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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, April 13, 1915, Image 1

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VOL V.. M). JUNEAU, AT. A SKA. TUESDAY, APRIL 13, 1915. " "5 " PRICE TEN CENTS.
AMERICAN 1
TRADE AT
TOP POINT
1
WASHINGTON. April 13.?The tig i
ures from American customs houses >
covering the business for March are 1
practically all in. ami they show ex
ports for the month that reach the
amazing total of $323.0mO.OOO. the jj
largest single month's business in the I
history' of the United States, far larger 1
than any nation has ever reached In 1
the same period of time.
The figures upon the imports of the
country will be available within a few j
days, and it is estimated that they will '
show that the balance of trade in fa- '
vor of the United States will be near
if not quite $200,000,000 as against a |
previous high monthly record of $14?.- 1
000,000. made in January of the pres
ent year.
Probably the most marked feature
of the business for March was the tre
mendously increased exportation to
South America, the Orient and Cana
da. though there was an increase in
the shipments to practically every neu
tral nation.
Information gathered by the Depart-;:
ment of Commerce and the Treasury (
Department indicate that the April' i
business will almost if not quite equal; <
that for March. i
Experts now estimate that the to- '
tal trade balance in favor of the Unit
ed States for the calendar year 1915 i
is likely to approximate $2,000.000,-. i
000. This estimate Is based upon the!:
fact that there has been a marked in
crease in the volume of the unillled :
orders on hand since March 1st. the
beginning of the enormous business <
transactions for March, and orders are !
booked for delivery during each month i
for the next year and a half. c
One of the marked features of the j ;i
exports for March is that while the
exports of guns, ammunition and other c
war munitions have shown the most v
marked increase yet their percentage
of the total has beeu smalt. Howev
er. much of the clothing and food- t
stuffs exportations to Europe and Can
ada have been for the ultimate us of' <
the army in Europe.
s 1
Copper Exports Increase.
NEW YORK. April 12. - The con :
stantly increasing exportations of cop-1
per and consequent advance in the \
price of that metal have been among <
the marked features of recent trade;
development. The prediction is free
ly made that there is a brilliant per-' i
iod ahead of the copper producers of
the United States. The demand from . 1
foreign markets for finished copper ]
products was never so heavy as it t
is at this time.
ONE AVERICAN CONCERN S
GETS BIG CONTRACT <
?*? i
NEW YORK. April 12. The Cruel i
ble Steel company, has got a contract j
for ammunition and war materials j:
amounting to Jl." ".000.000. I
AMERICAN COMPANY
TO MAKE DYESTUFFS
-+~
NEW YORK. April 13. -The United ?
States Dvc and Chemical Company, a <
new corporation, has leased the plant <
of the Keenan Paint & Color Works at |
Stamford. Conn. The plant comprs- i
cs 15 buildings and covers five acres. <
The company declares its intention is i
to supply the American market with ?
the dyestuffs that before the war were
supplied by Germany.
BIG COMPRESSOR 1
FOR PERSEVERANCE I
A duplicate of the large N'orberg !
air compressor has been ordered for ]
the Perseverance division of the Alas- 1
ka Gastineau properties, and is ex- '
I>ected on an early boat from the !
south.
This unit will have a displacement '
of 28,000 cu. ft., of air per minute,
and will be directly driven by a 540
h.p. G neral Electric motor. It will
be Installed in the same buildnig as
the present compressor, the nocessarj
arrangements as to foundation, pip
ing. etc.. having been made at the
time the first compressor was install
ed.
This installation will bring the to- ,
tal capacity of compressed air up to ''
S.600 cu. ft. per minute. This includes 1
the capacity of th ? compressor now 1
at the mouth of th> Sheep creek 1
tunnel. And it is expected thai this '
capacity will be sufficient for mining 1
ten or twelve thousand tons of ore
per day.
?
An "ad" in The Empire reaches ev
erybody.
(.<?+ + + + *> v ?> <? v ?> + + + ?> ; I
? WEATHER TODAY + c
+ Maximum-?4*5. i
+ Rainfall?A trace. (
+ Parly cloudy. ? \
?????? ?> v v ?> 'J t ' t ? + + + 1
HUBBARD ASKS
FOR VOTE ON
GOVERNMENT
Seuator O. P. Hubbard of Valdex,
iv hose tight to have a memorial ask
ing Statehood for Alaska was defeat
ed. Introduced in the upper house of
the legislature today a Joint resolution
isking that the people of Alaska rote
on what form of government they do
sire.
The resolution says, in part, that
SVhereas. the sentiments of the peo
ple of this Territory can only be ob
tained by submitting the question as
to the form of government best
idnpted to develop the resources of
the Territory, bo it resolved by the
legislature that at the delegate elec
tion in November, 1916. there be print
ed on the ballot In large type, the fol
lowing:
| For Full Territorial Qovernment
] .For Immediate Statehood
The resolution further provides that
the vote shall be canvassed and re
ported by the canvassing board.
Oppose Reservations.
The Haines Democratic club has
iskod the legislature to memorialize
L'ongress to remove the restrictions
at reservation placed upon the strip
ot 80 rods lying and situated between
ill claims lying on navigable water,
"to the end that the same may be
located, claimed and the title acquir
ed by bona llde homesteaders. The
communication from Haines was
signed by President J. W. Combs,
Manager of Hoard S. Pagan and Sec
retary Harry Combs.
?V memorial to the effect was Intro
luced In the House by Representative
lolland. and passed that body three
lays ago. This morning a Senate
?oramittee recommended it for pass
ige.
Other reports from committees, rec
ommending that measures bo passed.
i*ere tiled this morning as follows:
Measures Favored.
H. B. 60, local government of na
ive villages.
H. B. 44. Incorporation of second
:!ass cities.
H. B. 46. abolishing capital punish
nent.
H. B. 48. punishing carnal degener
acy.
S. B. 44. the committee on cduca
don's school bill, providing a uniform :
system.
In the House:
H. B. 56. prohibiting aliens from
Lshing in the waters of Alaska.
H. J. M. 13. asking that the laws re
nting to game and fur-bearing animals
je placed under the legislature's con
xol.
Settle Lawyer Question.
The special committee comprising
Senators Hubbard. Millard and Sulz
;r and Representatives Shoup, Burns
ind Daly, to report on House Concur
rent Resolution S. and S. J. R. 6. re
garding the selection of legal counsel
md prosecutors, for the Territory, re
jorted today, recommending that the
'ormer measure be withdrawn, and
mbstltuted by the Millard resolution.
The resolution recommended pro
rides that the board which is created
ihall havo authority to employ one
>r more attorneys in the various judi
cal divisions, to enforce the Territor
ial laws, and power to remove for
rause any or all of the attorneys is
rested in the board. The latter con
sists of the Governor. Secretary and
ITeasurer. The board shall decide
vhat matters arc to be prosecuted or
lefended.
The Judiciary committees of the two
-louses of the legislature are to make
he appointments, and the resolution
provides that if the committees fail
o make the appointments within 48
lours after the passage of the rcso
ution. the Governor shall then name
he attorneys, and the board shall fix
:he compensation.
<\SK AMERICANS TO
DECIDE ON REPAIRS
WASHINGTON. April 13.?The Ger
man embassy this morning asked Sec
retary of State William J. Bryan to
cause a survey to be made of the
Kronprinz Wilhelm to decide upon the
extent of repairs that will be neces
sary before the vessel will be sea
worthy. and to stipulate the time with
in which the repairs must be com
pleted. The German representative's
request was based upon a request
'rom the commander of the German
rrulser. which was delivered to Mr.
Bryan.
-IRE DESTROYS INSANE
ASYLUM NEAR CHICAGO
CHICAGO. April 13.?Two hundred
ronvolsccent patients in the State hos
pital for the insane were rescued to
lay from a Are which destroyed a
?ambling frame structure used as an
tnnex to the institution at Dunning.
Dther patients to the number of 2,
$00 were in a building nearby, and
were guarded to prevent a panic.
[VETO IS
SUSTAINED
IN SENATE
Gov. J. F. A. Strong's action In ve- <
tolng the repeal of the Sunday closing i
law, with the excoptlon of tho saloons ?
was sustained by the Territorial Sen- ,
ate late yesterday afternoon and tho
bill, which originated in tho House,
has now been decorated with crcpo.
No bill of similar provisions can now
be introduced at this session and the 1
present Blue Law will continue to op
orate in Alaska. The bill to repeal .
tho law was introduced early in the ]
session by Representative N. H.
Coombs of Nome, who was supported ,
by his colleagues from start to fin
ish. The Nome men claimed that the
federal officials in tho Socond Divis
ion had drawn tho lines of enforce
ment too closely, closing moving pic
ture shows, cord roomB, billiard halls,
cigar stores, bowling alleys and all I
merchandise stores. Only the drug J
stores were exempted, thoy declared.
Got. strong sent nis message 10
the House, announcing that ho had
disapproved of the bill, early yester
day afternoon. He stated in his mcs- 1
sago "that the Legislature of Alaska 1
could not afford to take a step back- 1
ward; that the question should not bo
considered solely from a religious <
anglo; nor was it intended to bo.'
"This bill would incrcaso tho hours
of labor that should be given to rost 1
and recreation." the Governor said.
He declared further that those who
opposed the present law were in the i
minority, and that the majority were
fully satisfied with It. i
The House passed the bill over <
tho protest of the Governor. Tho vote !1
to pass over tho veto was as follows: '
Ayes?Brltt, Burns, Coombs. Daly.
Day, Driscoll. Gctchcll. Hold. Noon, 1
Shoup, Tansey. Moran and Speaker <
Collins. i
Noes?Hcckman. Holland. Snow. ?
Senate 8ustains Governor 1
When the Governor's veto was an- I
nounced in the Senate, and a vote was 1
ordered, the veto was sustained by a i
vote of 5 to 3. The vote to pass the 1
bill not withstanding tho veto was as '
follows: . <
Ayes?Aldrich, Gaustad. McGann.
Noes?Hubbard, Millard Sulzer, Tan- 1
ncr. President Sutherland. Tho Gov- <
ernor was notified of the Senate's ac- '
tlon.
When the Sunday closing repeal bill
first come to a vote in the Senate, on i
April 9. it was passedl by a vote of
5 to 3. Senators Sulzer, Hubbard. '
Gaustad. Aldrich and McGann voted 1
"aye," Senators Millard. Sutherland, 1
Millard and Tanner opposing itj. On
the vote to pass the bill over the
Governor's veto. Senators Sulzer and ?
Hubbard switched their vote to sus- '
tain the veto. <
Roden Law Amended 1
The House mining committee's bill <
amending tho Roden law by providing I
that $100 worth of assessment work 1
shall suffice for the entire 160 acres
oi an association placer mining claim I
passed the Senate yesterday, over the 1
protest of Senators McGann and Al- <
drich, of the Nome delegation, who '
had fought hard to have tho Roden l
law unchanged, and Senator Suther- 1
land. Senators Hubbard. Sulzer, Tan- <
ncr. Millard and Gaustad voted "aye." 1
The bill now goe3 back to tho House <
of Representatives, in its amended <
form. It is declared that tho House ]
will have a spirited contest in the 1
question of the amendments.
Tho Senate passed tho Millard bill <
prohibiting boys undor 16 years from 1
frequenting pool rooms, by unanimous <
vote. An amendmont was attachod
to tho bill, including card rooms as a .
forbidden rendezvous of minors.
Election Bill Amended
The Driscoll election bill which
passed tho House, and which promul
gated a scorching political analysis
in the Senato yesterday, came in for
several amendments, among which
were the Incrcaso from 25 to 250 of
tho number of petitioners necessary
to insure an Independent running for
Delogate to Congress, and tho in
crease from 25 to 100 for a Legislative
candidate who seeks to run as an In
dependent ,
300 JACMNESE, WAL
MINERS ARE DROWNED
TOKIO, April 13.?Three hundred
were drowned In the Ubc coal mine
in the Shimonosclci district last night
when the undcrseas galleries of the
mine collapsed and let the ocean wa
ter into the mino.
BRITI8H SHOE FACTORIES
ARE AFTER ORDERS
LONDON, April 13. ? British shoe
manufacturers have so for caught up
on war ordors that thoy are asking
the war office for further ordors to
koop them going. It is likely that
many of them will turn to their regu
lar Iinc3 of footwear, with 'the re
sult that American manufacturers will
lose this foreign business.
NOON ASKS TflA"
SEWARD BE MADE
ALASKACAPITAL
Representative John Noon of Sew
ard wants the capital of Alaska mov
ed from Juneau, to Seward. Ho Intro
duced a joint resolution today asking
Congress to sond a committee to Alas
ka and examino conditions, and re
port, "bofore the capital building Is
erected In Juneau." The resolution
further recites that as the location of
the capital. Soward Is the most dcslr- |
able point.
Representative Noon also introduced
a resolution, directed to the Postmast
er General, oaking that the mall now
going to Nomo over the routo from.
Cordova and Fairbanks, be re-routed
by way of Soward and Iditarod. The
resolution avers that 400 miles could
be saved.
Fish Trap Find Friends.
In another animated discussion of
the Tanner fisheries memorial, which
passed the Senate, the House commit-'
teo of the whole today voted to strike
from the memorial tho following: :
"The advocacy of tho abolishment of!
power-boat trolling and continuation i
of tho fish trap Is inconsistent In thei
extreme." Mr. Hcckman, who lead
the fight against provisions of tho,1
memorial condemning fish traps, mov
ed to vacate tho three lines. The
rote was as follows:
To strike out: Britt, Burns, Daly,
Coombs, Getchcll. Held, Heckman,
Driscoll, Shoup, Speaker Collins.
Against striking: Day. Noon, Tan
jey, Holland, Moran, Snow.
Mr. Heckman moved further to
strike out all of Dr. David Starr Jor
lan's opinions In which tho Callfornlnn
college professor was quoted with
Btating that ''eventually, the traps !
would deplete tho fisheries of Alaska." |
He produced a telegram representing;
that the Seattle PosWntelHgencor, In
Uk Issue of 1908, hnd quoted (Dr. Jor-1
Ion as reversing his former statement
in regard to tho trap menace. Mr.
N'oon replied, with somo heat, that
Dr. Jordon was recognised as the fore-!
most authority orTflsh and their ha
Pits, and as to the Post-Intelllgenccr? ?
'that sheet was never known to tell
tho truth about Alaska," he declared.
Mr. Hcckman said ho concurred in
Dr. Jordan's knowledge of the science
t>f fish, but he pointed out that there
was a wide difference between the
fish science and practical fishing.
Another amendment to the memor
ial was the Insertion of tho following: :
'That preference should be given to
resident fishermen over aliens or Im
ported fishermen. This applies to
\leut8 and Indians."
Forest oMney Spilt Passed.
House Bill No. I and Senate Bill
Mo. 6 referring to proposed election
ind ballot laws were the main topic::
pf discussion In the Senate Commit- j
ice of the Whole this afternoon and
?s no agreement was reached a mo-j
lion was made that both bills be post-1
poned and placed on the daily file for!
Thursday. As Senator Sulzer's efforts \
:o amend the ballot bill to include a
primary and make party designation:;
>n the ballot failed he gave notice j
ihat he will tomorrow Introduce a bill1
:o cover those points. Senate Joint j
Resolution No. 5, referring to the dis-,
iributlon of monies derived from the
,'orest reserves equally among the four'
livisions passed the Senate, by a vote i
)f 6 to 2, Senators Tanner and Sulzer
rotlng against tho bill. Senate Reso
ution 10 referring to the pay of chap
alns and House Joint Memorial No.
3, asking Congress for a wireless sta
:ion at Kotzebuc passed the Senate
manimously.
+!
1
j GOVERNOR APPROVES
LIQUOR REFERENDUM
Whtlo a photographer clicked
Its record, and In the presence
of Representative C. K. Snow,
author of the measure, and Son
ator Millard, and Represents- 1
tlvcs Bums and Shoup, Gov. J.
F. A. Strong today at 12:30 ap
pended his signature to House
Bill 52. designating November
4, 1916, as tho dato on which
Alaskans will vote yes or no on
prohibition. Two pens wore
used, both of which were carved
from native ivory. One of the
pens will be sent to the mother
of tho Governor's secretary,
Mrs. T. A. Shorthill of Tacoma, j
who organized at Skagway in j
the late nineties the first W. C. |
| T. U. in Alaska.
The Legislature was advised
this afternoon, of the Gover
nor's approval of the bill, and
also that ho had signed H. B.
Bill 12, the Noon mechanics'
lien law, extending the time for
filing from 30 to 60 days, and
H. B. 13, by Ropresontatlve
Snow, making the 8-hour day
I
GERMANS 1
RETALIATE
ON ENGLISH.
AMSTERDAM. April 13.?The Ger- 0
man government has ofllcially an- 0
nounccd that i:. has Imprisoned 39 t
British officers in reprisal for the ^
treatment of Gorman submarine pris
oners in England. The British ofll- (
cors nro being kept in solitary con- "
flnemenL !l
c
Germany's Explanation.
LONDON, April 13.?The text of a t(
note presented by the German gov- K
ornmcnt to American Ambassador
James W. Gerard today in relation to
the treatment of submarine prisoners i
by Great Britain is contained in a
dispatch received from Berlin today.
It says: j r
"Tho Gorman government nas iearn- i *
cd with astonishment and indignation e
that the British government regards fl
officers and crews of German sub-11
marines as not honorable enemies. '
and accordingly treats them not as' "
other prisoners of war, but as ordin- 1
ary criminals. fi
"These officers and crews acted as
brave men in the discharge of their '
military duties, and therefore, they
are fully entiltlcd to be treated like
other prisoners of war in accordance
with international agreements. The r
German government, therefore, en- 1
tors the strongest protest against the t
measure which is contrary to interna
tional law, and sees itself at the same ]
time regretfully compelled to executo
the reprisals announced by it,.
"Therefore, subject to similar harsh
treatment, a corresponding number of (
English army officers, who are prison- ,
ers of war, have boon placed in soli- ,
tary confinement." ^ 1
HUERTA IS NOT
SEEKING TROUBLE (
NEW YORK, April 13. ? Gen. Vic- ?
toriano Huerta, former dictator Mex- '?
lco. arrived here.last night,, looking in I
tho best of health and in high spirits.
When aslted if his coming has any t
connection with conditions iu Mcki t
co. ho smiled good huraoredly before t
replying. "Not at all," he said. "I'm I
not looking for trouble. I am here on j '
pleasure and business?mostly pleas- j f
ure." He added: "Salute the Amer-j*
lean people for me through the press. \
I have just taken an oath to behave j1
myself while in your country." An
other smile accompanied the last de
claration, which had reference to' his
sworn declaration to tho Immigration f
officers.
Huerta said that he does not expect 1
to leave the United States during his <
American visit, "unless," he added, "it ?
should get too warm, then I might go
to Canada." "I speak of the weather." 5
he finished with another smile.
CARRAN2A ORDERS
37,000,000 CARTRIDGES ?
-4? *
NEW ORLEANS. April 13. Gen. '
Carranzn placed an order with local *
dealers today for 37,000,000 rounds of a
ammunltloh for mnchine and rifle car
tridges. c
# ? ?
GTJGGENHEIMS TO
EXTEND ROAD a
NEW YORK, April 13.?An extended [
article in the Now York Times says: ,
"It was, stated on good nuthorlty ?
yesterday that the Morgan and Gug- ,
genhoim interests would probably ex- ,
tend their line to certain agricultural ,
districts of Alaska within a few years, v
thereby bringing it into competition ,
with the government's railroad to a s
certain extent."
The same article contains an inter
view with George W. Perkins, who is c
interested In the Alaska Syndicate,
who congratulates the President upon
the "splendid choice" ho made in se
lecting the Seward route, and purchas- c
ing the Alaska Northern railroad.
Spcak'ng of the Copper River and
Northwestern railroad in which he is ?
interested he said: t
"That is located too far away, from ^
tho proposed government line to be a
competitor of it, but I believe it is a
better line than the government's
from an industrial standpoint.
"I am not sorry that it was rejected .
by the government, and we will devel
op it, of courso for futuro business.". f
W. R. NELSON DIES
AT KANSAS CITY
KANSAS CIAY, April 13.? William I
Rockhill Nelson, founder and for 35 1
years editor and proprietor of the t
Kansas City Star, died here last [
night, aged 74 years.
W. R. Nelson was born at Fort
Wayne, Ind., March 7, 1841. garduated
by Notre Dame university, and en
tered Journalism. He founded tho c
jWekeni' 'Gallery ?clf,'AA? ausmlfsaiwtx: 4
City, and Yor,mriny"yy?Sft,b''has bcSn^a (
ITALY PREPARES
TO SUBMIT TO
THE INEVITABLE
ROME. April 13.?Indications an
ccummulating that Italy is preparing
o submit to the pressure of publh
pinion and enter the war on the sid<
f the Allies. This morning the Mill
nrv Journal printed an order from th<
Var Department instructing all ofll
crs to dull the color of tho metal or
nlforms and scabbards. This ordci
as never been issued in the past ex
cpt upon the eve of entrance to war
Italy is crowding fier armed forcot
owanl the Austrian frontier wit!
renter rapidity than ever.
CAISER WANTS AUSTRIA
TO YIELD TO ITALV
?
LONDON, April 13.- A SwIhs just
eturncd from Vienna brings nowi
hat the Gcrmnn emperor has in strict
st incognito visited Schonbrunn, am
5 said to have succeeded in inducing
he Austrian emperor to cede tcrri
ory to Italy in return for her contln
cd neutrality. Absolute silence or
he subject is enjoined on Austro-Hun
;arian press.
AUSTRIA ASKS POPE
TO AID IN PEACE
GENEVA. April 13.?It is again re
lortcd in advices received here fron
tome that Austria has asked the Popt
o obtain peace proposals.
ffO THOUGHT OF
PEACE AT BERLIN
?
ROME, April 13. ? Information ii
hits city is that there is absolutcl;
10 basis for the report that poao
tegotiations are being considered a
Berlin. Theso reports. It is said, ar
jased upon Ignorance of the actus
:onditlons in the German Empire.
The assertion is made that bot
."lermans and Austrians, particularl
he former. Kayo within their border
supplies in everything necessary t
>rolong the war indefinitely.
Germans who are well informed an
low in Rome declare that the dctern
nation of the two Empires to carr,
he conflict to the end will become at
inrcnt soon when tho campiagn !
?esumcd with fresh vigor on bot]
ronts, according to plans mapped ou
>y the general staff during the wintei
TALY NOW HAS MARTIAL
LAW IN FULL EFFEC"
?????
ROME, April 13.?Martial law ha
tone Into effect throughout Italy
IVhilo no proclamation may be Issued
he military establishment will tnk
iver all telephone and telegraph linos
md the railroads.
JWEDISH QUEEN RETURNS
TO BERLIN FOR HEALTI
LONDON*. April 13.?Queen Victorii
if Sweden has gone to Dcrlin to Iiv<
vith her mothor. It is said that thi
ormer Is afflicted with incipient tu
icrculosis. the climate of Sweden no
greeing with her.
? ERMANY LOSES IN
BALTIC SUBMARINE WARFARE
?+?
PETROGRAD, April 13. ? The Ger
nans hare suffered heavy losses alonj
heir own coasts by tho loss of a num
icr of transports. In two months thi
lermnns have delivered nine submni
no attacks against the Russians' ii
he Baltic waters, nine of which thi
orpedoes failed to reach their mark
n nine other cases tho submarine!
' ere driven off before they could dc
Ivor any attack, In only one in
tnucc did any attack achieve re
ults.
SCHWAB SAYS KRUPP
GUNS ARE NOT GODC
*1* '
NEW YORK. April 13.?Charles M
Schwab asserts that German nnvn
pins (Krupp) arc "the poorest navn
[tins in existence," and says that Gei
nany must equal Great Britain's flee
o win. Ho rogards the French fleli
coupons the most efllcicnt because o
heir lightness. Asked if "the resui
if this conflict will be another perloi
if commercial competition, culminal
ng in another stupendous struggle?
ic replied: "I'm afraid it will."
'ROPHETESS SAYS GERMANY
WILL BECOME REPUBLIC
PARIS. April 13.?Mme. de Thebes
French prophetess, predicts that thi
European war will end in July, 191S
tnd that Germany will become a rc
mblic.
GERMANY TO.KEEP FERTILIZER
WASHINGTON',' April 13.?Effort
>f the United States government ti
ibtain concessions from Germany
vhlch would permit the importation o
Jerajai) ,ps?tni;h 'fertilizer, havo' failed
. ?Tmany will make no alteration oi
GERMANS
STRIKE AT
: RUSSIANS
, PETROGRAD, April 13. ? A new
. German offensive movement, accom
> par.ied by a renewal of the bombard
. ment of the fortress of Ossowetz, and
i strong infantry attacks has been
? launched from Suwalkl southward to
? ward the Vistula river. Dispatches
? received today recounting the move
ment say that floating fire rafts and
! incendiary bombs have been used in
' connection with the attacks.
Aviators have also circled over the
' Ossowetz, dropping bombs.
Incendiary bombs have been fired
L on Ossowetz, and fire rafts floated
down the Bierbrlsa river against the
v forte. The rafts were sent to the
1 bottom by Russian guno.
> Dispatches from Jadvabno that the
? Germans have delivered several stub
- born attacks against the Russian
i trenches. The attack was preceded by
?ia shower of hand grenades upon the
Slav positions.
Ail the attacks were repulsed with
heavy losses.
Near Suwalki four German guns
and many prisoners were captured
? from the attacking forces.
? INVASION CONTINUES SUCCESS
! FUL.
The Russian invasion of Hungary
is continuing its successful advance.
fl FIGHTING CONTINUES IN WEST.
, LONDON, April 13.?Fighting con
y tinues along the west front, with the
e point of most intense contact still
In 'the region between the Mcuse and
01 Moselle rivers.
1 AUSTRO-GERMAN ARMY
h IS IN FULL RETREAT
y t
"s ROME. April 13.?The Russian em
0 bassy has received a Petrograd dis
patch stating that the Austro-German
,1 army in the Carpathians nnd northern
Hungary is in full retreat.
y
.. GERMANY EXPECTED
sl TO BECOME ACTIVE
ll j
t LONDON. April 13.?Germany Is ex
? j pectcd to make the next move in the
' military field and some big stroke in
the east or west is thought likely be
r fore allies attempt their general spring
advance. According to Petrograd re
s ports the Kaiser is planning a new
campaign to offset the fall of Prze
I, mysl and meet the situation in the
c Dardanelles.
I.
FRANCE FINANCING
SMALLER NATIONS
j PARIS. April 13. ? French Sonatc
has passed a bill, which had already
x passed the Chamber of Deputies, pro
is viding for advancing to Siberia, Bel
ls glum. Greece and Montenegro the sum
. of $270,000,000.
t
BUSINESS CONDITIONS
IN GERMANY SATISFACTORY
1 LONDON. April 13.?Berlin advices
say the business situation iu Germany
?- is fairly satisfactory, although all in
j dustries are running on a restricted
i- scnle, chiefly because of the virtual
2 cessation of overseas exports, hut as
?- a large proportion of skilled workmen
l went into the army the sharp curtail
s meat In production was not attended
c by a corresponding Increaso In un
s employment. Pronounced scarcity of
t- workmen prevails in the Industrial
i- district about Essen. The demand for
- coal is greater than the mines can
meet. The production of pig iron is
about 55 per cent, of last year. Lo
comotive car shops are busy, while
) shipyards arc evidently working on
big government ordors.
1 TO PICTURE HORRORS
1 OF MODERN WAR
t PARIS, April 13. ? The Carnegie
1 Peace Foundation plans taking moving
f pictures of lighting, with Its suffer
t Ing, destruction of property, wounded
1 and prisoners, and atrocities, to ho
;? shown In the United States to instill
" In people the horror of war.
PRIZE FOR DESTROYING
GERMAN ZEPPELIN
1 ?
I'ARIS, April 13,?The Matin has of
i, cred a prize of 23,000 francs ($5000)
o for the first aviator who brings down
>. a zeppelin in Paris intrenched camp.
GERMANY PLANNING
WIDER SUBMARINE FIELD
?$?
LONDON. April 13.? Maximilian
;?> Harden, lecturing In Berlin, says that
r> as soon as Germany has succeeded in
extending the radius of action of the
f four bigger submarine types they can
I. be used for the lavish laying of mines,
a und England's uiaste.ry of the sea will
be at an'end.

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