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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, May 19, 1915, Image 1

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VOL. V., XQ. 572. ' JUNEAU, ALASKA. WEPKESPA?, PRICE TEN CENTS. ?
~~ ~
WASHINGTON NOTIFIED
OF THE STOPPAGE OF
SUBMARINE WARFARE
WASHINGTON, May 19?Official In-;
formation was received today that the
German reply to the American note
will not be completed for a week or
ten days. In the meantime, it is un-i
dcrstood that the German submarine j
warfare will stop on alt unarmedj
belligerent ships.
While the President had not been
informed this morning as to the ces-;
sation of the submarine warfare, pend
ing the reply of Germany to the Am
erican note, it was stated this after
noon at the State Department that
such was the intimation that was giv
en when the Department was Inform
ed of the further postponement of the
German reply.
LONDON CONFIRMS.
New York, May 19?Dispatches from
London today say that it is positively
asserted in Information from Berlin
that the submarine warfare has been
stepped by Germany pending the re
ply to America's note by the German (
government.
LUSITANIA'S
RESCUE STOPPED
NE WYORK, May ID.?The officers
of the British tank steamer Xarragan
sett, arriving here today, confirm the
report, that was In circulation short
ly after the sinking of the Lusitania. j
that a Submarine drove her off when
sho was going to the rescue of the Lu-!
sitania. The captain said that the call j
of the Lusitanla was beard, and the.
ship at once started to her aid. and
was within seven miles of her when
a submarine started for her and she'
was compelled to change her course
and put out into the ocean.
. . -
TRANSYLVANIA
NOTJLTTACKEDi;
BERLIN'. Mar 15.?A general deni-jc
al that a submarine attacked the':
Transylvania and attempted to sluk!
her is made by the German govern- ,
meat. It is stated that no passenger
ship has been attacked since the sink
ing of the Lusitanla.
*--*-? (
AMERICAN LUSITANIA <
VICTIMS ARE FOUND ;
QUEEXSTOWN. Ireland. May 19.?
bodies of three more Lusitania vie- i
tims have been brought to this place.
All of them are Americans.
FRYE CASE GOES TO
GERMAN PRIZE COURT ;
?c
WASHINGTON*. May 19.?Informs-i |
tlon was received here today that Ger
many has sent the case of the Will- f
lam P. Frye, sunk by the Prince Eit
el Friederich January _2S. to the prize
court.
BRITISH STEAMER SUNK.
CARDIFF. Wales, May 19. ? The (
British steamer Drumcoe was torpe
doed and sunk in the English channel.
The crew was saved. This is tho first
British ship to suffer attack this week, t
? ? ? t
CAPTAIN OF GUI-FLIGHT BURIED. (
NEW YORK. May 19.?The body of j
Capt. Gunter. of the Gulfllght, who <
was killed with his wife and daughter
as a result of the German attack on >
the Gulflight, was buried at Brooklyn
today.
WOMEN PLANNING *
LONGJ3AMPAIGN ;
NEW YORK. May 19.?Leading suf- 0
frage workers from all over the Unit- r
ed States are gathering here for the :
purpose of planning an active cam- *
palgn in the four Eastern States of 1
New York. Now Jersey. Massachu- (
setts aid Pennsylvania which will n
vote on the suffrage question next jj
fall. 1
While polls taken by New York
newspapers indicate that sentiment
in all of the States is opposed to wo
men suffrage, it is hoped to change
the sentiment by an active compaign
with little llkiihood of active and in
terested campaign in opposition.
, c
EIGHT DIE IN ACCIDENT
TO CANADIAN VESSEL j5
OTTAWA. May 19.?Eight members c
of the crew of 1-1 of the small gov
ernment vessel Christine were drown
ed when the vessel was accldontly
rammed and sunk by a Canadian sub
marine off Orleans island last nigh'.. ^
? ? <* ?> + ? *
? WEATHER TODAY *
? Maximum?70.
? Minimum?10. *
+ CLEAR!! + t!
+ * >> * + * * <* ? +'+ + * * * * r
WILSON MAY ASK
THAT ENGLAND I
STOP BLOCKADE
WASHINGTON. May 19.?It is bo-j
liovcd to be more than probable hcro;
that the President will send a note to j
Great Britain within the next lew
days protesting that the British block
ade of Germany is in violation of inter
national law.
The Persldent and the State Depart
ment have contended all along that
the blockade against Germany, which
denies admission to that country of
non-contraband goods, is unlawful be
cause there Is no blockado of Gorman
ports such as is recognizablo by in
ternational law.
PRESIDENT IS DUE AT
WASHINGTON TOMORROW
WASHINGTON. May 19.?President
Woodrow Wilson will be due at Wash
ington tomorrow morning on the
President's yacht Mayflower. He
watched the war game last night, but;
lias been in touch with the White.
House by wireless. The weather is!
calm off the Jersey coast
President In Chesapeake.
CAPE HENRY. May 19. ? The May
flower with President Wood row Wil
son on board passed in by the capes
today.
BARNES-ROOSEVELT
CASE NEARS END
SYRACUSE. X. Y.. May 19. ? The j
iamage case of Win. Barnes, Jr.. 1
igainst former President Roosevelt on ?
iccount of alleged libel will go to the j
iury Thursday. The arguments of j
rounsel began yesterday afternoon \
ind are continuing today. !
zaquis indians' on the
warpath against mexico
WASHINGTON. May 19.?The Ya-j
luis Indians, defeated by the Ameri
can Sonoar settlers and miners, have j
;one on the warpath against the Mex
ican authorities.
railroad directors to
be tried in october!
NEW YORK. May 19.?The trial of!
ho directors of the New York and i
few Haven railroad, charged with'
rriminal violation of the anti-trust
aws, has been set for October 5.
1itchie and baldwin
fight to a draw
??
BOSTON. May 19.?Willie Ritchie;
tnd Matty Baldwin fought 12 rounds;
o a draw hero last night. j1
:harge politics against
secretary of treasury ^
WASHINGTON. May 19.? Attor- 1
leys for the Rlggs National Bank <
rhargc that the affidavits In behalf t
>f Secretary of the Treasury William
3. McAdoo were for political pur
loses, and have no bearing on the i
rase at issue.
?madame" of bawdy
house acquitted; i
?*?
KETCHIKAN. May 19.?Lena Kip
>en was acquitted by a jury upon in
ductions by Judge Robert W. Jen- (
lings today. After the State had rest- I
?d its case. James M. Shoup, attor- a
icy for the defense, moved for an In- t
itructed verdict of acquittal on the t
rround that the government had not 1
iroved that the defendant was the c
iwner or the keeper of the house, and r
ilso that the prosecution had failed t
o establish the character of the house,
rho motion was granted. f
The second case, that against Marie
lall. wilt come up this afternoon.
austin acquitted. I
??fr? ?
KETCHIKAN*, May 19.?A. E. Aus- F
in was acquitted by a jury last night '
if a charge of shooting into a crowd
if children who persisted in throwing
tones at his house and wounding a
ittle girl. The jury was out only two
alnutes. a
alaska mining stock. id
NEW YORK .May IS.?Alaska Gold
loscd today at 33%: Chino. 42%:
rtah Copper. 63%; Ray, 2, %.
? ? ?? v
quake shakes oregon. /
PORTLAND, Ore.. May 19.?A dis- b
[net earthquake shock was felt in va
Ious portions of Oregon last night.
! BUSINESS MEN
ASK PEOPLE TO
VOTE f OR LICENSE
At a meeting or the Juneau Com
mercial Club last evening In tho coun
cil chamber at tho city hall, a set of
resolutions, submitted by Qrover C.
Winn, calling the voters attontion to
the cost of running tho city for a year
the Income, the present indebtedness;
etc., were read and adopted.
Among those who voiced their son
timcnts briefly wero: Mayor John
Reck, W. W. Shorthill, Grovcr C.
Winn and H. J. Fisher.
Mayor Reck called tho attention of
the gathering to tho fact that 20 mills
was all that could bo levied against
property under tho present law. "If
the town goes dry it means that the
schools must close for want of funds
as tho saloon liconses aro tho only
means at present by which to raise
sufficient rovenue. Tho street work
might be discontinued, but it Is dif
ferent with the schools. By means
of tho saloon licenses this year, I be
lieve the city will bo able to got out
of debt by tho first of next April. I
think the expenses of running the city
will bo $20,000 less than that of last
year."
"the resolutions presented by Gro
ver C. Winn, a member of the school
board, began with relating that a big
share of the saloon business of tho
city was with outside people who
might easily be supplied in some oth
er way; that tho short time allowed
tho saloon keepers to close up their
business was depriving them of guar
anteecd right, having boon engaged
in a legalized business; that the state
of Washington, which was voted dry
at the last election, gave tho saloon
men 14 months In which to close up
their business.
Tho expenses of running tho city
last year, as sot forth In the resolu
tions, was $84,447.43, including the
school budget of $19,137.11. The reve
nue for tho same year was $85,343.65,
of which $24,453 was derived from sa
loon licenses.
The present city indebtedness was
stated to be $29,656 up to the first of
April. Deprived of the saloon licens
js, the total indebtedness of tho city
it the end of this year would be $54.
109.74, figuring on tho basis of last
fear's expenses; that saloons were
paying about one-third of the city
:axes.
"I think that Mr. Winn's statements
\re a fair presentation of the case
trorn that point of view," Mr. Short
Mil responded, "but they are based
>n the expenses of last year and are
lot an approximate estimate of the
expenses of this year."
H. J. Fisher, president of the Com-!
nercial Club, objected to those parts
if the resolutions which appealed to 1
:he sympathy of tho voter regarding 1
;he probable financial loss to tho sa- 1
oon men, stating that they must ]
ako their chances. But as to tho ef- 1
!ect upon tho city he said:
"I never took a drink in my life,"
le said, ''and yet I'm going to vote ?
vet. for the reason that I think tho 1
:ity should havo a chance to acquire
>ther sources of revenue before it is
:ut off from this one."
? ? ? i
\NOTHER RICH PLACER 1
STRIKE MADE NEAR NOME 1
?41? 1
NOME, A placer strike is reported
rom the Council City district. Ground
>aying 10 cents a pan has been locat
>d. and a stampede of some propor
lons is under way. - I
Lanes in lee Pack. I
Lanes are opening in the ice pack I
n Bering sea, and the Corwin and ;
?olar Bear are expected to arrive at 1
s'ome before tho end of the weok. 1
? ? ? 1
3ARROW SAYS M'NAMARA I
SHOULD BE PARDONED
WASHINGTON, May 19.?Clarence
J. Darrow, of Chicago, attorney for
abor organizations, told the industrl- 1
il commission that tho McNamara I
?rothers should be pardoned because <
hey dynamited the Los Angolcs <
Times building without malice and be- >
:ause they thought they were doing
ight, and believe that they are mar
yrs to a cause and not criminals.
?AMOUS BANKER OF
MICHIGAN IS DEAD 1
DETROIT. Mich., May 18.?George t
tussell, president of tho Peoples' I
Itnte bank of Detroit, and formerly 1
?resident of tho American Bankers' 1
issociatlon, died here today. t
GEN. HUBBARD DIES.
?if?
NEW YORK, May 19.? Gen. Thorn- :
,s Hubbard, a veteran of tho civil j
srar and director in many railroads, c
led hero today. r
6???e t
EARL BLOSSON GOES SOUTH. c
Earl Blosson, the Seattle athlete
tho lost his leg in an accident in tho I
Llaska-Juneau tunnel last year, left on
he Mariposa this morning for his
ome In Seattle.
o ?*
The Empire has most readers I
ROME, May 19.?-Only a miracle can
avert war between Italy and Austria.
That it has been determined upon byj
ithe unanimous votr of the govern
j mcnt and the King's counsel and that
the King has consented is affirmed,
and the request of Parliament will If
assented to be equivalent to a declara
tion, which, undoubtedly, will follow
Immediately. *
AUSTRIA SEEKS NEGOTIATIONS.
Vienna, May 19.?The Austrian gov
ernment this afternoon Is attempting
to secure further negotiations with
Italy concerning the demands of that
country for territorial concessions.
DIPLOMATS LEAVE ITALIAN
CAPITAL.
LONDON, May 19.?That Italy has
decided upon v/ar Is accepted In all of
the European capitals today. A dis
patch from Berlin says that It Is un
derstood there that the German and
Austrian Ambassadors, other members
of the legations and members of the'
consular service left Italy last night.
This Is confirmed by a Vienna dis
patch which says that both the Ger
man and Austrian Ambassadors at
Rome presented verbal notes to For
eign Minister Sonnino, and that it is
understood in Vienna diplomatic cir
clcles that they have taken their de
parture.
The news from Washington that the i
United States was asked to care for
German and Austrian Interests at
Rome is only confirmatory of dis
patches of like purport that are com
Ing from all the capitals of Europe.
LONDON PLEASED WITH OUT
LOOK.
London is disposed to look upon
what la regarded as the certain, en
trance of Italy in the war on the side
of the Allies as the most Important
feature of the war since the German
army was stopied in its progress to
wards Paris September. Not
only will Italy add moro than 1,000,
000 men In the field against the Ger
man allies but it will stop the sup
plies that Germany and Austria have
been receiving through the Mediter
ranean and Adriatic channels.
U. S. TO CARE
FOR ALL INTERESTS
WASHINGTON, May 19.?The Gcr
man and Austrian Ambassadors called
at the State Department at Washing
ton this morning and asked the Am
erican ambassador at Rome to care
for Gerrftan and American Interests
at Rome In the event of war with thavi
country.
ITALY "MAKES LIKE REQUEST.
A few minutes after the German
and Austrian Ambassador had depart
ed from the State Department, the
Italian Ambassador called on a like
mission. He asked Secretary of State
William J. Bryan to assume the re
sponsibility of caring for Italian in
terests at Berlin, Vienna and Constan
tinople in the event of war with those
countries.
ROUMANIA EXPECTED TO
JOIN.
ROME, May 19. ? Ahe attitude of
Roumanla Is being watched with
jreat interest here. It is confidently
3elicvcd that she will join Italy in, an
actual alliance In the war v/ith Ger
many and Austria and in the settle
ment of the territorial rights In the
southeast afte^ the war shall have
seen terminated.
CABINET WILL ASK PARLIA- ,
MENT FOR POWER.
ROME, May 19.?The Italian Parlia- ,
ment when It convenes tomorrow will ?(
jc asked by the Cabinet to confer up- |
>n the latter plenary powers of gov- ,
jrnmcnt, enabling it to declare war 1
vithout further negotiations. <
ITALY WILL WIN SAYS
COMMANDER OF
NAVY.
ROME, May 19.?Admiral Betollo,
ormer minister of marine In the Ital
an government and now commanding
he fleet in the Adriatic, says that It t
s his impression that if Italy will (
ight she will win against all the j
'orces that Germany and Austria car. ]
ihrow again3t her. I
REVOLT AT POLA.
ROME, May 19.?A revolt occured .
it the Austrian naval station of Pola .
resterday and 50 were killed In a .
ilash with the government troops. The .
?evolt was among the employees at ,
he government arsenal. They took .
ihargo of the establishment until they .
verc subdued by the soldiers.
TALIAN SOCIALISTS
/ ARE AGAINST THE WAR .
? ' ,
TURIN. Italy. May 10.?Socialist .
vorkingmen have gone out on a strike .
icrc as a protest against war. .
GEO. HARKRIDER
DIES AT JUNEAU
THIS MORNING
George J-Iurkrlder, who has been a
resilient of Juneau and viclnty for the
last quarter of a century, died this
morning at two o'clock at St. Ann's
hospital of cancer of the stomach. He
was about 70 years of age.
The deceased was born in Ohio and
migrated to tlio West whore ho led
the life .of a cowboy for a number of
years', finally onterlng tho mining
game in Nevada. In tho Cassiar
country of British Columbia he ac
quired a considerable fortune. He at
one time owned valuable property iii
tho Silver Bow basin, which ho lost
through litigation, and at the time of
his death was part owner of a coal
claim on Admiralty island; tho sec
ond coal claim in Alaska to be patent
ed by the government.
JEFFERSON BRINGS
RETURNING MINERS
The steamer Jefferson docked at the
city wharf at 10 o'clock this morn
ing with a large list of passengers,
most of whopa ire bound for the In
terior on the first boats down tho Yu
kon.
The Jeff onion had 114 tons of
freight for Thane, 36 tons for Juneau,
mail and the following nnmcd passen
gers:
Willis nowou. k. Minis, inos mc
Intyre, E. M. Brcnnan, L, McQermott,
G. 0. Holmes, J. A. Hnndrnhan, Mrs.
J. A. Hnndrahan, Lonora Handrahan,
Mrs. M. Johnson. A. K. Miller, A. S,
Bailey. G. McAllister, P. Pantazes, J.
Lea, J. W. Steeley, T. Moran and J.
Engdny.
For Douglas ? E. P. Watcrlaln, L.
Cone and W. DcLcor.
The JofTerson will be southbound to
morrow morning at S o'clock.
WATSON BRINGS
ITS BANNER LOAD
The Admiral Watson docked at the
Pacific Coast Co. wharf this morning
at 2:20. having on board, with the out
going passengers from Juneau, the
iargSSC load of Westward passengers
of the season. Thirty second class
passengers left here for the Westward
in addition to a largo list of first class.
Every berth on tho ship was sold out
here and travelers turned away.
The Watson had a heavy tonnage of
freight for Gastineau ports, mail and
the following passengers:
A. M; McLean, B. F. Mooro, Mrs. A.
Watt. M. Tiffany, W. S. Doslin, J. F.
Robinson, Mr. and Mrs. B. M. Bohr
ends and Mirr. Bentrice Bchronds.
The Watson will bo southbound on
Ibe 2Sth.
BORDER LINE STEAMER
ARRIVES THIS MORNING
The Border Line steamer Al-Ki ar
rived from the south at S: 30 this morn
ing with 500 tons of freight for Gas
tineau ports and the following named
passengers for Juneau:
Mrs. C'. W. Collins, A. P. King, Hi
Wybom. Thos. Armstrong. Miss Helen
Mooro, Emil Joyce, Mrs. Maggie Joyce,
Cy Wright, Henry B. Foss. E. B. Rees,
John Kcllcy, S. R. Ames, W. B. Coffer
atn, J. Herman'Allen, H. L. Blake,
William Kent, Mrs. L. Rainboldt, Mrs.
Ci E. Tibbets and nine second class.
Tho Al-Ki will proceed from here to
Hoonah with 125 tons of freight for
that port, and. will be southbound to
morrow afternoon.
OWNER OF THE EDITH G.
REGARDS HER AS LOST
William LaVcllo, owner of the ill
rated Edith G. was a southbpnnd pas
senger on the Mariposa this morning
[rom Knik, having given up hopes of
:ver hearing anything from Capt.
3reen or the crew who were caught
In a storm between Dry bay nnd Yak
itat on the night of April 21sL Mr. La
velfe. who was formerly a part own
jr of the Grotto saloon, had gone to
Knik to await the arrival of the
Edith G.
JUNEAU CHORAL SOCIETY
WILL MEET TONIGHT
The Juneau Choral society will meet
onight at the studio of Miss Frances
Juilck at eight o'clock. Matters of
mportanco will be considered, and >
t is important that there bo a till at
endanco.
:? <t- ?:? 4* ?> ?!? ?> *> -t- * j
: ORDER ARREST OF *!
EMPEROR WILLIAM *
:? RAMSGATE, England May ?
I- 19.?1The coroner's Jury wldch' 4>
:? victims of the recent Zeppelin * ?
?> attack- returned a verdict of 4*
:? wilful murder againsi Empor- *
or William, and formally au- -t
thorized his arrest by the au- ?>
> ?> ?> <* ?> ?> ? 4- 4- ?> s- 4- -j- .
ENGLAND MAY GET
BI-PARTISAN
GOVERNMENT
LONDON, May 19. ? Premier As
quith today announced that he has
under consideration tho question of
rcconstrutclon of tho ministry on a
broader political basis.
It Is believed to bo his purpoao to
put three or four members of the Un
ionist party in the Cabinet.
BRITISH ADMIRAL
REPORTED RESIGNED
LONDON, May 19.?Tho morning
papers publish reports that persistent
rumors are in circulation that Lord
FiBher, first in command of the Brit
ish navy, has resigned his admiralty
commands.
TURKS SINK
^SUBMARINE
LONDON, May 19.? The Austral
ian submarine A-52 was sunk in the
Dardanelles yesterday. Tho crow was
captured by the Turks, and Its mem
bers arc now prisoners of war. This
is the second Australian submarine
to be sunk by the Turks.
More Troops at Dardanelles.
LONDON, May 19.?The British arc
re-inforclng the army on Gallipoll pen
insula. Fresh soldiers disembarked
near Kumbale on the Dardanelles this
morning.
The progress at the Dardanelles is
meeting with the satisfaction of Lord
Kitchener.
50 DIE IN RIOTS
>N AUSTRIAN SEAPORT
_ ?v?
ROME, May 19.?There wero fifty
killed yesterday In Trieste. Women
participated in the riots which were
caused largely because of inability
to got food.
SULTAN OF TURKEY
WAS SLATED TO DIE
PARIS, May 19.?A plot to kill the
Sultan of Turkey on his birthday was
discovered at Constantinople yester
day, and there have been hundreds
of arrests.
? ? ?
FAIRBANKS WOMEN
ESTABLISH PLAYFIELD;
FAIRBANKS, May 19.?The Wo
men's Civic Club, of this city, has es
tablished a children's playfield for
summer use. The pupils of the city
generally rushed to the support of
the proposition and are furnishing the
equipment.
FRENCH CONTRACT FOR
AMERICAN STOCKINGS
?fr
READING, Pa., May 19.?The gov
crnment of France has closed a con
tract for the entire output of a Straus
town hosiery mill for the next two
mouths. This will total approximate
ly 130,000 dozen pairs of stockings,
which will bo used by the French
soldiers.
FAMOUS BILLIAKOISI
TO LOCATE IN JUNEAUj
Grant Johnson, holder of the balk
line billard championship of the
Northwest, who ha3 associated himself
with George C, Burford's billiard par
lor, has decided to locate in Junenu,
and has sent for his family. Mr.
Johnson is at Burford'o afternoons
and evenings, and is prepared to play
all comers.
Mr. Johnson recently defeated W.
C. Duniwya, the champion bllllardist
of Portland, Oregon, in an 18.2 inch
balk lino contest, for '100 points. He
made an average of 10.2.
For the edification of Juneauitcs,
Mr. Johnson is playing the straight
mil billiards at Burgord's, and assum
ing tho difficult handicap of making
100 at a run or no count.
Willis E. Nowell, agent for iho Al
aska Steamship company, came in
from, Seattle on the Jefferson thlB
morning.
.5. .*..*???.<?? 4, 4. .;. % -> -;
4. 1
* KAISER VISITS ?
* EASTERN WAR ZONE *
> AMSTERDAM. May 19.?Em- ? ?
-?* peror William spent Sunday in ?> ?
the Eastern, war zone and wit- <?
nossed the i'ghting on the oast ?? j
.front where'; his forces were ?
* successful. v
* *
PESSIMISM IN LONDON
[ OVER RUSSIAN DEFEAT
[ IN WESTERN GAUCIA
PETROGRAD, May 19.?The outer
j forts of Przcmysl are being bombard
; cd by the armies of Germany and
i Austria which are attacking Russian
: positions along the San river.
Russian aviators report that the
| enemy have brought up heavy siege
[artillery, for use against Przcmysl,
and the San river positions.
!
LONDON DESPONDENT
OVER DEFEAT.
LONDON, May 19.?A feeling df in
| tense pessimism prevails here over
the result of the Russian and Austro
German battles in west Gallcia. No
longer is there any effort made to dis
count the importance of the Russian
defeat in that section, or to disguise
the circumstance that the Russians
seem unable to place a sufficient num
ber of men In the field to check the
advance of the enemy. The Russian
defeat In West Gallcia has also com
pelled a general withdrawal of the
Russians backward In Poland.
Since the beginning of the offensive
German and Austrian movement In
Gallcia when the Russians were at
tacked west of the Donajec river the
Russians have been forced back to
the San river, 80 miles east of the
Donjacc. Vienna claims to have cap
tured 175,000 troops and many guns
in that time.
RUSSIAN VICTORIES PARTLY
COMPENSATE.
The defeat of the Russians In West
Gaticia has been in part, at least com
pensated for by their victories In East
Galicia and Bukowina, where the Aus
trians have been completely routed.
RUSSIANS LOSE GENERAL.
The Russian General Kornltleff was
captured yesterday with other troops
by the Austrians and Germans.
WEATHER STOPS
WAR IN WEST
LONDON, May 19. ?? Heavy rains
and severe weather has temporarily
stopped the war in the western thea
tre. Aside from artillery duels there
is little fighting In Bolgium or Franco
today.
NEW CABINET
FOR PORTUGAL
LISBON, May 19.?A now Cabinet Is
in process of formation,to be made up
of leading members oI all the political
parties and pledged to strict neutral
ity among the political factions of Por
tugal.
Chagas Recovers.
Madrid, May 19.?Roports from Lis
bon say that all is quiot at that plnco.
Joas Chagas, head of the government,
has recovered from his wounds, and
is directing the government.
Reports say, however, that further
disorders arc feared.
AMERICANS MEET
DEMAND FOR AMMUNITION
WASHINGTON, May 19.?Ordnance
men declaro that the most striking
feature of the effect of the war in
Europe has been the development of
American machinery works to turn
out war material. On August first,
it was declared the output capacity in
military rifles did not exceed 700 a
day. By the end of June, it is stated.
the United States will have a dally
output capacity of 20,000. According
to the best Informed sources orders
for a total of 6,000,000 rifles *are now
pending. The Bethlehem works, It
Is learned, are turning out forglngs
for the heaviest guns In use abroad
and even furnishing forglngs for 15
Inch guns for British sorvlce. The
steel works at Bethlehem can turn
out equipment, It is estimated, at a
rate equal to almost any plant In the
United Kingdom or France, and sec
ond to Krupp's works,
CANADIAN TROOPS
REACH ENGLAND
LONDON, May 19.?The steamship
Metagama. from Montreal, has arriv
ed with 3,000 Canadian recruits to
supply vacant places in the Canadian
contingent at the front in France and
Belgium. They will be sent to the
front soon.
PITTSBURGH CHILDREN
PLANT 20,000 TREES
PITTSBURGH, May 19.? Twenty
thousand troes, tho gift of the City
Council have been planted by the
school children of Pittsburgh. Many
of the trees were placed in school
yards, where appropriate orcrclsoa
were held. This is the largest num
ber of trees ever planted In Pittsburgh
at one time and Is part of a plan to
make the city attractive.
An "ad" in Tho Empire rcachos ov
orybMy.

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