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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, April 19, 1915, Image 1

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VOL. V., NO. 747. /t"7 \ JUNEAU, ALASKA, MONDAY, APRIL .19, 1915. . PRICE TEN CENTS.
RAILROAD !
BUILDERS
GO WEST|
Bringing the first engineers who i
will be allied with the construction
of Alaska's $35,000,000 railroad, and
with every inch of her passenger space;
taken by stampeders from the States,
from Juneau, and many other Alas
kan ports, the steamship Admiral Ev-|
ans arrived in Juneau this morning
and will continue on her way to Knik
Anchorage late this afternoon.
The vanguard of the railroad com
mission is led by C. R. Breck. who,
with nfn_ men will make things ready J
at Ship Creek for tho arrival of a
larger party coming on the Mariposa j
which left Seattle last night. The Ev
ans has 175 tons of freight aboard for:
the commission, and this will be taken;
care of by the Breck party.
The Evans has 2S1 passengers on!
board for Westward points, having
sold out the Juneau space early yes?<
terday. On her passenger list. 58 sec
ond class were aboard from Seattle
for Seward. 37 for Knik Anchorage,
and Juneau contributed 49. mostly sec-:
ond class.
C. G. Jones, a member of the con-|
structlon force on the Panama canal, j
is a member of the Brock party.
Among tho business people aboard
are Mr. and Mrs. H. S. Young of Seat
tle. who will start a mercantile busi
ness people aboard are Mr. and Mrs.
H. S. Young of Seattle, who will start
a mercantile business near the rail
road base. Captain J. E. Peterson, who
is to operate a government launch on
Ship Creek, and August Buschmann.
a Southeastern Alaska cannervman,
who has a construction crew which
will erect a one-line salmon cannery
at Goose Bay,
Capt. E. A. Swift, a Paget Sound
steamboat man. who was also aboard
the Evans, will act as pilot again this;
summer on the government boat Chu-!
lltna. which will operate on Cook's In-!
let and up the Susitna river for about;
143 miles. William Eglund was re-j
turning also to take cnarge of the i
Chulitna's engine room.
Passengers for Juneau included 1
James L. Freeburn. H. J. Lee. Mr. and j
Mrs. Fred Amdor and Mrs. H. Brown
and child.
Passengers leaving Juneau on the
Evans will be T. R. Xeedham, M. S.
Parker. Jesse C. Bullock. Mrs. K. J.
McLean. Mrs. J. Gibson. Mrs. E. S.
Hewitt. Miss S. Seuda. J. Hooper and
Carl Stockwell. Thirty second class
passengers from Juneau and ten from
Douglas left on the Evans for the
Westward.
Mears On Way
SEATTLE. April 13? Lieut. Freder
ick Mean*, of the Alaska railroad en
gineering commission, is at the head
of a government railroad engineering
crowd of 50 which sailed on the Mari
posa last night for Knik. The Mari
posa has 90 passengers for Knik and
90 for Seward. Among her passen-j
gers for Juneau were the following:
J. Wulzen and wife. John Anderson.;
Andrew Sigdberg. Mrs. E. Miller. U.
A. Gates. J. S. Lowry. C. L. Coroy, Miss
O. Brooks and throe steerage.
400 on City of Seattle.
The City of Seattle, also sailing for
Alaska last night, has 400 passengers,
including cannery crews for Hawk In
let and Chatham. Among her Juneau
passengers are the following:
Mike Frui. John Mlchels. J. J. Mc
Mylberg. M. Thorp and wife. A. D.
Hartwell, R. F. Craft. G. W. Wilson
and wife. Simon Gusavich and two
steerage.
Purchasing Agent At Seattle
SEATTLE. April 19.?C. E. Dole, the
newly appointed purchasing agent for
the Alaska railroad engineering com
mission. arrived here yesterday from
r&numa. where he had gone to inspect
the canal equipment for the commis
sioa.
LABORERS WARNED* TO
STAY AWAY FROM ALASKA
WASHINGTON*. April 19?Senator,
Wesley L. Jones, of Washington. Sat
urday gave out a letter received from j
Chairman W. S. Edes. of the Alaska;
railroad engineering commission, in I
which the latter warned laboring men |
against rushing to Aluska with the j
hope in view of securing work on the;
railroad.
NEW YORK CONGRESSMAN
INSPECTS SEATTLE CANAL
SEATTLE. April 19.?Congressman
J. J. Fitzgerald, of New York, chair
man of the House appropriations com
mittee. is here inspecting the Lake
Washington canal.
?> "C? ??? + *!? -J- -I- v ?> -I- v v *> v I
<? WEATHER TODAY <?
Miximum?54. *
<- Minimum?31. *
-> ? -> + ?> +
ASSEMBLY
WORKING
WITH VIM
The legal counsel question was set
tled in the Legislature today. By an
agreement reached In conference. It
was recommended that the original
House substitute prevail, giving the
Governor the power to appoint legal
counsel after adjournment. The Sen
ate had amended the House substitute
but by the conference report, the Sen
ate is asked to recede.
The House concurred in the exerap-;
tion of women from payment of poll I
taxes, as provided in the bill relating j
to the incorporation of second-class;
cities, and the bill providing local self-!
government for Indian villages.
Representative Snow's bill making
the 8-hour day extend to all work
around mines, and to stores, laundries
hotels, etc.. was the subjoct of a di-;
vided committee's report. Represen
tatives Held and Getchell. of the la-1
bor committee, favoring the striking
out of all reference to mines, and j
Representatives Daly Snow and Brltt
concurring in the mining reference
contained in the bill.
H. J. Mi 10. asking the attorney-gen
eral to issue an order reducing the
fees for filing mining records in A1-:
asks, was recommended.
"uivorce our r\noc*cu uut.
H. B. SS. prescribing new grounds
for divorce, was killed, by indefinite
postponmeot. Mr. Coombs and Mr.!
Day voting in the negative.
With less than two weeks of offic
ial life remaining, the Second Alaska
legislative assembly is to put in full
unio:. hours from now on. with occas
ional overtime work at night. The
legislature will adjourn April 29.
Th" past week has been one of ac
complishment In both houses, and a
larg- number of measures have been,
acted upon. There remain, however,
for tidal disposal, a number of the
moel important measures before the
assembly, as well, as more than fifty j1
billr of a slight additional or correct- ?'
ive feature to the laws. Chief of the :
important measures yet to be finally '
acted on are the revenue measures. '
the attorney-general question, the
workmens' compensation and the elec
tion measures. The lattor bill was
passed by the House, but widely
amended in the Senate. The school
bills are before both houses.
The lien bill is to be sent back to
the Senate, if the conference commit
tee tails to agree to the amendments;
attached in the upper House.
Four Measures Killed
The Senate's sharp axe fell on three
of Representative Britt's bills today, J
by indefinitely postponing the phar
macy measure, the optometry measure
and the medical bill. Strong objection
was raised to all three measures. The i
law passed in 1913 by the First Leg
islature. creating the Board of Uniform
Law Commissioners, also will be guil
lotincd, it was indicated toaav, wnen >
the committee recommended for pas
sage Senate Bill 39, by Senator Al
drich. repealing the law.
Senator Millard, of Valdez. who pro
posed to amend the law by providing
that no money be paid to any member
of the commission for expenses, ex
cept as appropriated by the Legisla
ture. declared that the efforts to re
peal the law had been promoted by
"some jealous lawyers." Senator Al
drich told the Senate that his inspira
tlon for writing the repeal bill came
after he had read the expense account i
handed in by Judge R. A. Gunnison, a i
member of the commission, who made
a trip to Washington to attend the
Uniform Law convention. The Senate I
voted to repeal the law. Senator Mil
lard dissenting.
The Senate recommended the pas
sage of the Britt memorial asking that
the Legislature be given control over
the Alaska Fund, and the dental meas
ure was also favored, by the public
health committee. Chaplain Renison,
of the House, and Chaplain Stevens,
of the Senate, will be paid $100 each
for their services during the session,
the Governor having signed the reso
lution appropriating $200 for the pur
pose.
Compensation Act Hearing
The capital and labor committees
of the Senate and House will hold a
public hearing on the workmen's com
pensation bills tonight, in the House,
at 5t o'clock. The public is invited to
give its views on the measure.
Senator McGann's bill to sure the
professional juror evil was favored for
passage but laid over until tomorrow.
The Aldrich "medical and hospital fee"
bill went over to Wednesday. The
committee has filed an adverse report
on the bill, and it is believed the
measure will be killed by indefinitee
postponment.
By unanimous vote the Senate roc
ommended for passage Senator Sui
ter's memorial asking the Alaska road
commission to spend $50,000 of the
$330,000 available this year, for roads
in the First Division. Senator Sulzcr
(Continued on page 6.)
BUSINESS BOOM
CONTINUES TO
GAIN JJEADWAY
NEW YORK. April ID?The advance
in American industrial and railway
stocks continues, and there is no In
dication of a slackening among the
buyers. There was another sharp ad
vance Saturday, and today witnessod
still furthor advances.
JACKLING STOCKS MAKING
NEW RECORDS IN MARKET
Among the stocks to share in the
improved market condition are those
of the so-called Jackliug properties.
Alusku Gold closed today at 37%:
Utah Copper at 65; Chino at 44 and
Ray at 22%.
Many Improvements Planned
The ready market for stocks and
bonds is resulting in plans for great
quantities of* construction work and
improvements on ttye part of railroads
and industrial companies. While tho
immense orders from Europe are cred
ited with being tho direct cause for
the sharp advance Friday and Satur
day, the continued advance and heavy
buying are sustained by tho big orders
for steel and equipment that are be
ing placed by railroads.
NEW .YORK ACTRESS
KILLS SELF IN SEATTLE
SEATTLE. April 19.?Mrs. J. P. Der
ry. a New York actress known on the
stage as June Fields, committed sui
cide by shooting herself at the fash
ionable Chelsa hotel in this city yes
terday. Her husband is a New York
business man.
SEATTLE REAL ESTATE
DEALER ASPHYXIATED'
SEATTLE, April 19.?John R. Fos-j,
ter. a prominent Seattle real estate j
dealer, was accidentally asphyxiated
by leaking gas yesterday.
RUSSIA PLACES BIG
ORDER FOR SHOES
} |?
BOSTON, April 19. ? A large Bos
ton shoo concern has Just taken a con- <
tract for close to 1,500,000 pairs ofi
shoes for the Russian army. This bigi
arder in connection with the com- '
pany's domestic business which has
been showing improvement will keep
Its factories operating at capacity for
several months. i
TERRE HAUTE MAYOR
IS AT PENITENTIARY j
LEAVENWORTH. Kan.. April 19.? jj
Mayor Roberts, of Terrc Haute. Ind..
and 14 others arrived here today to (
serve terms in the penitentiary. \
FORMER SEATTLE JUDGE
DYING IN SEATTLE
A
SEATTLE, April 19.?Former Su
perior Court Judge J. W. Langley. of,
this city, is reported to be dying this i
afternoon.
CARPENTERS OFFER TO
ARBITRATE DIFFERENCES
CHICAGO, April 19?John A. Metz.
president of the carpenter's union,
Saturday offered to arbitrate their dif
ferences with the contractors and;
builders of Chicago without reference;
to the other trades involved in the;
strike at this place.
RAILROADS STILL
ORDERING RAILS
PITTSBURGH. Pa.. April 19.?The
Erie Railroad has ordered 35,000 tons
of rails, of which 21,000 will be rolled
by the Steel Corporations. The total
rail orders booked this month arc
267,000 tons.
SEATTLE TIMES APOLOGIZES
TO FORMER CONGRESSMAN
?$?
SEATTLE, April 19.?The suit of
former Congressman J. W. Bryan
against the Seattle Times for damages
for alleged libel was settled today by
the Times' paying Bryan $10 in cash
all the court costs including Bryan's
attorney fees and publishing a lengthy
apology to Bryan. For month the
Times has conducted a personal cam
paign against Bryan, whom it nick
named "Popcorn" Bryan.
BOSTON MAYOR LOOKS
FOR EARLY PROHIBITION
BOSTON, April 10. - Mayor J. M.!
Curley predicts that the United States :
will have National prohibition In ten '
years.
?*? ?*? ?*? ?** ?"? ? ? ?*-? ?i? ?*? ?*?
?> ?
? BARNES-ROOSEVELT *
? LIBEL SUIT BEGINS *
? SYRACUSE, N. Y? April 19. ?
? ?The trial of the libel suit of ?>
? William Barnes, jr., against for- *
? mer President Theodore Roose- *
? volt began in the supremo court <?
here this morning. The court *
? room was crowded. <?
?**
* ? * * * ? ?> ?. ? + v ?>
ISLAM
HAVE CP:
MOt
Word was received in Juneau Satur
day that the Alaska-Treasure gold
mine at Novnda Creek on Douglas Isl
and will be developed, and that work
will begin almost immediately. Brit
ish capitalists have joined with the
California owners of the property and
will furnish the monoy to develop the
property and work it. It is not stated
just how many men will be employed
this summer, but the Information is
that there will probably bo a large
force.
Considerable development has been
done on this property, and a few
months ago the California bondhold
ers who advanced tho monoy for the
development foreclosed their trust
mortgage, and secured title to the
property.
The property is said by experts to
be one of the most promising in this
region of the Territory, and tho show
ing mado was sufficiently good to en
able the new owners to raise all the
monoy that will be necessary to de
velop the property into a mine.
Full details of tho plans for tho do
volopmont of the Alaska-Treasure
property will be made known soon?
probably within a week.
COL. RICHARDSON
OUTLINES WORK
SEATTLE. April 19.?Col. W. P.
Richardson, president of the Alaska
board of road commissioners, is here
from Washington city. Speaking of
the work contemplated by his com
mission this summer ho said that the
bridge across Snake River, at Nome,
will be rebuilt as will bo the bridge
across Chena slough. He said, furth
er, that there will bo a small amount
jf work performed on Kenai Peninsula.
The Snake river and Chena slough
bridges were carried out by high wa-.
REPORT OF JAP
ACTIVITY UNTRUE
WASHINGTON. April 19. -Comman
3or Irwin of the United States cruiser
New Orleans reported to the Navy
Department yesterday that the report 1
that the Japanese are fixing up a na
val base at Turtle Bay, Lower Califor
nia. is without any foundation in fact.
The State Department said today
that reports of Commander Irwin that
;he reports of Japanese activity at Tur
tle Bay are untrue is in accordance
with information received by that De
partment.
ASQUITH SAYS PROHIBITION
IN ENGLAND IMPRACTICABLE
LONDON. April 19. ? Premier As
Quith of England has again stated that
total prohibition is impracticable, but
he pleads for compulsory Sunday clos
ing of all public rouses, with uniform
rigorous curtailment on other days.
ENGLAND TO RELIEVE
PRESSURE ON NEUTRALS
? -
WASHINGTON. April 19.?Attache
Crawford of the British Embassy at
Washington is working out a plan
with tho State Department at Wash
ington to eliminate so far as possible
tho unnecessary detention of Ameri
can ships. The British government
proposes to promulgate some addition
al rules for the disposition of vessels
in transit, designed to meet tho sug
gestions of the Stato Department.
ENGLAND'E ENEMIES HAVE
$425,000,000 THERE
LONDON, April 19.?The amount of
enemy property in England is $425,
000,000, including $153,000,000 capital
in partnerships, business and compan
ies, and $272,000,000 in other proper
ties. About $3,530,000 income receiv
ed from trose properties is being held
during the war in the custody of a
public trustee.
CANADA ADOPTS WAR
STAMP TAX ON LETTERS
OTTAWA, April 19.? A Canadian
act provides that there will bo a war
tax postage of 1 cont on all letters
and postcards, and stamps of varying
denominations will be required on all
checks, drafts, promissory notes, tele
grams, railway tickets, proprietary or
patent medicines, perfumery, wine and
champagne.
AMERICANS HAVE
100,000,000 ORDERS
NEW YORK, April 17,?It is stated
that upwards of $100,000,000 of order1,
from abroad have been given during
the present month which arc to be
filled in Installment.", during the
ondar year 1915, thus absorbing the
outputs of manufacturing plants in this
country for till these months ahead.
ALLIES GAINING
IN BELGIUM AND
ALSACECQUNTRY
LONDON, April 19,?The British
army has begun another drive at an
important section of the German line
which holds conquered Belgium.
Sharp fighting occurred yesterday in
Belgium. An official French report
today says that the British captured
200 yards of German trenches and re
tained their positions in the face of
several counter attacks.
The French war office this afternoon
announced that substantial progress
has been made by the French armies
in Alsace. Many German positions
have been taken, and counter attacks
by the Germans repulsed.
GERMANS DENY
REPORT
BERLIN, Ajrll 19.?Claiming that
the British and French acounts of vie- ]
tories on the Western front to be pure
inventions, and that the Germans have
gained minor advantages there, while
they are holding thoir own on the
East front, the German War office
this afternoon gave out the following
statement:
"To the South of ypres yesterday
the British were ejected from many
minor Gorman positions which had
been still held by them in this local
ity.
"The British attacks along the rail
road between Ypres and Comines
broke down with heavy losses to them.
"Between the Mouse and Moselle
rivers there have been heavy artillery
duels.
"The French attack against our po
sitions at Combres and In the Vosges
resulted in failure.
"On the East front the situation re
mains unchanged.
"The falsity of the Froncta and Brit
ish victories are abundantly proved by
reports from German' field liendnuar
tors."
FRENCH OUTLINE
PURPOSE IN WEST
PARIS, April lD.?Speaking of the
French operations between the Mouse
and Mosolle rivers, the war ofllco says:
"The objects of the French are: To
press back the German loft, to cause
the retirement of German armies on
the Aisne and Oise rivers: to pierce
the St Mihiel-Metz line of German
communications; to lessen the German
pressure at Verdun and establish a
French position nearer Metz; and to
dtslodgo the Germans from the only
position they hold on the west bank of
the Mouse south of Verdun. The bat*
tlefront in the Woovre Is not more
than 15 miles long, but heavy losses
have been indicted on both sides.
"German trcnchos filled with dead
bodies were taken by the Fronch.
KAISER SAYS ITALY
TO BLAME FOR LOSS
LONDON. April 19.?According to n
Paris cable the Kaiser recently made
the following statement to officers in
the Austrian Emperor's suite:
"Even if we are crushed, we shall
never tire of telling our children in
Austria, as well as in Germany, that
our downfall was due to Italy. If it
takes us 10 or even 20 years we will
win back whatever we give Italy now,
and also seise Venice as interest."
?
GERMANS HAVE CAPTURED
5,500 OF ENEMIES' GUNS
BERLIN, April 19.?Since the begin
ning of hostilities the German armies
have captured 5510 cannon according
to general headquarters announce
ment. Many of the disabled guns have
been repaired at the Krupp works and
are being used against the allies. The
report enumerates the following cap
tures: Belgian 3,300 guns; French 1,
300; Hussion, 850; British, 60.
ANOTHER DAM GIVES
, WAY TO HEAVY RAINS
ROSSWELL, N. M., April 19.?Part
of the diversion dam of the Kondo res
ervoir, a government irrigation pro
ject near here, gave way Saturday fol
lowing heavy rains in the mountains.
Portions of Rosswell and the surround
ing country is flooded, and the resi
dents of tho low lying sections fled for
The property damage has been con
siderable, but no loss of life has been
DUTCH PASSENGER
SERVICE TO BE RESTORED
LONDON. April 19.? The Great
Eastern Railway has announced that
a bi-weekly passenger service between
London and the Hook of Holland will
BREAD RIOTS AT BRESLAU
AMSTERDAM, April 19.? Serious
bread riots are Reported at Breslau,
Germany! Tli'e authorities have been
compelled to increase the people's al
lowance.
?J? ?J* ?*-? ??? ?*? ?J? ?*? ?% ?J? ?*? ?|? ?J? ?J? #\
?> ?t.
? AUSTRIA GIVES +
? UP ATTACKS ?
? PETROGRAD, April 19.?DIs- *
? patches received from the front ?
? today indicate that the Aus- ?
? trians have abandoned all at- ?
+ tempts to recapture the pobI- +
? tions that the Russians, have ?
? captured in Northern Hungary. ?
?
?j? '*? *{* *J? <$? <|? 4* ?** *j? ?f?
AUSTRIANS CLAIM
OF VICTORY DISPUTED
?
LONDON, April 19.?Reports from
the East front received during the
last 48 hours completely dlsaprovo the
report of tremendous Austrian victor
ies in Hungary and the Carpathian
mountains sent out Saturday afternoon
If the Austrians gained any victories
at all, they were of minor importance.
The Russians still hold their positions
on the South side of the Carpathian
mountains which were gained by the
forces that have been pouring through
Dukla, Lupkow and Roster passes,
while the fighting for the possession
of Oszok pasB continues, with the
Russians constantly increasing their
pressure along the whole line.
Further confirmation of the contin
ued Russian ascendency in the East
comes from Rome and Geneva where
it is reported that Gcramny has aban
doned the idea of conducting an of
fensive campaign in France and Bel
gium, and plans to join with Austria
in concentrating her efforts to defeat
the Russian armies in the East.
PEACE TALK IS
AGA?NRENEWED
WASHINGTON. April 19.?Informa
tion coming from many sources show
that the conviction Is growing thnt
tho war in Europe will terminate be
foro the erd of the present summer.
The belief that an early peace is like
ly is based upon several contingen
cies. Those who think it certain to
come arc convinced that the super
iority of the British and French forces
on the west front will be demonstrated
soon after the beginning of the spring
campaign, that the Russians will con
tinue to outnumber the Germans on
tho east front, and that the diploma
tists of Great Britain, France and Rus
sia will succeed in arriving at a solu
tion of the territorial interests in
Southeast Europe and thus secure the
early assistance of the various Bal
kan States and Greece and Italy. They
contend that such a showing will com
pel Germany and Austria to sue for
peace rather than to continue the war
against impossible odds.
Japan Expects Early Peace.
TOKYO, April 19. Count Okuma.
Premier of Japan, says the war in Eu
rope will soon be over.
DUTCH WORK FOR PEACE.
?4-?
LONDON, April 19.?The Loudon
Dally Mail's Rotterdam correspondent
telegraphs that an international com
mittee has been established at The
Hague in sympathy with the Dutch
anti-war council. Every nationality
Is represented and all the members
have undertaken to try to promote tho
peace movement.
AIRMEN DROP BOMBS
ON STRASSBURG
AMSTERDAM. April 19.?A hostile
airship at 1:30 o'clock Saturday morn
ing dropped 12 bombs on the city of
Strassburg, capital of Alsavc. The
Germans immediately turned their an
ti-aircraft guns loose on the flying ma
chine. and searchlights showed it fly
j Ing northward and finally disappear in
I the darkness.
ENGLISH CLOSE PORT.
LONDON. April 19.?The River Dee
and the port of Chester has been
! closed to all navigation at night by
, order of the British Admiralty.
BELGIAN PRINCE JOINS
ARMY AS PRIVATE
DUNKIRK. France. April 19. ? The
Duke of Brabant, the 14-year-old son
of King Albert, who has Joined the
Belgian army, has beon assigned tc
duty at the Belgian headquarters. He
is serving as a private.
EUROPEAN NEWS SYNDICATE
MANAGER KILLS HIMSELF
LONDON, April 19.?Baron Herber
De li'iU' T. managing director of th?
Router Telegram Company-, committei
suicide yesterday. He assigned .thi
j recent death of his wife as the cause
PERIL IN EAST fORCE
GERMANY AND AUSTRIA
TO ABANDON WEST
ROME, April 19.?Information re
, celved here Indicate that the German
staff has abandoned the plan for a
general offensive movement in France
and Belgium and to concertrate their
efforts to defeat the Russian offensive
movement that has made such head
way in the East.
This information is said to have
been conveyed In official communica
tions to the Italian cabinet as well as
having been confirmed by stateemnts
of Germans in high official circles.
The Germans admit that the menace
of continued Russian successes in the
East have compelled them to put aside
the hope of a further penetration Into
France. The Russian successes In the
East have a disturbing influence In
the Balkan States and threaten to
give the Russians an outlet.through
these countries to the Mediterranean
and through them into Hungary.
CONFIRMED AT GENEVA
GENEVA, April 19.?The Germans
and Austrlans have determined to con
centrate their energies on the Eastern
campaign. It is said that at a council
of war presided over by Gen. Von
Hindenburg yesterday it was decided
to transfer the Austrian heavy artil
lery that is now before Verdun to Po
land, and to send back to Cracow and
| Western Galfcia the Hungarian caval
ry that Is now on the Western front.
DETAILS OF GRAND
DUKE'S SHOOTING
BERLIN, April 19.?The details of
the shooting of Grand Duke Nicholas,
commander of the Russian army, are
published in the Berlin papers. It is
said that Grand Duke Nicholas sum
moned Gen. Sicvcrs to explain the de
feat of the Tenth Army Corps. A heat
ed colloquy took place, and the Grand
Duke gave Gen. Sievers a box on the
ear. The latter thereupon drew a re
volver nnd shot the Grand Duke, caus
ing a severe wound in the abdomen,
lie then turned the weapon upon him
| self, and committed suicide.
The fact that Gen. Sievers had com
mitted suicide was learned at the time
of his funeral, but the news that the
Grand Duke Nicholas had been wound
ed has only just become known.
It is alleged that the Grand Duke's
condition remains serious.
BRITISH LOSE
AT DARDANELLES
LONDON, April 19.? The British
submarine E-15 was lost yesterday,
while sho was attempting to carry out
a difficult reconnaisance in the Dar
danelles mine field she ran aground on
Kepliez point, and the crew were made
prisoners by the Turks.
This loss was preceded by the de
struction of a Turkish trpedo boat by
the British Saturday. The Turkish
craft attacked the British transport
Manitou off Chios, when a British
cruiser came to the assistance of tho
transport and destroyed the torpedo
boat. The Turks lost 100 men.
Airmen Attacking Turks
Word has come from Egypt that
British airmen have been dropping
bombs on a Turkish encampment near
the Border.
A French cruiser, whose fire has
been directed by a seaplane, has been
throwing shells on the Turkish troops
near Elarish. where an army destined
for the invasion of Egypt has its head
quarters.
I ? m
ARMENIANS AND
KURDS FIGHTING
TABRIZ, April 19. ? Engagements
between the Armenians and Kurds are
frequent In the vicinity of Van. In
Turkish Armenia, according to relia
ble information received here.
A general massacro of Christians is
expected in the province of Bashkala.
The killing of Christians has pro
ceeded with intermittent activity ever
since the iirst outbreak when so many
wore butchered by Kurds and Turk
ish troops.
GERMAN MINE SINKS
DUTCH STEAMSHIP
GRIMEBY. England. April 19.?The
Dutch steamship Olanda was sunk in
| the North Sea this morning by a Ger
man mine. Trawlers rescued the crew.
> i t t (
: GREEK STEALER SUNK
WITHOUT WARNING
?
t LONDON, April 19.?The crow of
; 'lie Greek steamship Ellispontos which
: was torpedoed by a submarine five
miles west of the North Hinder light
,! ship, has arrived at Flvis^ipjg. The
J captain was wounded, nnd has been
taken to a hospital. He said that his
j ship jvas torpedoed without warning.

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