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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, April 14, 1915, Image 1

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YOL. V., NO. 744. JUNEAU, ALASKA, WEDNESDAY, APRIL .14, 1915. ? PRICE TEN CENTS.
DIVISIONS
WIN fIGHT
fOR MONEY
The divisional road supervisor bill j
passed the House by a vote of 9 to 7'
today, the vote having been taken af
ter the noon recess. The bill provides,
that a road commissioner from each
division, named by the legislature,
shall have jurisdiction to spend ono
fourth of the forest reserve moneys
yielded from the sale of timber and
rent of land in the Third and First di
vision forest reserves.
The vote was as follows:
AyerCoombs. Daly. Day. Driscoll.
Getchell. Noon. Snow, Tansey. Speak
er Collins.
Nay: Britt. Burns. Heckman. Held.
Holland, Moran, Shoup.
In explaining his vote. Representa
tive Moran of the Second division de
clared his division needed the money,
and needed the roads, but. he main
tained. that by every authority thei
First and the Third divisions were en
titled to the money. "I would vote dif
ferently If I thought "the department
intended that the entire Territory
should split the money.' he said.
Governor to Name Counsel.
The House passed a substitute for
the Senate legal counsel resolution, by
a vote of 13 to 3, Shoup. Britt and
Burns voting in the negative. The
amendment takes the appointive pow
er from the judiciary committee and
lodges it with the Governor, after the
Legislature adjourns. It empowers.
the Governor to appoint one or more
attorneys to represent the Territory,
when legal representation for enforce!
ment of Territorial laws is necessary.
The resolut on now goes back to the
Senate.
The "16-year-old actor bill' was Kill
cd. by Indefinite postponement. The I
opposition to the measure maintained ?.:
that the councils should govern the!;
question, without appeal to the Legis-'
lature. The vote was as follows: ! i
To Postpone bill: Coombs, Daly.i;
Driscoll. Getchell. Heckman, Holland. .
Moran, Noon. Snow. Tansey, Speaker!]
Collins. ;
Against Postponement: Britt. Held.
Burns, Shoup.
The measure would have made it
unlawful for children under 16 to
appear in theatrical productions, or
in moving picture shows.
JACKLING STOCKS
SHOW BIG GAIN
NEW YORK. April 14.?Alaska Gold!
closed today at 36; Utah Copper at
64%. Other Jackllng stocks showed
tremendous gains. Cbino closing at.
44%; and Ray at 22%. This is a rec
ord for Utah Copper.
FIRE DRILLS PREVENTED
GREAT LOSS OF LIFE
CHICAGO. April 14.?Serious loss
of life was prevented at the fire which
yesterday destroyed the portion of the
State insane asylum at Dunning, north
west of Chicago, in which the convel
escent patients were kept by the fire
drills that the patients were put
through at regular intervals.
Warned by previous blazes, the au-j
thorities had trained the inmates in
many fire drills, so that each patient j
knew instantly what to do. Notwith
standing that the blaze had enveloped
a large part of the building before;
the alarm was given, and that the
whole structure was a seething fur-;
nace in a few minutes, the inmates'
were marched out. saving many of
their personal effects, and there was
not a single casualty.
FOOT AND MOUTH DISEASE
COMPLETELY STAMPED OUT
WASHINGTON. April 14.?Federal
oflfcers in charge of the foot anu
mouth campaign announce that the
disease has been stamped out. More
than 124,000 animals have been
slaughtered in the United States.
MORGAN LIBRARY MAY
NOT BE SOLO AT ALL
NEW YORK. April 14.?The New'
York Times says that the Morgan Li
brary is not to be given to the public
or sold, but is to be retained by the
present owner. J. P. Morgan.
MUST CONSERVE CAKE
IN GERMAN CAPITAL
COPENHAGEN. April 14. ? The
mayor of Berlin has issued a warning
to people that they must use less cake.;
Permission to use flour in cake* does!
not Involve the right to ano^ake itself
without restriction. !
?> <S> ? ?> t *> <?
WEATHER TODAY *
<? Maximum?43. <
? Minimum?36. +?'
? Rainfall?.60 in. ?
?> Cloudy. +!
HONORFOR
A.GSHOUP
IN HOUSE
After he had been "chased"', from
the Hojse by request of R0pre3en.tr...
tive Drlscoll, Representative A. G.
Shoup of Sitka, superintendent of the
Pioneers' Home, was given the thanks
of the people of Alaska, for faithfully
serving the Territory as superintend
ent of the Home, without compensa
tion, in a concurrent resolution which
Mr. Drlscoll -introduced. The resolu
tion was passed unanimously, and
when Mr. Shoup returned from hl3 ex
ile he learned of the compllmont that
had been paid him. The House want
ed to relmbur8C-him for his services
at Sitka, but under the law authoriz
ing the Pioneers' Home this power is
withheld, as Mr. Shoup was a member
of the First Legislature, which estab
lished the Institution. The resolution
unstintedly praises the efforts of the
superintendent in connection with his
unselfish service.
Six Measures Recommended.
The House committee on public
health recommended for passage the
Tansey pure food bill, providing food
inspectors for Alaska, and giving them
power to condemn food in restau
rants, etc.
Bills recommended for passage, by
the Senate today, were as follows:
S. B. 46. Sulzer, abolishing capital
punishment.
S. B. 48. education committee, de
nouncing unnatural crimes.
H. B. 50. judiciary committee, local j
government for native villages.
H. B. 44, Sboup, incorporation of;
second class cities.
ti. J. m. t, Mouana, wnaarawing ov
rod strip reservations.
S. B. 44. uniform schools, went to
the daily file for consideration Satur
day. House Concurrent Resolution 8.
t>y the ways and means committee, and
relating to legal counsel, tabled, sub
ject to recall.
The judiciary committee of the Son
ne recommended for passage S. B.
18, regarding the choosing of jurors.
\ public hearing on tho measure was
held and Judge Jennings. U. S. At
;orney Sinlser and Attorney John Rust
gard, who appeared, endorsed the bill.
Last Measures Filed.
Thirty-three new measures were in
troduced in the legislature today. It
was the last day for the introduction
of measures, unless by two-thirds con
sent of either house.
H. B. 80. Holland, an act to compel
road houses and boarding house keep
ers outside of incorporated cities to
keep a register of the names of all
travelers patronizing their place of
business, and providing penalties for
violation.
H. 3. 81. Driscoll. an act creating
the office of attorney general and pre
scribing his duties.
H. B. S2, by the committee on elec
tions. an act providing for the filling
(Continued on Page 3.)
DOCTOR'S BILL
IS TURNED DOWN
??
The Aldrich "name your own doctor"
bill, on which a public hearing was
held last night, received a setback
this morning when the committee re
ported the bill back to the Senate
with the recommendation that the bill
be indefinitely postponed. The report
was concurred in by Chairman Millard
and Senators Sulezr and Gaustad.
Senator Aldrich dissented to the re
port, and the matter will be threshed
out finally, Friday.
AMERICAN BANKERS
TO LEND TO EUROPE
?h?
NEW YORK, April 14.?As a result
of conferences among New York bank
ers. it Is expected that French credit,
perhaps, as large as J50.000.000, will
be arranged, followed by an English!
credit twice as large, a loan to Rus
sia projected in addition to J25.000.000
recently obtained and a possible cred
it to Italy.
LONDON NEWSPAPERS
ATTACK ASQUITH
LONDON. April 14. ? Premier Aa
quith is being bitterly attacked by his
own party press for alleged lack of vi
gor and foresight In the direction of
the war.
CLEVELAND TRIES TO
COMPROMISE WITH JOHN D
CLEVELAND. April 14.?The Cleve
land tax commissioners plan on wip
ing out John D. Rockefeller's S311.
000.000 personal property tax on the
grounds that it Is unreasonable and
they may invite him to go over the
situation to arrive at reasonable as
sessment."
If you want to meet your friends,
go to the "Roof Garden" Friday night.
PRESIDENT TO
INVE:
ALMA COAL
WASHINGTON, April 14. ? The
Presldont and Cabinet discusaod all
phases or tho Alaska coal question
with reference to supplying the navy,
yesterday, and it was decidod to make
a thorough investigation of all districts
in Alaska. It was also agreed that all
suitable coal fields should bo made
available for use at the oarliest posal
bio. date.
May Open Bering'Field.
WASHINGTON, April 14. ? That
tho government oxpects to tako stops
that will make tho Bering coal fields
available for development as woll as
the Matanuska fields is indicated by
tho fact that it was announced yoster
day evening that tho Alaska railroad
engineering commission will survey
routes to It both from Mile 38 on the
Copper River and Northwestern rail
road and from Controller Bay.
Work to bo Crowded Wintor
and Summer.
W. C. Edes, chairman of the engin
eering commission yesterday said that
the work on the government road from
Seward inland will be crowded winter
and summer. In the wintor time rock
work will be done.
Buying Immense Quantities of Sup*
piles.
| SEATTLE, April 14. ? The Alaska
road commission is purchasing enorm
i ous quantities of supplies for use on
I railroad constructoln in Alaska, and
jan immense tonnage will shortly be
gin moving from Seattle to Ship crcok,
? which will be tho base from which op
erations will be prosecuted.
Two Great Seaports for Alaska
Trade.
SEATTLE, April it.?in an euitor
ial under the heading:, "Cordova Too,"
after quoting parts of the Georgo W.
Perkins Interview in the New York
Times, says:
"It means that Alaska will have two
great seaports for the handling or
through buslnoss to the Interior, and
two great forces of development will
work concurrently in the upbuilding
of the rich northern Territory."
BRITISH TRAWLERS
IN NORTHERN WATERS
SEWARD. April 14. ? The United
States coast guard cutter Manning ar
rived here yesterday, and roports see
ing two British trawlers of the Brit
ish North sea fleet In tho waters of
the Gulf of Alaska. Thoy wore Ashing
beyond the three-mile limit.
TAFT AND ROOSEVELT
SERVE AS PALLBEARERS
NEW HAVEN, April 14. ? Former
Presidents William Howard Taft and
Theodore Roosevelt attended as hon
orary pallbearers at the funeral of
Thomas R. Lounsbery, professor em
eritus of English at Yale university.
ALLIES TRY TO UNITE
LITTLE BALKAN NATIONS
NE WYORK. April 14.?A London
special says last Sunday was devoted
to labors of the diplomatists of the
Allied nations in an effort to bring
about the reorganlation of tho Balkan
league and to insure tho alignment
of Italy and tho Balkan states with
the Allies.
I AMERICAN AUTHORITY
SAYS GERMANY OVERMATCHED
WASHINGTON, April 14. ? United
Statos Navy Year Book shows, that
; naval strength of the Allios Is 4,992,
1755 tons, compared with 1,654,085 for
tho Teutonic allios, or a superiority of
! 3,338,670 tons.
? ? ?
[MINNESOTA REFUSES
TO RAISE R. R. RATES
j ST. PAUL, Minn., April 14.?A bill
increasing intrastate passenger rates
In Minnesota from two to 2% cents
per mile has been killed in the Minne
sota Senate.
?+??+?????????
?> ?
? PRESIDENT MAKES *
? LINCOLN HOLIDAY +
??? ?
?> President Woodrow Wilson *
? yesterday signed an order that *
+ makes tomorrow ? Afcrll 15? '4
? a national memorial day. Gov- 4
? ernmont offices have been or- ?{?
+ dered closed. Tho cable offices *
4* will bo closed except for one 4
+ hour between 11 a. m. and 12. *
?S? The Legislature will not hold 4
+ sessions tomorrow. 4
? NO EMPIRE TOMORROW. 4
4 On account of the closing of 4
4 the cable office there will be no *
4 issue of The Empire tomorrow. 4
? It will be issued as usual' FrI- 4
4* day evening. 4
4 4
V
IN B E
WASHINGTON. April 14?Terrific ,
lighting is in progress today at Cala- J
ya. Mexico, and the fortunes of wnrjj
are running Btrongly in favor of Gen.! t
Villa, according to consular reports rc-, ]
celvod at tho State Dopartment, which; (
say that at least 45,000 men aro en-jj
gaged.
The fighting line extends from Ca- j
laya to Querctaro thence to Lagrioga. (
The reports to the State Dopartment ,
say that two of Gen. Obregon's com-: J
mandcrs havo been surrounded, and {
that the retreat to the south is cut'off. j (
Reports from Villa headquarters say | (
that Villa is personally directing the ,
battle, and that ho plans to destroy
the enemy.
Ulnted States After Refugees. ,
Tho Unitod States transport Sumner
sailed today from Galveston to Tampl- ,
co where she will receive 300-Anicri-J,
can refugees who dcslro to return to!'
the Unitod States.
FUNSTON TAKES
PERSONAL COMMAND .
WASHINGTON, April 14. ? MaJ.- J
Gen. Funston is enroUte today from
San Antonio to Brownsville, Tex., to ,
take personal chargo of the situation ,
there, which haa again become threat- ]
ening. ,
A sortlo of the Carranzlstas yester- [
day compelled the Villlstas to with-;,
draw their lines a greater distance ,
from Matamoras.
Tho main forces of Gen. Villa and ,
Gen. Carranza remain within striking
distance with each other in Centra! .
Mexico, and an early engagement it; !
expected.
NOMFS DOGS
:
SPR?RACEj;
NOME, April 14.?All Nome turned j 1
out this morning to witness the start I
of tho great Alt Alaska Sweepstakes
dog race, which got away to a good 1
start when Queen ConBtancc ;hy a 1
wave of a flag sent the teams away :
on the long 408-mile journey to Candle *
and return.
The race started at 9 o'clock, and j
that hour marks tho beginning oi the
time for all the teams. At 11 o'clock 1
all tho drivers had passed. Cape Nome
except Scppala. Kjcgstad was load- 1
Ing tho string.
Heavy snow is falling at Timber. It '
is cloudy at Council and clear at Can- '
die. 1
Ayrcs* Team Doesn't Start. 1
Fred Ayres' team took sick yester- :
day, and was unablo to enter tho race.
His entry looked like a winnor.
Tho entries are: '
Dr. Kittilscn, Alex llolmson, driver; '
Council Kennel Club, Eskimo John !1
driver; Paul Kjegstad, self driver; Al-i ?
Ian and Darling, Allan driver; Leon-'
ard Scppala, self driver.
"Scotty" Allan and Sepalla are the '
favorites in the betting.
I
Allan Takes Lead.
NOME, April 14.? "Scotty" Allan
arrived at Solomon at 12:41 p. m?
leading all entries, which are close be- 1
hind him. Scotty's time is 28 minutes '
behind last year's time to Solomon. :
INTERVIEW WITH
PRINCE RUPPRECHT i
: 1 ?
?? i
BERLIN, April 14.?"We arc on the "
way to ovorlook and forget our ma- I
terial losses in the thought that^ttio,
great future of the German Emp^c 'i
will make amends for them," pays
Crown Princo Jtupprecht of Bavaria
in an interview given to Ludwig Gang- .
hofor, the noted Gorman writer. Tho ]
Prince made it clear that Bavarians t
as woll as Prussians regard. England' 1
as their great foe.
30,000 WOMEN WANT
s . TO HELP IN WAR
LONDON.-April .14.?Thirty thouis- "i
and women have registered them
selves for special services for the goy- i
ornmcnt. Six thousand of them-have
agreed to take the places of men work- I
ins In the armament, factories, for the
purpose of Increasing tko output and J
also to enable men so engaged to go
to the front
RUSSIAN "HOOTCH" MAKERS
KILLED IN EXPLOSION
PETHOGRAD, April 14. ? Fifteen
were killed by an explosion in an illi
cit alcohol distillery, at Volkhove.
Mike Sullivan left. Qn...,th$,?cffer$on
today for Seattle, -.e io\ -,-nhot1
Mr. and Mrs. G. A. Rounsfel left on
the Jefferson today for Ketchikan.
[XPERT ROME
SAYS WAR WILL
BE PROLONGED
ROME. April 13.?Expert Homo has
Ibandoned all hope for'an early peace
ind expects the war to be continued
for not less than two more seasons un
less moro nations enter the conflict
toan are now ongnged. As the larg
3st and most accessible neutral capi
tal In Europe where all the belliger
ent nations have embassies to the Ital
ian court, representatives to the Vatic
in and a host of military experts of
both the army ami navy, alul finan
:ial representatives and secret service
jystcms, Rome has been a theatre for
Making estimates as to the preparcd
1CS8 of the warring nations to con
:lnue the war, and as to the probablll
;ics of early peace. Interest In these
topics has been added to by the clr
mmstanco that the Italian govern- j
nent is being pressed to enter the war
jy the people of Italy.
It is In such surroundings that the!
)olicf in a prolonged war has been
irrived at. Roman newspapers have :
?cached the conclusion that peace
will not como this year because olj
.he conviction of the preparedness of
Hermany to continue the conflict for
in indefinite poriod, and because of
toe further conviction that Germany
b determined to fight until the bitter
3nd. The newspapers have canvassed
too situation among the reprcsenta
Ives of all the countries, and they
lave beon given access to the data on
tola subject that lias been collected
ly the Italian government, and the
lonviction is practically unanimous
hat not only peace is not In sight, i
Jut that the beginning of the end is j
ret a long distance away:
It is stated with all the emphasis of j
in ascertained fact that Germany is j
imply prcpnrod with war matorinl and j
:hat she is soundly financed. It 1b j
ilso stated, with equal emphasis, that:
ihe is supplied with food supplies and :
the capacity to produce them, and
with raw material for a continuation
of the manufacture of ammunition and
other necessary items for the conduct
of the wjuv German -confidence .In
German ability lias hot been dimmed
by the failure to accomplish in ac
cordance with previous expectations,
ind the Emperor is still loyally sup
ported.
The opinion seems to bo that evon
:ually the war must end in the "de
tent of Germany and Austria, but itj
Is thought that unless Italy enters'
Lho conflict there will be at least two]
more summer campaigns before the!
break that will lead to an early col- j
lapse of the German defense must;
lome.
Thfc condition is causing the people
jf Italy to think soberly about the ad
visability of their Country's entering
Into, a long war. It is admitted that
the war sentiment has been fostered
largely by the argument that Italy's
entrance into the conflict would cause
i/iuiek termination of hostilities.
Tfowever, it is also apparcntthat the
largo majority of the people of tlje
country, and a smaller majority of the
newspapers still favor war, and that
:bo declaration of war by Italy against
\ustria and Germany would -create
ureroendous enthusiasm throughout
ill sections and all classes in the
country.
ITALY CONSENTS TO
OUTLET FOR SERBIA
LONDON, April 14. ? The London
Mall's Route correspondent yesterday
.vired tho Mail that Italy luis agrocd
it the solicitation of the Entente pow
ers to . support Serbia's claims to an
cutlel to the Adriatic. Serbia's de
mand contomplatcs acquisition of tjy
$tory at Bosnia and Dalmatlu or
Croatia, all three of them Austrian
lying north of Montenegro.
AUSTRIA AND GERMANY
UNITED UNTIL END
VJENNA, April 14.?Declaring re
ports of Austria attempting to mako
separate peace with Russia were pub
lished in an effort to caiue ill feeling
between the Teutonic allien, tho offic
ial Austrian news bureau says:
"Austria and Germunysarc united in
this war for their common defence.
They will not make peace separately, i
anil there will bo no peace until we
have made ourselves secure from fu-1
ture attacks."
Emperor Francis Joseph has con
ferred on Enver Pasha, tho Turkish
minister of war, the decoration of the
Order of Military Merit, first class,
and upon Admiral von Morton, com
mandant at the Dardanelles, the dec
oration of the samo order,, second
class.
GERMAN LOSSES HEAVY
IN CHAMPAGNE REGION
LONDON, April 14.?The Frencfi
have already hurled 11,000 dead taken
from the captured trenches' in the
German losses, including tin1 wounded
and prisoners, are' estimated at 50,
WAR IN
EAST IS
CENTER
LONDON, April .14?'The struggle
for the last Carpathian passes to re- ]
main in the hands or the Germanic al- '
lies stni holds the center of war stage. <
The Importance of the series of llrcc
battles that are being waged along
the eastern front from B^rtfeld to Bu- '
kowina is fuly recognized. The activ- '
itfes in other fielda appear to be of
relatively minor importance, though .
there is fierce fighting In the Nieman
and Suwalkl regions of North Poland.
Fighting South of Dukla Pass.
Dispatches from Petrograd declare
that fighting is in progress more than
14 miles south of Dulco plass, which i
would indicate that there has been a |
considerable Russian advance into 1
Hungary.
Offensive Relaxes.
The German offensive movement ,
against Ossowetz has relaxedin its fe
rocity.
The Russians have repulsed German
attacks in tho Nieman river district. J
Quiet in Western Theatre. ,
While fighting has beon In progress (
in the western theatre in tho Woevre
district until nearly noon yesterday,
generally Bpeaking there has been
comparatively little activity for the
last two or three days, beyond a con
solidation of positions preparatory to
another effort to oust the Germans
from St. Mihlcl.
German Ships In North Sea.
Rumors persist that German war
ships have been seen each day cruis
ing in the northern waters of tho
North sea near the Norwegian coast
The British admiralty refuses to make
any comment on the rumors.
Increased Activity at Dardanelles.
There has been increased activity
j noted for the last two days at the
Dardanelles. Dispatches from Athens
' :-ay that the allied fleet bombarded
I now defenses that have been erected
I on the site of some of the destroyed
forts, and silenced the guns there this
! morning.
I
Tdrko Claim Victory,
CONSTANTINOPLE, April 14. ?
The war ofllce announced this" evening
that the enemy patrol at the oxlt of
| the Dardanelles unsuccessfully bom- J
barded 'the new batteries that have
been erected at near the mouth of the
Dardanelles.
FRENCH TRY TO
POISON GERMANS
BERLIN, April 14. ? The German
war ofllcc announced this afternoon
that the French, operating northwest
of Verdun, last night employed again
st the German lines a bomb develop
ing a yellowish smoke and asphyxiat
ing gasses.
The announcement continued:
"In the western theatre an at
tempt was made by the enemy to ad
vance last night at Berry Aubac, but
it failed.
"Between the Mcusc and the Mos
elle, lighting continues, but with less
fury.
"Pouring a strong French attack
against our Malzory-Marchcvillc front
the French penetrated our positions
on one narrow section at Marchc
ville, but they were speedily driven
out by counter attacks."
FRENCH BRING DOWN
GERMAN AEROPLANES
PARIS, April 14.?The War Ofllce
announced this afternoon that lighting
censed yesterday in the Woevre region
boforc noon, and that quiet has pre
vailed since then throughout tho west
ern theatre of war. The. announce- '
ment continued:
'U\ German Zeppelin and aeroplanes!
threw bombs down on Baillcul, the
object being our aviation ground, but
this was not hit. Three civilians were
killed, and two German aeroplanes
wore brought down-within our lines.
A third German flying machine was
winged by the fire of our advance
posts, and fell near Orncs. One of
the aviators was hit by a bullet."
r t t
ITALY WILL DELAY
ENTRANCE TO WAR
[ NEW YORK. April 14.?Rome cor-:
I respondent of New York Times says: i
"In spite of undoubted failure of
j Prince Buclows negotiations, I am in
formed that Italy's intervention, al
though practically decided upon, is not
Imminent and is not likely to take
place boforo the end of April, since
in the meantime'things may happen
which riiay alter the situation and ren
der possible the realization of Italy's
aspirations without.' war.
AMERICANS GET
ANOTHER BIG ORDER
j?W NfiWK ^YORK,v4PTiL. ^^jwcliaslng
agents of the British government' have
j awarded contract -for over 1,000,000
burlap bags to a Now York concern.
AUSTRIANS
LOSE BIG
BATTLE
LEMBERG, Gallcla, April 14.?In a
desperate attack of the Russians on
the right flank of the Austrian posi
tion at Mezolaboroz, on the Hungarian
side of the East Beskid mountains,
and about 50 miles south of Presemysl,
the Austrlans were forced, after 12
hours battle, to make a precipitate re
treat.
The whole main crest in this region
which the Austrians considered to be
impregnable, is now in Russian hands.
The Russians have undisputed pos
session of three of the Important Car
pathian passes, and are now sending
troops through Uszok pass into the
Beskio mountain sections, the crest
and upper Hungarian slopes of which
are held by the Russians.
FIGHTING UNDER DIFFICULTIES.
Petrograd, April 14. ? It was an
nounced today that entire companies
of Russians perished Saturday in the
Carapathian mountain region by
marching off precipices which were
masked by snow. The men and their
guns were hurled into space as they
pressed forward in the wake of the
retreating Austrians into a desperate
struggle for a branch of the Uszok
pass. This brief mention serving to
Illustrate the difficulties encountered
in mountain fighting was received
here in the dispatches from the front
today.
STATE OF SIEGE
ON IN AUSTRIA
ROME, April 14.?A dispatch from
Trent, telegraphed from the frontier^
to the Idea Nazlonales, quotes an of
ficial who has just returned from Vien
na as authority for the statement that
a state of siege will probably be pro
claimed soon in Austria, because of
the unrest that 13 resulting from- the
Russian advance across the Cara
pathians Into Hungary.
The same authority says that weal
thy Hungarians are making hasty pre
parations for flight.
Austria Makes Promise to Italy.
The Idea Nazionales correspondent
says he has learned from the same
source that Emperor Francis Joseph
has decided to acceed to the urgent
requests of Germany to offer to cede
to Italy the so-called "Italian pro
vinces," including Fiumc, but only on
condition that Italy will join with Aus
tria and Germany in prosecuting the
war against the Triple Entente.
This part of the report is believed
in Rome to be without foundation, be
cause It is known in Vienna and Ber
lin that a condition that would ask
for more than neutrality from Italy
would be a waste of time.
DARDANELLES FORTS
SAFE AGAINST ATTACK
BERLIN, April 14.?More than 30,
000 troops have been lnnde<l by the
Allies on the island of Lemnos, in the
preparation Tor a new attack on the
Dardanelles, according to a dispatch
received from Athens Monday. Any
possible doubts as to the ability of 4
the Dardanelles forts to withstand the
attacks of the Anglo-French fleet were
removed by dispatches from Constan
tinople.
Official Turkish advices indicate
that the Allies have lost the advant
age gained by their early success at
the entrance of the Dardanelles, now
guns having _ been mounted in the
shore forts, and the mine sweepers
driven out, one being sunk and oth
cds damaged.
Russia's bombardment, of the Bos
phorus forts was a failure, as was
also its attack on the Eregli coaling
ports.
The "nine ships" sunk on the Ereg
li coast wore coal bargere and the coal
ing of vessels is going on as usual.
The Turks sunk tahc Russian ships
Provident, 2000 tons, and Vastochnja,
1500 tons. Their crews were taken
prisoners.
'CERMANS ACTIVE IN BALTii;
"COPENHAGEN, April 14.? Largo
German dreadnaughts are showing
great activity in the Baltic, according
to dispatches from Stockholm, and re
newed attacks on the Russian coast
towns arc expected.
WATCHING BULGARIA
ROME, April 14.?Bulgaria Is be
ing closely watched by all the powers,
especially Greece and Italy, whose fu
ture policy will undoubtdely be in
fluenced by any action Bulgaria may
take.
BRITISH PARLIAMENT- MEETS.
LONDON, April 14?The British par
liament reassembled today.

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