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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, May 10, 1915, Image 5

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SAN FRANCISCO WANTS
MORE ALASKA BUSINESS
The weekly "San Francisco Cham
ber of Commerce." a publication issued
by live San Francisco Chamber of Com
tuerce. of April 27 contains the follow
ing leading first page article on Alas
ka trade and tho Alaskan railroad:
next few years the government will
expend at least ?28.000."".> m building
416 miles of railroad from S. ward, on
the Pacific coast of Alaska, to Fair
banks. on tlve Tanana river, and a
thirty-eight mile branch up the Mat
noney will be spent in the purchase
supplies and material;, by contrac
tors Gangs of men must be fed and
be purchased somewhere and there is
good reason why San Francisco nice
chants should not furnish their share.
"Much criticism has been directed
in the past at San Francisco for her
desirable market and offers a greater
variety of merchandise than the nor
ther:: cities which have catered to and
secured this business. .Merchants will
say in excuse, that it is useless for
them to reach out for business in Al
aska because we have rtp direct steam
er lines from this port. Steamship of
ficials reply: "You get the trade and
wo will give you direct shipments.' In
the meantime nobody moves and a
very large and desirable business is
diverted to other cities, which, to say
the least are alive to their opportun
"Such direct -ervice can and should
be e-taWished now that the Alaskan
railroad : to be built by the govern
ment. r.! there is every reason why
the San Francisco merchant should
take prompt steps to secure the gov
> .-anient's requisition and bid thereon
and furnish all of the supplies for the I
railroad.
"San Francisco Is the most favor ,
able market for Alaskan trade. The:
steamship freight rates are the same)
from San Francisco as from Seattle.)
To a po^nt like Seward there is about \
one day's difference in the sailing
from San Francisco as against Sont-|
tie. the San Francisco trip being about
one day longer. Most of the merchan
dise supplied to Alaska from Seattle
has to be drawn either from the Fast,
Oregon or California, and the greater
portion of it must be drawn from Cal
ifornia. Merchandise for Alaska sup
plied by Seattle must bear the expense
of freight charges from California or
tho East, the expense of handling
through houses at Seattle and the prof
it and commission thereon. The hous
es in Seattle are smaller and the com
mission larger. The houses in San
Francisco which must in this connec
;ion as in every other be recognized
as the commercial center of the Pa
cific Coast, are larger, and the com
mission relatively smaller; and it Is
a fact that Eastern goods and most
Oregon goods can be landed in the
stores of the Alaskan merchants at
twenty per cent, less cost to tho Alas
kan merchant than goods from Puget!
Sound.
"Few people realize how fraught
with possibility is the building of this
road. Its construction will bring about
the industrial development of Central
Alaska, comprising. 200,0)0 square
miles. This region includes the gold
placer districts of the Yukon-Tanana
the Copper and the Susitna rivers,
and the Iditarod-lnnoko; and tho Mat
anuska branch will make accessible
eighty square miles of high grade coal
lands. The Susitna and Tanana val
leys. which are traversed by the road, i
contain large areas of agricultural j
lands and vaster trapts of good grass;
lands. It has been confidently pre-;
dieted by many that cattlo in this re-!
glon will become a profitable Indus- ?
"A hundred million dollars In gold j
have been taken out of this section j
of Alaska. With the construction of:
this new railroad dollars will com- j
menco to flow into it?dollars for sub- i
stantial development?and trade will*
surely follow the dollars. It is up $o
San Fransisco business men to famil
iarize themselves with conditions iu
this new market which is about to be >
created at their door.
"if merchants who are deslrious of
entering this field will send their j
names to the information and statisti
cal department of the chnmbor, that:
department will co-operate with them
in securing such information as will
be of value to them.'
Accompanying a copy of the publi
cation is the following letter, also dat
ed April 27, and signed by Robert
Newton Lynch vice-president and man
ager of the Chamber of Commerce:
"We aro enclosing herewith a copy
of our weekly 'Activities,' and invite
your nttcntion to an article on the
new Alaskan railroad as evidence of
our appreciation of what this railroad
means to Alaska, and a desire on our
part to Impress the merchants of this i
city with its importance to them.
"We would welcome suggestions
from your organization, as to how
commercial relations between Alaska;
and San Francisco may best be' ce
mented."
WHERE IS JOHN MENETHO SCOTT
Gov. J. F. A. Strong is in receipt of
a letter from Mrs. Eldora Dixon, 1911
Grant street, Denver, Colorado, mak
ing inquiries as to the whereabouts of
her brother John Menetho Scott, for
merly of Sprlngiield, Ohio, who was
last heard from in Alaska or tho I
Klondike. Alaska papers please copy.
* ? ?
Mrs. F. J. Wettrlck reached home
vesterday on the Humboldt.
~ I
I $90,000,000 of Gold! 1
is the total average annual production of the United States. A large proportion
of this is derived from the smelting of copper and lead ores. Of gold ores,
pure and simple, the United States mines about 10,000,000 tons per annum.
These figures are taken from an article in the Engineering and Mining Jour
nal. issue of March 6th. .In comparing
JUNEAU'S PRODUCTION [
this a: side goes on to say: "The three companies that are developing this
great lode qt Juneau contemplate the mining and milling of about 12,000,000
tons per annum, which is expected to yield about
j $1S,000,000 IN GOLD |:
thus, froi tliis single group of mines, will be extracted more tons of ore than
come from all of the gold mines in the United States at present; and they
. i will make an output equivalent to
I TWENTY PER CENT j
of the entire present production of gold in the United States." If only three
of the mines in this vicinity produce such a large percentage of the United
States entire output of gold.
WHAT MAY BE EXPECTED I
of the future? Surely with the great lodes that have already been discovered i
and t e vast possibilities of undiscovered ore throughout this section, it is f
net an unreason ble assumption to predict that within the next five to ten
years, the mines in this vicinity will
| PRODUCE 40 TO 50 PER CENT j
of the total gold output of this country. \Vi"h this vast store house of yellow
I metal with which nature has surrounded Juneau, and with the work of de
veloping mines on the largest scale in the history of the world so far advanced
when we reflect that
GOLD IS THE BASIS j
of all monetary value, not only of the United States, but of all civilized
countries, we are irresistably forced to the conclusion that a community so
pi endowed by natural resources must necessarily develop rapidly industrially
and commercially. And we know that great increase in population is always
j A NECESSARY CONSEQUENCE i
of such development. It therefore follows, as night follows the day, that real
estate values increase rapidly in proportion to such advancing conditions. I
These reasons should be sufficient to convince you that Juneau real estate
is now one of the safest and best investments you can make. Provided for the
I future by buying a lot in
CASEY-SHATTUCK ADDITION f
! This may be your last opportunity to get in on the ground floor of real estate
investments in Juneau. This addition presents every feature that insures -j
big returns on your investment. It is level, it adjoins the best residence sec
tion cf the city, it adjoins the waterfront, it is the only considerable tract of
i levels and to Tiich valid title can be obtained; and it will logically be in de
mand for business purposes in the future. Don't let this opportunity pass.
.: Buy now before the advance in price. Telephone or see us for an appoint
Shattuck Realty Company
TELEPHONE 2-4-9 CHENEY BLDG. 142 FRONT ST.
SPEAKER COLLINS
A LAWYER NOW
Speaker 10. B. Collins, of Fairbanks,
in the Fourth division, passed a suc
cessful examination Saturday for ud
mittanco to tlio bar before a commit
tee of attorneys appointed by Judge'
Jennings, ami was recmnmended to
bo admitted. The committee consist
ed of J. A. Helientlml, L. 1'. Shackle
ford and J. it. Winn. The findings will
be submitted to Judge Jennings for
his approval.
SEATTLE BALL
PLAYERS HERE
?M. Hose and Frank Healey, of Los
Angeles, arrived last night on the
Mrriposa and are staying at the Oc
cidental hotel. Both are professional
ball players, ltoso having been with
the Texas league of Waco last sum
mer. and Healey boing from the Seat
tle league. Rose also played a couple
of games with the Seattle tenm. They
are looking for positions, and will re
main in Juneau for the summer If they
can connect with somo employment.
??
FOREIGN PACKING COMPANY
FILES INCORPORATION PAPERS
The Nelson Lagoon Packing com
pany, with main place of business at
Bclllngham, Washington, tiled articles
of incorporation this morning in the
Territorial secretary's ofilce.
The capital stock of the company is
given at $150,000, of which $110,000
has already been paid in. The articles
empower the company to engage in a
general fishing and packing business
and to do any and all things neces
sary to the successful operation of
the same. E. B. Doming is president
of the company and B. M. Brosseau is
secretary. The incorporators and llrst
board of trustees are: E. S. McCord,
J. N. Ivcy, J. A. Shumaker, JI. E. Ilar
rah and W. Z. Kerr, all of Seattle.
YOUNG COMPANY FORCE
GO BEAR HUNTING
The C. W. Young Co. force tool; an
outiug yesterday to Eagle river on a
bear hunt. They found plenty of signs
but no bear. However, they brought
back about 1G0 rainbow trout, besides
what was eaten at the river. The
cook, whom they took along to try
the bear steak, served up the lesser
game for them. Those making up the
party on the launch Grubstake were:
Fred Berger, Amos Sunstrom, Chic
Harris, Fred Smith, Charley Hensel,
Loyd Gibson. Lester Mershon and
tarry Lucas.
EAGLE SHOWS HOMESTEADER
WHERE TO CATCH FISH
Arvid Franzcn, a-homesteader at
Doty's Cove, about 14 miles from Jun
eau got out his rille Saturday to slay
an Eagle which was about to descend
upon his pigeons. The bird sailed out
over the water at the mouth of a
creek on his approach, and suddenly
dived into the water and arose with
a big steel head salmon. This was hint
enough for the homesteader who had
trawled the cove in vain for days
past. He got out his tackle and be
fore night had 40 largo steel heads
in the bottom of his boat.
TWINS BORN TODAY.
?4-?
Twins ? brother and sister ? were
born at the Juneau dairy this morning;
said to bo the first instance of the
kind in Alaska. They were calves.
Willis E. Nowcll, agent for the Al
aska Steamship company, is expect
ed home on the Dolphin which sailed
from Seattle last night.
Ernest Klrbergcr, manager of the
Kako Trading company, at Kake, left
this morning on the Humblodt for Pet
ersburg.
ODDS ON WAR BETS
PREVAILING IN LONDON
??
War or no war; the sporting English
men will have his get. According to
the London Mall book is now being
made in the British metropolis on the
various possibilities of the campaign,
and likely betting is being done. The
Mail says that making book on the
war "has now become a recognized
business." The following are given
as the "Latest; official prices" and it
Is to bo noted that Londoners are op
timistic as to the speedy ending of
the war. That the war will end be
fore:
June 1, 1915?2 to 1 against.
Sept. 1, 1915?Even.
Dec. 1, 1915?3 to 1 on.
March 1. 1916?10 to 1 on.
That Germany will take Paris?26
to 1 against.
SCHOOLS REOPEN IN RHEIMS
?*?
After weeks of intermittent bom
bardment the schools have boon re
opened in the long-suffering city of
Rhcims, in Northern France, where
not only the far-famed Cathedral but
scores of other buildings have been
badly battered. Owing to^the bom- .
bardment it was decided not to al
low the children to return to their
regular school houses, so they aro
now learning their lessons in as
strange a school room as was ever
known?the cellars, deep down un
der the champagne warehouses of the
city, which is the great center of the
champagne trade. In the3o subter
ranean rooms the people of Rheiras
have boon taking refuge for months,
and they have decided that they aro
the only available "school rooms" in
which the children will really be safe
from the enemy's shells.
You have tried the rest; now try
the best for dying, cleaning, pressing
[ and repairing. The Capital Dye Works
! on Willoughby Ave. Temporary phono
; 13$. We call for i^id deliver. 5-4-6E
4+W4HH I"l I ?! ?! I I 'M I M-M I 1-1 Mil i/M i H-l-M I I 1 !? I 1 I 1 1 1 III 1 !? I 1 I !?
: * m i m m Mf: imiiimii +
iWoolwear Service!
*"*' """" ,m i
i Clothes coffis exac t!y
| what they cost per
g WEAR each day.
::i: lie first cost is only a re
:::: liable guide when you are
ready to buy the next suit
| WooSwear;
| MEANS LONG WEAR
WOOLWEAE.
TCE tlATIOHAl. nOTS son
f^7
J
II You will find the WOOL WEAR label
|! on our Boys Clothing
? Noe'folks, sizes 6 to 18, with two pairs of knickers ::::
:: SOLD EXCLUSIVELY BY ? ::::
I B. M. BEHRENDS CO.' 11
? *| m T t T I T T I I I 1 I 1 1 I 1 I I pi!
?H^H'I'i'I IYI i i i mum H I I I
BERGMANN DINING ROOM
New Management--Better Than Brer
BREAKFAST 6:00 a. m. to 11:00 a. m.
LUNCH - - 12:00 a. m. to 1:30 p. ni.
DINNER ? ? Ii:30 p. m. to 7:00 p. ni.
RATES S1.00 A DAY
Bcrgtnann Hotel Dining Room
FRANK GEHKING. Manager
I When in Scaltljp Stop
at the Place for
ALASKANS
It's Flro-Proof. Modern nnd Convenient |3
RATES $1.00 Per Day and Up j j
HOTEL BARKERj
CornerPlke anil Si*tfi
Free Auto Itus Meets all Heats nnd Trains W
SC. 0. Walaton & Conrad Frcodlrur.' Props, fij
ALASKAN SOURDOUGHS
fPl.c.ne !-9. P. O. Box 673 I
NEW YORK
EXCHANGE !
Henry Olson, Prop.
WINES, LIQUORS AND
CIGARS
! Front and Seward Streets
JUNEAU, ALASKA |
MADE IN JUNEAU
Concrete Dry and Watertight Floors and Col
lar*. Concrete plnin ami ornnnvntnl Walls
and Fence*. Concrete ribbed or travel tlnish
c;l Sldewnlk* and Steps. All work guaranteed.
ESTIMATES AND PLANS FREE.
H. D. BOURCY,
Hox "41 Contractor
MINING APPLICATION NO. 0178G.
In the United States Land Office for
the Juneau Land District,
Juneau, Alaska.
=? April 9th, 1915.
NOTICE.
Notice Is hereby given that the Al
aska Gastineau Mining company, a cor
poration, organized and existing under
The laws of tho SLitc of Now York, and
qualified to do and doing business as
a corporation at Juneau, Aiaskn. lias
made application for patent for the
Homestead No. 3 lode mining elnlin,
Survey No. 979, which said claim is
situated on the Northeast shore of
Gastineau Channel in the Harris Min
ing District, at Thane Post-Ofllce,
which is about 3^4 miles Southeast of
tho town of Juneau. Alaska, in Lati
tude 5S* 61' North, and in Lonigtudc
134* 20' West, and particularly des
cribed as follows, to-wit:
Beginning at Cor. No. 1 on the
lino of mean high tide of Gastineau
Channel, whenco U.S.L.M. No. 17
bcar?- South 27? 48' W. 4550.62 feet
distant; tlionce N. 27? 16' W. along
tlio said line of mean high tide
77.50 feet to Cor No. 2: thence N.
47? 57' W. 105.50 feet to Cor. No.
3; tltonco N. 42" 57' W. 90.70 feet
to Oor. No. 4; thence N. 38" OS'
E. 314.50 foot to Cor. No. 5; thence
i'TTT VTTT'l?l~l?r~1
S. 62* 52' E. 130G.00 feet to Cor.
No. G; thence S. 38? OS' \V. 355.80
feet to Cor. No. 7; thence N. 57?
18' W. 215.80 feet to Cor. No. 8;
thence N. 72" 07' W. 382.30 feet
to Cor. No. It; thence N. 79"
07' W. 285.30 feet to Cor. No. 10;
thence N. 61? 58' W. 19.85 feet to
Cor. No. 11; thence N. 39? 32' W.
143.80 feet to Cor. No. 1. the place
of beginning, containing an area
of 11.438 acres.
The names of the adjoining claim
are the Homestead Extension patent
ed lode mining claim, U. S. Survey Nc
900, and the Soldiers Additional Home
stead claim. Survey No. 1078, both be
longing to the Alaska (lastincau Min
ing company, and the Jumbo Millsite
patented. Survey No. 2G0, belonginj
to the Alaska Treadwell Gold Minlni
Company.
The names of the conflicting lodi
claims arc the Jumbo Millsite patent
ed, Survey No. 260, the Hunter Mill
site and the Wow Wow lode minim
clnim, Survey No. 994 A & D. all be
longing to the Alaska Treadwell Goli
Mining Company.
The conflict between the Homestem
No. 3 lode mining claim and the Jum
bo Millsite (inclusive of the conllic
between the Jumbo Millsite and tin
Wow Wow lode mining claim) is de
scribed as follows:
Beginning at a point S. 38? OS'
W. G.16 feet from Cor. No. 6 of the^
Homestead No. 3 lode mining*
claim; thence S. 38? OS' W. 339.45
feet to a point on line 1-2 of the
Jumbo Millsite; thence N. 34?
52' W. 50.G7 feet to Cor. No. 2 of
the Jumbo Millsite; thence N.
4G? 15' 13. along line 2-3 of the
Jumbo Millsite 328.33 feet to the
place of beginning containing an
area of 0.191 acres, but said con
flict is not included In this appli
cation.
The conflict between the Homestea*
No. 3 lode mining claim and the Wov
Wow lode mining claim, U. S. Survc;
NTo. 994-A (exclusive of the conflict o
the said Wow Wow lode mining clain
with the Jumbo Millsitc, Survey No
2G0) is described as follows*
Beginning at Cor. G of the Home
stend No. 3 lode mining claim;
thence S. 3S? OS' W. G. 1G feet to
a point on line 2-3 of the Jumbo
Mills!te; thence S. 4G? 15' W. .
89.97 feet to a point on the line
3-4 of the Wow Wow lode mining
claim: thence N. 11" 17' 10. 94.65
feet to a point on line 5-6 of
Homestead No. 3 lode mining
claim; thence S. 62? 52' Bi 56.49
feet to the place of beginning,
containing an area of 0.0G0 acres,
but said conflict is not excluded
from this application.
The location notice of the Home
stead No. 3 lode mining claim wai
Pled for record on Oct. 15, 1909, an<
recorded In book 19 of Lodes at pag<
<56 of the Records of the Record?
for the Juneau Recording Precinct, A1
nskn.
This notice was posted on tin
ground on the 9th day of April
1915.
ALASKA GASTJNEAU MINING
COMPANY.
By B. L. THANE,
Its Agent and Attorney in Fact
It is hereby ordered that the fore
going notice be published in the Alas
ka Daily Empire, a newspaper of ger
eral circulation, published at Juneau
Alaska, for a period of 60 days.
C. B. WALKER.
Register.
First publication, April 22. 1915.
Last publication, June 22, 1915.
;Yes, They're Here
A Big, Fresh Shipment of?
Victoria
Gluocoiates
? at that same big bargain price?
40c the Box
l 01
The Reliable Rexall Store.
I
? i .T."i? ???: :.n
The Empire will make advertising
contracts subject to proof of largest
irculation of any newspaper In Alaska.
Only Femmcr & Ritter handle tho
Nanaimo coal.. Try it and you'll al
ways buy it^ 4-5-tf.
PIANO TUNER
GEORGE ANDERSON ?The only
export piano tuner in Alaska, Fac
tory representative for high grade
pianos.?Phone 143.
Address P.O. Box 991, Juneau
II *"""
Mrs. F. M.McLean. Electric Treatment
f 5 Rheumatism, neuralgia nervousness,
i paralysis, indigestion, asthma, catarrh,
lumbngo, kidney and liver diseases,
cold, cough, etc, treated with vibration
and pads, electric blanket. OHlce in
Seward Bidg, No. 301-213.
KAKE MAIL ROUTE
Schedule In Effect April 1 to Nov. 30. 1915
The E. A. HHGG mil* .-very Monday at 8 o'Clock
n. m. from Young'* Float, utoppldtr at Douslaa,
Takn Hnrbor, Limestone. Snettislnirn. Sumdum.
Windham Ray, Flvc-Ffntrcr I.hrht, Fanahaw and
K:V.'. CAPT. P. MADSEX.
Concrete Chimney Blocks!
Double-Lock- Kiro-Proof- Clinker- Concrete
Chimney. (NOT CINDER OR COKE.)
8 est.? 12x14 in. Flue 6x8 In.
j " 8x8 in.
Concrete Products Mfg. Co.
r , Next to Cole'a Express.
-I- 4* 4- 4? 4- 4* 4- 4- 4- 4- 4- 4- 4- 4- 4* 4*
I -9 *
. * M. S. SUTTON 4?
4- Architect 4*
4- 113 Decker Bidg. 4*
?> Phone 111 Juneau, Alaska 4?
4* 4*
" .;. .;. .;. .;. .;. .;. .;. .;. .;. .;. .;. .;.
)! THE NOBBIEST LINE OF
I. SUITINGS
I have ever purchased for spring
and summer wear have Just ar
rived. Como In and look them
over. F. WOLLAND, Tailor.

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