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The Alaska daily empire. [volume] (Juneau, Alaska) 1912-1926, May 19, 1915, Image 2

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I IS IT WORTH WHILE 1
to own your own home? Now let's see. Suppose. for instance, you are renting a live-room house, >'"0.00 k
per month would be moderate rent In Juneau. Tho' would make a total cos; of >.".60.00 cor one year's
rent. If you pay this amount for ten years you will have expended the
! Handsome 'Sum of $3,600 I
Suppose ypu pay $S0Q for a lot: then experyl $1300 in the erection of a five-room house, -and llujt.
would build a house as good as the one for which you are paying rent,--the total cost of your ^
house and lot
Would Be $1,600 L
than ten years' rentals for this same; house and lot. Therefore, by owning your own uonv you will
have saved $1600 in ten years, not to speak of the increase in the value bf your home during that
NOW ASSUME
that you estimate conservatively; that your home will Increase in value only ten per cent per annum jjl
for ten years. It would be worth, at the end of that period. $4,000 or $2,000 more than i< cost you. J
This would make a total saving to you fn ten years of $3600. Do you not think this sum Is worth
saving?
I If You Pay Rent I
during till this time, at the end of ten years, you not only will not have caved anything but you "will iS
have paid $1600 more than enough to buy and pay for your own home, for the more privilege of living
in a house that belongs to someone else, and ir. the er.d. you will have only rent receipts to show for 3
the money you spent. Then you will have to begin
I Another Period of Ten Years
paving rent or start at that, late period to buy and pay for your own homo. Do you think that ? j
would be either good sense or good business? Should you then pay rent for another ten years, at
the end of that period you will be an old man; you will have paid out ?7,200. almost enough ta pay
for four homes as good as the one you are renting, and still not havo a shingle over your head-yon ?
It Will Then Be Too Late
to try to pay for your own home, and the chances are you will die homeless and your family will
be left without the security and protection, which a little foresight and business judgment on your i\
part would give them, if you would only start now.
CASEY-SHATTUCK ADDITION |
offers an opportunity for you to secure a home on easy payments. Buy a lot in this way, and if you
can do no better?erect a temporary house and live in it until you finish paying for your lot. Then %
build a nice home. Many people who are now rich have started in this way and never regretted It.' i
Neither will you. It is just like
Paying Rent to Yourself
because you must pay rent in order to live, and if you pay it in this way, in the end the property upon j
which you mako the payments becomes your own. This property will increase rapidly in value, it
adjoins the best residence section in the city. It is the only considerable tract of level land to which V
'[ you can secure good title, and it is the only property that Is logically situated so that it will bo avail
able for business purposes in the future. Call us up or see us for an appointment now, before you f
forget it.
Shattuck Realty Company
TELEPHONE 2-4-9. CHENEY BLDG. 142 FRONT ST. ^
DOES GERMANY
FEAR OUR SUPREMACY
BOSTON?It Is said by the well-in
formed that the Washington admin
istration is more alarmed over the
German situation than at any time
since the war started. Government
officials admit that the situation, is
undeniably serious, /.ccording to the
bankers who are in close touch to the
sources of information. Germany will
contain a suggestion of threatening
statements. The government want!
no more affairs like that of the Gul
In this connetcion it is of extreme
interest to hear of the reports that
have been brought to New York
bankers from Turkey in the past few
days by an American <V.*ho conversed
with the German officers who are di
recting the defence of the Dardan
elles and of Constantinople. The Amcr
lean had stated to the German officer
that the United States would under
all conditions keep his finger out o:
the pie.
"Ah:" replied the high Gorman offi-;
cer. "but we do not intend that you
shall stay out. We shah force you
into It. Xo matter who wins this
war. we will all be economicaly ex
hausicd. both victor and vanquished.
If America can keep out, she ??will
when peace Is declared have the trade
of the world in the palm of her hand,
.and all the nations of Europe will be
too exhausted to compete against her.
That is the reason that America must
? come in and will be forced in.; We
: do not fear her as air opponent. It
j makes little difference to us now
whether there are 50" or 100 more
| war vessels opposed to us. and it is
quite impossible that America can got
at us with her army, or at least an
army of such a size as to be an im- j
"But it is important to us that Amer
; ica must undergo an industrial and
economic paralysis such as would bo
brought about by her entrance Into
the war. She cannot equip an army
or a navy soon enough to do Ger
: many any great amount of damage,I
but when peace is declared, all the
nations of the world must start again
after the world's competitive com
merce on an equal footing, and we do
not propose that America shall have
ter. years start of the rest of us. We
will force her in."
This conversation took place early
in April. It might possibly be the idle
vaporing of a conceited German gen
eral. but the American took the trou
ble to check up. He found that an
other German officer had the same!
view. \Vaa_ihe Gulfllght incident in
tentional or accidental? ? (Boston 1
N'ew Bureau.)
?~
EXCURSIONISTS FOR
ALASKA INTERIOR
- ->?
SKATTLE, May 14.?Unable to vis
it Europe, several'''hundred Eastern
tourists will embark for Interior* Al
aska this summer, says the Seattle
Times. For the first time In the his
? tory of the North, four mammoth-ex
ranged. Bvory reservation is sold.
scenery e<tont. The excursionists
i were boohed in the East, the work
versions Is from Seattle through the j
waters of Southeastern Alaska to',
Skagway via Sitka, and thencej
, across Whitb Pass and down the
! Fathor of Northern Waters as far an
tic Circle and at which point the sun
is visible at midnight.
The first excursion will leave Seat
tle t>n the steamship Mariposa on
June ill, the longest day in the year,
it will then return upstream to Daw-.
on and other points of interest on;
Second Excursion In June.
The second excursion will leave Se
; attic on the steamship City of Seattle
j on Juno If and follow the same
will cover a distance of about 8,000 i
miles, will follQw the same route as
far as the mouth of the Tanana riv
or. where a side trip will he made to,
Fairbanks. The fessols will then;
? 4*. _ frt Iftl 1
continue down me
mouth at St. Michael. At this point :
the excursionists will be picked up
by the steamship Victoria and car
ried to Nome, and thoncc to South
western Alaska by way of Shclikoft
strait. The tourists will visit Cook
Inlet. _Soward. Valdoz, Cordova and
other points- of interest.
The first party of tourists for this |
excursion will leave Seattle on June
12 and arrive at St. Michael on July
17. The second will leave Seattle on
i July 10 and arrive at St. Michael on :
First Jaunts on Big Scale.
Excursionists through the interior!
of Aluska aro not a new idea. The
Seattle Chatabcr of Commerce suc
cessfully carried- out one of these
trips In the summer of 1912, but this
is the first time that Alaskan inter
ior travel has been arranged on so ,
large n scale. j
"We were somewhat dublouB .
about carrying it out successfully .
when we began to make our arrange- ;
mcnts last fall." said A. F. Zlpf, traf- ,
flc managor of the White Pass & Yu- ]
kon railroad, "but after we got start- ]
cd there was no trouble. Every res- ,
ervation has been sold and wc had j
to refuse accommodations to many
applicants. It is probable that we ,
wfil arrange for the fifth excursion. (
Mr. II. Wheoler, the general mann- (
gor of the company, is now enroute ,
to Skagway. where he will take up ,
tills* and other matters.
"The water on the Yukon is much ,
lower than usual this year. Our first j
boat, the NasutUn, which sailed from j
Lower Lebarge. is jfew on Its way (
upstream from Dawson." ,
COPPER SALES
ARE IMMENSE |
BOSTON. May 10.?It Is doubtful if \
copper investors and those identified ;
with the copper industry have any (
adequate conception of the enormous ]
sales of copper which have been j
effected In this country during the
While it is impossible to state in ]
actual figures just what this aggrc- .
gate is. we have the following im- |
portant statement from one of tjie
largest copper selling agencies in the j
country: (
"Our salos of copper in this I
country for the 12 months last ;
year wore 89,892 tons as com- i
pared with the first four months :
of this year, 88,012 tons. In oth- t
or words, we have done in four
months over here about as much
business as was done in twelve i
months last year."
If the above figures represent long I
tons?and long tons only are used in ;
calculating export business?it means c
that the agency referred to sold 201,- !1
358,080 pounds of copper last year;
while for the first four months of this
year It has sold 197,14C,8S0 pounds, 1
or within a little over 1.000,000 s
pounds of last year's aggregate.?
(Boston News Bureau.)
I
A BIBLE FOR MR. PERKINS
(New York World)
Painful a3 It is to agree with a man
who is trying to make this country I
a better place for our children to live
In, we mr take e.xceptiins to Mr.
George \Y .^trKins's remark In Okla
homa tbo; the men who adopted the
Sherman law and the new Democratic
tariff "tried by man-made laws to -
wipe out God-given economies." :
The Sherman law is the ancient
common law in the form of a statute.
It is not so old the Ten Command
ments, ,but it stands to government
and commorce about as they dp in
morals.
As to the tariff Mr. Perkins must
bo mistaken about the God-given eco
nomies of the Aldrich. Dlnglc'jr and '
McKinley laws. They were written
for the most part, the privilege hav
ing been paid for in campaign sub
scriptions, by the manufacturers, or
the attorneys of the manufacturers,
who expected to,profit by them.
No tariff, or law. ever came from
Sinai, and we. are surprised to learn
that Mr. Morgan's former partner
ioes not know it. The American Bi
ble Society should send one of its pub
lications to Mr. Perkins without de
The Empire will make advertising
:ontrncta subject to proof o' largest \
Irculation of any newspaper in Alaska.
When a man asks for bread and you
live him -a stone, you shouldn't live
n a glass house.
* :? * * }
v AMOI& THE THEATRES. *
AT THE DREAM THEATRE.
"The Million Dollar Mystery."
"In the Path of the Fast Express"
~this,one will please the most fas
The rest of the bill is well in keep
ing with tliis greatest of all pictures.
P. S.?'Kemember Saturday and
Sunday, Mary Pick ford in "Hearts
SEVEN-REEL SHOW AT
GRAND THEATRE TONIGHT
The patron:; of the Grand will see
in (
tonight:
"The White Slave Trniflc," la an
educational.- S-part ' Ituby feature.
(This picture passed by Natl.onnl
Board of Censors.)
"Zlgomar, the Third," or "The
Black Scourge" is a mighty, .4-pnrt
gesture of the greatest interest.
Don't miss this big show at the
Grand tonight.
AT THE ORPHEUM.
HOUSE OF THE MIRROR SCREEN
AND GOOD SHOWS
As usual, the episode of "The Per
ils of Paulino" proved more Interest-'
Ing and exciting than the last, and as
this serial is drawing to a "close you
cannot afford to miss any. Tonight
Is your last chance to see it.
The Pathe Daily News, with the
animated war map and other late hap
penings is always interesting,
The Biograph drama "Her Mother's
Weaknoss" is very good and the Edi
son comedy "Seraphina's Love Af
fairs" was a strong climax to the
show.
Entire change tomorrow night. ***
NOME MAY HAVE
BIG" OT^RTZ MINE
SEATTLE, May 11.?With practi
cally everybody in Nome interested
Interested in tho project. Martin Mor
in. James P. Daly and other legisla
tors from Alaska who aro registered
it the Hotel Barker, aro feeling opti
mistic over the fact that the New
Era mine has been bonded to an Eng
lish capitalist and that there is a pos- 1
sibllity that another Trendwcll wilil
[>e dovclopcd. says the Times.
"The claim," said Moran, "or rath
er u number of claims, through-which
there trends a big dyke of low-grade
ere was taken up scvcrai years ago,
mil was first developed by Jack Lee
]/, a partner of Rex Beach, tho Alas
ka author. Lecdy spent most of .his
ituo and considerable money In try
ing to develop the thin streaks of
Mgli-graciO tnnt run inruugu u luaoa.)
jf low-grade material. Finally be;
luit in disgust.
"The other Nomeites took up the
:lalms and banded them together and
thinly formed a company and bought
1 quart- mill. Tho mill gavo satis
,'actory tests for a small plant?the
returns were suillcient to demon
strate that if a bigjilant is placed on
ho ground and tho ores worked in
argo quantities, dividends will be the
result.
"An oxpert visited the ground last
maimer with the result that it has
seen bonded for a substantial sum,
*nd wo arc looking for big doings
.his summer.
"Tho dyke of oro is situated at the
toad of Snow Gulch on the Anvll-Gln
ilcr Creek divide, and it is believed 1
:hnt it was the source of the placer
jold that was.found in these sterams
ifter it had' been oroded by glacial
tction and cpnccntrated by the ac
ion of water."
SILK SALE at Goldstein's Empori
l?u Friday. 5-19-3t.
Like billiards? Sec Mr. Grant John- .
ion, northwestern champion, play 100 1
>r no count straight rail at Burford's ?
mv afternoon or evening. 5-18-tf 1
The truth is elastic. Try to stretch ]
t and it will sometimes fly back and
ting you.
Read the "Juneau Dry Club's" bul
etin in this issue. (5-7-tf.)
Yes?Many People
have told usjthc same story?distress
after eating, gases, heartburn. A
SsssSL?ggg
before end after each meal will relieve
you. Sold only by us?25c.
Wm. Britt, Juneau.
Elmer E. Smith, Douglas.
DID YOU SEE THE
LATEST
FASHIONS
AND
PATTERNS
FOR MAT?
Did You Compare our
Work and Our Prices?
Did You Visit the
Ladies Paradise?
j Our Work la Best.
Our Prices are Bight.
Juneau Tailoring
Company
Phone 150
Rooms 410-415 Goldstein BlocL
. i <
.> .j. ;
4. |
+ MARINE NOTES *
+ ?:?:
?> ?> ?> 4 4 ?> ?> .j.
The Humboldt is due scuthbound at
six thi3 evening.
The Admiral Evans is due to ur-!
rive from the Westward today. f
The Admiral Watson left for the j
Westward this morning at 2:30.
The Al-Ki will be southbound to
morrow afternoon.
The Spokane is due from the south 1
Friday morning.
The Northwestern sailed from Sc-i
xttle last night.
The Alamedh is due southbound on
the 25th.
The City ot Seattle sails from Se
attle Friday.
The Mariposa left southbound this
morning at eight.
MOVE OVER TO COAST
Of course, we can get along with
out, but a few gentle showers would
not be amiss in this part of the coun
try about now.?(Whitehorse Star.)
"All of the noys all the time." "?
jj The Sanitary Grocery |
G. BLOMGREN. Prop.
PHONE 8-5
y IF IT'S IN THE MARKET?
WE HAVE IT! |
STRAWBERRIES AND FRUITS |
will be in season very soon and j
? we will be well supplied to look M
I after your needs.
Ring us up and get ' J
what you want?
when you want it.
I he Sanitary Grocery S
Phone 85
: j
Instruction on Violin an?! Bani Instruments
Walter A. Coleman
Formerly musical director for Svo years at the
Orphcum Theatre, anil at mo>it of the leading
Cafes In Seattle
I CALL 28?RAYMOND'S j
for fresh fruits and Vegetables
WE CARRY THE LARGEST ASSORTMENT IN TOWN
Get Your Strawberries from lis. New Goods on Every Boat ;
H. J. RAYMOND 8 GO. j
I OLDEST BANK IN ALASKA
THE B. M. BEHRENDS BANK
JUNEAU, ALASKA
ESTABLISHED 1S91 INCORPORATED 1911
TOTAL KES6UKC.ES OVER 51,000,000. .
OFFIGERS
B. M. BEHRENDS PRESIDENT
J. R. WILLIS VICE-PRESIDENT
GUY McNAUG-HTON CASHIER
WE HAVE EVERY FACILITY FOR HANDLING BANKING BUSI
NESS IN ALL ITS DEPARTMENTS TO THE VERY BEST ADVANT
AGE OF OUR CUSTOMERS
Why this man bought a
Remington Junior
Typewriter
"I have been investigating several of
the recent makes of machines, seeking
for one of simple construction for ordi
nary manuscript and letter writing. I
was nearly ready to buy a machine of
another make when I just happened to
see for the first lime the Remington
Junior, and found it to be tlx very thing
I wanted.
The man who wrote this is the postmaster of a small
Southern town. He is only one of thousands who have
recently bought a Remington Junior. But his reasons
apply to everybody?they apply to YOU.
The Remington Junior is our latest product and the
latest idea in typewriting.
It is strictly a'high-grade machine.
3 It has the Remington Name, the Remington Guar- .
antee, the Remington Quality?everything Remington /
except weight and bulk. /
A "Simplified Remington" describes it exactly. /
And its price is $50.00 /
Remington Junior Typewriters will be sent "on examina- /
tion," without obligation to purchase. , R*min?ion
/ Typewriter
Easy payment terms can be arranged if desired. / Company
/ Please send me
/ your illustrated
Vfc ? ITP ?, / dcscriptivo booklet
Remington Typewriter /
/ I shall bo glad to bavo
. you uend jnc a Reming
"t^0inpa.ny / ton Junior Tjycwriter cu ,
~ * i examination. This request
(Incorporated) / docs not obligate me to pur
/ chase.
I. E. FISHER, Salesman /
2nd Floor - - Malony Bldg. /
/
/
j What Does a "Wet" I
i Vote, Mean? f
(Juneau Dry Club, Extra No. 2.) ?
I They tell us a wet vote will mean something like thirty thbus
and dollar:; of saloon money poure-i into the cO.v treasury. Hut is this <?
ALL it means? Let us see. It may mean that in mere dollars and J J
the city, but let >ur look a little luruier. < ?.
Who .will puy that, thirty thousand dollar the saloon men? Not ?
In a thousand years! Who then? Why, the patrons of the saloons,' <,
of course. And they will pay over the bars of the 19 saloons of Ju- ?
neau not less than ten times thirty thousand dollars during the year, x
> THREE HUNDRED THOUSAND DOLLLARS tnken from laboring o
< men. clerks, business and professional men, fathers, husbands, sons, ?
> and poured Into the slimy tills of the 19 hell-holes of Juneau in one
> year for?WHAT? Why, for the purpose of getting back one dob ?
j lar for every ten paid In. Who pays the saloon licenses and taxes? J
Who, indeed! How would you like to sec Uiat three hundred thous- o
> and dollars turned into the channels of legitimate trade?the gro* $
? ceries, bakeries, clothing stores, shoe stores, meat markets," news- x
stands, banks,' etc.? What would it mean to YOU if this were done? j>
> What would it mean to your neighbor? What would it mean to the j
> laborer, the miner, the carpenter, the painter, the dressmaker, the *
:s "movies." the mothers, tho wives, the boys and girls, the HOMES? ?
And that Is only the dollar side of the question. If the dollar ^
argument fail3 the saloon hasn't a leg left to stand on. So let's all ?
"get together" on May 24th and X
KILL THE SALOON
JUST RECEIVED! j
Balmaean Rain Coats, Children's Rain Coats and |
Capes. ?
UNDERWEAR SPECIAL?Ladies, Children's and |
Grown-Ups Union Suits, at 50c Per Garment. %
MRS. BERRY'S STORE |
THIRD AND FRANKLIN STREETS ?' J

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