?The Home Rule
plank in the Democratic platform of
1912 was as follows:
"The power to make laws to govern
local affairs is but the application to
Alaska of a right sanctified by the
blood of our fathers and Justified by
more than a century of actual exper
ience. Every Democratic convention
held in Alaska has insisted upon that
right, and we do but reiterate the ut
terances of these conventions when
we again represent to Congress:
(1) That the people of Alaska
want home rule. (2) That the
people of Alaska ought to have
home rule. (3) That until the
people of Alaska get home rule
they will never cease demanding
it as the right of American citi
zens.
"We pledge to the people of Alaska
that, if elected, our candidate for Dele
gate will use every effort to secure
the enactment of a law giving to Al
aska a local Legislature, elected by
the people, with power covering every
rightful subject of legislation not Na
tional in character."
(Signed) PROSPECTOR.
NO STATEHOOD DECLARATION
Upon receipt of this telegram, think
ing that perhaps the Prospector had
not understood the request. The Em
pire sent this wire to the Prospector:
"Did the Democratic 1912 platform
contain any reference to Statehood for
Alaska. If so. please wire it to The
Empire."
The following reply was received
last night:
VALDEZ, April 8.?Nothing in plat
form regarding Statehood. Mailing
you copy of platform on tonight's
st earner.
(Signed) PROSPECTOR.
RE-TREATMENT
PLANT PROGRESSES
Construction work at Thane is pro
gressing rapidly on all of the three
remaining units to be put under the
roof of the big mill, and by Juneau
first it is expected that the second unit
will be operating. As to the new re
treatment plant. G. T. Jackson, assist
ant superintendent, said:
,rWe have the foundation about com
pleted and the steel which is already
on hand, will be going up shortly. The
whole works will be pushed rapidly
as possible, and by August the third
unit should be operating."
A boarding house to accommodate
150 men is being constructed as well
as cottages for the foremen. There
are about 700 men employed in min
ing. milling and construction work in
connection with the Alaska Gastlneau
property.
The cleanup shipped out on the Ad
miral Evans consisted principally of
concentrates, but when the re-treat
ment plant is completed the mineral
will be reduced to- bullion. the same
a 8 at Tread well.
The F-npiro has most readers
?
? WEATHER TODAY *
4- _ Maximum?50. ?
+ Minimum?32. ?>
+ CLEAR. v
ASSEMBLY
! AFTER TAX
DODGERS
Representative Dan Driscoll of Fair
banks introduced In the House this
morning a bill to provide for the col
lection of unpaid Territorial taxes.
There is owing the Territory approx
imately $200,000 .which does not in
clude the few months in the present
calendar year.
The tax dodger bill, as it" was im
mediately dubbed, provides that the
? Speaker of the House and the Presi
dent of the Senate enter into a con
tract with a competent attorney, for
the prosecution of tnx dodgers. The
prosecutor Bhall reecive 15 per cent,
of the moneys collected, and $250 is
appropriated to pay marshal's costs
of filing papers and scrvlug processes.
The bill further provides that all ac
tions be triable in the United States
, court at Juneau. The bill was re
ferred to the ways and means com
mittee.
Liquor Bill Finally Passed.
The Senate passed without amend
ment today the Snow bill, providing
for a vote on the liquor question No
vember -I. 1917. with the provision that
saloons and breweries in Alaska shall j
suspend January 1, 1918 if thedrys
poll a majority of the votes cast. The
bill will go to Governor Strong, who
has declared he would sign It.
The House passed H. B. 38. making
subscribers to notes jointly or several
ly liable. H. B. 53. providing the month
ly payment of wages and providing
penalty for obtaining labor under false
pretenses, and House Joint Memorial
4. providing reservations on navigable
waters, between homesteads.
The House committee of the whole
held a hearing on the Tanner fisheries
memorial after adjournment. Capt.
Charles B. Oliver and George Rounsc
fell of Ketchikan were wltnosses.
H. B. 66, Mr. Snow, preventing mar
shals from acting as prosecutors or
attorneys for defendants In justices ?
courts, was Introduced, and referred
to the judiciary.
H. B. 67, Mr. Shoup. regulating gen
eral insurance bustness. was intro
duced and the same measure was filed
in the Senate as S. B. 43. by Senator
Millard.
First Division Loses Out.
Each division of Alaska will re
ceive one-fourth of the First and
Third division forest reserve moneys,
after 25 per cent. Is taken out for'
school purposes, the House of Repre-?
sentatives today agreed upon, with
Representative Shoup. Held, Heckman
and Britt, the First division's dele
gation. vigorously protesting. The
amount per division, is about $11,000.
Aftfcr an all-morning debate, the
Coombs bill, already amended several
times, went back to a Special commit
tee. with instructions to amend it by
inserting provisions for the creation
, of four road districts, with one olllce
commissioner in each division, who
shall draw the division's share of the
money and spend it for roads as he
! shall see fit. The road commissioner
will be elected first by the Legislature,
and after January 1. 1917. by the peo
ple.
Representative Shoup's motion that
no member of the first division be
placed on the special committee auth
orized to amend the bill, carried. My. j
Shoup stated it was the opinion of the
, pebple of the First division that the j
money from the Tongas forest re- j
serve should be spent in the First di
vision, where the Tongas forest is lo
cated, and that it would be unfair to
the voters of this section to have their
representatives in the legislature be
made a party to drawing up a meas
ure which will take an equal division,
, of the money. He cited that the First j
j division already had suffered irrepar
able damage, by the operation of the i
forest reserve law. Ho told of the
arrival here two years, ago of Capt.
Otto Sverdrup. famous Norwegian ex
plorer nad navigator, whom, he said,
came to Southeastern Alaska with two
and one-haif millions in cash, to erect
a paper mill in the forest, but who was
driven away by the forest service reg
ulations The Sverdrup plan. Mr.
Shoup mentioned, was to utilize the j
spruce trees, extracting the pulp for
the manufacture of paper. He said
that one of the most objectionable
rules of the reserve was that (or ev
; ery tree cut down another had to be:
planted.
What Alaska Lost.
"There was even no guarantee that j
Capt. Sverdrup would have title to
? the ground his pulp mill would occu
py. and for that reason he went to Si
beria. taking his money with him,"i
Mr. Shoup said.
Speaker Collins named Representa
tives Holland. Driscoll and Getchell to
draft the new bill. The motion to com
mit was unanimous, with tho excep
tion of the First division's members.
The House received the Sunday clos
ing bill, which passed the Senate with
the emergency clause attached, put
ting the law in force upon approval by j
i the Governor, the S-hour day bill.
| I
(Continued on Page 6.)
GIRL ENDS HER
LIFE AT FRISCO
SAX FRANCISCO, April 9. ? Mrs.
Chase Garfield. daughter of Mrs. Whit
Ing, wife of Dr. F. B. Whiting, of Se-j
attle, formerly a prominent Alaskan,
committed suicide here last night. The
cause of the act Is not known. She !
had been living with her husband, who
is an automobile salesman, at Dos An
geles.
Mrs. Garfield formerly lived with her
parents and attended school at Skag
way, where she met and was wooed ]
and wed by Chase Garfield. She was i
n daughter of Robert C. Smith, who i
was engaged In the brewery business
at Skagway in the early days of that
town's history. In partnership with the
late W. F. Matlock. As Miss Bess i I
Smith, the dead woman was very pop
ular. Her mother became the wife of i
Dr. Whiting.
LANE BOOSTING
GOOD TIMES
WASHINGTON. April 9.?Secretary
of the Interior Franklin K. Lane, who
has just returned from a trip through
out the country, asked for a statement1
of business conditions, said:
"Grand times are coming. They're
here now.
"I found everywhere a returning
feeling of optimism. Farmers all haveI
money, the banks are prepared to aid
business where it requires money, the
factories are resuming, all products
find a ready sale at profitable 'prices. 1
the railroads are doing increased busi
ness and financing themselves to bet- 1
ter advantage, the crop outlook is;
good, and there Is scarcely a cloud j
on the horizon anywhere."
COMMANDER OF F-4
EXPECTED DISASTER i
LOS ANGELES. April 1) ? Writing
two days before the disaster to tho <
United States suhiunrino F-4 to hit
brother. Allison Ede. of this city,
Lieut. Ede. commander of the ill-fated ]
craft indicated that he expected trou- i
ble for his vessel, commenting upon <
which, he said.
"I expect the whole thing to go up i
in smoke at any time."
He said the vessel was leaky and "
otherwise in poor condition.
GOVERNMENT
SUES GLAVIS i
SAX FRANCISCO, April 9. The i
United States government began suit <
against Louis R. Glavts. formerly;
chief of the Held division for the
United States general land oillce, 'or
$331 which he charged as expense ac
count and paid himself out of the pub- '
lie funds when, as disbursing ofllcor. (
he traveled from Seattle to Bevorly. ,
Mass., to lay before President Wm. H. j
Taft evidence in Alaska land cases ']
that he alleged involved Sccrteary of
the Interior Richard A. Bnllingcr.
Glavis is now practicing law here.
WAR OF 1812 RECALLED
ON DIPLOMATIC CONTROVERSY
?\
WASHINGTON, April 9.?The is- ,
sues causing the War of 1812 with i
Groat Britain was recalled by the \ ]
State Department officials yesterday i
when notified that France had nck-ji
nowledged that the arrest and remov- ,
al of August Picpenbrink, German i
born but who had declared his inten- ?
tions to become an American citizen,
from the American steamer Wlmber,
off Colon, last November, was illegal j
and that he would be given his liberty j
and compensation. Tlic United States i
claimed that the French had no right j;
to search an American ship and ar
rest members of its crew. Plonen- ,
brink was a steward on the American
ship.
BANK REPORTS SHOW
GENERAL IMPROVEMENT!
.>
WASHINGTON. April 9.?The Do-1
partmcnt of Commerce made public
reports of bank examiners on busiuess
conditions throughout the country.:
They show a marked improvement ov
er conditions a year ago. and indl- j
cate a continuation of improved bus-'
iness conditions.
JEFFERSON TO BRING
125 PASSENGERS NORTH
SEATTLE. April 0.?The Jefferson
will sail for Alaska tonight with 125
passengers, ilncluding 50 cannerymen
for Roe Point and Tec Harbor. She
will have the following named passen
gers for Juneau:
William Murphy, Thomas Knudson.'
Philip and Loreana Mark, E. D. Col
Yin, J. R. Mires, H. L. Fuller. H. A.
Peterson. L. A. Moore and sixteen
steerage.
2.000 AT WORK
PITTSBURGH. Pa.. April 9. ? The
mills of the Brier Hill Steel com
pany. Voungstown, O.. employing 2,000
men, have resumed operations.
SHIPS AND '
TR(
HIT IKS,,
?4'? A
PARIS, April 9. .Ml or the remain- c
Ing Frencli troops in Africa arc be- a
Ing held In rendinesi to assist the ai- ?
lied fleets and the liritish expedition- J
ary forces against Turkey. It is be- v
lieved that they will not be required j;
tor use against the Germans, and that
men and ships necessary to encom- ]
pass the dcfeat~of the Turks can be
spared for the movement that is un
derway against Constantinople.
Landing Troops at Dardanelles. J
LONDON, April 9.?Several French v
and German transports, escorted by | r
warships, arrived at the Dardanelles ' f
yesterday, and today they arc landing t
troops on Turkish soil, preparatory i
to an attuck on the inner forts of the i v
Dardanelles and on Constantinople, i
Among the troops on Turkish soil are c
British troops from Egypt, Canada, f
Australia and England, and troops j
from French Africa and Southern <j
Franco. c
King Says Fleets Cannot Force Strait. |
ROME, April 9.?King Constantino, 1
of Greece, is quoted by the Tribuno t
newspaper of this city as declaring
that it is his belief that it will be im
possible for the Allies to force the
Dardanelles without a combined at- ?
tack by land and sea. t
Greece Prepared For Eventualities, t
The King further was quoted as s
saying that Greece is in the same c
position as Italy and other countries 'I
which have made all necessary mili
tary preparations for war but have
not abandoned neutrality. He de
clared that while Greece's position
Is different from thnt of Italy, ho b?- ;
lieved its position would in the end 1
bo guided by events as they arise.
Turkey to Use Old Men And '
Young Boyo.
CONST ANTJNOLE, April 9. - The t
nen in the country, including boys. :
jf 19 years'of age. to. the defenso of ;
Turkey. Men ov over 60 yearn are
responding to the call. ]
RUSSIAN FLEET
COMMANDS SEA
?t-?
I.OXDON. April 9.?Advices from I
i'etrograd say the Black Sea has been v
:oinpletely cleared of Turkish ships <
ind that now the fleet will bo able to j1
:onccntrate Its efforts against the
Bosphorua forts. I
Turkey Has 30 Aeroplanes ;f
CONSTANTINOPLE, April 9.? 30 >
Turkish aeroplanes and hydroplanes <
of the most improved pattern are co- I
operating with the Dardanelles forts
Some have recently arrived from Ger- 1
many, others have been constructed in
Italy.
BELGIUM MAY GET '
CONSTANTINOPLE 1
I
NEW YORK. April 9.?New Yorl: 1
American Paris advices state that the (
principal decision upon which the En- *
tente have reached an agreement thnt
Is practically Una! is the granting of E
Constantinople to Belgium as compen
sation for the wholesale ruin of her
lountry.
TURKEY WOULD BE GENEROUS 1
PARIS. April 9.?An Athens dis- c
patch says that confirmation received
In diplomatic circles of the report
that Turkey has offered Bulgaria ter
ritory in Europe extending to Enos
Midia line, including Adrlanople, in f
exchange for continued neutrality.
JACKLING STOCKS ALL
SHOW ADVANCE TODAY :
NEW YORK, April 9.?Prices of the <
stock of all the companies of which k
Col. D. C. .Tackling is the principal
factor, showed marked advance on the <
stock exchange today. The closing
prices wore:
Alaska Gold 35%, Chino 40%,^.Ray
21%, Utah Copper 59%. '
? ? ? ;
. <
v :?v ,
NOTICE OF COMMITTEE
HEARING. I
Tho Senate committee on |
mining and manufactures will i
| hold the LAST public hearing ' I
j on Senate Bill No. 20. entitled
"An Act to regulate the colloc- \
| tion of medical and hospital
fees, by an employer from an 1
employee," in the Senate Cham- :
bcr. Goldstein Block, on Tues- <
day night, at 8 o'clock.
All persons desiring to appear
i before the committee, regard- ?
j this bill, arc invited to attend.
Dated, April 9, 1915. ! I
B. F. MILLARD, ; i
Chairman. > iJ
*- * :
WILSON SAYS IT [
IS TOO EARLY
TO fIX BLAME
WASHINGTON. April 9. ? In ad
[ressing the Maryland annual confer
ncc of the Methodist Episcopal
hurch here President Woodrow Wil
on said that It is his -belief that no n
nan is wise- enough -to pronounce a
udgment on the European war at thia
time. The President said that it
rould bo unjust for any one to attempt n
Inally to tlx the blame at this time.
:taly considers
peace and war r
HOME, April 9.?The quostions as 9
o whether an understanding between 11
taly and Austria Is still possible, or p
rhethor a separate Austro-Rusaian
leace treaty is probable are discussed v
roni many different angles by all of
ho Italian papers. The predomincnt
lolicf today is that separate peace s
rlth Russia is not likely because it p
s believed that Russia will insist up- t
>n concessions that Austria will re- n
use to make. It is thought that:
taly's chances for concessions with-;
iut war will be greater if Austria con-1
ludes peace than otherwise, because
he Allies will likely insist upon aid "
f Austria remains in the war as the "
>rico of their recognition of any Aus
ro-Italian agreement. "
Y ii
Italy Using Railway Cars.
GENEVA, April D.?Railroad rolling
tock is being withdrawn by Italy from i !
he Swiss frontier for use In the '
ransportatlon of troops, mall and j1
lores In Northern Italy destined for 1
he region bordering on Austrian jc
Tyrol. j J
ITALIANS SAILINGS DELAYED. 8
??.
LONDON, April 9.?Italian steam- N
trs in American ports have been or- c
Iered to postpone all sailings until ;
\pril 20. according to a dispatch from
tome. The purpose is to permit Ital- '
an reservists in the United States and '
Tanada to make connections with !
hem, and sail /or Italy. By delaying
ho sailing some of the war supply '
ihipmonts from the United States will
ilso be able to cntch the first sailings. 1
[TALY MAY WAIT
UNTIL MAYj
ROME, April 0.?Another sudden t
ihift in the diplomatic situation has t
tostponcd Italy's entrance into the t
var. It is said now that Italy will not i 1
mbark In the goncral European con- j t
lict until May if at all.
Within the last two days, the in
erventionalist press has curbed its
ictivitics, and instead of urging the
tovernment to open hostilities nt onco j t
ntlmates that there is grave doubt | s
>f the advisability of such action at, t
iresent. i
s
TAL+AN KING IS v
GERMAN INVESTOR 1
ROME, April 9.?King Victor Eman- /
tel of Italy has $25,000,000 invested j
n the Krupp armament works. If
taly declares war on Germany the
ting's investment will be seized by q
Jerman authorities and the house of it
5nvoy will be impoverished. t
+ + ? e
EGYPTIAN SUBJECT J
SHOOTS AT SULTAN t
??? v
CAIRO, Egypt. April 9?A native f
>f Egypt yesterday shot at Huoeein n
Cernal, Sultan of Egypt. The shot t
vent wild. The assailant was arrest- c
?d. 10
ITALY BUYS HORSES E
ST. LOUIS, April 9.?The Italian"
fovernmonf has contracted for 15,000
torses in St. Louis. I
?? jl
BAN ON ABSINTHE. ! fl
^.i|I
OAHIO, April 9.?The Egyptian gov- (
irnment has forbidden the sale of ab
linthe.
?
3EORGE GOULD WINS. r
FROM HOWARD GOULD l
NEW YORK. April 9? George J. i
3ould has won his action to foreclose {
i tax lion for $54,f>09 held on tho prop- t
;rty of his brother. Howard Gould, in <
fifth Avenue and 73rd street. i
?? i
"ORGAN SEES GOOD |t
TIMES ON THE WAY I j
?*1*?? I
CHICAGO. April 9.?James B. For- .
;an, president of the First National '
Bank. Chicago, says: "Industries that <
ire the largest recipient of ordors for ]
war supplies of course are enjoying '
joom times, but general trade has not; l
rot worked back to normal. But the j I
jutlook is cheerful; [?
BOSTON GETS WOOL !:
??>?
:han IS,000 pounds, or 22,000 bales, of I
toroigu wool has arrived at Boston \
In a week; 15,000 bales coming from i
FRENCH ON i
OFFENSIVE
IN FORCE
LONDON, April 9.?That the French
lovement between the Meusc river
nd Lorraine frontier is developing in-|
s a distinct and strong offensive I
lovement, with Gen. Joffre pushing
lc advance while the Germans are
taking fierce counter attacks, is the |
ubstance of the latest dispatches
eachlng London.
The French have continued to gain
round for two days, and their at
nek has gained in force as it has pro-;
ressed. New troops arc constantly
eing brought into action, as the for
ward movement io extended.
More than usually vigorously artll
;ry attacks have been made In other
ectlons of Northern France for the
urposc of preventing German concen
ration against the offensive move
ment.
rRENCH AVIATOR WINS DUEL.
FUBNES, Belgium, April 9,?A dra
datic duel in the air in which n Gcr
mn aircraft was brought down by
toland G. Garros, the famous French
viator, inside the lines of the Allies
8 described by Rnoul Pontus, son of
he former Belgian minister.
"The German at first succeeded in
Islng above Garros" machine," said
'ontus. "but Garros, by a sudden;
wist, escaped and then flew atop of
he German. Then quickly came the j
Tackling of the quick-firer. The Ger
nan replied with spirit, using a car-:
dne. Suddenly a long Jet of white
moke gushed from the German ma
:hine. aud then (lame enveloped the
rhole aeroplane, which dropped to
?nrth a few yards from where I
vatched the battle.
"The aviators in the German ma
rine were dead when we reached
hem. The machine tank contained
wo bullet holes.
The destroyed machine was named
.ho '2-Fortieth Flotilla.""
3erman submarine
sinks french bark
?-?-~?
SOUTHSHIELDS, Eng.. April 9.
rhe French bnrk Colonel Fsona waB
orpedocd and sunk by a German sub
narlne off St. Catherine's point today
ifter the British tug Homer lmd at
empted to sink the undersea craft.
1'he Homer was towing the bark when
he submarine appeared.
submarines in atlantic.
?1* -
DUBLIN, April 9.?Liner Dunedin
rom South America Nreports German
;ubmarincs In the Atlantic ocean og:
he west coast of Ireland. The Du
icdin was chased but eluded her pur-j
uer. The submarines was evidently j
vaiting for Atlantic liners from the
Jnitcd States.
\TCHISON TAKES OVER
another railroad,
CHICAGO. April 9.?The Atchison.
Topeka nnd Santa Fe railroad has ta-,
:cn over the St. Louis. Rocky Moun
ain & Pacific railway, whose line
?xtends from Dcs .Moines to Uto Park |
?few .Mexico. This acquisition gives
he Atchison control over the traffic
rhlph originates from the Raton coal
ields of Colfax county, New Mexico.
,nd assures the company also a prac
ically Inexhaustible supply of fuel
oal. The purchase price wa3 $3.
00.000.
iX-GOV. FOSS IS
for prohibition
?4-?
BOSTON. Mass.. April 9.?Kx-Gov..
Cugenc Foss favors nation-wide pro
libition purely as an ecomomic con
ilderation.
CANADIAN INDIANS
ARE PROGRESSSING
DAWSON, March 26.?Pev. Bcuja
nin Totty and Amos Njootlal returned
ast cvcninR from a long niusli to the
lorthward, in which they visited the
lativos on the Blackstone and the Por
luplne rivers. Thoy traveled 200 miles
o reach the Porcupine camps. All In-j
Hans in both ditsrlcts were found well
ind prosperous. The only death re
>orted among the mthls winter- was j
hat of an old Indian woman .jiamed
\nnie, who passed away In her sleep
11 January. Amos reports caribou ex
ccdingly plentiful on the Blackstone.!
The snow, there, he says, is tramped1
lown as though a herd of cattle had i
passed over it. The trail beyond
rwelvemile which had been, broken I
by-the police and the Indian mushers
his winter was obliterated by the re-1
:cnt snowstorm, and on the return it
was necessary, to break new trail j
ilong the same route.
Its a poor rule that won't work
both ways. Some men fail bccauso,
they are misunderstood and others!
succeed for the same reason.?(New
York Times.)
AUSTRIAN
OPPOSITION
COLLAPSES
PETROGRAD, April 9.? With the
Russian army in possession of all the
Carpathian passes, and all the main
summits and slopes of the Beskid
mountains, the Austrian operations in
the Carpathian region has completely
collapsed. The Russian general staff
has only to consider by what roads it
will invade Hungary. The Austrian
army is cut Into three parts, and its
ragged flanks are but shreds. It is be
lieved here that the capture of the
capitals of the dual monarchy is but
a matter of time.
The march Into Hungary will begin
immediately.
SEPARATE PEACE IS
TALKED.
The completely prostrated condition
of the Austrian army io causing a re
vival of Interest in the talk of sepa
rate peace with Austria. Austrians
are feeling Russia through Rome and
other capitals as to the terms that
v.'Ou!d be imposed.
GERMAN MOVEMENT
IN POLAND FAILS
PKTROGRAD. April 9.?Tlie war of
lice says "The Germans attached enor
mous importance to their ocenslvo
in the trans-Nleman district. This
failed completely, and our troops have
been on the offensive since March 27.
"The principal German aim was as
signed to the 31st division, supported
by three reserve regiments and a
large body of cavalry. These advanced
from Kalwaria on Krasno, and were
ordered to push nt alt costs to Lodzlc,
with object of cutting off the Rus
sians engaging the Gern ans toward
the West.
"The Germans made prodigious cf
firts, and attempted to envelop on the
Ice of Lake Dussla our right wing.
Moving over the ice. the Germans at
tempted to turn our position In the
oassagc between the two divisions of
Lake Slmno. ?
"The enemy gained some minor suc
cesses at first but wc twice counter
attacked the Germans who had pene
trated to our rear near villages of Zce
brziski and Metelitz, annihilating
them.
"The continued lull along tho Bzura
Rawka fro it has convinced the Rus
sian commanders that a large part of
the German troops on the left bank
of the Vistula have been sent to Ga
licfa and the Carpathians. German
artillery has also lessened, and it Is
believed the Germans are now hus
banding ammunition."
RUSSIANS BUY
U. S. AEROPLANES
TACOMA, Wash., April 9.?Fifteen
car loads of American aeroplanes for
Russian military use are being loaded
by the Hakushika Maru, a Japanese
liner. They will be shipped over the
Translberian railroad to the war zone.
VON KLUK MAY
LOSE HIS COMMAND
LONDON. April 9.?The opinion is
expressed in Berlin that as the result
of the wounding of Gen. von Kluk the
emperor will entrust tho command of
Von Kluk's army to I'rince Eltel
Fricdrich.
MANUFACTURER FAVORS
LABOR REFORM LAWS
CHICAGO. April 91?President Mc
Cormick, of the International Harves
ter Company, favors woman's eight
hour and a child labor bill In the Illi
nois legislature.
GARRISON WILL
STAY IN CABINET
WASHINGTON', April 9.?Secretary
of War Lindley M. Garrison, it is said,
says that he will stay in the Cabinet
until he is released. He is receptive
toward the New Jersey judgdtlp. but
denies that he has been offered the
place:
AMERICAN AUTOMOBILE
INDUSTRY SHOWS GROWTH
WASHINGTON. April 9.?The total
number of automobiles and trucks it?
the United States at the end of 1914
was 1.745,570. This is a gain of 500,
695 in 12 months and compares with
677.000 ir. 1911.
BURTON'S CANDIDACY
FOR PRESIDENCY ANNOUNCED
WASHINGTON. April 9.? Former
United States Senator Thoedorc K.
Burton is a candidato for the Republi
can nomination for the Presidency,
and headquarters will be opened at
Washington.
i Leading Republicans believe Col
| Roosevelt will support Borah, Burton
or Weeks, as the Republican candi
date for prescident.

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