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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, April 23, 1915, Image 1

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VOL. V.. NO. 551. JUNEAU, AT,AREA. PREPAY, APRIL 23. 1915. ? _ PRICE TUN GENTS
TEXAS IN THROES OF DEVASTATING FLOODS
LAST VESTIGE OP
STATEHOOD BUGABOO
REMOVED BY SENATE
Senator Hubbard's resolution asking
that the question of whether Alaskans
wanted a full Territorial form of gov
ernment. or Statehood, died in com
mittee this afternoon when Senator
Millard raised a point of order against j
it. maintaining that" the subject had
been disposed of by the passage of
the fuller Home Rule memorial over
the Statehood memorial, earlier in the
session. Senator Tanner, who was:
presiding, held that the point was well;
taken and the decision of the chair j
was sustained. Senators Millard, Tan
ner. Sulzer and Aldrich voting affir-1
mativelv. and Senators Hubbard. Suth
erland. Gaustad and McGann voting
"no." Hot words were exchanged by ?
the opposing Senators, and the cry
of "political buncombe" was raised by
both Senators Millard and Sutherland.
Senator Hubbard contended that the
will of the people was being defeated, j
Senator .Millard characterized the en
tire Statehood program as "a scheme!
to further the interests of a political j
machine."
Compensation Act Tonight
The Senate will take up the work-,
men's compensation bill tonight, at a'
special session to convene at 7:30. The,
Senators favored night sessions for the
five remaining days before adjourn
ment. and Sunda> also will find the
members at work on the bill, which
was referred to today as "the most
important piece of legislation pend
Among the bills recommended today ?
by the Senate for passage, while they ?
were read the second time, were the;
trust company bill, the bill permitting j
councils to grant 20-vear franchises j
to corporations, the bill to compensate ;
J. H. Cobb in the sum of ?250 for le-;
gal services, the bill relating to filling
the vacancy in the office of Delegate,
and the bill providing the election of
Doctor 3i!l Tomorrow
started things when it came up for
second reading, and was continued ov
er on the calendar, until tomorrow,
having the right-of-way of the day's
proceedings. The objection to the
measure as amended was that It
opened the way to permitting' ouack
doctors to gain a foothold.
Senator Tanner's bill to tax the fish
ing industry by means of a stamp
system, and Senator Aldrich's bill to
tax the fisheries' products, were con- ?
tinued over for a day.
Tanner Grills Colleagues
The charge that the First Division's
representatives In the House had be
(Continued on Page 5.)
ADVANoiT
STOCK MEANS
LOCAL EORTUNES
? I* -'
TREADWKLL. April 23.?Accord
ing to late financial papers received
from the States. Alaska-Juneau stock
is proving to be a sensation in the
Eastern markets. The stock made its
first appearance on Monday. April
12th. and raised almost three point3
in the first three days of trading.
Over 25,000 shares were sold in the
first two days. The highest point
reached up until the IStb of April'
was at closing time on that date. The
point reached was 16*4.
? The foitowing paragraph is taken j
from the Wall Street Journal of Ap
ril 14 th:
"Trading In Alaska-Juneau Gold j
mining stock was the feature of Tues- i
day's market on the curb. The stock
displayed notable strength throughout
the day. and at the close was quoted
at 15 9s bid comparing with bids at I
the close of business on Monday of
13%. It was -suggested that interests
holding large blocks of this stock had
intended to keep the market well
within their control during the first
day of trading in the issue, and guard
against too sharp an advance as a re
sult of the consistently bullish move
which had been previously published
concerning the property. Yesterday's
advance was gradual, with indications
of an excellent public demand."
Those who have read the report
are spreading the good news among
the Treadwell stockholders. The rise
to 16 in this stock means a net profit
for the people on the Island of nearly
(95.000 in the past month, as $140,000
worth of stock was taken by the
Treadwell and Alaska-Juneau employ
* <{? v ?> v ?> ?.'? v v
?> WEATHER TODAY *
?> Maximum?i5. v
Minimum?24. 4?
4- Cloudy?Rain.
<? Precipitation?.91 inch. ?
44 ? ? ? + + + + + ^ + ?> ?> 4>
? v ?> ? 4? ? 4* ? + ? ? 4- i
? +1
? NINE BILLS PASSED *i
? ? ? 4
?> Just before recess late this ?
afternoon tho Senate passed 4
?fr nine Senate bills, two resolu- 4*
? tions and one memorial as fol- 4
?> lows: v
-> No. 41, prohibiting profess- +
?> ional jurors.
<? Xo. 10. school and munici- 4*
? pal taxes. 4- j
? Xo. 32. providing for the elec- 4
<? tion of a superintendent of pub- 4-;
+ lie instruction two years hence. *
4 No. 19. designation of min- 4-,
4* ing claims by number. +
4? Xo. 29. punishing slander and ?
+ libel. ?
4 Xo. 37. providing penalties 4*
+ for wanton destruction of game *
? animals. ?
4- Xo. 42. additional pay to sec- ?>
? rotary of Alaska. +
4? Xo. 53. uniform acknowlcdg- +
-> ment of deeds. ?
-> Xo. 57. increasing salary of 4*
-> mining Inspector. 4
? Concurrent Resolution No. 4*
4- 12. payment for overtime to 4>
v employees. +
? Joint Memorial Xo. S, mine ?
experimental station at Juneau *>
Joint Resolution Xo. 8.?pay- +
?> ment of moneys by Clerks of +
? Courts, collected under Torri- 4
toriai revenue law. 4-'
4* v
4? 4- ?> -S> 4- 4? <? -!? + ?> + ? 4 ? ?
C. W. YOUNG COMPANY I
COMPLETE WHARF
The C. W. Voung Co., agents for
the Union Oil Company, have about j
finished work on the float and dock
at the South end of town, for the
handling of the products of the oil
company.
Special arrangements have been
made lor the accommodation of the
Juneau fishing fleet, by the construc
tion ol a gridiron, where the boats
can be beached for repairs and a long
tioat where they can lay.
The dock is 40 x SO feet, reaching
to 'deep water, with a warehouse on
the approach from the Sheep Creek
road.
Three floats 40 x 10 feet, and one
10 x 20 feet, have been constructed,
making 160 feet of float with deep
water on both sides at low tide so
that boats can lay there at all times.
Each float is equipped with a fresh
water tap. water having been piped
from a spring far up on the moun
tain side.
The gridiron is 30 x 60 feet, with
a sandy beach at one end. and will
hold a 90 foot boat with perfect
ease, l^arge booms will be ercted at
each end of the dock proper, so that
heavy engines or repair parts can be
swung from the boats to the deck for
transportation to any place In the;
city.
Two measuring tanks are being
built in the shops of the company
and will be installed soon one hold
ing 1300 gallons of distillate and the
other 400 gallons of gasoline. The
dock has been plentifully supplied with
ladders and other things to make it
as convenient as possible for the
men of the fishing fleet.
A three room house equipped with
running hot and cold water and a
modern bath and plumbing has been
built by the company for the wharf-;
inger, and has boon connected by
telephone with the Juneau system.
'The entire plant has cost the com
pany about $10,000. and no charge
will be made by the company for the
use of the float or gridiron. They have :
been installed for the use of the fish
ing fleet and we want the men of;
the fishing fleet to feel perfectly free^
to use them. That Is what they are'
for." said Manager J. C. McBrlde re
! cently.
ATLANTIC WIRELESS
STATIONS IMPROVED
??
NEW YOltK. April 23. -For the pur
pose of Insuring the wireless com
munication between Germany and the j
United States under all kinds of sta
tic conditions, the power of the Tele
funken wireless stations and those at
SayviHe, Long Island, it was learnod
today, have been almost trebled.
It Is claimed that the wireless in
struments respond now day or night
j and under all manner of weather con
| ditlons.
FRENCH GOVERNMENT
TO CARE FOR ORPHANS
PARIS. April 23>?C*1 ildron who have
jbeen made orphans by the war will
j be cared for by.tho government, ac
cording to plans worked out by the
French cabinet.
OUTSIDERS MUST
PAY TAXES OR
THEY CAN'T SUE
VALDEZ, April 23.?Judge Fred M.
Brown rendered n decision yesterday
In the United States District Court
that Is pregnant with wide possibili
ties In Alaska trade matters when he
ruled that a corporation organized un
der the laws or another State which
has failed to file its articles of incor
poration in Alaska, or to pay Its cor
poration taxes and failed to appoint
un agent here upon whom service of
legal processes may be served, can
not suo for moneys duo or alleged to
bo due in an Alaskan court.
The decision was rendered in' the
case of the \V. J. Van Scuyvcr com
pany,'a wholesale liquor company, of
Portland, Oregon, against Oscar Breed
man, a McCarthy soloon-keeper. The
suit was to recover Judgment for $800
for whiskoy alleged to have been sold
and delivered.
The decision, if sustained on appeal,
will make it impossible for corpora
tions from without Alaska, which have
not complied with the corporation laws
of the Territory, to collect accounts
owing them in Alaska.
If Judge Brown's conception of the
law is corroet It will add to tho reve
nues of Alaska becauso it will com
pel all tho outside corporations which
sell goods to Alaska to pay a corpora
tion tax within the Territory.
MAYOR RUNNING
CITY FROM PEN
? <? ?
LEAVENWORTH. Kans., April 23.
?Mayor Roberts, of Terro Haute, In
diana, continues to run that city by
telegraph. He has refused to resign,
and the impeachment proceedings
against him are being contostcd.
Other officials who are hero in the
penitentiary are also refusing to re
linquish their positions at Torre
Haute.
CARRANZA SENDS OFFICER
TO PRISON FOR MURDER
WASHINGTON, April 23.?Mail ad
vices received by the State Depart
ment say that Casfinorc Fernandez,
a Spanish subject who was shot and
killed by Capt. Loza, a Carranzlsta
officer at Puebla. With the sanction
of Gen. Carranza Capt. Loza was sen
tenced to 12 years in prison.
UNIVERSAL VOTING
RULE OF DENMARK
COPENHAGEN. April 23. ? Thore
will be universal voting hereafter in;
Denmark with one man one vote. This
is the result of action by the Danish
Parliament today.
FLEET PROGRAM NOW
CALLS FOR JULY TRIP
WASHINGTON. April 23.? Secre
tary of the Navy Josephus Daniels
announced today that it has been do
elded to be practicable for the floet
to" pass through the Panama Canal,
and it will pass through from the At
lantic to the Pacific in July as at
first planned.
CHICAGO POLICE OFFICIALS
ARE INDICTED FOR BRIBERY
CHICAGO. April 23.?Many indict
ments. charging bribery, have been
returned against former Chief of De
tectives Hatpin, and former sergeants
that have served under him.
ARIZONA LEGISLATURE
MEETS TO PROVIDE MONEY
PHOENIX, Ariz., April 23.?The
Arizona Legislature met today in ex
tra session to provide the State with
money for maintenance purposes.
GREEK CONSUL NAMED
FOR THE NORTHWEST
SEATTLE, April 23.?C. Liliopoules
of this city, has been appointed Greek
consul for the Northwestern Ameri
can States and Alaska.
FAMOUS CHICKASAW CHIEF
DIES IN OKLAHOMA
?!? 1
ADA. Okla., April 23.?Former Gov.
William L. Byrd, one of the last sur
viving executives of the old Chicka
iaw Nation and one of tho famous fi
gures of the old Indian Territory, died
here yesterday.
TURKS TRIED TO
GET PEACE TERMS
LONDON. April 23.?A cable from
| Athens states that two weeks ago the
Young Turk committee sounded tho Al
lies as to the terms of peace which
they would accept. Great Britain,
j however, rejected the proposals put
forward and nothing came of the ef
SEATTLE PIONEER DIES
. SEATTLE. April 23,?Albert Fort
! Louis, a 'pioneer of dty d(ed
ihere yesterday.
THAV
GET
r g
NEW YORK. April 23.?The Now
York supremo court today granted
Harry K. Thaw's application for a
jury trial to dotcrmlno his sanity. The
application for a jury trial on the
question of sanity was made after tho
refusal of the courts to direct hlo re
turn to Now Hampshire. It was vig
orously resisted by the Stato. If a
Jury should decide that Thaw la sane
he will be given his liberty.
ROOSEVELT STILL
ON WITNESS STAND
SYRACUSE. R. Y.. April 23.?For
mor President Thcodoro Roosevelt
was again on tho witness stand today
undergoing a gruelling cross-examina
tion. Attorney William M. Ivens has
been dragging him back and forth
across political campaigns In which
ho was associated with William Barnes
Jr. Whilo occasionally displaying Irri
tation, usually the former President
answers questions fully and frankly,
often asking to be permitted to ex
plain his answers.
Admits Catering To Barnes
SYRACUSE, N. Y.. April 23.?For
mer President Theodore Roosevelt
this afternoon, on cross examination,
admitted that he many times catered
to William Barnes, jr., and sought
his support and assistance. He stat
ed that he regards Barnes us a sort
of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Ho said
that on more than one occasion he
had asked for the support . of Mr.
Barnes and former Senator Thomas
C. Piatt, and had agreed to consider
them and tholr organization In vnrlous
ways.
PRESIDENT CANT ATTEND
SOUTHERN CONGRESS
WASHINGTON. April 23.?It was
announced today at ill Whlto Houso
that President Woodrow Wilson will
be unable to attend the Southern Com
mercial Congress at Muhkogoe. Okla
homa. next week.
When the Invitation was extended
some time ago President Wilson said
he would bo glad to attend the con
ference if the public business would
permit.
NEW ELECTION
FOR CANADA
VANCOUVER, B. C.. April 23?H. H.
Stevens, member of Parliament for
Vancouver city, who has returned from
Ottawa, says a Dominion election may
be announced any minute.
Provincial Election Postponed
It Is believed that tho provjt jtol
election in British Columbia will be
postponed until after the Dominion
election, and take place next fall.
Attorney-General Bowser has post
poned an advertised election trip into
Eastern British Columbia, and it is
believed it has nlrcady beon deter
mined to put off the proposed election
for tho third time.
AMERICAN SAYS ALL
SOLDIERS HAVE DRINK
CHICAGO. April 23.?A Chlcaco Tri
bune "dispatch from R. R. McCormlck
saya British soldiers arc served with
rum in trenches Just as with beef and
biscuits and every French soldier in
camp or trenches is given a bottle
of wine for supper every night. "All
wine shops in the war zone are open
and their owners will bo Astors if the
front docs not move soon. 1 never saw
a soldier of either army who gave any
sign of intoxication.' ' 4i
VANCOUVER TO GET
LARGE WAR ORDERS
VANCOUVER. B. C.. April 23.?Van
couver Arms will get largo ordors for
shells if the contracts can be handled
quickly. This is the announcement
made by Col. Carnegie, the ordnance
expert, from the British War Oillce.
Already a large order has been placed
in Victoria.
!? 4
? TRADE BALANCE FOR 4
* MARCH $140,969,374 ?
| 4. 1 ? 4
:? WASHINGTON. April 23.? *
? The excess of American oxports 4
<? over Imports for March this 4
? year aggregated the magnifi- 4
? cent total of $140,969,347. ac? 4
+ cording to tho official figures 4
4? that have boon made public. 4
?F This is the greatest trade bal- 4
? anco for March in the history 4
4? of American commerce. 4
? Tho oxports for tho month 4
? were $299,009,563 and the Im- 4
4- ports $158,040,216. ?:
? ? ? * + ? 4. ?>
BRITISH TROOPS
ART HOLDING
BELGIAN GAIN
LONDON, April 23.?The Gorman
forcca In Belgium have been making
one forced attack after another to re
gain Hill No. 60 and other ground that
has been gained by the British In the
fighting near Ypres, and caBt of that
place. Despite thcso repeated rushes,
however, the British have shown no
sign of roloxing their grip on the
gained ground. Instead thoy have
repulsed the charges In ovcry Instance
and have inflicted heavy Iosscb.
Tho fighting in this looality today
Bhows signs of developing along 'a wide
front, with constantly Increasing In
tensity, even rivaling the attempts of
the Germans to break through the
British lines last fall, when the great
turning movement was attempted
against tho Allies' loft.
Each day sees more and more men
In action.
BRITISH GAIN THREE
MILES AT YPRES
LONDON, April 23.?The British ad
vance of thrco miles at Ypres is the
greatest single advance since autumn,
exceeding in importance the Neuve
Chapclle battle. The Germans are In
dignant alleging that the British used
asphyxiating gas.
GREAT FIGHTS
AT SEA EXPECTED
LONDON, April 23.?Great activity
in naval circles is one of the disting
uishing features of the events of to
day. The activity extends both to the
North and the Agean seas.
German ships have again been re
ported from the northern portion of
the North sea.
Reports from Cuxhavon indicate that
the Gcrmanp are planning a fleet
i movement, and the reports considered
: with the repeated rumors of the pres
ence of German ships in the North
sea havo caused London to expect ac
counts of a hoavy engagement with
ing the near future.
ITALY AND AUSTRIA
ARE NEGOTIATING
ROME, April 23.?Austrian Ambas
j sudor Macchio today held a long con
! Terence with the Italian Foreign Win
i ister Sonnlnio. They were in close
! conversation for several hours. At
j times they utilized the services of
! stenographers and messengers, but
for the most part they were closeted
"alone. Sonninlo talked for a few min
i utes at a time with other Cabinet of
t fleers in a nearby office.
While no announcement has been
made today as to the situation between
Italy and Austria it is believed that
the difficulties between the two
countries will be settled amicably,
and that Italy will get substantially
nil that she has demanded.
It is an open secret here that Count
von Buelow has urged that Austria
make such concessions as shall be
necossary to Insure tho neutrality ol
Austria. Tho German government
has taken the position for weeks thai
Italy's entrance to the war would be
fatal to the German Allies.
GERMANY EXTENDS
CONTRABAND LIST
WASHINGTON, April 23.?Dispatch
es from Berlin state that German hat
placed coal, coke, pig iron and aero
planes on the contraband li?t of car
goes consigned to the order of or t<
neutral countries, with which the bel
Ugorents mt.y trade. Tho order pro
vides that contraband and the vossoli
which carry it aro subject to seizun
by German war vessels.
It is believed here that this is Gcr
many'3 last act for reprisal agains'
the English blockade.
FRENCH OFFICIALS ARE
WELL SATISFIEC
PARIS, April 23. ? Both Presiden
Poincare and War Minister MlUerand
who returned from western lines, ex
press omphalic satisfaction with tin
situation In the north. They are ful
of praiso for the work of the French
British and Belgian forces.
, MORE 8HRAPNELL
CONTRACTS FOR U. S
, NEW YORK, April 23. ? Amcrlcai
, Car & Foundry company, which recenl
. ly secured $1,800,000 shrapnel contract
, is negotiating for another $2,000.00
, contract.
> CANADIAN AGAIN
WINS BOSTON MARATHOr
1
BOSTON, Ap;i> 23.?Edward Fabr
? of Montreal has von the Boston Mai
? athon in two hours 31 minutes. Th
? time was slow owing to the grea
- heat. This is Fnbres fifth attemp'
k Fab re was second Taut year to Duff
v also a 'Canadian,
RUSSIAN FLEET
STRIKES HARD
BLOWATTURKS
- ? ? ? ? i ?
Pctrograd, April 23.?The Russian
Black Sea torpedo boat squadron bom
bnrded the Turkish coast between
Archava and Artschin on the coast
on the 19th of April. This Is a strip of
the coast 15 miles long in which was
located the quarters of the Turkish
army operating in this section.
The Russians swept the country,
shot and shell, destroying the bar
racks, provision stores and other
buildings.
A large number of coast-wise Turk
ish vossels which had been landed
with ammunition and supplies were
sunk.
Ten Turks Sunk
LONDON, April 23.? Reports re
ceived yesterday say the Russian
Black sea fleet destroyed ten Turkish
supply vessels, and bombarded Ar
chava.
ALLIES CONTINUE TO
BOMBARD GALLIPOLI
PARIS, April 23.?Dispatches from
Athens say that the Allies continue
the bombardment of Galllpoli penin
sula positions. The entrance to the
Dardanelles Is kept absolutely sealed
by the French and Allies' ships. Al
most dally torpedo boats or destroy
ers enter the strait, and the larger
craft arc sent In and with their heavy
guns prevent the Turks from recon
' structlng forts previously dismantled.
Bombard Dardanelles
PARIS. April 23.? Word received
from Athens this evening says that
four British warships bombarded the
? Dardanelles for throe hours this af
ternoon. silencing the defenses before
? quitting.
f BRITISH SINK SUBMARINE
E-15 IN DARDANELLES
LONDON. April 23.?The submarine
E-15. reported from Constantinople as
sunk by the Turks, was destroyed by
the British after It had run aground.
It was destroyed to prevent the em
cmy from securing it. It had ground
ed on Kephez point.
TURKS INVADING
: PERSIA IN FORCE
TEHERAN, (via Petrograd), April
23.?Turkish troops arc Invading Per
. sla In force. They have occupied Kas
i rishirin. surrounding the government
i houses there and are advancing to
; ward Kirmanshah. Small detachments
; of Persians opposing them are falling
t hack towards Hammadan.
WOULD GIVE CONSTANTINOPLE
TO THE UNITED STATES
??
, LONDON, April 23. Dr. Vernon
Bartlet, professor of church history in
Mansfield College, Oxford, has written
" a letter to the London Daily Mail, mak
5 ing the unlquo suggestion that Con
" stantinople be turned over to the Unit
' cd States, one power, he believes.
' which is sulllciently disinterested to
' govern it justly and without preju
" dice.
i ? t i
5 RUSSIANS DROP
BOMBS ON SHIPS
PETROGRAD. April 23.? Russian
airships today dropped bombs on
Plock. Several German boats on the
j Vistula river were struck by the
bombs.
1 ZEPPELINS VISIT
ENGLAND TODAY
' LONDON. April 23.?Two German
? Zeppelins were sighted off the North
umberland coast this afternoon.
There have been no reports recelV'
ed of any bombs being dropped. II
: is believed at the admiralty that it
is but another reconnoitering expedi
1 tlon.
;> + 4 ? ?
? GERMAN SUBMARINE
5 SINKS BRITISH TRAWLER
GRIMSBY, April 23.?The Britisti
trawler Lawrence was sunk off the
*1 conBt here by a German submarine
The crew was SAVCtf.
c
INCOMING GOLD BREAKS
e ALL PREVIOUS RECORD?
t NEW YORK. April 23.?More thai
L $300,000,000 worth of gold was brough
y into the United States during March
a new high-water mark.
TORRENTAL FLOODS
CAUSE DEATH AND
DAMAGE IN TEXAS
AUSTIN, April 23.?It Is estimated
this evening that the damage to prop
erty in this city on account of the
flood has reached $1,000,006.
The Texas militia ordered out this
j afternoon Is now In charge of the sft
uation. It was called out particularly
to prevent looting In the flood-swept
sections, and Is rendering aid In re
lieving distress and saving property.
For twelve hours firemen and police
had been on constant duty In the In
undated districts, without taking suf
ficient time to eat food.
Scores of imperiled women and chil
dren have been clinging for safety to
branches of trees and on- the tops of
houses. Most of them, however, have
now been rescued and taken to the
higher altitudes where they are safe.
FORTY DEAD
DALLAS, Tex., April 23.?Forty are
dead and a half million dollars worth
of property destroyed in Austin and
vicinity as the result of floods that
prevail in various section of Texas
and Oklahoma.
Torrcntal rains, accompanied by
lightning and high winds yesterday
and Inst night soaked the greater pnrt
of Eastern Oklahoma and all of Tex
as. The damage to property has been
considerable, and wide spread, though
Austin has been the greatest sufferer.
A great deal of damage has been
done to railroads. Tracks have been
washed out in many pluces, demoral
izing train schedules and causing great
inconvenience and annoyance to busi
ness.
Wire communications have been in
terfered with in various sections of
the Southwest, and information from
many sections of the country is com
pletely lacking.
Communication with Austin was re-^.
established this afternoon.
/
Water Rising at Austin
AUSTIN. Tex., April 23.? Water
continues to rise In all the streams in ?
tliic section. '
Fifteen to twenty dead bodies have .
been recovered. It is estimated that!
the loss of life might reach twice I
that number. I
Floods are sweeping down Waller ;
and Shoal creeks. Houses arc jammed I
against the bridges in the business i
section.
CZAR VISITS
ARMY AT FRONT
Petrograd, April 23.?The Czar has
arrived at Lemberg and will inspect
the Russian lines in Galicla and the
Carpathian region. *
It is said that His Majesty is In
high spirits on account of Unreports
lie received from the front, which
continue to show gains for the Czar's
troops.
RUSSIANS CAPTURE
70,000 PRISONERS
PETROGRAD. April 23. ? Reports
from the front declare that 70,000 pris
: oners were taken In the Carpathians
!Sunday and Monday.
17,000,000 POLES
IN NEED OF FOOD
LONDON, April 23.?Seven million
Poles, of whom 2,000,000 are Jews,
arc in dire need of food. This Is the
substance of a statement made this
afternoon by Herman Laudau, the
Jewish phinanthropist, who is asso
ciated with various Jewish charitable
societies.
Of the sufferers, said Laudau, 5.
500,000 are east of the Vistula river,
and 1,500,000 are west of it. The
Jews are even poorer than the Gen
tiles, becuuse of the boycott that had
been maintained against the Jews In
various purts of Poland before the
beginning of the war. which impover
ished thousands who otherwise would
huve been able to provide for their
families.
k VANCOUVER MAN
KILLED IN WAR
VANCOUVER. B. C., April 23.?
Last night's casualty list, telegraphed
ft from London, contains the name of
? William J. Bowser, of this city, as
having been killed In France Aprli
15th. He was tho nephew and name
sake of Attorney-General William J.
Bowser, now acting Premier of Brit
ish Columbia. He was one of the
l well known and popular young men
! of the province, and a member of the
1 first contingent of Canadian troops to
go to the front.
s:g steel orders
for the export trade
1: PITTSBURGH. April 23.?Export or
tiders of about 15,000 tons of* steel have
,' been placed In the past week, the bulk
? of It going to the Sled 'Corporation.

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